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Gray, M. E.

Normalized to: Gray, M.

115 article(s) in total. 1258 co-authors, from 1 to 38 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 4,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.13124  [pdf] - 2120164
Analysis of Methanol Maser Flares in G107.298+5.63 andS255-NIRS3
Comments: 5 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-06-23
A 3D maser model has been used to perform an inverse problem on the light curves from three high-amplitude maser flares, selected on the basis of contemporaneous infra-red observations. Plots derived from the model recover the size of the maser cloud, and two parameters linked to saturation, from three observational properties of the light curve. Recovered sizes are consistent with independent interferometric measurements. Maser objects transition between weak and moderate saturation during a flare.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.02506  [pdf] - 2086413
Excited-state hydroxyl maser catalogue from the methanol multibeam survey -- I. Positions and Variability
Comments: 32 pages, 11 figures, 4 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS; Typo in figure 5 caption corrected in 2nd version; Transposition error of words 'right' and 'left' in Figure 11 caption corrected in 3rd version
Submitted: 2016-05-09, last modified: 2020-04-29
We present the results of the first complete unbaised survey of the Galactic Plane for 6035-MHz excited-state hydroxyl masers undertaken as part of the Methanol Multibeam Survey. These observations cover the Galactic longitude ranges $186^{\circ}< l < 60^{\circ}$ including the Galactic Centre. We report the detection of 127 excited-state hydroxyl masers within the survey region, 47 being new sources. The positions of new detections were determined from interferometric observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We discuss the association of 6035-MHz masers in our survey with the 6668-MHz masers from the MMB Survey, finding 37 likely methanol-excited-state hydroxyl masers maser pairs with physical separations of <=0.03pc and 55 pairings separated by <=0.1pc. Using these we calculate for the first time an excited-state hydroxyl maser life time of between 3.3x10^3 and 8.3x10^3 years. We also discuss the variability of the 6035-MHz masers and detection rates of counterpart 6030-MHz excited-state hydroxyl masers (28% of our sample having detection at both frequencies).
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.08408  [pdf] - 2085246
Mapping and characterisation of cosmic filaments in galaxy cluster outskirts: strategies and forecasts for observations from simulations
Comments: 22 pages, 17 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-04-17
Upcoming wide-field surveys are well-suited to studying the growth of galaxy clusters by tracing galaxy and gas accretion along cosmic filaments. We use hydrodynamic simulations of volumes surrounding 324 clusters from \textsc{The ThreeHundred} project to develop a framework for identifying and characterising these filamentary structures, and associating galaxies with them. We define 3-dimensional reference filament networks reaching $5R_{200}$ based on the underlying gas distribution and quantify their recovery using mock galaxy samples mimicking observations such as those of the WEAVE Wide-Field Cluster Survey. Since massive galaxies trace filaments, they are best recovered by mass-weighting galaxies or imposing a bright limit (e.g. $>L^*$) on their selection. We measure the transverse gas density profile of filaments, derive a characteristic filament radius of $\simeq0.7$--$1~h^{-1}\rm{Mpc}$, and use this to assign galaxies to filaments. For different filament extraction methods we find that at $R>R_{200}$, $\sim15$--$20%$ of galaxies with $M_*>3 \times 10^9 M_{\odot}$ are in filaments, increasing to $\sim60%$ for galaxies more massive than the Milky-Way. The fraction of galaxies in filaments is independent of cluster mass and dynamical state, and is a function of cluster-centric distance, increasing from $\sim13$% at $5R_{200}$ to $\sim21$% at $1.5R_{200}$. As a bridge to the design of observational studies, we measure the purity and completeness of different filament galaxy selection strategies. Encouragingly, the overall 3-dimensional filament networks and $\sim67$% of the galaxies associated with them are recovered from 2-dimensional galaxy positions.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.04490  [pdf] - 2054195
Maser Flares Driven by Variations in Pumping and Background Radiation
Comments: 19 pages, 15 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-02-11
We simulate maser flares by varying either the pump rate or the background level of radiation in a 3D model of a maser cloud. We investigate the effect of different cloud shapes, saturation levels and viewpoints. Results are considered for clouds with both uniform and internally variable unsaturated inversion. Pumping and background variations are represented by several different driving functions, some of which are light curves drawn from observations. We summarise the pumping variability results in terms of three observable parameters, the maximum flux density achieved, a variability index and duty cycle. We demonstrate typical ranges of the flux density that may result from viewing an aspherical object from random viewpoints. The best object for a flare is a prolate cloud, viewed close to its long axis and driven from unsaturated conditions to at least modest saturation. Results for variation of the background level are qualitatively different from the variable pumping results in that they tend to produce short intervals of low flux density under conditions of moderate saturation and sufficient variability to be consistent with strong flaring. Variable background models typically have a significantly higher duty cycle than those with variable pumping.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.11518  [pdf] - 2046515
The Three Hundred Project: Backsplash galaxies in simulations of clusters
Comments: 13 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-01-30
In the outer regions of a galaxy cluster, galaxies may be either falling into the cluster for the first time, or have already passed through the cluster centre at some point in their past. To investigate these two distinct populations, we utilise TheThreeHundred project, a suite of 324 hydrodynamical resimulations of galaxy clusters. In particular, we study the 'backsplash population' of galaxies; those that have passed within $R_{200}$ of the cluster centre at some time in their history, but are now outside of this radius. We find that, on average, over half of all galaxies between $R_{200}$ and $2R_{200}$ from their host at $z=0$ are backsplash galaxies, but that this fraction is dependent on the dynamical state of a cluster, as dynamically relaxed clusters have a greater backsplash fraction. We also find that this population is mostly developed at recent times ($z\leq0.4$), and is dependent on the recent history of a cluster. Finally, we show that the dynamical state of a given cluster, and thus the fraction of backsplash galaxies in its outskirts, can be predicted based on observational properties of the cluster.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.10347  [pdf] - 1878850
Maser Flare Simulations from Oblate and Prolate Clouds
Comments: 11 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-04-23
We investigated, through numerical models, the flaring variability that may arise from the rotation of maser clouds of approximately spheroidal geometry, ranging from strongly oblate to strongly prolate examples. Inversion solutions were obtained for each of these examples over a range of saturation levels from unsaturated to highly saturated. Formal solutions were computed for rotating clouds with many randomly chosen rotation axes, and corresponding averaged maser light curves plotted with statistical information. The dependence of results on the level of saturation and on the degree of deformation from the spherical case were investigated in terms of a variability index and duty cycle. It may be possible to distinguish observationally between flares from oblate and prolate objects. Maser flares from rotation are limited to long timescales (at least a few years) and modest values of the variability index ($\lesssim 100$), and can be aperiodic or quasi-periodic. Rotation is therefore not a good model for H$_2$O variability on timescales of weeks to months, or of truly periodic flares.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.00466  [pdf] - 1864105
The time delay between star formation quenching and morphological transformation of galaxies in clusters: a phase-space view of EDisCS
Comments: 19 pages, 14 figures, accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomy Society (MNRAS); accepted 2019 March 25
Submitted: 2019-03-31
We explore the possible effect of cluster environments on the structure and star formation histories of galaxies by analysing the projected phase-space (PPS) of intermediate-redshift cluster (0.4<z<0.8). HST I-band imaging data from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) allow us to measure deviations of the galaxies' light distributions from symmetric and smooth profiles using two parameters, Ares ('asymmetry') and RFF (residual flux fraction or 'roughness'). Combining these structural parameters with age-sensitive spectral indicators like Hdelta, Hgamma and Dn4000, we establish that in all environments younger star-forming galaxies of all morphologies are 'rougher' and more asymmetric than older, more quiescent ones. Combining a subset of the EDisCS clusters we construct a stacked PPS diagram and find a significant correlation between the position of the galaxies on the PPS and their stellar ages, irrespective of their morphology. We also observe an increasing fraction of galaxies with older stellar populations towards the cluster core, while the galaxies' structural parameters (Ares and RFF) do not seem to segregate strongly with PPS. These results may imply that, transformation happens on a longer timescale as they accumulate and age in the cluster cores.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.05629  [pdf] - 1826866
OMEGA -- OSIRIS Mapping of Emission-line Galaxies in A901/2 -- V. The rich population of jellyfish galaxies in the multi-cluster system Abell 901/2
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2018-12-13, last modified: 2019-02-05
We present the results of a systematic search and characterisation of jellyfish galaxy candidates in the multi-cluster system A901/2, at z ~ 0.165, as part of the OMEGA survey. By visual inspecting ACS/HST F606W images looking for morphological signatures of ram-pressure stripping events in Halpha-emitting galaxies, we identify a total of 70 candidates. Out of these, 53 are clearly star-forming galaxies and 5 are highly probable AGN hosts, the classification of the remaining galaxies is more uncertain. They have late-type and irregular morphologies and most of them are part of the blue cloud with only 4 being previously classified as dusty reds. The AGN activity is not prominent in the sample and, of the few cases of galaxies hosting AGN, such activity does not seem to be correlated to the gas stripping phenomenon. Our jellyfish galaxy candidates do not have a preferential pattern of motion within the multi-cluster system, although the most compelling cases appear to inhabit the inner regions of the most massive sub-cluster centres. The sSFR of these galaxies indicates that their star formation activity is enhanced, in contrast with what is observed for the rest of the star-forming galaxy population in the system. Half of the sample is forming stars at a higher rate than the main-sequence for field galaxies and this behaviour is more evident for the most compelling candidates. For some galaxies, the spatially resolved Halpha emission appears to be as disturbed and extended as their continuum counterparts. Our findings point towards a scenario where the ram pressure stripping is triggering a period of intense and extended star formation throughout the galaxy while it is also disturbing the morphology. This is the largest sample of jellyfish galaxy candidates found in a single system suggesting that cluster mergers might be the ideal environment for studying ram pressure stripping effects.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.05969  [pdf] - 1823099
The Three Hundred Project: Ram pressure and gas content of haloes and subhaloes in the phase-space plane
Comments: 17 pages, 12 figures, accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-01-17
We use TheThreeHundred project, a suite of 324 resimulated massive galaxy clusters embedded in a broad range of environments, to investigate (i) how the gas content of surrounding haloes correlates with phase-space position at $z=0$, and (ii) to investigate the role that ram pressure plays in this correlation. By stacking all 324 normalised phase-space planes containing 169287 haloes and subhaloes, we show that the halo gas content is tightly correlated with phase-space position. At $\sim\,1.5-2\,\text{R}_{\text{200}}$ of the cluster dark matter halo, we find an extremely steep decline in the halo gas content of infalling haloes and subhaloes irrespective of cluster mass, possibly indicating the presence of an accretion shock. We also find that subhaloes are particularly gas-poor, even in the cluster outskirts, which could indicate active regions of ongoing pre-processing. By modelling the instantaneous ram pressure experienced by each halo and subhalo at $z=0$, we show that the ram pressure intensity is also well correlated with phase-space position, which is again irrespective of cluster mass. In fact, we show that regions in the phase-space plane with high differential velocity between a halo or subhalo and its local gas environment, are almost mutually exclusive with high halo gas content regions. This suggests a causal link between the gas content of objects and the instantaneous ram pressure they experience, where the dominant factor is the differential velocity.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.09631  [pdf] - 1806339
Constraining Theories of Polarized SiO Maser Transport: Multi-Epoch Analysis of a $\pi/2$ Electric Vector Rotation Feature
Comments: Figure Sets included as Appendix B
Submitted: 2018-12-22
The detailed polarization mechanisms of SiO masers originating from the near circum\-stellar environment of Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are not yet definitively known. Prevailing theories are broadly classified as either Zeeman or non-Zeeman in origin, the latter including effects such as anisotropic pumping or anisotropic resonant scattering. The predicted behavior of the linear and circular polarization fractions and electric vector position angle vary by theory. In particular, individual maser features that exhibit a rotation in linear polarization of $\sim \pi/2$ as a function of frequency over their extent can be utilized as a test of several maser polarization transport theories. In this paper, we analyze one SiO ($\nu=1$, $J=1-0$) maser feature toward the Mira variable, TX Cam that exhibits this internal polarization rotation and persists across five epochs (spanning $\sim3$ months). We compare our results to the predictions by several maser polarization theories and find that the linear polarization across the feature is consistent with a geometric effect for a saturated maser originating when the angle between the projected magnetic field and the line of sight ($\theta$) crosses the Van Vleck angle $\theta_F \sim 55^{\circ}$. However, the electric vector position angle (EVPA) exhibits a smooth rotation across the spatial extent of the feature rather than the expected abrupt $\pi/2$ flip. We discuss possible explanations for this discrepancy and alternative theories. Circular polarization across the feature is also analyzed and it is the most accurately described by Zeeman effects giving rise to a circular polarization fraction of the form $m_c$ is approximately proportional to $\cos \theta$.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.03199  [pdf] - 1930877
Galaxy Cluster Mass Reconstruction Project - IV. Understanding the effects of imperfect membership on cluster mass estimation
Comments: 18 pages, 11 figures, 3tables; accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-06-08, last modified: 2018-08-16
The primary difficulty in measuring dynamical masses of galaxy clusters from galaxy data lies in the separation between true cluster members from interloping galaxies along the line of sight. We study the impact of membership contamination and incompleteness on cluster mass estimates obtained with 25 commonly used techniques applied to nearly 1000 mock clusters. We show that all methods overestimate or underestimate cluster masses when applied to contaminated or incomplete galaxy samples respectively. This appears to be the main source of the intrinsic scatter in the mass scaling relation. Applying corrections based on a prior knowledge of contamination and incompleteness can reduce the scatter to the level of shot noise expected for poorly sampled clusters. We establish an empirical model quantifying the effect of imperfect membership on cluster mass estimation and discuss its universal and method-dependent features. We find that both imperfect membership and the response of the mass estimators depend on cluster mass, effectively causing a flattening of the estimated - true mass relation. Imperfect membership thus alters cluster counts determined from spectroscopic surveys, hence the cosmological parameters that depend on such counts.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.00530  [pdf] - 1732826
OMEGA - OSIRIS Mapping of Emission-line Galaxies in A901/2: IV. - Extinction of Star-Formation Estimators with Inclination
Comments: 12 pages, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-08-01
We study the effect of inclination on the apparent brightness of star-forming galaxies in spectral passbands that are commonly used as star-formation indicators. As diagnostics we use mass-to-light ratios in three passbands: the UV continuum at 280 nm, the H$\alpha$ emission line, and the FIR 24$\mu$-band. We include a study of inclination trends in the IR/UV ratio ("IRX") and the IR/H$\alpha$ ratio. Our sample comprises a few hundred galaxies from the region around the clusters Abell 901/902 with deep data and inclinations measured from outer disks in Hubble Space Telescope images. As a novelty, the H$\alpha$- and separately the NII-emission are measured by tunable-filter imaging and encompass galaxies in their entirety. At galaxy stellar masses above log $M_*/M_\odot > 10$ we find trends in the UV and H$\alpha$ mass-to-light ratio that suggest an inclination-induced attenuation from face-on to edge-on of $\sim 1$ mag and $\sim 0.7$ mag in UV and H$\alpha$, respectively, implying that star-formation rates of edge-on galaxies would be underestimated by $\sim 2.5\times$ in UV and $\sim 2\times$ in H$\alpha$. We find the luminosities in UV and H$\alpha$ to be well correlated, but the optical depth of diffuse dust that causes inclination dependence appears to be lower for stars emitting at 280 nm than for gas clouds emitting Balmer lines. For galaxies with log $M_*/M_\odot < 9.7$, we find no measurable effect at $>0.1$ mag. The absence of an inclination dependence at 24$\mu$ confirms that the average galaxy is optically thin in the FIR.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.10332  [pdf] - 1723529
Constraining Theories of SiO Maser Polarization: Analysis of a $pi$/2 EVPA Change
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-07-26
The full theory of polarized SiO maser emission from the near-circumstellar environment of Asymptotic Giant Branch stars has been the subject of debate, with theories ranging from classical Zeeman origins to predominantly non-Zeeman anisotropic excitation or propagation effects. Features with an internal electric vector position angle (EVPA) rotation of $\sim \pi /2$ offer unique constraints on theoretical models. In this work, results are presented for one such feature that persisted across five epochs of SiO $\nu=1, J=1-0$ VLBA observations of TX Cam. We examine the fit to the predicted dependence of linear polarization and EVPA on angle ($\theta$) between the line of sight and the magnetic field against theoretical models. We also present results on the dependence of $m_c$ on $\theta$ and their theoretical implications. Finally, we discuss potential causes of the observed differences, and continuing work.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.01625  [pdf] - 1652533
A New 3D Maser Code Applied to Flaring Events
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS, 2018 February 23, 12 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2018-03-05
We set out the theory and discretization scheme for a new finite-element computer code, written specifically for the simulation of maser sources. The code was used to compute fractional inversions at each node of a 3-D domain for a range of optical thicknesses. Saturation behaviour of the nodes with regard to location and optical depth were broadly as expected. We have demonstrated via formal solutions of the radiative transfer equation that the apparent size of the model maser cloud decreases as expected with optical depth as viewed by a distant observer. Simulations of rotation of the cloud allowed the construction of light-curves for a number of observable quantities. Rotation of the model cloud may be a reasonable model for quasi-periodic variability, but cannot explain periodic flaring.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.06756  [pdf] - 1663335
Sun-Sized Water Vapor Masers in Cepheus A
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ, February 16, 2018
Submitted: 2018-02-19
We present the first VLBI observations of a Galactic water maser (in Chepeus A) made with a very long baseline interferometric array involving the RadioAstron Earth-orbiting satellite station as one of its elements. We detected two distinct components at -16.9 and 0.6 km/s with a fringe spacing of 66 microarcseconds. In total power, the 0.6 km/s component appears to be a single Gaussian component of strength 580 Jy and width of 0.7 km/s. Single-telescope monitoring showed that its lifetime was only 8~months. The absence of a Zeeman pattern implies the longitudinal magnetic field component is weaker than 120 mG. The space-Earth cross power spectrum shows two unresolved components smaller than 15 microarcseconds, corresponding to a linear scale of 1.6 x 10^11 cm, about the diameter of the Sun, for a distance of 700 pc, separated by 0.54 km/s in velocity and by 160 +/-35 microarcseconds in angle. This is the smallest angular structure ever observed in a Galactic maser. The brightness temperatures are greater than 2 x 10^14K, and the line widths are 0.5 km/s. Most of the flux (about 87%) is contained in a halo of angular size of 400 +/- 150 microarcseconds. This structure is associated with the compact HII region HW3diii. We have probably picked up the most prominent peaks in the angular size range of our interferometer. We discuss three dynamical models: (1) Keplerian motion around a central object, (2) two chance overlapping clouds, and (3) vortices caused by flow around an obstacle (i.e., von Karman vortex street) with Strouhal number of about~0.3.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.02350  [pdf] - 1608589
Vibrationally excited water emission at 658 GHz from evolved stars
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures. Accepted in A&A
Submitted: 2017-11-07
Several rotational transitions of water have been identified toward evolved stars in the ground vibrational state as well as in the first excited state of the bending mode. In the latter vibrational state of water, the 658 GHz J = 1_1,0-1_0,1 rotational transition is often strong and seems to be widespread in late-type stars. Our main goals are to better characterize the nature of the 658 GHz emission, compare the velocity extent of the 658 GHz emission with SiO maser emission to help locate the water layers and, more generally, investigate the physical conditions prevailing in the excited water layers of evolved stars. Another goal is to identify new 658 GHz emission sources and contribute in showing that this emission is widespread in evolved stars. Eleven evolved stars were extracted from our mini-catalog of existing and potential 658 GHz sources for observations with the APEX telescope equipped with the SEPIA receiver. The 13CO J=6-5 line was placed in the same receiver sideband for simultaneous observation with the 658 GHz line of water. We have compared the 658 GHz line properties with our H2O radiative transfer models in stars and we have compared the velocity ranges of the 658 GHz and SiO J=2-1, v=1 maser lines. All stars show 658 GHz emission with a peak flux density in the range 50-70 Jy to 2000-3000 Jy. We have shown that the 658 GHz line is masing and we found that the 658 GHz velocity extent tends to be correlated with that of the SiO maser suggesting that both emission lines are excited in circumstellar layers close to the central star. Broad and stable line profiles are observed at 658 GHz. This could indicate maser saturation although we have tentatively provided first information on time variability at 658 GHz.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.10108  [pdf] - 1626322
Galaxy Cluster Mass Reconstruction Project: III. The impact of dynamical substructure on cluster mass estimates
Comments: 14 pages, 8 figures, 3 tables. Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-09-28
With the advent of wide-field cosmological surveys, we are approaching samples of hundreds of thousands of galaxy clusters. While such large numbers will help reduce statistical uncertainties, the control of systematics in cluster masses becomes ever more crucial. Here we examine the effects of an important source of systematic uncertainty in galaxy-based cluster mass estimation techniques: the presence of significant dynamical substructure. Dynamical substructure manifests as dynamically distinct subgroups in phase-space, indicating an 'unrelaxed' state. This issue affects around a quarter of clusters in a generally selected sample. We employ a set of mock clusters whose masses have been measured homogeneously with commonly-used galaxy-based mass estimation techniques (kinematic, richness, caustic, radial methods). We use these to study how the relation between observationally estimated and true cluster mass depends on the presence of substructure, as identified by various popular diagnostics. We find that the scatter for an ensemble of clusters does not increase dramatically for clusters with dynamical substructure. However, we find a systematic bias for all methods, such that clusters with significant substructure have higher measured masses than their relaxed counterparts. This bias depends on cluster mass: the most massive clusters are largely unaffected by the presence of significant substructure, but masses are significantly overestimated for lower mass clusters, by $\sim10\%$ at $10^{14}$ and $\geq20\%$ for $\leq10^{13.5}$. The use of cluster samples with different levels of substructure can, therefore, bias certain cosmological parameters up to a level comparable to the typical uncertainties in current cosmological studies.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.07455  [pdf] - 1586277
VLBA imaging of the 3mm SiO maser emission in the disk-wind from the massive protostellar system Orion Source I
Comments: 11 pages, 12 figures; accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-07-24
We present the first images of the 28SiO v=1, J=2-1 maser emission around the closest known massive young stellar object Orion Source I observed at 86 GHz (3mm) with the VLBA. These images have high spatial (~0.3 mas) and spectral (~0.054 km/s) resolutions. We find that the 3mm masers lie in an X-shaped locus consisting of four arms, with blue-shifted emission in the south and east arms and red-shifted emission in the north and west arms. Comparisons with previous images of the 28SiO v=1,2, J=1-0 transitions at 7mm (observed in 2001-2002) show that the bulk of the J=2-1 transition emission follows the streamlines of the J=1-0 emission and exhibits an overall velocity gradient consistent with the gradient at 7mm. While there is spatial overlap between the 3mm and 7mm transitions, the 3mm emission, on average, lies at larger projected distances from Source I (~44 AU compared with ~35 AU for 7mm). The spatial overlap between the v=1, J=1-0 and J=2-1 transitions is suggestive of a range of temperatures and densities where physical conditions are favorable for both transitions of a same vibrational state. However, the observed spatial offset between the bulk of emission at 3mm and 7mm possibly indicates different ranges of temperatures and densities for optimal excitation of the masers. We discuss different maser pumping models that may explain the observed offset. We interpret the 3mm and 7mm masers as being part of a single wide-angle outflow arising from the surface of an edge-on disk rotating about a northeast-southwest axis, with a continuous velocity gradient indicative of differential rotation consistent with a Keplerian profile in a high-mass proto-binary.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.06390  [pdf] - 1584917
First detection of THz water maser in NGC7538-IRS1 with SOFIA and new 22 GHz e-MERLIN maps
Comments: accepted to A&A, 15 pages
Submitted: 2017-06-20
The formation of massive stars is still not well understood. Accumulating a large amount of mass infalling within a single entity in spite of radiation pressure is possible if, among several other conditions, enough thermal energy is released. Despite numerous water line observations, with the Herschel Space Observatory, in most of the sources observations were not able to trace the emission from the hot core around the newly forming protostellar object. We want to probe the physical conditions and water abundance in the inner layers of the host protostellar object NGC7538-IRS1 using a highly excited H2O line. Water maser models predict that several THz water masers should be detectable in these objects. We present SOFIA observations of the o-H2O 8(2,7)-7(3,4) line at 1296.41106 GHz and a 6(1,6)-5(2,3) 22 GHz e-MERLIN map of the region (first-ever 22 GHz images made after the e-MERLIN upgrade). In order to be able to constrain the nature of the emission - thermal or maser - we use near-simultaneous observations of the 22 GHz water maser performed with the Effelsberg radiotelescope and e-MERLIN. A thermal water model using the RATRAN radiative transfer code is presented based on HIFI pointed observations. Molecular water abundances are derived for the hot core. The H2O 8(2,7)- 7(3,4) line is detected toward NGC7538-IRS1 with one feature at the source velocity (-57.7 km/s) and another one at -48.4 km/s. We propose that the emission at the source velocity is consistent with thermal excitation and is excited in the innermost part of the IRS1a massive protostellar object's closest circumstellar environment. The other emission is very likely the first detection of a water THz maser line, pumped by shocks due to IRS1b outflow, in a star-forming region. Assuming thermal excitation of the THz line, the water abundance in NGC7538-IRS1's hot core is estimated to be 5.2x10^{-5} with respect to H2.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.05199  [pdf] - 1584789
OMEGA - OSIRIS Mapping of Emission-line Galaxies in A901/2: III. - Galaxy Properties Across Projected Phase Space in A901/2
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-06-16
We conduct a comprehensive projected phase-space analysis of the A901/2 multi-cluster system at $z\sim0.165$. Aggregating redshifts from spectroscopy, tunable-filter imaging, and prism techniques, we assemble a sample of 856 cluster galaxies reaching $10^{8.5}M_\odot$ in stellar mass. We look for variations in cluster galaxy properties between virialised and non-virialised regions of projected phase-space (PPS). Our main conclusions point to relatively gentle environmental effects, expressed mainly on galaxy gas reservoirs. (1) Stacking the four subclusters in A901/2, we find galaxies in the virialised region are more massive, redder, and have marginally higher S\`ersic indices, but their half-light radii and Hubble types are not significantly different. (2) After accounting for trends in stellar mass, there is a remaining change in rest-frame colour across PPS. Primarily, the colour difference is due to an absence in the virialised region of galaxies with rest-frame $B-V<0.7$ and moderate-to-high ($M_\star>10^{9.85}M_\odot$) stellar mass. (3) There is an infalling population of lower-mass ($M_\star\leq10^{9.85}M_\odot$), relatively blue ($B-V<0.7$) elliptical or spheroidal galaxies that is strikingly absent in the virialised region. (4) The number of bona-fide star-forming and AGN galaxies in the PPS regions is strongly dictated by stellar mass. However, there remains a reduced fraction of star-forming galaxies in the centres of the clusters at fixed stellar mass, consistent with the star-formation-density relation in galaxy clusters. (5) There is no change in specific H$\alpha$-derived star-formation rates of star-forming galaxies at fixed mass across the cluster environment. This suggests that preprocessing of galaxies during infall plays a prominent role in quenching star formation.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.03402  [pdf] - 1583260
The effect of the environment on the structure, morphology and star-formation history of intermediate-redshift galaxies
Comments: 15 Pages, 10 Figures; Accepted for publication in MNRAS on 2017 May 9. Received 2017 May 3
Submitted: 2017-05-09
With the aim of understanding the effect of the environment on the star formation history and morphological transformation of galaxies, we present a detailed analysis of the colour, morphology and internal structure of cluster and field galaxies at $0.4 \le z \le 0.8$. We use {\em HST} data for over 500 galaxies from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) to quantify how the galaxies' light distribution deviate from symmetric smooth profiles. We visually inspect the galaxies' images to identify the likely causes for such deviations. We find that the residual flux fraction ($RFF$), which measures the fractional contribution to the galaxy light of the residuals left after subtracting a symmetric and smooth model, is very sensitive to the degree of structural disturbance but not the causes of such disturbance. On the other hand, the asymmetry of these residuals ($A_{\rm res}$) is more sensitive to the causes of the disturbance, with merging galaxies having the highest values of $A_{\rm res}$. Using these quantitative parameters we find that, at a fixed morphology, cluster and field galaxies show statistically similar degrees of disturbance. However, there is a higher fraction of symmetric and passive spirals in the cluster than in the field. These galaxies have smoother light distributions than their star-forming counterparts. We also find that while almost all field and cluster S0s appear undisturbed, there is a relatively small population of star-forming S0s in clusters but not in the field. These findings are consistent with relatively gentle environmental processes acting on galaxies infalling onto clusters.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.02133  [pdf] - 1582414
Simultaneous 183 GHz H2O Maser and SiO Observations Towards Evolved Stars Using APEX SEPIA Band 5
Comments: 11 pages, accepted by A&A. The abstract here has been shortened
Submitted: 2017-04-07
We investigate the use of 183 GHz H2O masers for characterization of the physical conditions and mass loss process in the circumstellar envelopes of evolved stars. We used APEX SEPIA Band 5 to observe the 183 GHz H2O line towards 2 Red Supergiant and 3 Asymptotic Giant Branch stars. Simultaneously, we observed lines in 28SiO v0, 1, 2 and 3, and for 29SiO v0 and 1. We detected the 183 GHz H2O line towards all the stars with peak flux densities greater than 100 Jy, including a new detection from VY CMa. Towards all 5 targets, the water line had indications of being due to maser emission and had higher peak flux densities than for the SiO lines. The SiO lines appear to originate from both thermal and maser processes. Comparison with simulations and models indicate that 183 GHz maser emission is likely to extend to greater radii in the circumstellar envelopes than SiO maser emission and to similar or greater radii than water masers at 22, 321 and 325 GHz. We speculate that a prominent blue-shifted feature in the W Hya 183 GHz spectrum is amplifying the stellar continuum, and is located at a similar distance from the star as mainline OH maser emission. From a comparison of the individual polarizations, we find that the SiO maser linear polarization fraction of several features exceeds the maximum fraction allowed under standard maser assumptions and requires strong anisotropic pumping of the maser transition and strongly saturated maser emission. The low polarization fraction of the H2O maser however, fits with the expectation for a non-saturated maser. 183 GHz H2O masers can provide strong probes of the mass loss process of evolved stars. Higher angular resolution observations of this line using ALMA Band 5 will enable detailed investigation of the emission location in circumstellar envelopes and can also provide information on magnetic field strength and structure.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.06483  [pdf] - 1534879
OMEGA -- OSIRIS Mapping of Emission-line Galaxies in A901/2: II. -- Environmental influence on integrated star formation properties and AGN activity
Comments: 20 pages, 16 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-01-23
We present a study of the star formation and AGN activity for galaxies in the Abell 901/2 multi-cluster system at z~0.167 as part of the OMEGA survey. Using Tuneable Filter data obtained with the OSIRIS instrument at the GTC we produce spectra covering the Halpha and [N II] spectral lines for more than 400 galaxies. Using optical emission-line diagnostics, we identify a significant number of galaxies hosting AGN, which tend to have high masses and a broad range of morphologies. Moreover, within the environmental densities probed by our study, we find no environmental dependence on the fraction of galaxies hosting AGN. The analysis of the integrated Halpha emission shows that the specific star formation rates (SSFRs) of a majority of the cluster galaxies are below the field values for a given stellar mass. We interpret this result as evidence for a slow decrease in the star formation activity of star-forming galaxies as they fall into higher-density regions, contrary to some previous studies which suggested a rapid truncation of star formation. We find that most of the intermediate- and high-mass spiral galaxies go through a phase in which their star formation is suppressed but still retain significant star-formation activity. During this phase, these galaxies tend to retain their spiral morphology while their colours become redder. The presence of this type of galaxies in high density regions indicates that the physical mechanism responsible for suppressing star-formation affects mainly the gas component of the galaxies, suggesting that ram-pressure stripping or starvation are potentially responsible.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.00834  [pdf] - 1526420
Gaia Shows That Messier 40 is Definitely Not a Binary Star
Comments: 1 page. Refereed and accepted for publication in Observatory
Submitted: 2016-12-02
M40 has always been something of an oddity in the Messier Catalogue, since it is just a pair of stars rather than an extended object. Doubts have also been expressed as to whether it is even a physical binary. Here, we note that the Hipparcos/Gaia parallaxes for these two stars remove all doubt: Messier 40 comprises a pair of entirely unrelated stars.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.07311  [pdf] - 1485618
nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations V: Investigation of the Cluster Infall Region
Comments: 14 pages, 9 figures, 1 table; accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-09-23
We examine the properties of the galaxies and dark matter haloes residing in the cluster infall region surrounding the simulated $\Lambda$CDM galaxy cluster studied by Elahi et al. (2016) at z=0. The $1.1\times10^{15}h^{-1}\text{M}_{\odot}$ galaxy cluster has been simulated with eight different hydrodynamical codes containing a variety of hydrodynamic solvers and subgrid schemes. All models completed a dark-matter only, non-radiative and full-physics run from the same initial conditions. The simulations contain dark matter and gas with mass resolution $m_{\text{DM}}=9.01\times 10^8h^{-1}\text{M}_{\odot}$ and $m_{\text{gas}}=1.9\times 10^8h^{-1}\text{M}_{\odot}$ respectively. We find that the synthetic cluster is surrounded by clear filamentary structures that contain ~60% of haloes in the infall region with mass ~$10^{12.5} - 10^{14} h^{-1}\text{M}_{\odot}$, including 2-3 group-sized haloes ($> 10^{13}h^{-1}\text{M}_{\odot}$). However, we find that only ~10% of objects in the infall region are subhaloes residing in haloes, which may suggest that there is not much ongoing preprocessing occurring in the infall region at z=0. By examining the baryonic content contained within the haloes, we also show that the code-to-code scatter in stellar fraction across all halo masses is typically ~2 orders of magnitude between the two most extreme cases, and this is predominantly due to the differences in subgrid schemes and calibration procedures that each model uses. Models that do not include AGN feedback typically produce too high stellar fractions compared to observations by at least ~1 order of magnitude.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.03729  [pdf] - 1405621
Towards detecting methanol emission in low-mass protoplanetary discs with ALMA: The role of non-LTE excitation
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS, 15 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2016-05-12
The understanding of organic content of protoplanetary discs is one of the main goals of the planet formation studies. As an attempt to guide the observational searches for weak lines of complex species in discs, we modelled the (sub-)millimetre spectrum of gaseous methanol (CH$_3$OH), one of the simplest organic molecules, in the representative T Tauri system. We used 1+1D disc physical model coupled to the gas-grain ALCHEMIC chemical model with and without 2D-turbulent mixing. The computed CH$_3$OH abundances along with the CH$_3$OH scheme of energy levels of ground and excited torsional states were used to produce model spectra obtained with the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) 3D line radiative transfer code LIME. We found that the modelled non-LTE intensities of the CH$_3$OH lines can be lower by factor of $>10$--$100$ than those calculated under assumption of LTE. Though population inversion occurs in the model calculations for many (sub-)millimetre transitions, it does not lead to the strong maser amplification and noticeably high line intensities. We identify the strongest CH$_3$OH (sub-)millimetre lines that could be searched for with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) in nearby discs. The two best candidates are the CH$_{3}$OH $5_0-4_0~A^+$ (241.791 GHz) and $5_{-1}-4_{-1}~E$ (241.767 GHz) lines, which could possibly be detected with the $\sim5\sigma$ signal-to-noise ratio after $\sim3$ hours of integration with the full ALMA array.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.02679  [pdf] - 1397006
First Detection of $^3$He$^+$ in the Planetary Nebula IC$\,$418
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters
Submitted: 2016-04-10
The $^3$He isotope is important to many fields of astrophysics, including stellar evolution, chemical evolution, and cosmology. The isotope is produced in low-mass stars which evolve through the planetary nebula (PN) phase. $^3$He abundances in PNe can help test models of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. We present the detection of the $^3$He$^+$ emission line using the single dish Deep Space Station 63, towards the PN IC$\,$418. We derived a $^3$He/H abundance in the range 1.74$\pm$0.8$\times$10$^{-3}$ to 5.8$\pm$1.7$\times$10$^{-3}$, depending on whether part of the line arises in an outer ionized halo. The lower value for $^3$He/H ratio approaches values predicted by stellar models which include thermohaline mixing, but requires that large amounts of $^3$He are produced inside low-mass stars which enrich the interstellar medium (ISM). However, this over-predicts the $^3$He abundance in HII regions, the ISM, and proto-solar grains, which is known to be of the order of 10$^{-5}$. This discrepancy questions our understanding of the evolution of the $^3$He, from circumstellar environments to the ISM.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.06182  [pdf] - 1313358
The Physics of Water Masers observable with ALMA and SOFIA: Model Predictions for Evolved Stars
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-10-21
We present the results of models that were designed to study all possible water maser transitions in the frequency range 0-1.91THz, with particular emphasis on maser transitions that may be generated in evolved-star envelopes and observed with the ALMA and SOFIA telescopes. We used tens of thousands of radiative transfer models of both spin species of H2O, spanning a considerable parameter space in number density, kinetic temperature and dust temperature. Results, in the form of maser optical depths, have been summarized in a master table, Table 6. Maser transitions identified in these models were grouped according to loci of inverted regions in the density/kinetic temperature plane, a property clearly related to the dominant mode of pumping. A more detailed study of the effect of dust temperature on maser optical depth enabled us to divide the maser transitions into three groups: those with both collisional and radiative pumping schemes (22,96,209,321,325,395,941 and 1486\,GHz), a much larger set that are predominantly radiatively pumped, and another large group with a predominantly collisional pump. The effect of accelerative and decelerative velocity shifts of up to 5km/s was found to be generally modest, with the primary effect of reducing computed maser optical depths. More subtle asymmetric effects, dependent on line overlap, include maximum gains offset from zero shift by >1km/s, but these effects were predominantly found under conditions of weak amplification. These models will allow astronomers to use multi-transition water maser observations to constrain physical conditions down to the size of individual masing clouds (size of a few astronomical units).
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.01115  [pdf] - 1308343
Linking the Structural Properties of Galaxies and their Star Formation Histories with STAGES
Comments: 16 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-10-05
We study the links between star formation history and structure for a large mass-selected galaxy sample at 0.05 < z_phot < 0.30. The galaxies inhabit a very broad range of environments, from cluster cores to the field. Using HST images, we quantify their structure following Hoyos et al. (2012), and divide them into disturbed and undisturbed. We also visually identify mergers. Additionally, we provide a quantitative measure of the degree of disturbance for each galaxy ("roughness"). The majority of elliptical and lenticular galaxies have relaxed structure, showing no signs of ongoing star formation. Structurally-disturbed galaxies, which tend to avoid the lowest-density regions, have higher star-formation activity and younger stellar populations than undisturbed systems. Cluster spirals with reduced/quenched star formation have somewhat less disturbed morphologies than spirals with "normal" star-formation activity, suggesting that these "passive" spirals have started their morphological transformation into S0s. Visually identified mergers and galaxies not identified as mergers but with similar roughness have similar specific star formation rates and stellar ages. The degree of enhanced star formation is thus linked to the degree of structural disturbance, regardless of whether it is caused by major mergers or not. This suggests that merging galaxies are not special in terms of their higher-than-normal star-formation activity. Any physical process that produces "roughness", or regions of enhanced luminosity density, will increase the star-formation activity in a galaxy with similar efficiency. An alternative explanation is that star formation episodes increase the galaxies' roughness similarly, regardless of whether they are merger-induced or not.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.06831  [pdf] - 1292293
Wavelength Self-Calibration and Sky Subtraction for Fabry-Perot Interferometers: Applications to OSIRIS
Comments: MNRAS accepted; 7 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2015-08-27
We describe techniques concerning wavelength calibration and sky subtraction to maximise the scientific utility of data from tunable filter instruments. While we specifically address data from the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy instrument (OSIRIS) on the 10.4~m Gran Telescopio Canarias telescope, our discussion is generalisable to data from other tunable filter instruments. A key aspect of our methodology is a coordinate transformation to polar coordinates, which simplifies matters when the tunable filter data is circularly symmetric around the optical centre. First, we present a method for rectifying inaccuracies in the wavelength calibration using OH sky emission rings. Using this technique, we improve the absolute wavelength calibration from an accuracy of 5 Angstroms to 1 Angstrom, equivalent to ~7% of our instrumental resolution, for 95% of our data. Then, we discuss a new way to estimate the background sky emission by median filtering in polar coordinates. This method suppresses contributions to the sky background from the outer envelopes of distant galaxies, maximising the fluxes of sources measured in the corresponding sky-subtracted images. We demonstrate for data tuned to a central wavelength of 7615~$\rm\AA$ that galaxy fluxes in the new sky-subtracted image are ~37% higher, versus a sky-subtracted image from existing methods for OSIRIS tunable filter data.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.02053  [pdf] - 1550259
OMEGA -- OSIRIS Mapping of Emission-line Galaxies in A901/2: I.-- Survey description, data analysis, and star formation and AGN activity in the highest density regions
Comments: MNRAS accepted, 19 pages, 20 figures,1 table
Submitted: 2015-04-08
We present an overview of and first results from the OMEGA survey: the OSIRIS Mapping of Emission-line Galaxies in the multi-cluster system A901/2. The ultimate goal of this project is to study star formation and AGN activity across a broad range of environments at a single redshift. Using the tuneable-filter mode of the OSIRIS instrument on GTC, we target Halpha and [NII] emission lines over a ~0.5 X 0.5 deg2 region containing the z~0.167 multi-cluster system A901/2. In this paper we describe the design of the survey, the observations and the data analysis techniques developed. We then present early results from two OSIRIS pointings centred on the cores of the A901a and A902 clusters. AGN and star-forming (SF) objects are identified using the [NII]/Halpha vs. W_Halpha (WHAN) diagnostic diagram. The AGN hosts are brighter, more massive, and possess earlier-type morphologies than SF galaxies. Both populations tend to be located towards the outskirts of the high density regions we study. The typical Halpha luminosity of these sources is significantly lower than that of field galaxies at similar redshifts, but greater than that found for A1689, a rich cluster at z~0.2. The Halpha luminosities of our objects translate into star-formation rates (SFRs) between ~0.02 and 6 Msun/yr. Comparing the relationship between stellar mass and Halpha-derived SFR with that found in the field indicates a suppression of star formation in the cores of the clusters. These findings agree with previous investigations of this multi-cluster structure, based on other star formation indicators, and demonstrate the power of tuneable filters for this kind of study.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.08225  [pdf] - 1450548
Galaxy sizes as a function of environment at intermediate redshift from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-03-27
In order to assess whether the environment has a significant effect on galaxy sizes, we compare the mass--size relations of cluster and field galaxies in the $0.4 < z < 0.8$ redshift range from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) using HST images. We analyse two mass-selected samples, one defined using photometric redshifts ($10.2 \le \log M_\ast/M_{\odot} \le 12.0$), and a smaller more robust subsample using spectroscopic redshifts ($10.6 \le \log M_\ast/M_{\odot} \le 11.8$). We find no significant difference in the size distributions of cluster and field galaxies of a given morphology. Similarly, we find no significant difference in the size distributions of cluster and field galaxies of similar rest-frame $B-V$ colours. We rule out average size differences larger than $10$--$20$\% in both cases. Consistent conclusions are found with the spectroscopic and photometric samples. These results have important consequences for the physical process(es) responsible for the size evolution of galaxies, and in particular the effect of the environment. The remarkable growth in galaxy size observed from $z\sim2.5$ has been reported to depend on the environment at higher redshifts ($z>1$), with early-type/passive galaxies in higher density environments growing earlier. Such dependence disappears at lower redshifts. Therefore, if the reported difference at higher-$z$ is real, the growth of field galaxies has caught up with that of cluster galaxies by $z\sim1$. Any putative mechanism responsible for galaxy growth has to account for the existence of environmental differences at high redshift and their absence (or weakening) at lower redshifts.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.01779  [pdf] - 944874
Measuring Magnetic Fields Near and Far with the SKA via the Zeeman Effect
Comments: 10 pages, 0 figures; to appear as part of 'Cosmic Magnetism' in Proceedings 'Advancing Astrophysics with the SKA (AASKA14)', PoS(AASKA14)110
Submitted: 2015-03-05
The measurement of Zeeman splitting in spectral lines---both in emission and absorption---can provide direct estimates of the magnetic field strength and direction in atomic and molecular clouds, both in our own Milky Way and in external galaxies. This method will probe the magnetic field in the warm and cold neutral components of the interstellar medium, providing a complement to the extensive SKA Faraday studies planning to probe the field in the ionized components.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.07347  [pdf] - 1231873
Galaxy Cluster Mass Reconstruction Project: II. Quantifying scatter and bias using contrasting mock catalogues
Comments: 25 pages, 19 figures, 7 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-02-25
This article is the second in a series in which we perform an extensive comparison of various galaxy-based cluster mass estimation techniques that utilise the positions, velocities and colours of galaxies. Our aim is to quantify the scatter, systematic bias and completeness of cluster masses derived from a diverse set of 25 galaxy-based methods using two contrasting mock galaxy catalogues based on a sophisticated halo occupation model and a semi-analytic model. Analysing 968 clusters, we find a wide range in the RMS errors in log M200c delivered by the different methods (0.18 to 1.08 dex, i.e., a factor of ~1.5 to 12), with abundance matching and richness methods providing the best results, irrespective of the input model assumptions. In addition, certain methods produce a significant number of catastrophic cases where the mass is under- or over-estimated by a factor greater than 10. Given the steeply falling high-mass end of the cluster mass function, we recommend that richness or abundance matching-based methods are used in conjunction with these methods as a sanity check for studies selecting high mass clusters. We see a stronger correlation of the recovered to input number of galaxies for both catalogues in comparison with the group/cluster mass, however, this does not guarantee that the correct member galaxies are being selected. We do not observe significantly higher scatter for either mock galaxy catalogues. Our results have implications for cosmological analyses that utilise the masses, richnesses, or abundances of clusters, which have different uncertainties when different methods are used.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.5810  [pdf] - 910678
SKA studies of nearby galaxies: star-formation, accretion processes and molecular gas across all environments
Comments: 23 pages, 4 figures, to appear as part of 'Continuum Science' in Proceedings 'Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array' PoS(AASKA14)070
Submitted: 2014-12-18
The SKA will be a transformational instrument in the study of our local Universe. In particular, by virtue of its high sensitivity (both to point sources and diffuse low surface brightness emission), angular resolution and the frequency ranges covered, the SKA will undertake a very wide range of astrophysical research in the field of nearby galaxies. By surveying vast numbers of nearby galaxies of all types with $\mu$Jy sensitivity and sub-arcsecond angular resolutions at radio wavelengths, the SKA will provide the cornerstone of our understanding of star-formation and accretion activity in the local Universe. In this chapter we outline the key continuum and molecular line science areas where the SKA, both during phase-1 and when it becomes the full SKA, will have a significant scientific impact.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.3167  [pdf] - 1223581
The environmental dependence of the structure of galactic discs in STAGES S0 galaxies: implications for S0 formation
Comments: 27 pages, 16 figures, accepted to MNRAS. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1108.6206
Submitted: 2014-12-09
We present an analysis of V-band radial surface brightness {\mu}(r) profiles for S0s in different environments using HST/ACS imaging and data from the Space Telescope A901/2 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES). Using a sample of ~280 field and cluster S0s, we find that in both environments, ~25 per cent have a pure exponential disc (Type I) and ~50 per cent exhibit an up-bending disc break (antitruncation, Type III). However, we find hardly any (< 5 per cent) down-bending disc breaks (truncations, Type II) in our S0s and many cases (~20 per cent) where no exponential component was observed. We also find no evidence for an environmental dependence on the disc scalelength or break strength (outer-to-inner scalelength ratio), implying that the galaxy environment does not affect the stellar distribution in S0 stellar discs. Comparing disc structure between these S0s and the spirals from our previous studies, we find: i) no evidence for the Type I scalelength being dependent on morphology; and ii) some evidence suggesting the Type II/III break strength is smaller (weaker) in S0s compared to spirals. Taken together, these results suggest that the stellar distribution in S0s is not drastically affected by the galaxy environment. However, some process inherent to the morphological transformation of spirals into S0s does affect the stellar disc causing a weakening of {\mu}(r) breaks and may even eliminate truncations from S0s. In further tests, we perform analytical bulge-disc decompositions on our S0s and compare the results to those for spirals from our previous studies. For Type III galaxies, we find that bulge light can account for the excess light at large radii in up to ~50 per cent of S0s but in only ~15 per cent of spirals. We propose that this result is consistent with a fading stellar disc (evolving bulge-to-disc ratio) being an inherent process in the transformation of spirals into S0s.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.5497  [pdf] - 903752
ALMA sub-mm maser and dust distribution of VY Canis Majoris
Comments: Letter 4 pages, 5 figures plus appendix with 3 figures. Accepted by Astronomy and Astrophysics Letters
Submitted: 2014-09-18, last modified: 2014-11-05
Cool, evolved stars have copious, enriched winds. The structure of these winds and the way they are accelerated is not well known. We need to improve our understanding by studying the dynamics from the pulsating stellar surface to about 10 stellar radii, where radiation pressure on dust is fully effective. Some red supergiants have highly asymmetric nebulae, implicating additional forces. We retrieved ALMA Science Verification data providing images of sub-mm line and continuum emission from VY CMa. This enables us to locate water masers with milli-arcsec precision and resolve the dusty continuum. The 658-, 321- and 325-GHz masers lie in irregular, thick shells at increasing distances from the centre of expansion. For the first time this is confirmed as the stellar position, coinciding with a compact peak offset to the NW of the brightest continuum emission. The maser shells (and dust formation zone) overlap but avoid each other on tens-au scales. Their distribution is broadly consistent with excitation models but the conditions and kinematics appear to be complicated by wind collisions, clumping and asymmetries.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.0595  [pdf] - 1222359
OMEGA: OSIRIS Mapping of Emission-Line Galaxies in A901/2
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, B. Rodriguez Del Pino et al. 2014, in IAU Symp. 309, "Galaxy in 3D across the Universe", B. L. Ziegler, F. Combes, H. Dannerbauer, M. Verdugo, Eds. (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press), in press
Submitted: 2014-10-02
This work presents the first results from an ESO Large Programme carried out using the OSIRIS instrument on the 10m GTC telescope (La Palma). We have observed a large sample of galaxies in the region of the Abell 901/902 system (z ~ 0.165) which has been extensively studied as part of the STAGES project. We have obtained spectrally and spatially resolved H-alpha and [NII] emission maps for a very large sample of galaxies covering a broad range of environments. The new data are combined with extensive multi-wavelength observations which include HST, COMBO-17, Spitzer, Galex and XMM imaging to study star formation and AGN activity as a function of environment and galaxy properties such as luminosity, mass and morphology. The ultimate goal is to understand, in detail, the effect of the environment on star formation and AGN activity.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.0643  [pdf] - 1222361
Amplification of OAM Radiation by Astrophysical Masers
Comments:
Submitted: 2014-10-02
We extend the theory of astrophysical maser propagation through a medium with a Zeeman-split molecular response to the case of a non-uniform magnetic field, and allow a component of the electric field of the radiation in the direction of propagation: a characteristic of radiation with orbital angular momentum. A classical reduction of the governing equations leads to a set of nine differential equations for the evolution of intensity-like parameters for each Fourier component of the radiation. Four of these parameters correspond to the standard Stokes parameters, whilst the other five represent the $z$-component of the electric field, and its coupling to the conventional components in the $x-y$-plane. A restricted analytical solution of the governing equations demonstrates a non-trivial coupling of the Stokes parameters to those representing orbital angular momentum: the $z$-component of the electric field can grow from a background in which only Stokes-$I$ is non-zero. A numerical solution of the governing equations reveals radiation patterns with a radial and angular structure for the case of an ideal quadrupole magnetic field perpendicular to the propagation direction. In this ideal case generation of radiation orbital angular momentum, like polarization, can approach 100 per cent.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.7069  [pdf] - 1216582
Local ensemble transform Kalman filter, a fast non-stationary control law for adaptive optics on ELTs: theoretical aspects and first simulation results
Comments: This paper was published in Optics Express and is made available as an electronic reprint with the permission of OSA. The paper can be found at the following URL on the OSA website: http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/ . Systematic or multiple reproduction or distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law
Submitted: 2014-08-29
We propose a new algorithm for an adaptive optics system control law, based on the Linear Quadratic Gaussian approach and a Kalman Filter adaptation with localizations. It allows to handle non-stationary behaviors, to obtain performance close to the optimality defined with the residual phase variance minimization criterion, and to reduce the computational burden with an intrinsically parallel implementation on the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs).
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.4650  [pdf] - 844928
Future mmVLBI Research with ALMA: A European vision
Tilanus, R. P. J.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Zensus, J. A.; Baudry, A.; Bremer, M.; Falcke, H.; Giovannini, G.; Laing, R.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Vlemmings, W.; Abraham, Z.; Afonso, J.; Agudo, I.; Alberdi, A.; Alcolea, J.; Altamirano, D.; Asadi, S.; Assaf, K.; Augusto, P.; Baczko, A-K.; Boeck, M.; Boller, T.; Bondi, M.; Boone, F.; Bourda, G.; Brajsa, R.; Brand, J.; Britzen, S.; Bujarrabal, V.; Cales, S.; Casadio, C.; Casasola, V.; Castangia, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Charlot, P.; Chemin, L.; Clenet, Y.; Colomer, F.; Combes, F.; Cordes, J.; Coriat, M.; Cross, N.; D'Ammando, F.; Dallacasa, D.; Desmurs, J-F.; Eatough, R.; Eckart, A.; Eisenacher, D.; Etoka, S.; Felix, M.; Fender, R.; Ferreira, M.; Freeland, E.; Frey, S.; Fromm, C.; Fuhrmann, L.; Gabanyi, K.; Galvan-Madrid, R.; Giroletti, M.; Goddi, C.; Gomez, J.; Gourgoulhon, E.; Gray, M.; di Gregorio, I.; Greimel, R.; Grosso, N.; Guirado, J.; Hada, K.; Hanslmeier, A.; Henkel, C.; Herpin, F.; Hess, P.; Hodgson, J.; Horns, D.; Humphreys, E.; Kramer, B. Hutawarakorn; Ilyushin, V.; Impellizzeri, V.; Ivanov, V.; Julião, M.; Kadler, M.; Kerins, E.; Klaassen, P.; Klooster, K. van 't; Kording, E.; Kozlov, M.; Kramer, M.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kurtanidze, O.; Lazio, J.; Leite, A.; Leitzinger, M.; Lepine, J.; Levshakov, S.; Lico, R.; Lindqvist, M.; Liuzzo, E.; Lobanov, A.; Lucas, P.; Mannheim, K.; Marcaide, J.; Markoff, S.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Martins, C.; Masetti, N.; Massardi, M.; Menten, K.; Messias, H.; Migliari, S.; Mignano, A.; Miller-Jones, J.; Minniti, D.; Molaro, P.; Molina, S.; Monteiro, A.; Moscadelli, L.; Mueller, C.; Müller, A.; Muller, S.; Niederhofer, F.; Odert, P.; Olofsson, H.; Orienti, M.; Paladino, R.; Panessa, F.; Paragi, Z.; Paumard, T.; Pedrosa, P.; Pérez-Torres, M.; Perrin, G.; Perucho, M.; Porquet, D.; Prandoni, I.; Ransom, S.; Reimers, D.; Rejkuba, M.; Rezzolla, L.; Richards, A.; Ros, E.; Roy, A.; Rushton, A.; Savolainen, T.; Schulz, R.; Silva, M.; Sivakoff, G.; Soria-Ruiz, R.; Soria, R.; Spaans, M.; Spencer, R.; Stappers, B.; Surcis, G.; Tarchi, A.; Temmer, M.; Thompson, M.; Torrelles, J.; Truestedt, J.; Tudose, V.; Venturi, T.; Verbiest, J.; Vieira, J.; Vielzeuf, P.; Vincent, F.; Wex, N.; Wiik, K.; Wiklind, T.; Wilms, J.; Zackrisson, E.; Zechlin, H.
Comments: Replaced figures 2 and 3: corrected position SRT. Corrected minor typo in 5.1
Submitted: 2014-06-18, last modified: 2014-07-01
Very long baseline interferometry at millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths (mmVLBI) offers the highest achievable spatial resolution at any wavelength in astronomy. The anticipated inclusion of ALMA as a phased array into a global VLBI network will bring unprecedented sensitivity and a transformational leap in capabilities for mmVLBI. Building on years of pioneering efforts in the US and Europe the ongoing ALMA Phasing Project (APP), a US-led international collaboration with MPIfR-led European contributions, is expected to deliver a beamformer and VLBI capability to ALMA by the end of 2014 (APP: Fish et al. 2013, arXiv:1309.3519). This report focuses on the future use of mmVLBI by the international users community from a European viewpoint. Firstly, it highlights the intense science interest in Europe in future mmVLBI observations as compiled from the responses to a general call to the European community for future research projects. A wide range of research is presented that includes, amongst others: - Imaging the event horizon of the black hole at the centre of the Galaxy - Testing the theory of General Relativity an/or searching for alternative theories - Studying the origin of AGN jets and jet formation - Cosmological evolution of galaxies and BHs, AGN feedback - Masers in the Milky Way (in stars and star-forming regions) - Extragalactic emission lines and astro-chemistry - Redshifted absorption lines in distant galaxies and study of the ISM and circumnuclear gas - Pulsars, neutron stars, X-ray binaries - Testing cosmology - Testing fundamental physical constants
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.5816  [pdf] - 1209123
A quantum mechanical approach to establishing the magnetic field orientation from a maser Zeeman profile
Comments: 10 pages, 5 Figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-04-23
Recent comparisons of magnetic field directions derived from maser Zeeman splitting with those derived from continuum source rotation measures have prompted new analysis of the propagation of the Zeeman split components, and the inferred field orientation. In order to do this, we first review differing electric field polarization conventions used in past studies. With these clearly and consistently defined, we then show that for a given Zeeman splitting spectrum, the magnetic field direction is fully determined and predictable on theoretical grounds: when a magnetic field is oriented away from the observer, the left-hand circular polarization is observed at higher frequency and the right-hand polarization at lower frequency. This is consistent with classical Lorentzian derivations. The consequent interpretation of recent measurements then raises the possibility of a reversal between the large-scale field (traced by rotation measures) and the small-scale field (traced by maser Zeeman splitting).
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.4610  [pdf] - 1208454
Galaxy Cluster Mass Reconstruction Project: I. Methods and first results on galaxy-based techniques
Comments: 25 pages, 15 figures, 5 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-03-18
This paper is the first in a series in which we perform an extensive comparison of various galaxy-based cluster mass estimation techniques that utilise the positions, velocities and colours of galaxies. Our primary aim is to test the performance of these cluster mass estimation techniques on a diverse set of models that will increase in complexity. We begin by providing participating methods with data from a simple model that delivers idealised clusters, enabling us to quantify the underlying scatter intrinsic to these mass estimation techniques. The mock catalogue is based on a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model that assumes spherical Navarro, Frenk and White (NFW) haloes truncated at R_200, with no substructure nor colour segregation, and with isotropic, isothermal Maxwellian velocities. We find that, above 10^14 M_solar, recovered cluster masses are correlated with the true underlying cluster mass with an intrinsic scatter of typically a factor of two. Below 10^14 M_solar, the scatter rises as the number of member galaxies drops and rapidly approaches an order of magnitude. We find that richness-based methods deliver the lowest scatter, but it is not clear whether such accuracy may simply be the result of using an over-simplistic model to populate the galaxies in their haloes. Even when given the true cluster membership, large scatter is observed for the majority non-richness-based approaches, suggesting that mass reconstruction with a low number of dynamical tracers is inherently problematic.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.5954  [pdf] - 1180140
Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter: a non-stationary control law for complex adaptive optics systems on ELTs
Comments: Proceedings of the AO4ELT3 conference; 8 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2013-10-22, last modified: 2014-01-09
We propose a new algorithm for an adaptive optics system control law which allows to reduce the computational burden in the case of an Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) and to deal with non-stationary behaviors of the turbulence. This approach, using Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter and localizations by domain decomposition is called the local ETKF: the pupil of the telescope is split up into various local domains and calculations for the update estimate of the turbulent phase on each domain are performed independently. This data assimilation scheme enables parallel computation of markedly less data during this update step. This adapts the Kalman Filter to large scale systems with a non-stationary turbulence model when the explicit storage and manipulation of extremely large covariance matrices are impossible. First simulation results are given in order to assess the theoretical analysis and to demonstrate the potentiality of this new control law for complex adaptive optics systems on ELTs.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.5618  [pdf] - 1380644
Probing the accelerating Universe with radio weak lensing in the JVLA Sky Survey
Comments: Submitted in response to NRAO's recent call for community white papers on the VLA Sky Survey (VLASS)
Submitted: 2013-12-19, last modified: 2013-12-30
We outline the prospects for performing pioneering radio weak gravitational lensing analyses using observations from a potential forthcoming JVLA Sky Survey program. A large-scale survey with the JVLA can offer interesting and unique opportunities for performing weak lensing studies in the radio band, a field which has until now been the preserve of optical telescopes. In particular, the JVLA has the capacity for large, deep radio surveys with relatively high angular resolution, which are the key characteristics required for a successful weak lensing study. We highlight the potential advantages and unique aspects of performing weak lensing in the radio band. In particular, the inclusion of continuum polarisation information can greatly reduce noise in weak lensing reconstructions and can also remove the effects of intrinsic galaxy alignments, the key astrophysical systematic effect that limits weak lensing at all wavelengths. We identify a VLASS "deep fields" program (total area ~10-20 square degs), to be conducted at L-band and with high-resolution (A-array configuration), as the optimal survey strategy from the point of view of weak lensing science. Such a survey will build on the unique strengths of the JVLA and will remain unsurpassed in terms of its combination of resolution and sensitivity until the advent of the Square Kilometre Array. We identify the best fields on the JVLA-accessible sky from the point of view of overlapping with existing deep optical and near infra-red data which will provide crucial redshift information and facilitate a host of additional compelling multi-wavelength science.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.3444  [pdf] - 746639
Silicon isotopic abundance toward evolved stars and its application for presolar grains
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2013-11-14
Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) is important for understanding the composition of the present-day interstellar medium (ISM) and of our solar system. In this paper, we aim to track the GCE by using the 29Si/30Si ratios in evolved stars and tentatively relate this to presolar grain composition. We used the APEX telescope to detect thermal SiO isotopologue emission toward four oxygen-rich M-type stars. Together with the data retrieved from the Herschel science archive and from the literature, we were able to obtain the 29Si/30Si ratios for a total of 15 evolved stars inferred from their optically thin 29SiO and 30SiO emission. These stars cover a range of masses and ages, and because they do not significantly alter 29Si/30Si during their lifetimes, they provide excellent probes of the ISM metallicity (or 29Si/30Si ratio) as a function of time. The 29Si/30Si ratios inferred from the thermal SiO emission tend to be lower toward low-mass oxygen-rich stars (e.g., down to about unity for W Hya), and close to an interstellar or solar value of 1.5 for the higher-mass carbon star IRC+10216 and two red supergiants. There is a tentative correlation between the 29Si/30Si ratios and the mass-loss rates of evolved stars, where we take the mass-loss rate as a proxy for the initial stellar mass or current stellar age. This is consistent with the different abundance ratios found in presolar grains. We found that older objects (up to possibly 10 Gyr old) in our sample trace a previous, lower 29Si/30Si value of about 1. Material with this isotopic ratio is present in two subclasses of presolar grains, providing independent evidence of the lower ratio. Therefore, the 29Si/30Si ratio derived from the SiO emission of evolved stars is a useful diagnostic tool for the study of the GCE and presolar grains.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.6496  [pdf] - 1172335
Brighter galaxy bias: underestimating the velocity dispersions of galaxy clusters
Comments: 11 pages, 9 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-06-27
We study the systematic bias introduced when selecting the spectroscopic redshifts of brighter cluster galaxies to estimate the velocity dispersion of galaxy clusters from both simulated and observational galaxy catalogues. We select clusters with Ngal > 50 at five low redshift snapshots from a semi-analytic model galaxy catalogue, and from a catalogue of SDSS DR8 groups and clusters across the redshift range 0.021<z<0.098. We employ various selection techniques to explore whether the velocity dispersion bias is simply due to a lack of dynamical information or is the result of an underlying physical process occurring in the cluster, for example, dynamical friction. The velocity dispersions and stacked particle velocity distributions of the parent dark matter (DM) halos are compared to the corresponding cluster dispersions and galaxy velocity distribution. We find a clear bias between the halo and the semi-analytic galaxy cluster velocity dispersion on the order of sigma gal / sigma DM = 0.87-0.95 and a distinct difference in the stacked galaxy and DM particle velocity distribution. We identify a systematic underestimation of the velocity dispersions when imposing increasing absolute I-band magnitude limits. This underestimation is enhanced when using only the brighter cluster members for dynamical analysis on the order of 5-35%, indicating that dynamical friction is a serious source of bias when using galaxy velocities as tracers of the underlying gravitational potential. In contrast to the literature we find that the resulting bias is not only halo mass-dependent but that the nature of the dependence changes according to the galaxy selection strategy. We make a recommendation that, in the realistic case of limited availability of spectral observations, a strictly magnitude-limited sample should be avoided to ensure an unbiased estimate of the velocity dispersion.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.6186  [pdf] - 679311
Tully-Fisher analysis of the multiple cluster system Abell 901/902
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics; 16 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2013-04-23
We derive rotation curves from optical emission lines of 182 disk galaxies (96 in the cluster and 86 in the field) in the region of Abell 901/902 located at $z\sim 0.165$. We focus on the analysis of B-band and stellar-mass Tully-Fisher relations. We examine possible environmental dependencies and differences between normal spirals and "dusty red" galaxies, i.e. disk galaxies that have red colors due to relatively low star formation rates. We find no significant differences between the best-fit TF slope of cluster and field galaxies. At fixed slope, the field population with high-quality rotation curves (57 objects) is brighter by $\Delta M_{B}=-0\fm42\pm0\fm15$ than the cluster population (55 objects). We show that this slight difference is at least in part an environmental effect. The scatter of the cluster TFR increases for galaxies closer to the core region, also indicating an environmental effect. Interestingly, dusty red galaxies become fainter towards the core at given rotation velocity (i.e. total mass). This indicates that the star formation in these galaxies is in the process of being quenched. The luminosities of normal spiral galaxies are slightly higher at fixed rotation velocity for smaller cluster-centric radii. Probably these galaxies are gas-rich (compared to the dusty red population) and the onset of ram-pressure stripping increases their star-formation rates. The results from the TF analysis are consistent with and complement our previous findings. Dusty red galaxies might be an intermediate stage in the transformation of infalling field spiral galaxies into cluster S0s, and this might explain the well-known increase of the S0 fraction in galaxy clusters with cosmic time.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.2864  [pdf] - 1165196
e-MERLIN resolves Betelgeuse at wavelength 5 cm
Comments: 6pp (incl. appendix), 3 figs Accepted by MNRAS letters 2013 Mar 12
Submitted: 2013-03-12
Convection, pulsation and magnetic fields have all been suggested as mechanisms for the transport of mass and energy from the optical photosphere of red supergiants, out to the region where the stellar wind is launched. We imaged the red supergiant Betelgeuse at 0.06-0.18 arcsec resolution, using e-MERLIN at 5.5--6.0 GHz, with a sensitivity of ~0.01 mJy/beam. Most of the radio emission comes from within an ellipse (0.235x0.218) arcsec^2 (~5x the optical radius), with a flux density of 1.62 mJy, giving an average brightness temperature ~1250 K. This radio photosphere contains two hotspots of 0.53 and 0.79 mJy/beam, separated by 90 milli-arcsec, with brightness temperatures 5400+/-600 K and 3800+/-500 K. Similar hotspots, at more than double the distance from the photosphere of those seen in any other regime, were detected by the less-sensitive `old' MERLIN in 1992, 1995 and 1996 and many exceed the photospheric temperature of 3600 K. Such brightness temperatures are high enough to emanate from pockets of chromospheric plasma. Other possibilities include local shock heating, the convective dredge-up of hot material or exceptionally cool, low density regions, transparent down to the hottest layer at ~40 milliarcsec radius. We also detect an arc 0.2--0.3 arcsec to the SW, brightness temperature ~150 K, in a similar direction to extensions seen on both smaller and larger scales in the infra-red and in CO at mm wavelengths. These preliminary results will be followed by further e-MERLIN, VLA and ALMA observations to help resolve the problem of mass elevation from 1 to 10 R* in red supergiants.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.2530  [pdf] - 1164530
Polarization morphology of SiO masers in the circumstellar envelope of the AGB star R Cassiopeiae
Comments: 14 pages, 15 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-02-11
Silicon monoxide maser emission has been detected in the circumstellar envelopes of many evolved stars in various vibrationally-excited rotational transitions. It is considered a good tracer of the wind dynamics close to the photosphere of the star. We have investigated the polarization morphology in the circumstellar envelope of an AGB star, R Cas. We mapped the linear and circular polarization of SiO masers in the v=1, J=1-0 transition. The linear polarization is typically a few tens of percent while the circular polarization is a few percent. The fractional polarization tends to be higher for emission of lower total intensity. We found that, in some isolated features the fractional linear polarization appears to exceed 100%. We found the Faraday rotation is not negligible but is ~15 deg., which could produce small scale structure in polarized emission whilst total intensity is smoother and partly resolved out. The polarization angles vary considerably from feature to feature but there is a tendency to favour the directions parallel or perpendicular to the radial direction with respect to the star. In some features, the polarization angle abruptly flips 90 deg. We found that our data are in the regime where the model of Goldreich et al (1973) can be applied and the polarization angle flip is caused when the magnetic field is at close to 55 deg. to the line of sight. The polarization angle configuration is consistent with a radial magnetic field although other configurations are not excluded.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.4750  [pdf] - 623924
Ram pressure and dusty red galaxies - key factors in the evolution of the multiple cluster system Abell 901/902
Comments: Electronic version published in Astronomy and Astrophysics Volume 549, Page 0; 19 pages, 21 figures
Submitted: 2012-11-20, last modified: 2013-02-06
We present spectroscopic observations of 182 disk galaxies (96 in the cluster and 86 in the field environment) in the region of the Abell 901/902 multiple cluster system, which is located at a redshift of $z\sim 0.165$. The presence of substructures and non-Gaussian redshift distributions indicate that the cluster system is dynamically young and not in a virialized state. We find evidence for two important galaxy populations. \textit{Morphologically distorted galaxies} are probably subject to increased tidal interactions. They show pronounced rotation curve asymmetries at intermediate cluster-centric radii and low rest-frame peculiar velocities. \textit{Morphologically undistorted galaxies} show the strongest rotation curve asymmetries at high rest-frame velocities and low cluster-centric radii. Supposedly, this group is strongly affected by ram-pressure stripping due to interaction with the intra-cluster medium. Among the morphologically undistorted galaxies, dusty red galaxies have particularly strong rotation curve asymmetries, suggesting ram pressure is an important factor in these galaxies. Furthermore, dusty red galaxies on average have a bulge-to-total ratio higher by a factor of two than cluster blue cloud and field galaxies. The fraction of kinematically distorted galaxies is 75% higher in the cluster than in the field environment. This difference mainly stems from morphological undistorted galaxies, indicating a cluster-specific interaction process that only affects the gas kinematics but not the stellar morphology. Also the ratio between gas and stellar scale length is reduced for cluster galaxies compared to the field sample. Both findings could be best explained by ram-pressure effects.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.6214  [pdf] - 1152374
AGN host galaxies at redshift z~0.7: peculiar or not?
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics; 17 pages, 30 figures; reposted with affiliation updates and language editing
Submitted: 2012-10-23, last modified: 2012-11-09
We perform a quantitative morphological comparison between the hosts of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and quiescent galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z~0.7). The imaging data are taken from the large HST/ACS mosaics of the GEMS and STAGES surveys. Our main aim is to test whether nuclear activity at this cosmic epoch is triggered by major mergers. Using images of quiescent galaxies and stars, we create synthetic AGN images to investigate the impact of an optical nucleus on the morphological analysis of AGN hosts. Galaxy morphologies are parameterized using the asymmetry index A, concentration index C, Gini coefficient G and M20 index. A sample of ~200 synthetic AGN is matched to 21 real AGN in terms of redshift, host brightness and host-to-nucleus ratio to ensure a reliable comparison between active and quiescent galaxies. The optical nuclei strongly affect the morphological parameters of the underlying host galaxy. Taking these effects into account, we find that the morphologies of the AGN hosts are clearly distinct from galaxies undergoing violent gravitational interactions. In fact, the host galaxies' distributions in morphological descriptor space are more similar to undisturbed galaxies than major mergers. Intermediate-luminosity (Lx < 10^44 erg/s) AGN hosts at z~0.7 show morphologies similar to the general population of massive galaxies with significant bulges at the same redshifts. If major mergers are the driver of nuclear activity at this epoch, the signatures of gravitational interactions fade rapidly before the optical AGN phase starts, making them undetectable on single-orbit HST images, at least with usual morphological descriptors. This could be investigated in future synthetic observations created from numerical simulations of galaxy-galaxy interactions.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.2583  [pdf] - 1124740
Evolved star water maser cloud size determined by star size
Comments: Accepted by A&A 2012 July 10 Main text 29 pages, 62 figures Appendix 44 pages, 23 figures
Submitted: 2012-07-11
Cool, evolved stars undergo copious mass loss but the details of how the matter is returned to the ISM are still under debate. We investigated the structure and evolution of the wind at 5 to 50 stellar radii from Asymptotic Giant Branch and Red Supergiant stars. 22-GHz water masers around seven evolved stars were imaged using MERLIN, at sub-AU resolution. Each source was observed at between 2 and 7 epochs (several stellar periods). We compared our results with long-term Pushchino single dish monitoring. The 22-GHz emission is located in ~spherical, thick, unevenly filled shells. The outflow velocity doubles between the inner and outer shell limits. Water maser clumps could be matched at successive epochs separated by <2 years for AGB stars, or at least 5 years for RSG. This is much shorter than the decades taken for the wind to cross the maser shell, and comparison with spectral monitoring shows that some features fade and reappear. In 5 sources, most of the matched features brighten or dim in concert from one epoch to the next. One cloud in W Hya was caught in the act of passing in front of a background cloud leading to 50-fold, transient amplification. The masing clouds are 1-2 orders of magnitude denser than the wind average and contain a substantial fraction of the mass loss in this region, with a filling factor <1%. The RSG clouds are ~10x bigger than those round the AGB stars. Proper motions are dominated by expansion, with no systematic rotation. The maser clouds survive for decades (the shell crossing time) but the masers are not always beamed in our direction. Radiative effects cause changes in flux density throughout the maser shells on short timescales. Cloud size is proportional to parent star size; clouds have a similar radius to the star in the 22-GHz maser shell. Stellar properties such as convection cells must determine the clumping scale.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.6328  [pdf] - 1084487
Measures of Galaxy Environment - I. What is "Environment"?
Comments: 14 pages, 9 figures, 1 table, published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-09-28, last modified: 2012-06-18
The influence of a galaxy's environment on its evolution has been studied and compared extensively in the literature, although differing techniques are often used to define environment. Most methods fall into two broad groups: those that use nearest neighbours to probe the underlying density field and those that use fixed apertures. The differences between the two inhibit a clean comparison between analyses and leave open the possibility that, even with the same data, different properties are actually being measured. In this work we apply twenty published environment definitions to a common mock galaxy catalogue constrained to look like the local Universe. We find that nearest neighbour-based measures best probe the internal densities of high-mass haloes, while at low masses the inter-halo separation dominates and acts to smooth out local density variations. The resulting correlation also shows that nearest neighbour galaxy environment is largely independent of dark matter halo mass. Conversely, aperture-based methods that probe super-halo scales accurately identify high-density regions corresponding to high mass haloes. Both methods show how galaxies in dense environments tend to be redder, with the exception of the largest apertures, but these are the strongest at recovering the background dark matter environment. We also warn against using photometric redshifts to define environment in all but the densest regions. When considering environment there are two regimes: the 'local environment' internal to a halo best measured with nearest neighbour and 'large-scale environment' external to a halo best measured with apertures. This leads to the conclusion that there is no universal environment measure and the most suitable method depends on the scale being probed.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.3546  [pdf] - 1118021
Radio and IR interferometry of SiO maser stars
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures, submitted to Proc. IAU Symp. 287 "Cosmic masers - from OH to H_0", R.S. Booth, E.M.L. Humphreys, W.H.T. Vlemmings (eds.), invited paper
Submitted: 2012-04-16
Radio and infrared interferometry of SiO maser stars provide complementary information on the atmosphere and circumstellar environment at comparable spatial resolution. Here, we present the latest results on the atmospheric structure and the dust condensation region of AGB stars based on our recent infrared spectro-interferometric observations, which represent the environment of SiO masers. We discuss, as an example, new results from simultaneous VLTI and VLBA observations of the Mira variable AGB star R Cnc, including VLTI near- and mid-infrared interferometry, as well as VLBA observations of the SiO maser emission toward this source. We present preliminary results from a monitoring campaign of high-frequency SiO maser emission toward evolved stars obtained with the APEX telescope, which also serves as a precursor of ALMA images of the SiO emitting region. We speculate that large-scale long-period chaotic motion in the extended molecular atmosphere may be the physical reason for observed deviations from point symmetry of atmospheric molecular layers, and for the observed erratic variability of high-frequency SiO maser emission
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1203.2527  [pdf] - 1117223
Methanol and excited OH masers towards W51: I - Main and South
Comments: 19 pages, 16 figures and 4 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-03-12
MERLIN phase-referenced polarimetric observations towards the W51 complex were carried out in March 2006 in the Class II methanol maser transition at 6.668 GHz and three of the four excited OH maser hyperfine transitions at 6 GHz. Methanol maser emission is found towards both W51 Main and South. We did not detect any emission in the excited OH maser lines at 6.030 and 6.049 GHz down to a 3 sigma limit of ~20 mJy per beam. Excited OH maser emission at 6.035 GHz is only found towards W51 Main. This emission is highly circularly polarised (typically 45% and up to 87%). Seven Zeeman pairs were identified in this transition, one of which contains detectable linear polarisation. The magnetic field strength derived from these Zeeman pairs ranges from +1.6 to +6.8 mG, consistent with the previously published magnetic field strengths inferred from the OH ground-state lines. The bulk of the methanol maser emission is associated with W51 Main, sampling a total area of ~3"x2.2" (i.e., ~16200x11900 AU), while only two maser components, separated by ~2.5", are found in the W51 South region. The astrometric distributions of both 6.668-GHz methanol and 6.035-GHz excited-OH maser emission in the W51 Main/South region are presented here. The methanol masers in W51 Main show a clear coherent velocity and spatial structure with the bulk of the maser components distributed into 2 regions showing a similar conical opening angle with of a central velocity of ~+55.5 km/s and an expansion velocity of =<5 km/s. The mass contained in this structure is estimated to be at least 22 solar masses. The location of maser emission in the two afore-mentioned lines is compared with that of previously published OH ground-state emission. Association with the UCHII regions in the W51 Main/South complex and relationship of the masers to infall or outflow in the region are discussed.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.3930  [pdf] - 1093094
Radiation Transfer in the Cavity and Shell of Planetary Nebulae
Comments: MNRAS accepted; 10 Figs
Submitted: 2012-01-18
We develop an approximate analytical solution for the transfer of line-averaged radiation in the hydrogen recombination lines for the ionized cavity and molecular shell of a spherically symmetric planetary nebula. The scattering problem is treated as a perturbation, using a mean intensity derived from a scattering-free solution. The analytical function was fitted to Halpha and Hbeta data from the planetary nebula NGC6537. The position of the maximum in the intensity profile produced consistent values for the radius of the cavity as a fraction of the radius of the dusty nebula: 0.21 for Halpha and 0.20 for Hbeta. Recovered optical depths were broadly consistent with observed optical extinction in the nebula, but the range of fit parameters in this case is evidence for a clumpy distribution of dust.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.0787  [pdf] - 1092705
The 6-GHz methanol multibeam maser catalogue IV: Galactic longitudes 186 to 330 including the Orion-Monoceros region
Comments: 39 Pages, 8 Figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-01-03
We present the fourth portion of a Galactic Plane survey of methanol masers at 6668 MHz, spanning the longitude range 186 degrees to 330 degrees. We report 207 maser detections, 89 new to the survey. This completes the southern sky part of the Methanol Multibeam survey and includes a large proportion of new sources, 43%. We also include results from blind observations of the Orion-Monoceros star forming region, formally outside the latitude range of the Methanol Multibeam survey; only the four previously known methanol emitting sites were detected, of which we present new positions and spectra for masers at Orion-A (south) and Orion-B, obtained with the MERLIN array.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.3801  [pdf] - 1091698
Anti-truncated stellar light profiles in the outer regions of STAGES spiral galaxies: bulge or disc related?
Comments: Accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-11-16
We present a comparison of azimuthally averaged radial surface brightness mu(r) profiles and analytical bulge-disc decompositions (de Vaucouleurs, r^(1/4) bulge plus exponential disc) for spiral galaxies using Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys V-band imaging from the Space Telescope A901/2 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES). In the established classification scheme, antitruncated mu(r) profiles (Type III) have a broken exponential disc with a shallower region beyond the break radius r_brk. The excess light at large radii (r > r_brk) can either be caused by an outer exponential disc (Type III-d) or an extended spheroidal component (Type III-s). Using our comparisons, we determine the contribution of bulge light at r > r_brk for a large sample of 78 (barred/unbarred, Sa-Sd) spiral galaxies with outer disc antitruncations (mu_brk > 24 mag arcsec^-2). In the majority of cases (~85 per cent), evidence indicates that excess light at r > r_brk is related to an outer shallow disc (Type III-d). Here, the contribution of bulge light at r > r_brk is either negligible (~70 per cent) or too little to explain the antitruncation (~15 per cent). However in the latter cases, bulge light can affect the measured disc properties (e.g. mu_brk, outer scalelength). In the remaining cases (~15 per cent), light at r > r_brk is dominated by the bulge (Type III-s). Here, for most cases the bulge profile dominates at all radii and only occasionally (3 galaxies, ~5 per cent) extends beyond that of a dominant disc and explains the excess light at r > r_brk. We thus conclude that in the vast majority of cases antitruncated outer discs cannot be explained by bulge light and thus remain a pure disc phenomenon.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.0932  [pdf] - 1083829
Spatial matter density mapping of the STAGES Abell A901/2 supercluster field with 3D lensing
Comments: Accepted by MNRAS Sep. 2011; 21 pages, 13 figures, 2 tables, correction of a few typos
Submitted: 2011-09-05, last modified: 2011-11-10
We present weak lensing data from the HST/STAGES survey to study the three-dimensional spatial distribution of matter and galaxies in the Abell 901/902 supercluster complex. Our method improves over the existing 3D lensing mapping techniques by calibrating and removing redshift bias and accounting for the effects of the radial elongation of 3D structures. We also include the first detailed noise analysis of a 3D lensing map, showing that even with deep HST quality data, only the most massive structures, for example M200>~10^15 Msun/h at z~0.8, can be resolved in 3D with any reasonable redshift accuracy (\Delta z~0.15). We compare the lensing map to the stellar mass distribution and find luminous counterparts for all mass peaks detected with a peak significance >3\sigma. We see structures in and behind the z=0.165 foreground supercluster, finding structure directly behind the A901b cluster at z~0.6 and also behind the SW group at z~0.7. This 3D structure viewed in projection has no significant impact on recent mass estimates of A901b or the SW group components SWa and SWb.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.6828  [pdf] - 1084546
A New Automatic Method to Identify Galaxy Mergers I. Description and Application to the STAGES Survey
Comments: 25 pages, 14 figures, 4 tables. To appear in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-09-30
We present an automatic method to identify galaxy mergers using the morphological information contained in the residual images of galaxies after the subtraction of a Sersic model. The removal of the bulk signal from the host galaxy light is done with the aim of detecting the fainter minor mergers. The specific morphological parameters that are used in the merger diagnostic suggested here are the Residual Flux Fraction and the asymmetry of the residuals. The new diagnostic has been calibrated and optimized so that the resulting merger sample is very complete. However, the contamination by non-mergers is also high. If the same optimization method is adopted for combinations of other structural parameters such as the CAS system, the merger indicator we introduce yields merger samples of equal or higher statistical quality than the samples obtained through the use of other structural parameters. We explore the ability of the method presented here to select minor mergers by identifying a sample of visually classified mergers that would not have been picked up by the use of the CAS system, when using its usual limits. Given the low prevalence of mergers among the general population of galaxies and the optimization used here, we find that the merger diagnostic introduced in this work is best used as a negative merger test, i.e., it is very effective at selecting non-merging galaxies. As with all the currently available automatic methods, the sample of merger candidates selected is contaminated by non-mergers, and further steps are needed to produce a clean sample. This merger diagnostic has been developed using the HST/ACS F606W images of the A901/02 cluster (z=0.165) obtained by the STAGES team. In particular, we have focused on a mass and magnitude limited sample (log M/M_{O}>9.0, R_{Vega}<23.5mag)) which includes 905 cluster galaxies and 655 field galaxies of all morphological types.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1108.6206  [pdf] - 1083721
The environmental dependence of the structure of outer galactic discs in STAGES spiral galaxies
Comments: Accepted to MNRAS. Appendix A available at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~ppxdtm/STAGES_profiles_appendix.pdf
Submitted: 2011-08-31
We present an analysis of V-band radial surface brightness profiles for spiral galaxies from the field and cluster environments using Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging and data from the Space Telescope A901/2 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES). We use a large sample of ~330 face-on to intermediately inclined spiral galaxies and assess the effect of the galaxy environment on the azimuthally averaged radial surface brightness mu profiles for each galaxy in the outer stellar disc (24 < mu < 26.5 mag per sq arcsec). For galaxies with a purely exponential outer disc (~50 per cent), we determine the significance of an environmental dependence on the outer disc scalelength h_out. For galaxies with a broken exponential in their outer disc, either down-bending (truncation, ~10 per cent) or up-bending (anti-truncation, ~40 per cent), we measure the strength T (outer-to-inner scalelength ratio, log_10(h_out/h_in) of the mu breaks and determine the significance of an environmental dependence on break strength T. Surprisingly, we find no evidence to suggest any such environmental dependence on either outer disc scalelength h_out or break strength T, implying that the galaxy environment is not affecting the stellar distribution in the outer stellar disc. We also find that for galaxies with small effective radii (r_e < 3 kpc) there is a lack of outer disc truncations in both the field and cluster environments. Our results suggest that the stellar distribution in the outer disc of spiral galaxies is not significantly affected by the galaxy environment.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.4190  [pdf] - 1077437
Flares and Proper Motions of Ground-State OH Masers in W75N
Comments: 14 pages, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-06-21
The star-forming region W75N hosts bright OH masers that are observed to be variable. We present observations taken in 2008 of the ground-state OH maser transitions with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and the Multi-Element Radio-Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) and with the Nancay Radio Telescope in 2011. Several of the masers in W75N were observed to be flaring, with the brightest 1720-MHz maser in excess of 400 Jy. The 1720-MHz masers appear to be associated with the continuum source VLA 1, unlike the bright flaring 1665- and 1667-MHz masers, which are associated with VLA 2. The 1720-MHz masers are located in an outflow traced by water masers and are indicative of very dense molecular material near the H II region. The magnetic field strengths are larger in the 1720-MHz maser region than in most regions hosting only main-line OH masers. The density falls off along the outflow, and the order of appearance of different transitions of OH masers is consistent with theoretical models. The 1665- and 1667-MHz VLBA data are compared against previous epochs over a time baseline of over 7 years. The median maser motion is 3.5 km/s, with a scatter that is comparable to thermal turbulence. The general pattern of maser proper motions observed in the 1665- and 1667-MHz transitions is consistent with previous observations.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.3386  [pdf] - 359974
The extended atmospheres of Mira variables probed by VLTI, VLBA, and APEX
Comments: 5 pages, to appear in Proc. of "Why Galaxies Care About AGB Stars II", ASP Conf. Ser., Franz Kerschbaum, Thomas Lebzelter, and Bob Wing (eds.)
Submitted: 2011-05-17
We present an overview on our project to study the extended atmospheres and dust formation zones of Mira stars using coordinated observations with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). The data are interpreted using an approach of combining recent dynamic model atmospheres with a radiative transfer model of the dust shell, and combining the resulting model structure with a maser propagation model.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.1089  [pdf] - 1076442
The 43GHz SiO maser in the circumstellar envelope of the AGB star R Cassiopeiae
Comments: 12 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2011-05-05
We present multi-epoch, total intensity, high-resolution images of 43GHz, v=1, J=1-0 SiO maser emission toward the Mira variable R Cas. In total we have 23 epochs of data for R Cas at approximate monthly intervals over an optical pulsation phase range from 0.158 to 1.78. These maps show a ring-like distribution of the maser features in a shell, which is assumed to be centred on the star at a radius of 1.6 to 2.3 times the stellar radii. It is clear from these images that the maser emission is significantly extended around the star. At some epochs a faint outer arc can be seen at 2.2 stellar radii. The intensity of the emission waxes and wanes during the stellar phase. Some maser features are seen infalling as well as outflowing. We have made initial comparisons of our data with models by Gray et. al. (2009).
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1103.3913  [pdf] - 1052850
Major structures of the inner Galaxy delineated by 6.7-GHz methanol masers
Comments: 35 pages, 11 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2011-03-20
We explore the longitude-velocity distribution of 6.7-GHz methanol masers in the context of the inner structure of our Galaxy. We analyse the correlation in velocities within this distribution and identify density enhancements indicating large-scale regions of enhanced star formation. These are interpreted as the starting points of the spiral arms and the interaction of the Galactic bar with the 3-kpc arms. The methanol masers support the presence of a long thin bar with a 45 degree orientation. Signatures of the full 3-kpc arm structure are seen, including a prominent tangent at approximately -22 degrees Galactic longitude. We compare this distribution with existing models of the gas dynamics of our Galaxy. The 3-kpc arm structure appears likely to correspond to the radius of corotation resonance of the bar, with the bar on its inner surface and the starting points of the spiral arms on its outer surface.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.3050  [pdf] - 1033750
The 6-GHz methanol multibeam maser catalogue II: Galactic longitudes 6 to 20
Comments: 25 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-07-18
We present the second portion of an unbiased survey of the Galactic plane for 6668-MHz methanol masers. This section of the survey spans the longitude range 6 degrees to 20 degrees. We report the detection of 119 maser sources, of which 42 are new discoveries. The masers are tightly constrained to the Galactic plane, with only four outside a latitude range of +/- 1 degree. This longitude region includes the brightest known 6668-MHz methanol maser, 9.621+0.196, as well as the two brightest newly discovered sources in the southern survey as a whole. We list all the sources associated with the 3-kpc arms within +/- 15 degrees longitude and consider further candidates beyond 15 degrees longitude. We identify three new sources associated with the Galactic bar and comment on the density of masers in relation to the bar orientation.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:0908.3824  [pdf] - 951059
Search for gravitational-wave bursts associated with gamma-ray bursts using data from LIGO Science Run 5 and Virgo Science Run 1
LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Acernese, F.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Alshourbagy, M.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Aoudia, S.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Armor, P.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M.; Benacquista, M.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bigotta, S.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Boccara, C.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogue, L.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Broeck, C. Van Den; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Brunet, G.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bullington, A.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Carbognani, F.; Cardenas, L.; Caride, S.; Castaldi, G.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R. C.; Corda, C.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Coulon, J. -P.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dari, A.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dueck, J.; Duke, I.; Dumas, J. -C.; Dwyer, J. G.; Echols, C.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Faltas, Y.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J. -D.; Franc, J.; Franzen, A.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goeßzetler, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Granata, M.; Granata, V.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grimaldi, F.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Guidi, G.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G. D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Isogai, T.; Ito, M.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; de la Jordana, L. Sancho; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, R.; Khazanov, E.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; La Penna, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, H.; Lei, M.; Leindecker, N.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, C.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Longo, M.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lu, P.; Lubinski, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mackowski, J. -M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McIntyre, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; McKenzie, K.; Mehmet, M.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Menzinger, F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minelli, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mino, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moreau, J.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Morioka, T.; Mors, K.; Mosca, S.; Moscatelli, V.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; MowLowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Muhammad, D.; Mühlen, H. zur; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, H.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Numata, K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Pardi, S.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Punken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabaste, O.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raics, Z.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Salemi, F.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Scanlan, M.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; van der Sluys, M. V.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Stein, A.; Stein, L. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K. -X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, Patrick J.; Swinkels, B.; Szokoly, G. P.; Talukder, D.; Tang, L.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Terenzi, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Trummer, J.; Ugolini, D.; Ulmen, J.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; Brand, J. F. J. van den; van der Putten, S.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; van Veggel, A. A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.
Comments: 16 pages, 3 figures. Updated references. To appear in ApJ.
Submitted: 2009-08-26, last modified: 2010-04-07
We present the results of a search for gravitational-wave bursts associated with 137 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments during the fifth LIGO science run and first Virgo science run. The data used in this analysis were collected from 2005 November 4 to 2007 October 1, and most of the GRB triggers were from the Swift satellite. The search uses a coherent network analysis method that takes into account the different locations and orientations of the interferometers at the three LIGO-Virgo sites. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave burst signals associated with this sample of GRBs. Using simulated short-duration (<1 s) waveforms, we set upper limits on the amplitude of gravitational waves associated with each GRB. We also place lower bounds on the distance to each GRB under the assumption of a fixed energy emission in gravitational waves, with typical limits of D ~ 15 Mpc (E_GW^iso / 0.01 M_o c^2)^1/2 for emission at frequencies around 150 Hz, where the LIGO-Virgo detector network has best sensitivity. We present astrophysical interpretations and implications of these results, and prospects for corresponding searches during future LIGO-Virgo runs.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.3583  [pdf] - 554112
Searches for gravitational waves from known pulsars with S5 LIGO data
The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Acernese, F.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Alshourbagy, M.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Aoudia, S.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Armor, P.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M.; Benacquista, M.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bigotta, S.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Boccara, C.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogue, L.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Broeck, C. Van Den; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Brunet, G.; Budzynski, R.; Bulik, T.; Bullington, A.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Carbognani, F.; Cardenas, L.; Caride, S.; Castaldi, G.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R. C.; Corda, C.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Coulon, J. -P.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dari, A.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dueck, J.; Duke, I.; Dumas, J. -C.; Dwyer, J. G.; Echols, C.; Edgar, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Faltas, Y.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J. -D.; Franc, J.; Franzen, A.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Granata, M.; Granata, V.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grimaldi, F.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Guidi, G.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G. D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Isogai, T.; Ito, M.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; de la Jordana, L. Sancho; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, R.; Khazanov, E.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; La Penna, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, H.; Lei, M.; Leindecker, N.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, C.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Longo, M.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lu, P.; Lubinski, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mackowski, J. -M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McIntyre, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; McKenzie, K.; Mehmet, M.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Menzinger, F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minelli, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mino, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moreau, J.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Morioka, T.; Mors, K.; Mosca, S.; Moscatelli, V.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; MowLowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Muhammad, D.; Mühlen, H. zur; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, H.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Numata, K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Pardi, S.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabaste, O.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raics, Z.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Salemi, F.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Scanlan, M.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; van der Sluys, M. V.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Stein, A.; Stein, L. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K. -X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szokoly, G. P.; Talukder, D.; Tang, L.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Terenzi, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Trummer, J.; Ugolini, D.; Ulmen, J.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; Brand, J. F. J. van den; van der Putten, S.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; van Veggel, A. A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Bégin, S.; Corongiu, A.; D'Amico, N.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hobbs, G. B.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Marshall, F. E.; Middleditch, J.; Possenti, A.; Ransom, S. M.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B.
Comments: 39 pages, 5 figures, Accepted in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2009-09-19, last modified: 2010-02-26
We present a search for gravitational waves from 116 known millisecond and young pulsars using data from the fifth science run of the LIGO detectors. For this search ephemerides overlapping the run period were obtained for all pulsars using radio and X-ray observations. We demonstrate an updated search method that allows for small uncertainties in the pulsar phase parameters to be included in the search. We report no signal detection from any of the targets and therefore interpret our results as upper limits on the gravitational wave signal strength. The most interesting limits are those for young pulsars. We present updated limits on gravitational radiation from the Crab pulsar, where the measured limit is now a factor of seven below the spin-down limit. This limits the power radiated via gravitational waves to be less than ~2% of the available spin-down power. For the X-ray pulsar J0537-6910 we reach the spin-down limit under the assumption that any gravitational wave signal from it stays phase locked to the X-ray pulses over timing glitches, and for pulsars J1913+1011 and J1952+3252 we are only a factor of a few above the spin-down limit. Of the recycled millisecond pulsars several of the measured upper limits are only about an order of magnitude above their spin-down limits. For these our best (lowest) upper limit on gravitational wave amplitude is 2.3x10^-26 for J1603-7202 and our best (lowest) limit on the inferred pulsar ellipticity is 7.0x10^-8 for J2124-3358.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.2475  [pdf] - 1025161
The 6-GHz methanol multibeam maser catalogue I: Galactic Centre region, longitudes 345 to 6
Comments: 35 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2010-02-12
We have conducted a Galactic plane survey of methanol masers at 6668 MHz using a 7-beam receiver on the Parkes telescope. Here we present results from the first part, which provides sensitive unbiased coverage of a large region around the Galactic Centre. Details are given for 183 methanol maser sites in the longitude range 345$^{\circ}$ through the Galactic Centre to 6$^{\circ}$. Within 6$^{\circ}$ of the Centre, we found 88 maser sites, of which more than half (48) are new discoveries. The masers are confined to a narrow Galactic latitude range, indicative of many sources at the Galactic Centre distance and beyond, and confined to a thin disk population; there is no high latitude population that might be ascribed to the Galactic Bulge. Within 2$^{\circ}$ of the Galactic Centre the maser velocities all lie between -60 and +77 \kms, a range much smaller than the 540 \kms range observed in CO. Elsewhere, the maser with highest positive velocity (+107 \kms) occurs, surprisingly, near longitude 355$^{\circ}$ and is probably attributable to the Galactic bar. The maser with the most negative velocity (-127 \kms) is near longitude 346$^{\circ}$, within the longitude-velocity locus of the near side of the `3-kpc arm'. It has the most extreme velocity of a clear population of masers associated with the near and far sides of the 3-kpc arm. Closer to the Galactic Centre the maser space density is generally low, except within 0.25 kpc of the Centre itself, the `Galactic Centre Zone', where it is 50 times higher, which is hinted at by the longitude distribution, and confirmed by the unusual velocities.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.1067  [pdf] - 33518
Barred disks in dense environments
Comments: 7 pages, 2 figures; To appear in "Tumbling, twisting, and winding galaxies: Pattern speeds along the Hubble sequence", E. M. Corsini and V. P. Debattista (eds.), Memorie della Societa` Astronomica Italiana
Submitted: 2010-02-04
We investigate the properties of bright (MV <= -18) barred and unbarred disks in the Abell 901/902 cluster system at z~0.165 with the STAGES HST ACS survey. To identify and characterize bars, we use ellipse-fitting. We use visual classification, a Sersic cut, and a color cut to select disk galaxies, and find that the latter two methods miss 31% and 51%, respectively of disk galaxies identified through visual classification. This underscores the importance of carefully selecting the disk sample in cluster environments. However, we find that the global optical bar fraction in the clusters is ~30% regardless of the method of disk selection. We study the relationship of the optical bar fraction to host galaxy properties, and find that the optical bar fraction depends strongly on the luminosity of the galaxy and whether it hosts a prominent bulge or is bulgeless. Within a given absolute magnitude bin, the optical bar fraction increases for galaxies with no significant bulge component. Within each morphological type bin, the optical bar fraction increases for brighter galaxies. We find no strong trend (variations larger than a factor of 1.3) for the optical bar fraction with local density within the cluster between the core and virial radius (R ~ 0.25 to 1.2 Mpc). We discuss the implications of our results for the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.0704  [pdf] - 1018206
Relating basic properties of bright early-type dwarf galaxies to their location in Abell 901/902
Comments: 12 pages, 8 figures, accepted for publication in A&A, typo corrected in abstract
Submitted: 2009-11-04, last modified: 2009-11-05
We present a study of the population of bright early-type dwarf galaxies in the multiple-cluster system Abell 901/902. We use data from the STAGES survey and COMBO-17 to investigate the relation between the color and structural properties of the dwarfs and their location in the cluster. The definition of the dwarf sample is based on the central surface brightness and includes galaxies in the luminosity range -16 >= M_B >~-19 mag. Using a fit to the color magnitude relation of the dwarfs, our sample is divided into a red and blue subsample. We find a color-density relation in the projected radial distribution of the dwarf sample: at the same luminosity dwarfs with redder colors are located closer to the cluster centers than their bluer counterparts. Furthermore, the redder dwarfs are on average more compact and rounder than the bluer dwarfs. These findings are consistent with theoretical expectations assuming that bright early-type dwarfs are the remnants of transformed late-type disk galaxies involving processes such as ram pressure stripping and galaxy harassment. This indicates that a considerable fraction of dwarf elliptical galaxies in clusters are the results of transformation processes related to interactions with their host cluster.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.5718  [pdf] - 902240
Interacting Galaxies in the A901/902 Supercluster with STAGES
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ. 34 pages, 16 figures. Version with full resolution figures available at: http://www.as.utexas.edu/~alh/apj/int/ ; updated abridged abstract
Submitted: 2009-10-29, last modified: 2009-10-30
We present a study of galaxy mergers and the influence of environment in the Abell 901/902 supercluster at z~0.165. We use HST ACS F606W data from the STAGES survey, COMBO-17, Spitzer 24um, and XMM-Newton X-ray data. Our analysis utilizes both a visual classification system, and quantitative CAS parameters to identify systems which show evidence of a recent or ongoing merger of mass ratio >1/10. Our results are: (1) After visual classification and minimizing the contamination from false projection pairs, we find that the merger fraction f_merge is 0.023+/-0.007. The estimated fractions of likely major mergers, likely minor mergers, and ambiguous cases are 0.01+/-0.004, 0.006+/-0.003, and 0.007+/-0.003, respectively. (2) The mergers lie outside the cluster core of radius R < 0.25 Mpc: the lack of mergers in the core is likely due to the large galaxy velocity dispersion in the core. Mergers populate the region (0.25 Mpc < R <= 2 Mpc) between the core and outskirt. In this region, the estimated frequency of mergers is similar to those seen at typical group overdensities. This suggests ongoing growth of the clusters via accretion of group and field galaxies. (3) We compare our observed merger fraction with those reported in other clusters and groups out to z~0.4. Existing data points on the merger fraction for L<= L* galaxies in clusters allow for a range of evolutionary scenarios. (4) The fraction of mergers, which lie on the blue cloud is 80%+/-18% versus 34%+/-7% for non-interacting galaxies, implying that interacting galaxies are preferentially blue. (5) The average SFR, based on UV or UV+IR data, is enhanced by a factor of ~1.5 to 2 in mergers compared to non-interacting galaxies. However, mergers in the clusters contribute only a small fraction (between 10% and 15%) of the total SFR density.(Abridged)
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.5665  [pdf] - 1018143
The environmental dependence of the stellar mass-size relation in STAGES galaxies
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-10-29
We present the stellar mass-size relations for elliptical, lenticular, and spiral galaxies in the field and cluster environments using HST/ACS imaging and data from the Space Telescope A901/2 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES). We use a large sample of ~1200 field and cluster galaxies, and a sub-sample of cluster core galaxies, and quantify the significance of any putative environmental dependence on the stellar mass-size relation. For elliptical, lenticular, and high-mass (log M*/M_sun > 10) spiral galaxies we find no evidence to suggest any such environmental dependence, implying that internal drivers are governing their size evolution. For intermediate/low-mass spirals (log M*/M_sun < 10) we find evidence, significant at the 2-sigma level, for a possible environmental dependence on galaxy sizes: the mean effective radius a_e for lower-mass spirals is ~15-20 per cent larger in the field than in the cluster. This is due to a population of low-mass large-a_e field spirals that are largely absent from the cluster environments. These large-a_e field spirals contain extended stellar discs not present in their cluster counterparts. This suggests the fragile extended stellar discs of these spiral galaxies may not survive the environmental conditions in the cluster. Our results suggest that internal physical processes are the main drivers governing the size evolution of galaxies, with the environment possibly playing a role affecting only the discs of intermediate/low-mass spirals.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.3728  [pdf] - 1003017
Less than 10 percent of star formation in z=0.6 massive galaxies is triggered by major interactions
Comments: Submitted to ApJ. 41 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2009-07-21
Both observations and simulations show that major tidal interactions or mergers between gas-rich galaxies can lead to intense bursts of starformation. Yet, the average enhancement in star formation rate (SFR) in major mergers and the contribution of such events to the cosmic SFR are not well estimated. Here we use photometric redshifts, stellar masses and UV SFRs from COMBO-17, 24 micron SFRs from Spitzer and morphologies from two deep HST cosmological survey fields (ECDFS/GEMS and A901/STAGES) to study the enhancement in SFR as a function of projected galaxy separation. We apply two-point projected correlation function techniques, which we augment with morphologically-selected very close pairs (separation <2 arcsec) and merger remnants from the HST imaging. Our analysis confirms that the most intensely star-forming systems are indeed interacting or merging. Yet, for massive (M* > 10^10 Msun) star-forming galaxies at 0.4<z<0.8, we find that the SFRs of galaxies undergoing a major interaction (mass ratios <1:4 and separations < 40 kpc) are only 1.80 +/- 0.30 times higher than the SFRs of non-interacting galaxies when averaged over all interactions and all stages of the interaction, in good agreement with other observational works. We demonstrate that these results imply that <10% of star formation at 0.4 < z < 0.8 is triggered directly by major mergers and interactions; these events are not important factors in the build-up of stellar mass since z=1.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:0906.0306  [pdf] - 1453819
Optically-passive spirals: The missing link in gradual star formation suppression upon cluster infall
Comments: Proceedings of "The Starburst-AGN connection" conference held in Shanghai, Oct 27-31, 2008
Submitted: 2009-06-01
Galaxies migrate from the blue cloud to the red sequence when their star formation is quenched. Here, we report on galaxies quenched by environmental effects and not by mergers or strong AGN as often invoked: They form stars at a reduced rate which is optically even less conspicuous, and manifest a transition population of blue spirals evolving into S0 galaxies. These 'optically passive' or 'red spirals' are found in large numbers in the STAGES project (and by Galaxy Zoo) in the infall region of clusters and groups.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.3066  [pdf] - 900707
Barred Galaxies in the Abell 901/2 Supercluster with STAGES
Comments: accepted for publication in ApJ, abstract abridged, for high resolution figures see http://www.as.utexas.edu/~marinova/STAGES/STAGES_bars.pdf
Submitted: 2009-04-20
We present a study of bar and host disk evolution in a dense cluster environment, based on a sample of ~800 bright (MV <= -18) galaxies in the Abell 901/2 supercluster at z~0.165. We use HST ACS F606W imaging from the STAGES survey, and data from Spitzer, XMM-Newton, and COMBO-17. We identify and characterize bars through ellipse-fitting, and other morphological features through visual classification. (1) We explore three commonly used methods for selecting disk galaxies. We find 625, 485, and 353 disk galaxies, respectively, via visual classification, a single component S'ersic cut (n <= 2.5), and a blue-cloud cut. In cluster environments, the latter two methods miss 31% and 51%, respectively, of visually-identified disks. (2) For moderately inclined disks, the three methods of disk selection yield a similar global optical bar fraction (f_bar-opt) of 34% +10%/-3%, 31% +10%/-3%, and 30% +10%/-3%, respectively. (3) f_bar-opt rises in brighter galaxies and those which appear to have no significant bulge component. Within a given absolute magnitude bin, f_bar-opt is higher in visually-selected disk galaxies that have no bulge as opposed to those with bulges. For a given morphological class, f_bar-opt rises at higher luminosities. (4) For bright early-types, as well as faint late-type systems with no evident bulge, the optical bar fraction in the Abell 901/2 clusters is comparable within a factor of 1.1 to 1.4 to that of field galaxies at lower redshifts (5) Between the core and the virial radius of the cluster at intermediate environmental densities, the optical bar fraction does not appear to depend strongly on the local environment density and varies at most by a factor of ~1.3. We discuss the implications of our results for the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.1373  [pdf] - 315805
Maser emission from SiO isotopologues traces the innermost 100 AU around Radio Source I in Orion BN/KL
Comments: 10 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication by ApJ
Submitted: 2009-04-08
We have used the Very Large Array (VLA) at 7 mm wavelength to image five rotational transitions (J=1-0) from three SiO isotopologues towards Orion BN/KL: 28SiO v=0,1,2; and 29SiO and 30SiO v=0. For the first time, we have mapped the 29SiO and 30SiO J=1-0 emission, established the maser nature of the emission, and confirmed association with the deeply embedded high-mass young stellar object commonly denoted radio Source I. The 28SiO v=0 maser emission shows a bipolar structure that extends over ~700 AU along a northeast-southwest axis, and we propose that it traces a bipolar outflow driven by Source I. The high-brightness isotopic SiO maser emission imaged with a ~0.2 arcsec resolution has a more compact distribution, generally similar to that of the 28SiO v=1,2 emission, and it probably traces bulk gas flows in a region of diameter <100 AU centered on Source I. On small scales of <10 AU, however, compact 29SiO/30SiO v=0 and 28SiO v=1,2 emission features may be offset from one another in position and line-of-sight velocity. From a radiative transfer analysis based on a large velocity gradient (LVG) pumping model, we derive similar temperatures and densities for the optimum excitation of both 29SiO/30SiO v=0 and 28SiO v=1,2 masers, significantly higher than required for 28SiO v=0 maser excitation. In order to account for the small-scale differences among the isotopologues (v=0) and the main species (v=1,2), follow-up radiative transfer modeling that incorporates non-local line overlap among transitions of all SiO isotopic species may be required.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.2042  [pdf] - 315075
Obscured star formation in intermediate-density environments: A Spitzer study of the Abell 901/902 supercluster
Comments: 18 pages, 14 figures, ApJ in press, corrected and added references
Submitted: 2008-09-11, last modified: 2008-12-18
We explore the amount of obscured star-formation as a function of environment in the A901/902 supercluster at z=0.165 in conjunction with a field sample drawn from the A901 and CDFS fields, imaged with HST as part of the STAGES and GEMS surveys. We combine the COMBO-17 near-UV/optical SED with Spitzer 24um photometry to estimate both the unobscured and obscured star formation in galaxies with Mstar>10^{10}Msun. We find that the star formation activity in massive galaxies is suppressed in dense environments, in agreement with previous studies. Yet, nearly 40% of the star-forming galaxies have red optical colors at intermediate and high densities. These red systems are not starbursting; they have star formation rates per unit stellar mass similar to or lower than blue star-forming galaxies. More than half of the red star-forming galaxies have low IR-to-UV luminosity ratios, relatively high Sersic indices and they are equally abundant at all densities. They might be gradually quenching their star-formation, possibly but not necessarily under the influence of gas-removing environmental processes. The other >40% of the red star-forming galaxies have high IR-to-UV luminosity ratios, indicative of high dust obscuration. They have relatively high specific star formation rates and are more abundant at intermediate densities. Our results indicate that while there is an overall suppression in the star-forming galaxy fraction with density, the small amount of star formation surviving the cluster environment is to a large extent obscured, suggesting that environmental interactions trigger a phase of obscured star formation, before complete quenching.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.3873  [pdf] - 18830
The STAGES view of red spirals and dusty red galaxies: Mass-dependent quenching of star-formation in cluster infall
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2008-11-24
We investigate the properties of optically passive spirals and dusty red galaxies in the A901/2 cluster complex at redshift ~0.17 using restframe near-UV-optical SEDs, 24 micron IR data and HST morphologies from the STAGES dataset. The cluster sample is based on COMBO-17 redshifts with an rms precision of sigma_cz~2000 km/sec. We find that 'dusty red galaxies' and 'optically passive spirals' in A901/2 are largely the same phenomenon, and that they form stars at a substantial rate, which is only 4x lower than that in blue spirals at fixed mass. This star formation is more obscured than in blue galaxies and its optical signatures are weak. They appear predominantly in the stellar mass range of log M*/Msol=[10,11] where they constitute over half of the star-forming galaxies in the cluster; they are thus a vital ingredient for understanding the overall picture of star formation quenching in clusters. We find that the mean specific SFR of star-forming galaxies in the cluster is clearly lower than in the field, in contrast to the specific SFR properties of blue galaxies alone, which appear similar in cluster and field. Such a rich red spiral population is best explained if quenching is a slow process and morphological transformation is delayed even more. At log M*/Msol<10, such galaxies are rare, suggesting that their quenching is fast and accompanied by morphological change. We note, that edge-on spirals play a minor role; despite being dust-reddened they form only a small fraction of spirals independent of environment.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.3890  [pdf] - 18832
STAGES: the Space Telescope A901/2 Galaxy Evolution Survey
Comments: 29 pages, 22 figures; accepted to MNRAS. Full data release available at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/astronomy/stages
Submitted: 2008-11-24
We present an overview of the Space Telescope A901/2 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES). STAGES is a multiwavelength project designed to probe physical drivers of galaxy evolution across a wide range of environments and luminosity. A complex multi-cluster system at z~0.165 has been the subject of an 80-orbit F606W HST/ACS mosaic covering the full 0.5x0.5 (~5x5 Mpc^2) span of the supercluster. Extensive multiwavelength observations with XMM-Newton, GALEX, Spitzer, 2dF, GMRT, and the 17-band COMBO-17 photometric redshift survey complement the HST imaging. Our survey goals include simultaneously linking galaxy morphology with other observables such as age, star-formation rate, nuclear activity, and stellar mass. In addition, with the multiwavelength dataset and new high resolution mass maps from gravitational lensing, we are able to disentangle the large-scale structure of the system. By examining all aspects of environment we will be able to evaluate the relative importance of the dark matter halos, the local galaxy density, and the hot X-ray gas in driving galaxy transformation. This paper describes the HST imaging, data reduction, and creation of a master catalogue. We perform Sersic fitting on the HST images and conduct associated simulations to quantify completeness. In addition, we present the COMBO-17 photometric redshift catalogue and estimates of stellar masses and star-formation rates for this field. We define galaxy and cluster sample selection criteria which will be the basis for forthcoming science analyses, and present a compilation of notable objects in the field. Finally, we describe the further multiwavelength observations and announce public access to the data and catalogues.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.2770  [pdf] - 18623
An Improved Model of SiO Maser Emission in Miras
Comments: accepted by MNRAS, MN-08-1478-MJ.R1
Submitted: 2008-11-17
We describe a combined dynamic atmosphere and maser propagation model of SiO maser emission in Mira variables. This model rectifies many of the defects of an earlier model of this type, particularly in relation to the infra-red (IR) radiation field generated by dust and various wavelength-dependent, optically thick layers. Modelled masers form in rings with radii consistent with those found in VLBI observations and with earlier models. This agreement requires the adoption of a radio photosphere of radius approximately twice that of the stellar photosphere, in agreement with observations. A radio photosphere of this size renders invisible certain maser sites with high amplification at low radii, and conceals high-velocity shocks, which are absent in radio continuum observations. The SiO masers are brightest at an optical phase of 0.1 to 0.25, which is consistent with observed phase-lags. Dust can have both mild and profound effects on the maser emission. Maser rings, a shock and the optically thick layer in the SiO pumping band at 8.13\micron appear to be closely associated in three out of four phase samples.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.5201  [pdf] - 17952
The 6-GHz Multibeam Maser Survey I. Techniques
Comments: 13 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication by MNRAS
Submitted: 2008-10-29
A new 7-beam 6-7 GHz receiver has been built to survey the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds for newly forming high-mass stars that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6668 MHz. The receiver was jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) and allows simultaneous coverage at 6668 and 6035 MHz. It was successfully commissioned at Parkes in January 2006 and is now being used to conduct the Parkes-Jodrell multibeam maser survey of the Milky Way. This will be the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane for masers of not only 6668-MHz methanol, but also 6035-MHz excited-state hydroxyl. The survey is two orders of magnitude faster than most previous systematic surveys and has an rms noise level of ~0.17 Jy.This paper describes the observational strategy, techniques and reduction procedures of the Galactic and Magellanic Cloud surveys, together with deeper, pointed, follow-up observations and complementary observations with other instruments. It also includes an estimate of the survey detection efficiency. The 111 days of observations with the Parkes telescope have so far yielded >800 methanol sources, of which ~350 are new discoveries. The whole project will provide the first comprehensive Galaxy-wide catalogue of 6668-MHz and 6035-MHz masers.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.4758  [pdf] - 1530028
Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar
The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Armor, P.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bastarrika, M.; Bayer, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Brunet, G.; Bullington, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Casebolt, T.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Cokelaer, T.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, R. M.; Dalrymple, J.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Duke, I.; Dumas, J. -C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Echols, C.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Flasch, K.; Fotopoulos, N.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimaldi, F.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayama, K.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Hennessy, M.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Ito, M.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, ÂG.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamat, S.; Kanner, J.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Khan, R.; Khazanov, E.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Kozhevatov, I.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lang, M. M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leindecker, N.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Lubinski, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McIntyre, G.; McIvor, G.; McKechan, D.; McKenzie, K.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Miller, J.; Minelli, J.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; MowLowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, H.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Petrie, T.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramsunder, M.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; de la Jordana, L. Sancho; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Schediwy, S. W.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Stein, L. C.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K. -X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ulmen, J.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Broeck, C. Van Den; van der Sluys, M.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zweizig, J.; Santostasi, G.
Comments: Accepted for Ap. J. Lett. Minor changes in results due to calibration correction
Submitted: 2008-05-30, last modified: 2008-07-22
We present direct upper limits on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar using data from the first nine months of the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). These limits are based on two searches. In the first we assume that the gravitational wave emission follows the observed radio timing, giving an upper limit on gravitational wave emission that beats indirect limits inferred from the spin-down and braking index of the pulsar and the energetics of the nebula. In the second we allow for a small mismatch between the gravitational and radio signal frequencies and interpret our results in the context of two possible gravitational wave emission mechanisms.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.3886  [pdf] - 1453807
Galaxy Evolution in Dense Environments: Properties of Interacting Galaxies in the A901/02 Supercluster
Comments: To appear in the proceedings of "Formation and Evolution of Galaxy Disks", Rome, October 2007, Eds. J. Funes and E. M. Corsini. 2 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2008-02-26
We present a study of galaxies in the STAGES survey of the Abell 901/902 supercluster at z~0.165, based on HST ACS F606W, COMBO-17, Spitzer 24um, XMM-Newton X-ray, and gravitational lensing maps. We characterize galaxies with strong, externally-triggered morphological distortions and normal, relatively undisturbed galaxies, using visual classification and quantitative CAS parameters. We compare normal and distorted galaxies in terms of their frequency, distribution within the cluster, star formation properties, and relationship to dark matter (DM) or surface mass density, and intra-cluster medium (ICM) density. We report here our preliminary results.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.3910  [pdf] - 10459
Characterizing Barred Galaxies in the Abell 901/902 Supercluster
Comments: to appear in the ASP conference proceedings of the "Frank N. Bash Symposium 2007: New Horizons in Astronomy", editors: A. Frebel, J. Maund, J. Shen, M. Siegel
Submitted: 2008-02-26
In dense clusters, higher densities at early epochs as well as physical processes, such as ram pressure stripping and tidal interactions become important, and can have direct consequences for the evolution of bars and their host disks. To study bars and disks as a function of environment, we are using the STAGES ACS HST survey of the Abell 901/902 supercluster (z~0.165), along with earlier field studies based the SDSS and the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey (OSUBSGS). We explore the limitations of traditional methods for characterizing the bar fraction, and in particular highlight uncertainties in disk galaxy selection in cluster environments. We present an alternative approach for exploring the proportion of bars, and investigate the properties of bars as a function of host galaxy color, Sersic index, stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), specific SFR, and morphology.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.3908  [pdf] - 1453808
Morphological Transformations of Galaxies in the A901/02 Supercluster from STAGES
Comments: To appear in the ASP conference proceedings of the "Frank N. Bash Symposium 2007: New Horizons in Astronomy", Eds. A. Frebel, J. Maund, J. Shen, M. Siegel. 4 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2008-02-26
We present a study of galaxies in the Abell 901/902 Supercluster at z~0.165, based on HST ACS F606W, COMBO-17, Spitzer 24um, XMM-Newton X-ray, and gravitational lensing maps, as part of the STAGES survey. We characterize galaxies with strong externally-triggered morphological distortions and normal relatively undisturbed galaxies, using visual classification and quantitative CAS parameters. We compare normal and distorted galaxies in terms of their frequency, distribution within the cluster, star formation properties, and relationship to dark matter (DM) or surface mass density, and intra-cluster medium (ICM) density. We revisit the morphology density relation, which postulates a higher fraction of early type galaxies in dense environments, by considering separately galaxies with a low bulge-to-disk (B/D) ratio and a low gas content as these two parameters may not be correlated in clusters. We report here on our preliminary analysis.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.1156  [pdf] - 8764
The dark matter environment of the Abell 901/902 supercluster: a weak lensing analysis of the HST STAGES survey
Comments: 13 pages, 6 figures and 4 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2008-01-07
We present a high resolution dark matter reconstruction of the z=0.165 Abell 901/902 supercluster from a weak lensing analysis of the HST STAGES survey. We detect the four main structures of the supercluster at high significance, resolving substructure within and between the clusters. We find that the distribution of dark matter is well traced by the cluster galaxies, with the brightest cluster galaxies marking out the strongest peaks in the dark matter distribution. We also find a significant extension of the dark matter distribution of Abell 901a in the direction of an infalling X-ray group Abell 901alpha. We present mass, mass-to-light and mass-to-stellar mass ratio measurements of the structures and substructures that we detect. We find no evidence for variation of the mass-to-light and mass-to-stellar mass ratio between the different clusters. We compare our space-based lensing analysis with an earlier ground-based lensing analysis of the supercluster to demonstrate the importance of space-based imaging for future weak lensing dark matter 'observations'.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.0384  [pdf] - 170194
Multibeam Maser Survey of methanol and excited OH in the Magellanic Clouds: new detections and maser abundance estimates
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication by MNRAS
Submitted: 2008-01-02
We present the results of the first complete survey of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds for 6668-MHz methanol and 6035-MHz excited-state hydroxyl masers. In addition to the survey, higher-sensitivity targeted searches towards known star-formation regions were conducted. The observations yielded the discovery of a fourth 6668-MHz methanol maser in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), found towards the star-forming region N160a, and a second 6035-MHz excited-state hydroxyl maser, found towards N157a. We have also re-observed the three previously known 6668-MHz methanol masers and the single 6035-MHz hydroxyl maser. We failed to detect emission from either transition in the Small Magellanic Cloud. All observations were initially made using the Methanol Multibeam (MMB) survey receiver on the 64-m Parkes telescope as part of the MMB project and accurate positions have been measured with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We compare the maser populations in the Magellanic Clouds with those of our Galaxy and discuss their implications for the relative rates of massive star-formation, heavy metal abundance, and the abundance of complex molecules. The LMC maser populations are demonstrated to be smaller than their Milky Way counterparts. Methanol masers are under-abundant by a factor of ~45, whilst hydroxyl and water masers are a factor of ~10 less abundant than our Galaxy.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:0707.1517  [pdf] - 2966
Environmental dependence of AGN activity in the supercluster A901/2
Comments: 20 pages, 15 figures. MNRAS accepted. Version with full resolution figures, including Figure 14, is available at http://www.sc.eso.org/~rgilmour/
Submitted: 2007-07-10
We present XMM data for the supercluster A901/2, at z ~ 0.17, which is combined with deep imaging and 17-band photometric redshifts (from the COMBO-17 survey), 2dF spectra and Spitzer 24um data, to identify AGN in the supercluster. The 90ksec XMM image contains 139 point sources, of which 11 are identified as supercluster AGN with L_X(0.5-7.5keV) > 1.7x10^41 erg/cm2/s. The host galaxies have M_R < -20 and only 2 of 8 sources with spectra could have been identified as AGN by the detected optical emission lines. Using a large sample of 795 supercluster galaxies we define control samples of massive galaxies with no detected AGN. The local environments of the AGN and control samples differ at >98 per cent significance. The AGN host galaxies lie predominantly in areas of moderate projected galaxy density and with more local blue galaxies than the control sample, with the exception of one very bright Type I AGN very near the centre of a cluster. These environments are similar to, but not limited to, cluster outskirts and blue groups. Despite the large number of potential host galaxies, no AGN are found in regions with the highest galaxy density (excluding some cluster cores where emission from the ICM obscures moderate luminosity AGN). AGN are also absent from the areas with lowest galaxy density. We conclude that the prevalence of cluster AGN is linked to their environment.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610284  [pdf] - 85708
Cosmological constraints from COMBO-17 using 3D weak lensing
Comments: 10 pages, 4 figures. Accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-10-10, last modified: 2007-05-17
We present the first application of the 3D cosmic shear method developed in Heavens et al. (2006) and the geometric shear-ratio analysis developed in Taylor et al. (2006), to the COMBO-17 data set. 3D cosmic shear has been used to analyse galaxies with redshift estimates from two random COMBO-17 fields covering 0.52 square degrees in total, providing a conditional constraint in the (sigma_8, Omega_m) plane as well as a conditional constraint on the equation of state of dark energy, parameterised by a constant w= p/rho c^2. The (sigma_8, Omega_m) plane analysis constrained the relation between sigma_8 and Omega_m to be sigma_8(Omega_m/0.3)^{0.57 +- 0.19}=1.06 +0.17 -0.16, in agreement with a 2D cosmic shear analysis of COMBO-17. The 3D cosmic shear conditional constraint on w using the two random fields is w=-1.27 +0.64 -0.70. The geometric shear-ratio analysis has been applied to the A901/2 field, which contains three small galaxy clusters. Combining the analysis from the A901/2 field, using the geometric shear-ratio analysis, and the two random fields, using 3D cosmic shear, w is conditionally constrained to w=-1.08 +0.63 -0.58. The errors presented in this paper are shown to agree with Fisher matrix predictions made in Heavens et al. (2006) and Taylor et al. (2006). When these methods are applied to large datasets, as expected soon from surveys such as Pan-STARRS and VST-KIDS, the dark energy equation of state could be constrained to an unprecedented degree of accuracy.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:0704.0774  [pdf] - 147
Galaxy morphologies and environment in the Abell 901/902 supercluster from COMBO-17
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 7 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2007-04-05
We present a morphological study of galaxies in the A901/902 supercluster from the COMBO-17 survey. A total of 570 galaxies with photometric redshifts in the range 0.155 < z_phot < 0.185 are visually classified by three independent classifiers to M_V=-18. These morphological classifications are compared to local galaxy density, distance from the nearest cluster centre, local surface mass density from weak lensing, and photometric classification. At high local galaxy densities, log(Sigma_10 /Mpc^2) > 1.5, a classical morphology-density relation is found. A correlation is also found between morphology and local projected surface mass density, but no trend is observed with distance to the nearest cluster. This supports the finding that local environment is more important to galaxy morphology than global cluster properties. The breakdown of the morphological catalogue by colour shows a dominance of blue galaxies in the galaxies displaying late-type morphologies and a corresponding dominance of red galaxies in the early-type population. Using the 17-band photometry from COMBO-17, we further split the supercluster red sequence into old passive galaxies and galaxies with young stars and dust according to the prescription of Wolf et al. (2005). We find that the dusty star-forming population describes an intermediate morphological group between late-type and early-type galaxies, supporting the hypothesis that field and group spiral galaxies are transformed into S0s and, perhaps, ellipticals during cluster infall.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0611935  [pdf] - 87321
Morphology-dependent trends of galaxy age with environment in Abell 901/902 seen with COMBO-17
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS (Letters)
Submitted: 2006-11-30
We investigate correlations between galaxy age and environment in the Abell 901/2 supercluster for separate morphologies. Using COMBO-17 data, we define a sample of 530 galaxies, complete at $M_V -5\log h<-18$ on an area of $3.5\times 3.5$ (Mpc/$h$)$^2$. We explore several age indicators including an extinction-corrected residual from the colour-magnitude relation (CMR). As a result, we find a clear trend of age with density for galaxies of all morphologies that include a spheroidal component, in the sense that galaxies in denser environments are older. This trend is not seen among Scd/Irr galaxies since they all have young ages. However, the trend among the other types is stronger for fainter galaxies. While we also see an expected age-morphology relation, we find no evidence for a morphology-density relation at fixed age.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0611709  [pdf] - 87095
Pumping of OH Main-Line Masers in Star-Forming Regions
Comments: 13 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-11-22
Pumping routes of masers can in principle be recovered from a small matrix of master equations, at an advanced stage of elimination, by tracing back the coefficients to a set of unmodified all-process rate coefficients, drawn from those which appeared in the original set of master equations, prior to any elimination operations. The traceback is achieved by logging the operations carried out on each coefficient. There is no guarantee that a pumping scheme can be represented as a small set of important routes in this way. In the present work, the traceback method is applied to a model which is typical of a large volume of parameter space which produces very strong inversions in the main lines of the rotational ground state of OH, at 1665- and 1667-MHz. For both lines, the pumping scheme is largely restricted to the $^{2}\Pi_{3/2}$ stack of rotational levels, and it is possible to list a comparatively small set of routes (less than ten) which provide more than 80 per cent of the inversion. In both cases, the strongest, and simplest, route consists of a radiative upward stage, to the $^{2}\Pi_{3/2}, J=5/2$ rotational level, followed by a collisional de-excitation to the rotational ground state.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0506112  [pdf] - 73512
The Shear TEsting Programme 1: Weak lensing analysis of simulated ground-based observations
Comments: 18 pages, 5 figures. Version accepted by MNRAS includes 2 extra explanatory figures and updated results for the Kuijken analysis (see astroph/0601011)
Submitted: 2005-06-06, last modified: 2006-02-09
The Shear TEsting Programme, STEP, is a collaborative project to improve the accuracy and reliability of all weak lensing measurements in preparation for the next generation of wide-field surveys. In this first STEP paper we present the results of a blind analysis of simulated ground-based observations of relatively simple galaxy morphologies. The most successful methods are shown to achieve percent level accuracy. From the cosmic shear pipelines that have been used to constrain cosmology, we find weak lensing shear measured to an accuracy that is within the statistical errors of current weak lensing analyses, with shear measurements accurate to better than 7%. The dominant source of measurement error is shown to arise from calibration uncertainties where the measured shear is over or under-estimated by a constant multiplicative factor. This is of concern as calibration errors cannot be detected through standard diagnostic tests. The measured calibration errors appear to result from stellar contamination, false object detection, the shear measurement method itself, selection bias and/or the use of biased weights. Additive systematics (false detections of shear) resulting from residual point-spread function anisotropy are, in most cases, reduced to below an equivalent shear of 0.001, an order of magnitude below cosmic shear distortions on the scales probed by current surveys. Our results provide a snapshot view of the accuracy of current ground-based weak lensing methods and a benchmark upon which we can improve. To this end we provide descriptions of each method tested and include details of the eight different implementations of the commonly used Kaiser, Squires and Broadhurst (1995) method (KSB+) to aid the improvement of future KSB+ analyses.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0509327  [pdf] - 75909
OH megamasers, starburst and AGN activity in Markarian 231
Comments: 16 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2005-09-13
We present MERLIN observations of OH maser and radio continuum emission from the Ultra Luminous IR Galaxy Markarian 231. The 1665- and 1667-MHz transitions have a combined velocity extent of 720 km/s and show a similar position-velocity structure including a gradient of 1.7 km/s/pc from NW to SE along the 420-pc major axis, steeper in the inner few tens of pc. The maser distribution is modelled as a torus rotating about an axis inclined at ~45deg. We estimate the enclosed mass density to be 320(90) Msun in a flattened distribution, including a central unresolved mass of </=8E+06 Msun. All the maser emission is projected against a region with a radio continuum brightness temperature >/=1E+05 K, giving a maser gain of </=2.2. The 1667:1665-MHz line ratio is close to the LTE ratio of 1.8 consistent with radiatively pumped, unsaturated masers. The size of individual masing regions is in the range 0.25-4 pc with a covering factor close to unity. There are no very bright compact masers, in contrast to galaxies such as the Seyfert 2 Markarian 273 where the masing torus is viewed nearer edge-on. The comparatively modest maser amplification seen from Markarian 231 is consistent with its classification as a Seyfert 1. Most of the radio continuum emission on 50-500 pc scales is probably of starburst origin but the compact peak is 0.4 per cent polarized by a magnetic field running north-south, similar to the jet direction on these scales. There is no close correlation between maser and continuum intensity. Comparisons with other data show that the jet changes direction close the nucleus and suggest that the sub-kpc disc hosting the masers and starburst activity is severely warped.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0506150  [pdf] - 271851
Red-sequence galaxies with young stars and dust: The cluster Abell 901/902 seen with COMBO-17
Comments: accepted version, only minor changes and typos corrected, 17 pages in A&A print format
Submitted: 2005-06-07, last modified: 2005-08-06
We report the discovery of a rich component of dusty star-forming galaxies contaminating the red-sequence in the supercluster system comprising Abell 901a, 901b and A902 at redshift ~0.17. These galaxies do not fit into the colour-density relation, because their preferred habitat is different from that of regular red-sequence galaxies, which are typically dust-poor, old and passively evolving. The dusty red galaxies prefer the medium-density outskirts of clusters while being rare in both the low-density field and the high-density cluster cores. This new result is based on the information content in the medium-band photometry of the COMBO-17 survey. The photo-z accuracy of the ~800 brightest cluster galaxies is <0.01 and of the order of the velocity dispersion of the cluster. This enables us to select a rich and clean cluster sample, in which we can trace age-sensitive and dust-sensitive spectral features independently with the detailed medium-band SED data. We find the red colour of the dusty galaxies to be a result of dust extinction combined with relatively old stellar ages. We speculate that the dusty red galaxies could either be a product of minor mergers between established old red cluster galaxies with infalling blue field galaxies, or mark a period in the internal transformation of blue field galaxies into red cluster galaxies, which is triggered by the environmental influences experienced during cluster infall.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0507641  [pdf] - 74810
The symmetric dust shell and the central star of the bipolar planetary nebula NGC 6537
Comments: 10 pages, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2005-07-27
We present high-resolution images of the strongly bipolar planetary nebula NGC 6537, obtained with Hubble Space Telescope and with the infrared adaptive optics system on the Very Large Telescope. The central star is detected for the first time. Using the multi-band photometry and constraints from the dynamical age of the nebula, we derive a temperature in the range 1.5-2.5 10^5 K, a luminosity~10^3 L_sun and a core mass M_c~0.7-0.9 M_sun. The progenitor mass is probably in the range M_i = 3-7 M_sun. The extinction map shows a largely symmetric, and compact dust structure, which is most likely a shell, located at the neck of the bipolar flow, only 4 arcsec from the star. The dust shell traces a short-lived phase of very high mass loss at the end of the AGB. The dynamical age of the shell and bipolar lobes are very similar but the morphologies are very different. The data suggests that the mass loss during the ejection of the compact shell was largely spherically symmetric, and the pronounced bipolarity formed afterwards. The dynamical ages of the bipolar lobes and dust shell are similar, which is consistent with suggestions that bipolar structures form in a run-away event at the very last stages of the AGB mass loss. The inner edge of the dust shell is ionized, and PAH emission is seen just outside the ionized gas. We associate the PAH emission with the photo-dissociation region of the molecular shell.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0501028  [pdf] - 70140
Hidden bipolarity in red supergiant winds
Comments: 4 pages. 4 figures. Proceedings of the 7th European VLBI Network Symposium held in Toledo, Spain on October 12-15, 2004. Editors: R. Bachiller, F. Colomer, J.-F. Desmurs, P. de Vicente (Observatorio Astronomico Nacional), p. 209-212. Needs evn2004.cls
Submitted: 2005-01-03
Many observations of late-type M stars show large near-spherical circumstellar envelopes, yet planetary nebulae and supernova remnants are frequently axisymmetric. We present VLBI and MERLIN observations of masers around the red supergiant S Per which show varying degrees of axisymmetry and a dynamically significant magnetic field. There is no evidence for rotation here or in most similar objects. We examine possible origins of the magnetic field.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0412679  [pdf] - 70083
MERLIN 6-GHz maser emission from W3(OH)
Comments: 2 pages. 2 figures. Proceedings of the 7th European VLBI Network Symposium held in Toledo, Spain on October 12-15, 2004. Editors: R. Bachiller, F. Colomer, J.-F. Desmurs, P. de Vicente (Observatorio Astronomico Nacional), p. 199-200. Needs evn2004.cls
Submitted: 2004-12-30
We present the preliminary results of the first alignment to milliarsecond accuracy of the 6 GHz maser emission in OH and methanol maser lines toward W3(OH). The identifications of Zeeman pairs allowed us to infer the actual velocity of the OH material and the magnetic field strength at the location where 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission arises.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0407173  [pdf] - 66015
Angular diameters, fluxes and extinction of compact planetary nebulae: further evidence for steeper extinction towards the Bulge
Comments: Accepted by MNRAS. 17 pages, 9 figures (including 36 contour plots of PNe), 5 Tables (including 2 large tables of angular diameters, fluxes and extinction)
Submitted: 2004-07-08
We present values for angular diameter, flux and extinction for 70 Galactic planetary nebulae observed using narrow band filters. Angular diameters are derived using constant emissivity shell and photoionization line emission models. The mean of the results from these two models are presented as our best estimate. Contour plots of 36 fully resolved objects are included and the low intensity contours often reveal an elliptical structure that is not always apparent from FWHM measurements. Flux densities are determined, and for both H-alpha and O[III] there is little evidence of any systematic differences between observed and catalogued values. Observed H-alpha extinction values are determined using observed H-alpha and catalogued radio fluxes. H-alpha extinction values are also derived from catalogued H-alpha and H-beta flux values by means of an Rv dependent extinction law. Rv is then calculated in terms of observed extinction values and catalogued H-alpha and H-beta flux values. Comparing observed and catalogue extinction values for a subset of Bulge objects, observed values tend to be lower than catalogue values calculated with Rv = 3.1. For the same subset we calculate <Rv> = 2.0, confirming that toward the Bulge interstellar extinction is steeper than Rv = 3.1. For the inner Galaxy a relation with the higher supernova rate is suggested, and that the low-density warm ionized medium is the site of the anomalous extinction. Lowvalues of extinction are also derived using dust models with a turnover radius of 0.08 microns.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0403666  [pdf] - 63857
A catalogue of the Chandra Deep Field South with multi-colour classification and photometric redshifts from COMBO-17
Comments: submitted to Astronomy & Astrophysics, public data set available at http://www.mpia.de/COMBO/combo_index.html
Submitted: 2004-03-29
We present the COMBO-17 object catalogue of the Chandra Deep Field South for public use, covering a field which is 31.5' x 30' in size. This catalogue lists astrometry, photometry in 17 passbands from 350 to 930 nm, and ground-based morphological data for 63,501 objects. The catalogue also contains multi-colour classification into the categories 'Star', 'Galaxy' and 'Quasar' as well as photometric redshifts. We include restframe luminosities in Johnson, SDSS and Bessell passbands and estimated errors. The redshifts are most reliable at R<24, where the sample contains approximately 100 quasars, 1000 stars and 10000 galaxies. We use nearly 1000 spectroscopically identified objects in conjunction with detailed simulations to characterize the performance of COMBO-17. We show that the selection of quasars, more generally type-1 AGN, is nearly complete and minimally contaminated at z=[0.5,5] for luminosities above M_B=-21.7. Their photometric redshifts are accurate to roughly 5000 km/sec. Galaxy redshifts are accurate to 1% in dz/(1+z) at R<21. They degrade in quality for progressively fainter galaxies, reaching accuracies of 2% for galaxies with R~222 and of 10% for galaxies with R>24. The selection of stars is complete to R~23, and deeper for M stars. We also present an updated discussion of our classification technique with maps of survey completeness, and discuss possible failures of the statistical classification in the faint regime at R>24.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0403384  [pdf] - 63575
Evolution of the Dark Matter Distribution with 3-D Weak Lensing
Comments: 11 pages, 4 figures; submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2004-03-16
We present a direct detection of the growth of large-scale structure, using weak gravitational lensing and photometric redshift data from the COMBO-17 survey. We use deep R-band imaging of two 0.25 square degree fields, affording shear estimates for over 52000 galaxies; we combine these with photometric redshift estimates from our 17 band survey, in order to obtain a 3-D shear field. We find theoretical models for evolving matter power spectra and correlation functions, and fit the corresponding shear correlation functions to the data as a function of redshift. We detect the evolution of the power at the 7.7 sigma level given minimal priors, and measure the rate of evolution for 0<z<1. We also fit correlation functions to our 3-D data as a function of cosmological parameters sigma_8 and Omega_Lambda. We find joint constraints on Omega_Lambda and sigma_8, demonstrating an improvement in accuracy by a factor of 2 over that available from 2D weak lensing for the same area.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0402095  [pdf] - 62609
Mapping the 3-D dark matter with weak lensing in COMBO-17
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS; 21 pages, 18 figures
Submitted: 2004-02-04
We present a 3-dimensional lensing analysis of the z=0.16 supercluster A901/2, resulting in a 3-D map of the dark matter distribution within a 3 X 10^{5} [Mpc]^3 volume from the COMBO-17 survey. We perform a chi^2-fit of isothermal spheres to the tangential shear pattern around each cluster as a function of redshift to estimate the 3-D positions and masses of the main clusters in the supercluster from lensing alone. We then present the first 3-D map of the dark matter gravitational potential field, Phi, using the Kaiser-Squires (1993) and Taylor (2001) inversion methods. These maps clearly show the potential wells of the main supercluster components, including a new cluster behind A902, and demonstrates the applicability of 3-D dark matter mapping and projection free-mass-selected cluster finding to current data. Finally, we develop the halo model of dark matter and galaxy clustering and compare this with the auto-and cross-correlation functions of the 3-D gravitational potential, galaxy number densities and galaxy luminosity densities measured in the A901/2 field. We find significant anti-correlations between the gravitational potential field and the galaxy number density and luminosities, as expected due to baryonic infall into dark matter concentrations. We find good agreement with the halo model for the number densities and luminosity correlation functions.
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0312327  [pdf] - 61540
Modification of Dust Grain Structure by Sputtering
Comments: tex file and nine postscript figure in tar.gz archive
Submitted: 2003-12-12
We have applied the SRIM computer code to study the sputtering of some likely astrophysical grain materials, and we have shown that selective embedding of metallic projectiles offers a partial explanation of gas-phase depletions. We show that supernova shockwaves sweep a significantly larger mass of interstellar gas per unit time than the shockwaves generated by outflows in star-forming regions. We apply our sputtering model to the bombardment levels expected in a supernova shock, and show that net embedding may dominate over net sputtering, leading to grain growth under some circumstances, particularly when the bombarding gas is enriched with metals from the supernova progenitor star. A combination of short cooling times and net embedding mean that it is possible for a type II supernova to generate more dust that it destroys, and we conclude that, in general, the sputtering process often leads to a compositional change in the grain material rather than simply to grain erosion.
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0312106  [pdf] - 61319
Linking star-formation and enivronment in the A901/902 supercluster
Comments: 5 pages, accepted for publication as a letter in MNRAS
Submitted: 2003-12-04
We investigate correlations between the location of galaxies in dense environments and their degree of star-formation activity. Using photometric redshifts and spectral classifications from the unique 17-band COMBO-17 survey we are able to precisely isolate galaxies from the Abell 901/902 supercluster within a thin redshift slice around z=0.16. We compare the detailed photometric properties of the supercluster galaxies with the underlying dark matter density field as revealed by weak gravitational lensing. We find strong evidence for segregation by type, with the highest density regions populated almost exclusively by galaxies classified according to their rest-frame U-V colours as quiescent. We also observe a threshold surface mass density from lensing, \kappa\sim 0.05 (corresponding to a physical density \Sigma = 2.5x10^(14)h M_\sun Mpc^(-2)), above which star-formation activity is rapidly suppressed. This abrupt transformation affects primarily the faint end of the star-forming galaxy population and occurs at a local surface number density corresponding to roughly 400h^2 Mpc^(-2) to a limit of M*_V+6. When only galaxies brighter than M*+1 are considered the trends with environment remain, but are more gradual and extend beyond 2h^(-1) Mpc radius.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0210213  [pdf] - 52251
The shear power spectrum from the COMBO-17 survey
Comments: Matches version to appear in 1st May edition of MNRAS (vol. 341, pp.100-118)
Submitted: 2002-10-09, last modified: 2003-04-04
We perform a cosmic shear analysis of the COMBO-17 survey -- a unique dataset with shear quality R-band imaging and accurate photometric redshift estimates (dz=0.05) for ~90% of galaxies to R=24.0. We undertake a full maximum likelihood analysis to measure the weak lensing power spectra, Cl^kk, Cl^bb & Cl^kb from l=400 to l=10^4. We find a strong measurement of the convergence power over five fields. The b-field has a much lower significance, indicating our data is free of major systematics, while the cross-correlation of k & b is consistent with zero. We have also calculated the shear correlation functions and variance over a range of scales between 0.5 and 20 arcmin. In addition, we have used our results to measure cosmological parameters, constraining the normalisation of the matter power spectrum to be sigma_8=(0.72 \pm 0.09)(Omega_m/0.3)^-0.49, where the errors quoted are 1-sigma due to the intrinsic dispersion in galaxy ellipticities, cosmic and sampling variance. We have significantly reduced the usual additional uncertainty in the median redshift (z_m) of the survey by estimating z_m directly from the data. To demonstrate the power of accurate redshift information, we have also measured parameters from a shear analysis of only those galaxies with accurate redshifts. In this case, we have eliminated the uncertainty in the redshift distribution of sources and we show that the uncertainty in the resulting parameter constraints are reduced by more than a factor of 2 compared to the typical uncertainties found in cosmic shear surveys to date. Finally, we combine our parameter measurements with constraints from the 2dFGRS and from the CMB. With these additional constraints, we measure sigma_8=0.73 +0.05/-0.03 and Omega_m=0.27 +/- 0.02.
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0202426  [pdf] - 47920
Numerical simulations of stellar SiO maser variability. Investigation of the effect of shocks
Comments: 16 pages, 8 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2002-02-22
A stellar hydrodynamic pulsation model has been combined with a SiO maser model in an attempt to calculate the temporal variability of SiO maser emission in the circumstellar envelope (CE) of a model AGB star. This study investigates whether the variations in local physical conditions brought about by shocks are the predominant contributing factor to SiO maser variability because, in this work, the radiative part of the pump is constant. We find that some aspects of the variability are not consistent with a pump provided by shock-enhanced collisions alone. In these simulations, gas parcels of relatively enhanced SiO abundance are distributed in a model CE by a Monte Carlo method, at a single epoch of the stellar cycle. From this epoch on, Lagrangian motions of individual parcels are calculated according to the velocity fields encountered in the model CE during the stellar pulsation cycle. The potentially masing gas parcels therefore experience different densities and temperatures, and have varying line-of-sight velocity gradients throughout the stellar cycle, which may or may not be suitable to produce maser emission. At each epoch (separated by 16.6 days), emission lines from the parcels are combined to produce synthetic spectra and VLBI-type images. We report here the results for v=1, J=1-0 (43-GHz) and J=2-1 (86-GHz) masers.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0111288  [pdf] - 46054
Probing the distribution of dark matter in the Abell 901/902 supercluster with weak lensing
Comments: 23 pages, 19 figures. ApJ, accepted
Submitted: 2001-11-14
We present a weak shear analysis of the Abell 901/902 supercluster, composed of three rich clusters at z=0.16. Using a deep R-band image from the 0.5 x 0.5 degree MPG/ESO Wide Field Imager together with supplementary B-band observations, we build up a comprehensive picture of the light and mass distributions in this region. We find that, on average, the light from the early-type galaxies traces the dark matter fairly well, although one cluster is a notable exception to this rule. The clusters themselves exhibit a range of mass-to-light (M/L) ratios, X-ray properties, and galaxy populations. We attempt to model the relation between the total mass and the light from the early-type galaxies with a simple scale-independent linear biasing model. We find M/L_B=130h for the early type galaxies with zero stochasticity, which, if taken at face value, would imply Omega_m < 0.1. However, this linear relation breaks down on small scales and on scales equivalent to the average cluster separation (approximately 1 Mpc), demonstrating that a single M/L ratio is not adequate to fully describe the mass-light relation in the supercluster. Rather, the scatter in M/L ratios observed for the clusters supports a model incorporating non-linear biasing or stochastic processes. Finally, there is a clear detection of filamentary structure connecting two of the clusters, seen in both the galaxy and dark matter distributions, and we discuss the effects of cluster-cluster and cluster-filament interactions as a means to reconcile the disparate descriptions of the supercluster.
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0101431  [pdf] - 40569
Infrared constraints on the dark mass concentration observed in the cluster Abell 1942
Comments: 8 pages, 7 figures. MNRAS submitted (after referee revision)
Submitted: 2001-01-24
We present a deep H-band image of the region in the vicinity of the cluster Abell 1942 containing the puzzling dark matter concentration detected in an optical weak lensing study by Erben et al. (2000). We demonstrate that our limiting magnitude, H=22, would be sufficient to detect clusters of appropriate mass out to redshifts comparable with the mean redshift of the background sources. Despite this, our infrared image reveals no obvious overdensity of sources at the location of the lensing mass peak, nor an excess of sources in the I-H vs. H colour-magnitude diagram. We use this to further constrain the luminosity and mass-to-light ratio of the putative dark clump as a function of its redshift. We find that for spatially-flat cosmologies, background lensing clusters with reasonable mass-to-light ratios lying in the redshift range 0<z<1 are strongly excluded, leaving open the possibility that the mass concentration is a new type of truly dark object.
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0004161  [pdf] - 1232448
Infrared observations of gravitational lensing in Abell 2219 with CIRSI
Comments: 12 pages, 12 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS, minor changes
Submitted: 2000-04-12, last modified: 2000-06-21
We present the first detection of a gravitational depletion signal at near-infrared wavelengths, based on deep panoramic images of the cluster Abell 2219 (z=0.22) taken with the Cambridge Infrared Survey Instrument (CIRSI) at the prime focus of the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. Infrared studies of gravitational depletion offer a number of advantages over similar techniques applied at optical wavelengths, and can provide reliable total masses for intermediate redshift clusters. Using the maximum likelihood technique developed by Schneider, King & Erben (1999), we detect the gravitational depletion at the 3 sigma confidence level. By modeling the mass distribution as a singular isothermal sphere and ignoring uncertainty in the unlensed number counts, we find an Einstein radius of 13.7 +3.9/-4.2 arcsec (66% confidence limit). This corresponds to a projected velocity dispersion of approximately 800 km/s, in agreement with constraints from strongly-lensed features. For a Navarro, Frenk and White mass model, the radial dependence observed indicates a best-fitting halo scale length of 125/h kpc}. We investigate the uncertainties arising from the observed fluctuations in the unlensed number counts, and show that clustering is the dominant source of error. We extend the maximum likelihood method to include the effect of incompleteness, and discuss the prospects of further systematic studies of lensing in the near-infrared band.
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0001513  [pdf] - 34310
Strong and weak lensing analysis of cluster Abell 2219 based on optical and near infrared data
Comments: 12 pages, 19 figures, submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2000-01-28
We present a gravitational lensing study of the massive galaxy cluster A2219 (redshift 0.22). This investigation is based on multicolour images from U through H, which allows photometric redshifts to be estimated for the background sources. The redshifts provide useful extra information for the lensing models: we show how they can be used to identify a new multiple-image system (and rule out an old one), how this information can be used to anchor the mass model for the cluster, and how the redshifts can be used to construct optimal samples of background galaxies for a weak lensing analysis. Combining all results, we obtain the mass distribution in this cluster from the inner, strong lensing region, out to a radius of 1.5 Mpc. The mass profile is consistent with a singular isothermal model over this radius range. Parametric and non-parametric reconstructions of the mass distribution in the cluster are compared. The main features (elongation, sub-clumps, radial mass profile) are in good agreement.
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9905354  [pdf] - 106680
Hubble Space Telescope Near-infrared and Optical Imaging of Faint Radio Sources in the Distant Cluster Cl0939+4713
Comments: 10 pages, LaTeX, 5 figures (3 GIFs), uses emulateapj.sty, ApJ submitted
Submitted: 1999-05-27
We present deep Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS near-infrared and WFPC2 optical imaging of a small region in the core of the distant rich cluster Cl0939+4713 (z=0.41). We compare the optical and near-infrared morphologies of cluster members and find apparent small-scale optical structures within the galaxies which are absent in the near-infrared. We conclude that strong dust obscuration is a common feature in the late-type galaxies in distant clusters. We then concentrate on a sample of ten faint radio galaxies lying within our NICMOS field and selected from a very deep 1.4-GHz VLA map of the cluster with a 1sigma flux limit of 9uJy. Using published data we focus on the spectral properties of the eight radio-selected cluster members and show that these comprise a large fraction of the post-starburst population in the cluster. The simplest interpretation of the radio emission from these galaxies is that they are currently forming massive stars, contradicting their classification as post-starburst systems based on the optical spectra. We suggest that this star formation is hidden from view in the optical by the same obscuring dust which is apparent in our comparison on the optical and near-infrared morphologies of these galaxies. We caution that even in the restframe optical the effects of dust cannot be ignored when comparing samples of distant galaxies to low-redshift systems, particularly if dust is as prevelant in distant galaxies as appears to be the case in our study.
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9712124  [pdf] - 99613
Testing the clump model of SiO maser emission
Comments: 7 pages, 2 figures, accepted for MNRAS
Submitted: 1997-12-08
Building on the detection of J=7-6 SiO maser emission in both the v=1 and v=2 vibrational states towards the symbiotic Mira, R Aquarii, we have used the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to study the changes in the SiO maser features from R Aqr over a stellar pulsational period. The observations, complemented by contemporaneous data taken at 86 GHz, represent a test of the popular thermal-instability clump models of SiO masers. The `clump' model of SiO maser emission considers the SiO masers to be discrete emitting regions which differ from their surroundings in the values of one or more physical variables (SiO abundance, for example). We find that our observational data are consistent with a clump model in which the appearance of maser emission in the J=7-6 transitions coincides with an outward-moving shock impinging on the inner edge of the maser zone.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9610227  [pdf] - 95751
GHRS Monitoring of the Outflowing Material in NGC 4151
Comments: 4 pages, 3 postscript figures, to appear in the GHRS Science Symposium Proceedings
Submitted: 1996-10-28
We present the results of a GHRS program to monitor the absorption lines in the spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151 caused by outflowing gas from the nucleus. Although we see subtle changes over the four year period in the GHRS spectra of the broader of the absorption features, the wavelength constancy of all the features is remarkable. The limits on the secular acceleration suggest that either (1) The absorbing clouds are well beyond the broad emission line region, or (2) The clouds are experiencing significant drag from an intercloud medium. The exception to this constancy occurred during one of the epochs of our monitoring when a broad shallow C IV trough appeared at an outflow velocity of 3750 km/s and then subsequently disappeared.