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Guttridge, P.

Normalized to: Guttridge, P.

4 article(s) in total. 289 co-authors, from 1 to 3 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 24,5.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.6784  [pdf] - 713384
The Hot and Energetic Universe: The X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) for Athena+
Comments: Supporting paper for the science theme "The Hot and Energetic Universe" to be implemented by the Athena+ X-ray observatory (http://www.the-athena-x-ray-observatory.eu). 17 pages, 19 figures
Submitted: 2013-08-30
The Athena+ mission concept is designed to implement the Hot and Energetic Universe science theme submitted to the European Space Agency in response to the call for White Papers for the definition of the L2 and L3 missions of its science program. The Athena+ science payload consists of a large aperture high angular resolution X-ray optics and twelve meters away, two interchangeable focal plane instruments: the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) and the Wide Field Imager (WFI). The X-IFU is a cryogenic X-ray spectrometer, based on a large array of Transition Edge Sensors (TES), offering 2.5 eV spectral resolution, with ~5" pixels, over a field of view of 5 arc minutes in diameter. In this paper, we briefly describe the Athena+ mission concept and the X-IFU performance requirements. We then present the X-IFU detector and readout electronics principles, the current design of the focal plane assembly, the cooling chain and review the global architecture design. Finally, we describe the current performance estimates, in terms of effective area, particle background rejection, count rate capability and velocity measurements. Finally, we emphasize on the latest technology developments concerning TES array fabrication, spectral resolution and readout performance achieved to show that significant progresses are being accomplished towards the demanding X-IFU requirements.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.3369  [pdf] - 1150725
VIS: the visible imager for Euclid
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2012-08-16
Euclid-VIS is a large format visible imager for the ESA Euclid space mission in their Cosmic Vision program, scheduled for launch in 2019. Together with the near infrared imaging within the NISP instrument it forms the basis of the weak lensing measurements of Euclid. VIS will image in a single r+i+z band from 550-900 nm over a field of view of ~0.5 deg2. By combining 4 exposures with a total of 2240 sec, VIS will reach to V=24.5 (10{\sigma}) for sources with extent ~0.3 arcsec. The image sampling is 0.1 arcsec. VIS will provide deep imaging with a tightly controlled and stable point spread function (PSF) over a wide survey area of 15000 deg2 to measure the cosmic shear from nearly 1.5 billion galaxies to high levels of accuracy, from which the cosmological parameters will be measured. In addition, VIS will also provide a legacy imaging dataset with an unprecedented combination of spatial resolution, depth and area covering most of the extra-Galactic sky. Here we will present the results of the study carried out by the Euclid Consortium during the Euclid Definition phase.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.3193  [pdf] - 429544
Euclid Definition Study Report
Laureijs, R.; Amiaux, J.; Arduini, S.; Auguères, J. -L.; Brinchmann, J.; Cole, R.; Cropper, M.; Dabin, C.; Duvet, L.; Ealet, A.; Garilli, B.; Gondoin, P.; Guzzo, L.; Hoar, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Holmes, R.; Kitching, T.; Maciaszek, T.; Mellier, Y.; Pasian, F.; Percival, W.; Rhodes, J.; Criado, G. Saavedra; Sauvage, M.; Scaramella, R.; Valenziano, L.; Warren, S.; Bender, R.; Castander, F.; Cimatti, A.; Fèvre, O. Le; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Levi, M.; Lilje, P.; Meylan, G.; Nichol, R.; Pedersen, K.; Popa, V.; Lopez, R. Rebolo; Rix, H. -W.; Rottgering, H.; Zeilinger, W.; Grupp, F.; Hudelot, P.; Massey, R.; Meneghetti, M.; Miller, L.; Paltani, S.; Paulin-Henriksson, S.; Pires, S.; Saxton, C.; Schrabback, T.; Seidel, G.; Walsh, J.; Aghanim, N.; Amendola, L.; Bartlett, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Benabed, K.; Cuby, J. -G.; Elbaz, D.; Fosalba, P.; Gavazzi, G.; Helmi, A.; Hook, I.; Irwin, M.; Kneib, J. -P.; Kunz, M.; Mannucci, F.; Moscardini, L.; Tao, C.; Teyssier, R.; Weller, J.; Zamorani, G.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero; Boulade, O.; Foumond, J. J.; Di Giorgio, A.; Guttridge, P.; James, A.; Kemp, M.; Martignac, J.; Spencer, A.; Walton, D.; Blümchen, T.; Bonoli, C.; Bortoletto, F.; Cerna, C.; Corcione, L.; Fabron, C.; Jahnke, K.; Ligori, S.; Madrid, F.; Martin, L.; Morgante, G.; Pamplona, T.; Prieto, E.; Riva, M.; Toledo, R.; Trifoglio, M.; Zerbi, F.; Abdalla, F.; Douspis, M.; Grenet, C.; Borgani, S.; Bouwens, R.; Courbin, F.; Delouis, J. -M.; Dubath, P.; Fontana, A.; Frailis, M.; Grazian, A.; Koppenhöfer, J.; Mansutti, O.; Melchior, M.; Mignoli, M.; Mohr, J.; Neissner, C.; Noddle, K.; Poncet, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Serrano, S.; Shane, N.; Starck, J. -L.; Surace, C.; Taylor, A.; Verdoes-Kleijn, G.; Vuerli, C.; Williams, O. R.; Zacchei, A.; Altieri, B.; Sanz, I. Escudero; Kohley, R.; Oosterbroek, T.; Astier, P.; Bacon, D.; Bardelli, S.; Baugh, C.; Bellagamba, F.; Benoist, C.; Bianchi, D.; Biviano, A.; Branchini, E.; Carbone, C.; Cardone, V.; Clements, D.; Colombi, S.; Conselice, C.; Cresci, G.; Deacon, N.; Dunlop, J.; Fedeli, C.; Fontanot, F.; Franzetti, P.; Giocoli, C.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gow, J.; Heavens, A.; Hewett, P.; Heymans, C.; Holland, A.; Huang, Z.; Ilbert, O.; Joachimi, B.; Jennins, E.; Kerins, E.; Kiessling, A.; Kirk, D.; Kotak, R.; Krause, O.; Lahav, O.; van Leeuwen, F.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lombardi, M.; Magliocchetti, M.; Maguire, K.; Majerotto, E.; Maoli, R.; Marulli, F.; Maurogordato, S.; McCracken, H.; McLure, R.; Melchiorri, A.; Merson, A.; Moresco, M.; Nonino, M.; Norberg, P.; Peacock, J.; Pello, R.; Penny, M.; Pettorino, V.; Di Porto, C.; Pozzetti, L.; Quercellini, C.; Radovich, M.; Rassat, A.; Roche, N.; Ronayette, S.; Rossetti, E.; Sartoris, B.; Schneider, P.; Semboloni, E.; Serjeant, S.; Simpson, F.; Skordis, C.; Smadja, G.; Smartt, S.; Spano, P.; Spiro, S.; Sullivan, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trotta, R.; Verde, L.; Wang, Y.; Williger, G.; Zhao, G.; Zoubian, J.; Zucca, E.
Comments: 116 pages, with executive summary and table of contents
Submitted: 2011-10-14
Euclid is a space-based survey mission from the European Space Agency designed to understand the origin of the Universe's accelerating expansion. It will use cosmological probes to investigate the nature of dark energy, dark matter and gravity by tracking their observational signatures on the geometry of the universe and on the cosmic history of structure formation. The mission is optimised for two independent primary cosmological probes: Weak gravitational Lensing (WL) and Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). The Euclid payload consists of a 1.2 m Korsch telescope designed to provide a large field of view. It carries two instruments with a common field-of-view of ~0.54 deg2: the visual imager (VIS) and the near infrared instrument (NISP) which contains a slitless spectrometer and a three bands photometer. The Euclid wide survey will cover 15,000 deg2 of the extragalactic sky and is complemented by two 20 deg2 deep fields. For WL, Euclid measures the shapes of 30-40 resolved galaxies per arcmin2 in one broad visible R+I+Z band (550-920 nm). The photometric redshifts for these galaxies reach a precision of dz/(1+z) < 0.05. They are derived from three additional Euclid NIR bands (Y, J, H in the range 0.92-2.0 micron), complemented by ground based photometry in visible bands derived from public data or through engaged collaborations. The BAO are determined from a spectroscopic survey with a redshift accuracy dz/(1+z) =0.001. The slitless spectrometer, with spectral resolution ~250, predominantly detects Ha emission line galaxies. Euclid is a Medium Class mission of the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme, with a foreseen launch date in 2019. This report (also known as the Euclid Red Book) describes the outcome of the Phase A study.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0305057  [pdf] - 56530
A Concept for an STJ-based Spectrograph
Comments: Accepted in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 12 pages with 10 figures
Submitted: 2003-05-05
We describe a multi-order spectrograph concept suitable for 8m-class telescopes, using the intrinsic spectral resolution of Superconducting Tunneling Junction detectors to sort the spectral orders. The spectrograph works at low orders, 1-5 or 1-6, and provides spectral coverage with a resolving power of R~8000 from the atmospheric cutoff at 320 nm to the long wavelength end of the infrared H or K band at 1800 nm or 2400 nm. We calculate that the spectrograph would provide substantial throughput and wavelength coverage, together with high time resolution and sufficient dynamic range. The concept uses currently available technology, or technologies with short development horizons, restricting the spatial sampling to two linear arrays; however an upgrade path to provide more spatial sampling is identified. All of the other challenging aspects of the concept - the cryogenics, thermal baffling and magnetic field biasing - are identified as being feasible.