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Gondolo, Paolo

Normalized to: Gondolo, P.

101 article(s) in total. 409 co-authors, from 1 to 27 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 3,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.04112  [pdf] - 1790908
Anapole Dark Matter after DAMA/LIBRA-phase2
Comments: 16 pages, 6 figures. Updated to published version
Submitted: 2018-08-13, last modified: 2018-11-28
We re-examine the case of anapole dark matter as an explanation for the DAMA annual modulation in light of the DAMA/LIBRA-phase2 results and improved upper limits from other DM searches. If the WIMP velocity distribution is assumed to be a Maxwellian, anapole dark matter is unable to provide an explanation of the DAMA modulation compatible with the other searches. Nevertheless, anapole dark matter provides a better fit to the DAMA-phase2 modulation data than an isoscalar spin-independent interaction, due to its magnetic coupling with sodium targets. A halo-independent analysis shows that explaining the DAMA modulation above 2 keVee in terms of anapole dark matter is basically impossible in face of the other null results, while the DAMA/LIBRA-phase2 modulation measurements below 2 keVee are marginally allowed. We conclude that in light of current measurements, anapole dark matter does not seem to be a viable explanation for the totality of the DAMA modulation.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.03399  [pdf] - 1738334
DarkSUSY 6 : An Advanced Tool to Compute Dark Matter Properties Numerically
Comments: 58 pages with jcappub.sty, 6 figures. Main additions in version 6.1 are a new particle module for self-interacting dark matter, as well as the option to perform freeze-out calculations with arbitrary dark sector temperatures. Matches version published in JCAP
Submitted: 2018-02-09, last modified: 2018-08-24
The nature of dark matter remains one of the key science questions. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are among the best motivated particle physics candidates, allowing to explain the measured dark matter density by employing standard big-bang thermodynamics. We introduce here a radically new version of the widely used DarkSUSY package, which allows to compute the properties of such dark matter particles numerically. With DarkSUSY 6 one can accurately predict a large variety of astrophysical signals from dark matter, such as direct detection rates in low-background counting experiments and indirect detection signals through antiprotons, antideuterons, gamma rays and positrons from the Galactic halo, or high-energy neutrinos from the center of the Earth or of the Sun. For thermally produced dark matter like WIMPs, high-precision tools are provided for the computation of the relic density in the Universe today, as well as for the size of the smallest dark matter protohalos. Furthermore, the code allows to calculate dark matter self-interaction rates, which may affect the distribution of dark matter at small cosmological scales. Compared to earlier versions, DarkSUSY 6 introduces many significant physics improvements and extensions. The most fundamental new feature of this release, however, is that the code has been completely re-organized and brought into a highly modular and flexible shape. Switching between different pre-implemented dark matter candidates has thus become straight-forward, just as adding new - WIMP or non-WIMP - particle models or replacing any given functionality in a fully user-specified way. In this article, we describe the physics behind the computer package, along with the main structure and philosophy of this major revision of DarkSUSY. A detailed manual is provided together with the public release at www.darksusy.org.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.04670  [pdf] - 1585963
Inflation without Inflaton: A Model for Dark Energy
Comments: New references added. To appear in Physical Review D
Submitted: 2017-07-14, last modified: 2017-10-17
The interaction between two initially causally disconnected regions of the universe is studied using analogies of non-commutative quantum mechanics and deformation of Poisson manifolds. These causally disconnect regions are governed by two independent Friedmann-Lema\^{\i}tre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metrics with scale factors $a$ and $b$ and cosmological constants $\Lambda_a$ and $\Lambda_b$, respectively. The causality is turned on by positing a non-trivial Poisson bracket $[ {\cal P}_{\alpha}, {\cal P}_{\beta} ] =\epsilon_{\alpha \beta}\frac{\kappa}{G}$, where $G$ is Newton's gravitational constant and $\kappa $ is a dimensionless parameter. The posited deformed Poisson bracket has an interpretation in terms of 3-cocycles, anomalies and Poissonian manifolds. The modified FLRW equations acquire an energy-momentum tensor from which we explicitly obtain the equation of state parameter. The modified FLRW equations are solved numerically and the solutions are inflationary or oscillating depending on the values of $\kappa$. In this model the accelerating and decelerating regime may be periodic. The analysis of the equation of state clearly shows the presence of dark energy. By completeness, the perturbative solution for $\kappa \ll1 $ is also studied.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.03770  [pdf] - 1790567
Examining the time dependence of DAMA's modulation amplitude
Comments: 13 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2017-10-10
If dark matter is composed of weakly interacting particles, Earth's orbital motion may induce a small annual variation in the rate at which these particles interact in a terrestrial detector. The DAMA collaboration has identified at a 9.3$\sigma$ confidence level such an annual modulation in their event rate over two detector iterations, DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA, each with $\sim7$ years of observations. We statistically examine the time dependence of the modulation amplitudes, which "by eye" appear to be decreasing with time in certain energy ranges. We perform a chi-squared goodness of fit test of the average modulation amplitudes measured\ by the two detector iterations which rejects the hypothesis of a consistent modulation amplitude at greater than 80\%, 96\%, and 99.6\% for the 2--4~keVee, 2--5~keVee and 2--6~keVee energy ranges, respectively. We also find that among the 14 annual cycles there are three $\gtrsim 3\sigma$ departures from the average in the 5-6~keVee energy range. In addition, we examined several phenomenological models for the time dependence of the modulation amplitude. Using a maximum likelihood test, we find that descriptions of the modulation amplitude as decreasing with time are preferred over a constant modulation amplitude at anywhere between 1$\sigma$ and 3$\sigma$, depending on the phenomenological model for the time dependence and the signal energy range considered. A time dependent modulation amplitude is not expected for a dark matter signal, at least for dark matter halo morphologies consistent with the DAMA signal. New data from DAMA/LIBRA--phase2 will certainly aid in determining whether any apparent time dependence is a real effect or a statistical fluctuation.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.08942  [pdf] - 1582138
Halo-independent determination of the unmodulated WIMP signal in DAMA: the isotropic case
Comments: 34 pages, 11 figures. Discussion extended, one figure added. Factor of two corrected in all amplitudes. DAMA exposure changed from 13 to 14 cycles. Updated to published version
Submitted: 2017-03-27, last modified: 2017-09-26
We present a halo-independent determination of the unmodulated signal corresponding to the DAMA modulation if interpreted as due to dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). First we show how a modulated signal gives information on the WIMP velocity distribution function in the Galactic rest frame, from which the unmodulated signal descends. Then we perform a mathematically-sound profile likelihood analysis in which we profile the likelihood over a continuum of nuisance parameters (namely, the WIMP velocity distribution). As a first application of the method, which is very general and valid for any class of velocity distributions, we restrict the analysis to velocity distributions that are isotropic in the Galactic frame. In this way we obtain halo-independent maximum-likelihood estimates and confidence intervals for the DAMA unmodulated signal. We find that the estimated unmodulated signal is in line with expectations for a WIMP-induced modulation and is compatible with the DAMA background+signal rate. Specifically, for the isotropic case we find that the modulated amplitude ranges between a few percent and about 25% of the unmodulated amplitude, depending on the WIMP mass.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.01750  [pdf] - 1532457
Inverted dipole feature in directional detection of exothermic dark matter
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2016-11-06
Directional dark matter detection attempts to measure the direction of motion of nuclei recoiling after having interacted with dark matter particles in the halo of our Galaxy. Due to Earth's motion with respect to the Galaxy, the dark matter flux is concentrated around a preferential direction. An anisotropy in the recoil direction rate is expected as an unmistakable signature of dark matter. The average nuclear recoil direction is expected to coincide with the average direction of dark matter particles arriving to Earth. Here we point out that for a particular type of dark matter, inelastic exothermic dark matter, the mean recoil direction as well as a secondary feature, a ring of maximum recoil rate around the mean recoil direction, could instead be opposite to the average dark matter arrival direction. Thus, the detection of an average nuclear recoil direction opposite to the usually expected direction would constitute a spectacular experimental confirmation of this type of dark matter.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.05783  [pdf] - 1422262
Late Kinetic Decoupling of Light Magnetic Dipole Dark Matter
Comments: 14 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2016-03-18, last modified: 2016-03-28
We study the kinetic decoupling of light (lesssim 10 GeV) magnetic dipole dark matter (DM). We find that present bounds from collider, direct DM searches, and structure formation allow magnetic dipole DM to remain in thermal equilibrium with the early universe plasma until as late as the electron-positron annihilation epoch. This late kinetic decoupling leads to a minimal mass for the earliest dark protohalos of thousands of solar masses, in contrast to the conventional weak scale DM scenario where they are of order 10^{-6} solar masses.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.03781  [pdf] - 1384743
A review of the discovery reach of directional Dark Matter detection
Comments: 57 pages, 23 figures, to appear in Physics Reports
Submitted: 2016-02-11, last modified: 2016-03-17
Cosmological observations indicate that most of the matter in the Universe is Dark Matter. Dark Matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) can be detected directly, via its elastic scattering off target nuclei. Most current direct detection experiments only measure the energy of the recoiling nuclei. However, directional detection experiments are sensitive to the direction of the nuclear recoil as well. Due to the Sun's motion with respect to the Galactic rest frame, the directional recoil rate has a dipole feature, peaking around the direction of the Solar motion. This provides a powerful tool for demonstrating the Galactic origin of nuclear recoils and hence unambiguously detecting Dark Matter. Furthermore, the directional recoil distribution depends on the WIMP mass, scattering cross section and local velocity distribution. Therefore, with a large number of recoil events it will be possible to study the physics of Dark Matter in terms of particle and astrophysical properties. We review the potential of directional detectors for detecting and characterizing WIMPs.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.2637  [pdf] - 1247977
Global fits of the dark matter-nucleon effective interactions
Comments: 32 pages, 11 figures, replaced to match the published version
Submitted: 2014-05-12, last modified: 2015-07-17
The effective theory of isoscalar dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by heavy spin-one or spin-zero particles depends on 10 coupling constants besides the dark matter particle mass. Here we compare this 11-dimensional effective theory to current observations in a comprehensive statistical analysis of several direct detection experiments, including the recent LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite results. From a multidimensional scan with about 3 million likelihood evaluations, we extract the marginalized posterior probability density functions (a Bayesian approach) and the profile likelihoods (a frequentist approach), as well as the associated credible regions and confidence levels, for each coupling constant vs dark matter mass and for each pair of coupling constants. We compare the Bayesian and frequentist approach in the light of the currently limited amount of data. We find that current direct detection data contain sufficient information to simultaneously constrain not only the familiar spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions, but also the remaining velocity and momentum dependent couplings predicted by the dark matter-nucleon effective theory. For current experiments associated with a null result, we find strong correlations between some pairs of coupling constants. For experiments that claim a signal (i.e., CoGeNT and DAMA), we find that pairs of coupling constants produce degenerate results.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.06554  [pdf] - 1263983
Global limits and interference patterns in dark matter direct detection
Comments: 24 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2015-04-24
We compare the general effective theory of one-body dark matter nucleon interactions to current direct detection experiments in a global multidimensional statistical analysis. We derive exclusion limits on the 28 isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the theory, and show that current data place interesting constraints on dark matter-nucleon interaction operators usually neglected in this context. We characterize the interference patterns that can arise in dark matter direct detection from pairs of dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, or from isoscalar and isovector components of the same operator. We find that commonly neglected destructive interference effects weaken standard direct detection exclusion limits by up to one order of magnitude in the coupling constants.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.02233  [pdf] - 989499
Kinetic decoupling of WIMPs: analytic expressions
Comments: 19 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2015-01-09
We present a general expression for the values of the average kinetic energy and of the temperature of kinetic decoupling of a WIMP, valid for any cosmological model. We show an example of the usage of our solution when the Hubble rate has a power-law dependence on temperature, and we show results for the specific cases of kination cosmology and low- temperature reheating cosmology.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.4683  [pdf] - 860352
A possible link between the GeV excess and the 511 keV emission line in the Galactic Centre
Comments: 2 pages; 1 figure
Submitted: 2014-06-18, last modified: 2014-08-03
The morphology and characteristics of the so-called GeV gamma-ray excess detected in the Milky Way lead us to speculate about a possible common origin with the 511 keV line mapped by the SPI experiment about ten years ago. In the previous version of our paper, we assumed 30 GeV dark matter particles annihilating into $b \bar{b}$ and obtained both a morphology and a 511 keV flux (\phi_{511 keV} ~ 10^{-3} ph/cm^2/s) in agreement with SPI observation. However our estimates assumed a negligible number density of electrons in the bulge which lead to an artificial increase in the flux (mostly due to negligible Coulomb losses in this configuration). Assuming a number density greater than $n_e > 10^{-3} cm^{-3}$, we now obtain a flux of 511 keV photons that is smaller than \phi_{511 keV} ~ 10^{-6} ph/cm^2/s and is essentially in agreement with the 511 keV flux that one can infer from the total number of positrons injected by dark matter annihilations into $b \bar{b}$. We thus conclude that -- even if 30 GeV dark matter particles were to exist-- it is impossible to establish a connexion between the two types of signals, even though they are located within the same 10 deg region in the galactic centre.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.4508  [pdf] - 1202835
Direct detection of Light Anapole and Magnetic Dipole DM
Comments: 20 pages, 6 figures. v2: updated with CoGeNT 2014 data, 1 figure added. v3: updated with SuperCDMS 2014 data, version accepted by JCAP
Submitted: 2014-01-17, last modified: 2014-04-26
We present comparisons of direct detection data for "light WIMPs" with an anapole moment interaction (ADM) and a magnetic dipole moment interaction (MDM), both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) for the dark halo of our galaxy and in a halo-independent manner. In the SHM analysis we find that a combination of the 90% CL LUX and CDMSlite limits or the new 90% CL SuperCDMS limit by itself exclude the parameter space regions allowed by DAMA, CoGeNT and CDMS-II-Si data for both ADM and MDM. In our halo-independent analysis the new LUX bound excludes the same potential signal regions as the previous XENON100 bound. Much of the remaining signal regions is now excluded by SuperCDMS, while the CDMSlite limit is much above them. The situation is of strong tension between the positive and negative search results both for ADM and MDM. We also clarify the confusion in the literature about the ADM scattering cross section.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.6183  [pdf] - 1166164
Halo-independent analysis of direct detection data for light WIMPs
Comments: 15 pages, 17 figures; v2: XENON10 bound corrected and minor changes in the text. v3: text and figures improved, accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2013-04-23, last modified: 2013-09-26
We present a halo-independent analysis of direct detection data on "light WIMPs," i.e. weakly interacting massive particles with mass close to or below 10 GeV/c^2. We include new results from silicon CDMS detectors (bounds and excess events), the latest CoGeNT acceptances, and recent measurements of low sodium quenching factors in NaI crystals. We focus on light WIMPs with spin-independent isospin-conserving and isospin-violating interactions with nucleons. For these dark matter candidates we find that a low quenching factor would make the DAMA modulation incompatible with a reasonable escape velocity for the dark matter halo, and that the tension among experimental data tightens in both the isospin-conserving and isospin-violating scenarios. We also find that a new although milder tension appears between the CoGeNT and DAMA annual modulations on one side and the silicon excess events on the other, in that it seems difficult to interpret them as the modulated and unmodulated aspects of the same WIMP dark matter signal.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.4481  [pdf] - 750680
On the sbottom resonance in dark matter scattering
Comments: 31 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2013-07-16
A resonance in the neutralino-nucleus elastic scattering cross section is usually purported when the neutralino-sbottom mass difference m_sbottom-m_chi is equal to the bottom quark mass m_b ~ 4 GeV. Such a scenario has been discussed as a viable model for light (~ 10 GeV) neutralino dark matter as explanation of possible DAMA and CoGeNT direct detection signals. Here we give physical and analytical arguments showing that the sbottom resonance may actually not be there. In particular, we show analytically that the one-loop gluon-neutralino scattering amplitude has no pole at m_sbottom=m_chi+m_b, while by analytic continuation to the regime m_sbottom<m_chi, it develops a pole at m_sbottom=m_chi-m_b. In the limit of vanishing gluon momenta, this pole corresponds to the only cut of the neutralino self-energy diagram with a quark and a squark running in the loop, when the decay process chi->squark+quark becomes kinematically allowed. The pole can be interpreted as the formation of a sbottom-antibottom-qqq or antisbottom-bottom qqq resonant state (where qqq are the nucleon valence quarks), which is kinematically not accessible if the neutralino is the LSP. Our analysis shows that the common practice of estimating the neutralino-nucleon cross section by introducing an ad-hoc pole at m_sbottom=m_chi+m_b into the effective four-fermion interaction (including higher-twist effects) should be discouraged, since it corresponds to adding a spurious pole to the scattering process at the center-of-mass energy sqrt(s) m_chi m_sbottom-m_b. Our considerations can be extended from the specific case of supersymmetry to other cases in which the dark matter particle scatters off nucleons through the exchange of a b-flavored state almost degenerate to its mass, such as in theories with extra dimensions and in other mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios recently discussed in the literature.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.7415  [pdf] - 657411
Numerical Evidence for Dark Star Formation: A Comment on "Weakly Interacting Massive Particle Dark Matter and First Stars: Suppression of Fragmentation in Primordial Star Formation" by Smith et al. 2012, ApJ 761, 154
Comments: 8 pages, no figure
Submitted: 2013-04-27
(abridged) This comment is intended to show that simulations by Smith et al. (S12) support the Dark Star (DS) scenario and even remove some potential obstacles. Our previous work illustrated that the initial hydrogen densities of the first equilibrium DSs are high, ~10^{17}/cm^3 for the case of 100 GeV WIMPs, with a stellar radius of ~2-3 AU. Subsequent authors have somehow missed the fact that equilibrium DSs have the high densities they do. S12 have numerically simulated the effect of dark matter annihilation on the contraction of a protostellar gas cloud en route to forming the first stars. They show results at a density ~5 10^{14}/cm^3, slightly higher than the value at which annihilation heating prevails over cooling. However, they are apparently unable to reach the ~10^{17}/cm^3 density of our hydrostatic DS solutions. We are in complete agreement with their physical result that the gas keeps collapsing to densities > 5 10^{14}/cm^3, as it must before equilibrium DSs can form. However we are in disagreement with some of the words in their paper which imply that DSs never come to exist. It seems to us that S12 supports the DS scenario. They use the sink particle approach to treat the gas that collapses to scales smaller than their resolution limit. We argue that their sink is effectively a DS, or contains one. An accretion disk forms as more mass falls onto the sink, and the DS grows. S12 not only confirm our predictions about DS in the range where the simulations apply, but also solve a potential obstruction to DS formation by showing that dark matter annihilation prevents the fragmentation of the collapsing gas. Whereas fragmentation might perturb the dark matter away from the DS and remove its power source, instead S12 show that further sinks, if any, form only far enough away as to leave the DS undisturbed in the comfort of its dark matter surroundings.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.1914  [pdf] - 673048
The effect of quark interactions on dark matter kinetic decoupling and the mass of the smallest dark halos
Comments: 20 pages, 4 figures, the discussion added on the scattering between the dark matter and pions
Submitted: 2012-05-09, last modified: 2012-11-29
The kinetic decoupling of dark matter (DM) from the primordial plasma sets the size of the first and smallest dark matter halos. Studies of the DM kinetic decoupling have hitherto mostly neglected interactions between the DM and the quarks in the plasma. Here we illustrate their importance using two frameworks: a version of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and an effective field theory with effective DM-quark interaction operators. We connect particle physics and astrophysics obtaining bounds on the smallest dark matter halo size from collider data and from direct dark matter search experiments. In the MSSM framework, adding DM-quark interactions to DM-lepton interactions more than doubles the smallest dark matter halo mass in a wide range of the supersymmetric parameter space.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.6359  [pdf] - 1116962
Halo independent comparison of direct dark matter detection data
Comments: version slightly longer than the first, with 3 additional figures and the latest XENON100 bound added. 7 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2012-02-28, last modified: 2012-09-07
We extend the halo-independent method of Fox, Liu, and Weiner to include energy resolution and efficiency with arbitrary energy dependence, making it more suitable for experiments to use in presenting their results. Then we compare measurements and upper limits on the direct detection of low mass ($\sim10$ GeV) weakly interacting massive particles with spin-independent interactions, including the upper limit on the annual modulation amplitude from the CDMS collaboration. We find that isospin-symmetric couplings are severely constrained both by XENON100 and CDMS bounds, and that isospin-violating couplings are still possible at the lowest energies, while the tension of the higher energy CoGeNT bins with the CDMS modulation constraint remains. We find the CRESST II signal is not compatible with the modulation signals of DAMA and CoGeNT.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.2333  [pdf] - 1123304
Aberration features in directional dark matter detection
Comments: 24 pages, 46 figures, addition of new section 7 on anisotropic models and Fig. 15
Submitted: 2012-05-10, last modified: 2012-07-11
The motion of the Earth around the Sun causes an annual change in the magnitude and direction of the arrival velocity of dark matter particles on Earth, in a way analogous to aberration of stellar light. In directional detectors, aberration of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) modulates the pattern of nuclear recoil directions in a way that depends on the orbital velocity of the Earth and the local galactic distribution of WIMP velocities. Knowing the former, WIMP aberration can give information on the latter, besides being a curious way of confirming the revolution of the Earth and the extraterrestrial provenance of WIMPs. While observing the full aberration pattern requires extremely large exposures, we claim that the annual variation of the mean recoil direction or of the event counts over specific solid angles may be detectable with moderately large exposures. For example, integrated counts over Galactic hemispheres separated by planes perpendicular to Earth's orbit would modulate annually, resulting in Galactic Hemisphere Annual Modulations (GHAM) with amplitudes larger than the usual non-directional annual modulation.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.6361  [pdf] - 1091933
Ring-like features in directional dark matter detection
Comments: 26 pages, 27 figures, same conclusions, but major revisions in the text and figures, and addition of statistical tests
Submitted: 2011-11-28, last modified: 2012-05-09
We discuss a novel dark matter signature relevant for directional detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). For heavy enough WIMPs and low enough recoil energies, the maximum of the recoil rate is not in the direction of the average WIMP arrival direction but in a ring around it at an angular radius that increases with the WIMP mass and can approach 90 degrees at very low energies. The ring is easier to detect for smaller WIMP velocity dispersion and larger average WIMP velocities relative to the detector. In principle the ring could be used as an additional indication of the WIMP mass range.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1107.1714  [pdf] - 439295
Impacts of Dark Stars on Reionization and Signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background
Comments: Small changes in response to referee's comments; matches version accepted for publication in ApJ. 14 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2011-07-08, last modified: 2011-09-01
We perform a detailed and systematic investigation of the possible impacts of dark stars upon the reionization history of the Universe, and its signatures in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We compute hydrogen reionization histories, CMB optical depths and anisotropy power spectra for a range of stellar populations including dark stars. If dark stars capture large amounts of dark matter via nuclear scattering, reionization can be substantially delayed, leading to decreases in the integrated optical depth to last scattering and large-scale power in the EE polarization power spectrum. Using the integrated optical depth observed by WMAP7, in our canonical reionization model we rule out the section of parameter space where dark stars with high scattering-induced capture rates tie up more than ~90% of all the first star-forming baryons, and live for over ~250 Myr. When nuclear scattering delivers only moderate amounts of dark matter, reionization can instead be sped up slightly, modestly increasing the CMB optical depth. If dark stars do not obtain any dark matter via nuclear scattering, effects upon reionization and the CMB are negligible. The effects of dark stars upon reionization and its CMB markers can be largely mimicked or compensated for by changes in the existing parameters of reionization models, making dark stars difficult to disentangle from astrophysical uncertainties, but also widening the range of standard parameters in reionization models that can be made consistent with observations.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.2876  [pdf] - 956077
Daily modulation due to channeling in direct dark matter crystalline detectors
Comments: 29 pages, 15 figures. v3: version accepted by PRD. Minor corrections made, corrected Eq. 12 and 13 and Figs. 2, 3.a, and 4.a, corrected Eqs. 27-38 by a factor of 2, added the observability condition for solid Ne
Submitted: 2011-01-14, last modified: 2011-06-20
The channeling of the ion recoiling after a collision with a WIMP in direct dark matter crystalline detectors produces a larger scintillation or ionization signal than otherwise expected. Channeling is a directional effect which depends on the velocity distribution of WIMPs in the dark halo of our Galaxy and could lead to a daily modulation of the signal. Here we compute upper bounds to the expected amplitude of daily modulation due to channeling using channeling fractions that we obtained with analytic models in prior work. After developing the general formalism, we examine the possibility of finding a daily modulation due to channeling in the data already collected by the DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA experiments. We find that even the largest daily modulation amplitudes (of the order of 10% in some instances) would not be observable for WIMPs in the standard halo in the 13 years of data taken by the DAMA collaboration. For these to be observable the DAMA total rate should be 1/40 of what it is or the total DAMA exposure should be 40 times larger. The daily modulation due to channeling will be difficult to measure in future experiments. We find it could be observed for light WIMPs in solid Ne, assuming no background.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1011.6006  [pdf] - 1042228
Channeling in solid Xe, Ar and Ne direct dark matter detectors
Comments: 17 pages, 25 figures, the structure of the paper is modified and some important equations, explanations and references are added, Fig 7 is added
Submitted: 2010-11-27, last modified: 2011-06-14
The channeling of the ion recoiling after a collision with a WIMP changes the ionization signal in direct detection experiments, producing a larger scintillation or ionization signal than otherwise expected. We give estimates of the fraction of channeled recoiling ions in solid Xe, Ar and Ne crystals using analytic models produced since the 1960's and 70's to describe channeling and blocking effects.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.1706  [pdf] - 371192
The BigBOSS Experiment
Schlegel, D.; Abdalla, F.; Abraham, T.; Ahn, C.; Prieto, C. Allende; Annis, J.; Aubourg, E.; Azzaro, M.; Baltay, S. Bailey. C.; Baugh, C.; Bebek, C.; Becerril, S.; Blanton, M.; Bolton, A.; Bromley, B.; Cahn, R.; Carton, P. -H.; Cervantes-Cota, J. L.; Chu, Y.; Cortes, M.; Dawson, K.; Dey, A.; Dickinson, M.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Ealet, A.; Edelstein, J.; Eppelle, D.; Escoffier, S.; Evrard, A.; Faccioli, L.; Frenk, C.; Geha, M.; Gerdes, D.; Gondolo, P.; Gonzalez-Arroyo, A.; Grossan, B.; Heckman, T.; Heetderks, H.; Ho, S.; Honscheid, K.; Huterer, D.; Ilbert, O.; Ivans, I.; Jelinsky, P.; Jing, Y.; Joyce, D.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, S.; Kieda, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, C.; Kneib, J. -P.; Kong, X.; Kosowsky, A.; Krishnan, K.; Lahav, O.; Lampton, M.; LeBohec, S.; Brun, V. Le; Levi, M.; Li, C.; Liang, M.; Lim, H.; Lin, W.; Linder, E.; Lorenzon, W.; de la Macorra, A.; Magneville, Ch.; Malina, R.; Marinoni, C.; Martinez, V.; Majewski, S.; Matheson, T.; McCloskey, R.; McDonald, P.; McKay, T.; McMahon, J.; Menard, B.; Miralda-Escude, J.; Modjaz, M.; Montero-Dorta, A.; Morales, I.; Mostek, N.; Newman, J.; Nichol, R.; Nugent, P.; Olsen, K.; Padmanabhan, N.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Park, I.; Peacock, J.; Percival, W.; Perlmutter, S.; Peroux, C.; Petitjean, P.; Prada, F.; Prieto, E.; Prochaska, J.; Reil, K.; Rockosi, C.; Roe, N.; Rollinde, E.; Roodman, A.; Ross, N.; Rudnick, G.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Sanchez, J.; Sawyer, D.; Schimd, C.; Schubnell, M.; Scoccimaro, R.; Seljak, U.; Seo, H.; Sheldon, E.; Sholl, M.; Shulte-Ladbeck, R.; Slosar, A.; Smith, D. S.; Smoot, G.; Springer, W.; Stril, A.; Szalay, A. S.; Tao, C.; Tarle, G.; Taylor, E.; Tilquin, A.; Tinker, J.; Valdes, F.; Wang, J.; Wang, T.; Weaver, B. A.; Weinberg, D.; White, M.; Wood-Vasey, M.; Yang, J.; Yeche, X. Yang. Ch.; Zakamska, N.; Zentner, A.; Zhai, C.; Zhang, P.
Comments: This report is based on the BigBOSS proposal submission to NOAO in October 2010, and reflects the project status at that time with minor updates
Submitted: 2011-06-09
BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (kmax = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (kmax = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.3325  [pdf] - 1040648
Channeling in direct dark matter detection III: channeling fraction in CsI crystals
Comments: 14 pages, 18 figures, Accepted for publication in JCAP on 28 October 2010, updated references
Submitted: 2010-09-16, last modified: 2010-11-03
The channeling of the ion recoiling after a collision with a WIMP changes the ionization signal in direct detection experiments, producing a larger signal scintillation or ionization than otherwise expected. We give estimates of the fraction of channeled recoiling ions in CsI crystals using analytic models produced since the 1960's and 70's to describe channeling and blocking effects.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1008.3676  [pdf] - 275596
Channeling in direct dark matter detection II: channeling fraction in Si and Ge crystals
Comments: 28 pages, 45 figures, Accepted for publication in JCAP on 27 October 2010, Minor revisions: added an appendix, updated references, corrected some typos, added some text before Section 2
Submitted: 2010-08-22, last modified: 2010-11-03
The channeling of the ion recoiling after a collision with a WIMP changes the ionization signal in direct detection experiments, producing a larger signal than otherwise expected. We give estimates of the fraction of channeled recoiling ions in Si and Ge crystals using analytic models produced since the 1960's and 70's to describe channeling and blocking effects. We used data obtained to avoid channeling in the implantation of dopants in Si crystals to test our models.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.3110  [pdf] - 270070
Channeling in direct dark matter detection I: channeling fraction in NaI (Tl) crystals
Comments: 37 pages, 35 figures, Accepted for publication in JCAP on 27 October 2010, Minor revisions: added an appendix, updated references, updated Fig. 9, corrected a few typos
Submitted: 2010-06-15, last modified: 2010-11-03
The channeling of the ion recoiling after a collision with a WIMP changes the ionization signal in direct detection experiments, producing a larger signal than otherwise expected. We give estimates of the fraction of channeled recoiling ions in NaI (Tl) crystals using analytic models produced since the 1960's and 70's to describe channeling and blocking effects. We find that the channeling fraction of recoiling lattice nuclei is smaller than that of ions that are injected into the crystal and that it is strongly temperature dependent.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.3690  [pdf] - 229145
DM production mechanisms
Comments: 27 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2010-09-20
We review the mechanism of production of dark matter particles in the early Universe, both in standard and non-standard pre-Big Bang Nucleosynthesis cosmologies. We concentrate mostly on the production of WIMPs.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.0972  [pdf] - 332910
XENON10/100 dark matter constraints in comparison with CoGeNT and DAMA: examining the Leff dependence
Comments: 23 pages, 9 figures. Version 2: more careful treatment of XENON10 efficiencies, expanded discussion. A response to arXiv:1006.2031 is found in the Appendix
Submitted: 2010-06-04, last modified: 2010-07-29
We consider the compatibility of DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT, XENON10 and XENON100 results for spin-independent (SI) dark matter Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), particularly at low masses (~ 10 GeV), assuming a standard dark matter halo. The XENON bounds depend on the scintillation efficiency factor Leff for which there is considerable uncertainty. Thus we consider various extrapolations for Leff at low energy. With the Leff measurements we consider, XENON100 results are found to be insensitive to the low energy extrapolation. We find the strongest bounds are from XENON10, rather than XENON100, due to the lower energy threshold. For reasonable choices of Leff and for the case of SI elastic scattering, XENON10 is incompatible with the DAMA/LIBRA 3$\sigma$ region and severely constrains the 7-12 GeV WIMP mass region of interest published by the CoGeNT collaboration.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.3368  [pdf] - 1025241
Finding high-redshift dark stars with the James Webb Space Telescope
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures; v2: matches published version
Submitted: 2010-02-18, last modified: 2010-06-23
The first stars in the history of the Universe are likely to form in the dense central regions of 10^5-10^6 Msolar cold dark matter halos at z=10-50. The annihilation of dark matter particles in these environments may lead to the formation of so-called dark stars, which are predicted to be cooler, larger, more massive and potentially more long-lived than conventional population III stars. Here, we investigate the prospects of detecting high-redshift dark stars with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). We find that dark stars at z>6 are intrinsically too faint to be detected by JWST. However, by exploiting foreground galaxy clusters as gravitational telescopes, certain varieties of cool (Teff < 30000 K) dark stars should be within reach at redshifts up to z=10. If the lifetimes of dark stars are sufficiently long, many such objects may also congregate inside the first galaxies. We demonstrate that this could give rise to peculiar features in the integrated spectra of galaxies at high redshifts, provided that dark stars make up at least 1 percent of the total stellar mass in such objects.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.0025  [pdf] - 332440
The WIMP capture process for dark stars in the early universe
Comments: 13 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2010-05-31
The first stars to form in the universe may have been dark stars, powered by dark matter annihilation instead of nuclear fusion. The initial amount of dark matter gathered by the star gravitationally can sustain it only for a limited period of time. It has been suggested that capture of additional dark matter from the environment can prolong the dark star phase even to the present day. Here we show that this capture process is ineffective to prolong the life of the first generation of dark stars. We construct a Monte-Carlo simulation that follows each Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) in the dark matter halo as its orbit responds to the formation and evolution of the dark star, as it scatters off the star's nuclei, and as it annihilates inside the star. A rapid depletion of the WIMPs on orbits that cross the star causes the demise of the first generation of dark stars. We suggest that a second generation of dark stars may in principle survive much longer through capture. We comment on the effect of relaxing our assumptions.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1004.1258  [pdf] - 903056
Dark Matter that can form Dark Stars
Comments: 17 pages, 4 figures, figure 1 fixed
Submitted: 2010-04-08, last modified: 2010-04-09
The first stars to form in the Universe may be powered by the annihilation of weakly interacting dark matter particles. These so-called dark stars, if observed, may give us a clue about the nature of dark matter. Here we examine which models for particle dark matter satisfy the conditions for the formation of dark stars. We find that in general models with thermal dark matter lead to the formation of dark stars, with few notable exceptions: heavy neutralinos in the presence of coannihilations, annihilations that are resonant at dark matter freeze-out but not in dark stars, some models of neutrinophilic dark matter annihilating into neutrinos only and lighter than about 50 GeV. In particular, we find that a thermal DM candidate in standard Cosmology always forms a dark star as long as its mass is heavier than about 50 GeV and the thermal average of its annihilation cross section is the same at the decoupling temperature and during the dark star formation, as for instance in the case of an annihilation cross section with a non-vanishing s-wave contribution.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1003.4748  [pdf] - 137068
SUSY Tools for Dark Matter and at the Colliders
Comments: 20 pages, 4 figures, Chapter 16 of the book "Particle Dark Matter: Observations, Models and Searches" edited by G. Bertone, Cambridge University Press, http://cambridge.org/us/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521763684
Submitted: 2010-03-24
With present and upcoming SUSY searches both directly, indirectly and at accelerators, the need for accurate calculations is large. We will here go through some of the tools available both from a dark matter point of view and at accelerators. For natural reasons, we will focus on public tools, even though there are some rather sophisticated private tools as well.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1003.4442  [pdf] - 903013
Positrons in Cosmic Rays from Dark Matter Annihilations for Uplifted Higgs Regions in MSSM
Comments: 11 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2010-03-23
We point out that there are regions in the MSSM parameter space which successfully provide a dark matter (DM) annihilation explanation for observed positron excess (e.g. PAMELA), while still remaining in agreement with all other data sets. Such regions (e.g. the uplifted Higgs region) can realize an enhanced neutralino DM annihilation dominantly into leptons via a Breit-Wigner resonance through the CP-odd Higgs channel. Such regions can give the proper thermal relic DM abundance, and the DM annihilation products are compatible with current antiproton and gamma ray observations. This scenario can succeed without introducing any additional degrees of freedom beyond those already in the MSSM.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.0015  [pdf] - 1958025
Axion cold dark matter in non-standard cosmologies
Comments: 38 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2009-11-30
We study the parameter space of cold dark matter axions in two cosmological scenarios with non-standard thermal histories before Big Bang nucleosynthesis: the Low Temperature Reheating (LTR) cosmology and the kination cosmology. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks during inflation, we find more allowed parameter space in the LTR cosmology than in the standard cosmology and less in the kination cosmology. On the contrary, if the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks after inflation, the Peccei-Quinn scale is orders of magnitude higher than standard in the LTR cosmology and lower in the kination cosmology. We show that the axion velocity dispersion may be used to distinguish some of these non-standard cosmologies. Thus, axion cold dark matter may be a good probe of the history of the Universe before Big Bang nucleosynthesis.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.0323  [pdf] - 902277
The case for a directional dark matter detector and the status of current experimental efforts
Comments: 48 pages, 37 figures, whitepaper on direct dark matter detection with directional sensitivity
Submitted: 2009-11-01
We present the case for a dark matter detector with directional sensitivity. This document was developed at the 2009 CYGNUS workshop on directional dark matter detection, and contains contributions from theorists and experimental groups in the field. We describe the need for a dark matter detector with directional sensitivity; each directional dark matter experiment presents their project's status; and we close with a feasibility study for scaling up to a one ton directional detector, which would cost around $150M.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.4377  [pdf] - 1958024
Dark Matter Axions Revisited
Comments: 14 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2009-03-25, last modified: 2009-10-20
We study for what specific values of the theoretical parameters the axion can form the totality of cold dark matter. We examine the allowed axion parameter region in the light of recent data collected by the WMAP5 mission plus baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae, and assume an inflationary scenario and standard cosmology. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is restored after inflation, we recover the usual relation between axion mass and density, so that an axion mass $m_a =67\pm2{\rm \mu eV}$ makes the axion 100% of the cold dark matter. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is broken during inflation, the axion can instead be 100% of the cold dark matter for $m_a < 15{\rm meV}$ provided a specific value of the initial misalignment angle $\theta_i$ is chosen in correspondence to a given value of its mass $m_a$. Large values of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale correspond to small, perhaps uncomfortably small, values of the initial misalignment angle $\theta_i$.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.3941  [pdf] - 902148
Axion cold dark matter revisited
Comments: 3 pages, 2 figures. Talk given at TAUP 2009 conference, Rome, Italy, July 1-5 2009
Submitted: 2009-10-20
We study for what specific values of the theoretical parameters the axion can form the totality of cold dark matter. We examine the allowed axion parameter region in the light of recent data collected by the WMAP5 mission plus baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae \cite{komatsu}, and assume an inflationary scenario and standard cosmology. We also upgrade the treatment of anharmonicities in the axion potential, which we find important in certain cases. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is restored after inflation, we recover the usual relation between axion mass and density, so that an axion mass $m_a =(85 \pm 3){\rm \mu eV}$ makes the axion 100% of the cold dark matter. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is broken during inflation, the axion can instead be 100% of the cold dark matter for $m_a < 15{\rm meV}$ provided a specific value of the initial misalignment angle $\theta_i$ is chosen in correspondence to a given value of its mass $m_a$. Large values of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale correspond to small, perhaps uncomfortably small, values of the initial misalignment angle $\theta_i$.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.2713  [pdf] - 20452
Compatibility of DAMA/LIBRA dark matter detection with other searches in light of new Galactic rotation velocity measurements
Comments: 18 pages, 6 figures. v2: added reference, minor changes to match JCAP version
Submitted: 2009-01-18, last modified: 2009-09-11
The DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation data, which may be interpreted as a signal for the existence of weakly interacting dark matter (WIMPs) in our galactic halo, are re-examined in light of new measurements of the local velocity relative to the galactic halo. In the vicinity of the Sun, the velocity of the Galactic disk has been estimated to be 250 km/s rather than 220 km/s. Our analysis is performed both with and without the channeling effect included. The best fit regions to the DAMA data are shown to move to slightly lower WIMP masses. Compatibility of DAMA data with null results from other experiments (CDMS, XENON10, and CRESST I) is investigated given these new velocities. A small region of spin-independent (elastic) scattering for 7-8 GeV WIMP masses remains at 3$\sigma$. Spin-dependent scattering off of protons is viable for 5-15 GeV WIMP masses for direct detection experiments (but has been argued by others to be further constrained by Super-Kamiokande due to annihilation in the Sun).
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.1253  [pdf] - 148498
Non-Thermal Production of WIMPs, Cosmic $e^\pm$ Excesses and $\gamma$-rays from the Galactic Center
Comments: 23 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2009-05-08
In this paper we propose a dark matter model and study aspects of its phenomenology. Our model is based on a new dark matter sector with a U(1)' gauge symmetry plus a discrete symmetry added to the Standard Model of particle physics. The new fields of the dark matter sector have no hadronic charges and couple only to leptons. Our model can not only give rise to the observed neutrino mass hierarchy, but can also generate the baryon number asymmetry via non-thermal leptogenesis. The breaking of the new U(1)' symmetry produces cosmic strings. The dark matter particles are produced non-thermally from cosmic string loop decay which allows one to obtain sufficiently large annihilation cross sections to explain the observed cosmic ray positron and electron fluxes recently measured by the PAMELA, ATIC, PPB-BETS, Fermi-LAT, and HESS experiments while maintaining the required overall dark matter energy density. The high velocity of the dark matter particles from cosmic string loop decay leads to a low phase space density and thus to a dark matter profile with a constant density core in contrast to what happens in a scenario with thermally produced cold dark matter where the density keeps rising towards the center. As a result, the flux of gamma rays radiated from the final leptonic states of dark matter annihilation from the Galactic center is suppressed and satisfies the constraints from the HESS gamma-ray observations.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.2926  [pdf] - 157728
Solar neutrino limit on axions and keV-mass bosons
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure, version accepted by PRD. Results corrected for erroneous axio-electric and Compton cross sections in the literature
Submitted: 2008-07-18, last modified: 2009-04-29
The all-flavor solar neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) constrains nonstandard energy losses to less than about 10% of the Sun's photon luminosity, superseding a helioseismological argument and providing new limits on the interaction strength of low-mass particles. For the axion-photon coupling strength we find g_a\gamma < 7E-10 1/GeV. We also derive explicit limits on the Yukawa coupling to electrons of pseudoscalar, scalar and vector bosons with keV-scale masses.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.3070  [pdf] - 315723
Dark Stars: a new look at the First Stars in the Universe
Comments: 14 pages, 4 figures, 1 Table, Submitted to APJ
Submitted: 2009-03-18
We have proposed that the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may be Dark Stars (DS), powered by dark matter heating rather than by nuclear fusion, and in this paper we examine the history of these DS. The power source is annihilation of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) which are their own antiparticles. These WIMPs are the best motivated dark matter (DM) candidates and may be discovered by ongoing direct or indirect detection searches (e.g. FERMI /GLAST) or at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A new stellar phase results, powered by DM annihilation as long as there is DM fuel, from millions to billions of years. We build up the dark stars from the time DM heating becomes the dominant power source, accreting more and more matter onto them. We have included many new effects in the current study, including a variety of particle masses and accretion rates, nuclear burning, feedback mechanisms, and possible repopulation of DM density due to capture. Remarkably, we find that in all these cases, we obtain the same result: the first stars are very large, 500-1000 times as massive as the Sun; as well as puffy (radii 1-10 A.U.), bright ($10^6-10^7 L_\odot$), and cool ($T_{surf} < $10,000 K) during the accretion. These results differ markedly from the standard picture in the absence of DM heating. Hence DS should be observationally distinct from standard Pop III stars. In addition, DS avoid the (unobserved) element enrichment produced by the standard first stars. Once the dark matter fuel is exhausted, the DS becomes a heavy main sequence star; these stars eventually collapse to form massive black holes that may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes and intermediate black holes, and explain ARCADE data.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.0101  [pdf] - 900636
Dark Stars: A New Study of the FIrst Stars in the Universe
Comments: article to be published in special issue on Dark Matter and Particle Physics in New Journal of Physics
Submitted: 2009-02-28
We have proposed that the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may be Dark Stars (DS), powered by dark matter heating rather than by nuclear fusion. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, which may be their own antipartners, collect inside the first stars and annihilate to produce a heat source that can power the stars. A new stellar phase results, a Dark Star, powered by dark matter annihilation as long as there is dark matter fuel, with lifetimes from millions to billions of years. We find that the first stars are very bright ($\sim 10^6 L_\odot$) and cool ($T_{surf} < 10,000$K) during the DS phase, and grow to be very massive (500-1000 times as massive as the Sun). These results differ markedly from the standard picture in the absence of DM heating, in which the maximum mass is about 140$M_\odot$ and the temperatures are much hotter ($T_{surf} > 50,000$K); hence DS should be observationally distinct from standard Pop III stars. Once the dark matter fuel is exhausted, the DS becomes a heavy main sequence star; these stars eventually collapse to form massive black holes that may provide seeds for supermassive black holes observed at early times as well as explanations for recent ARCADE data and for intermediate black holes.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.4574  [pdf] - 121228
Dark Stars: D\"od och \AA teruppst\aa ndelse
Comments: 3 pages, 1 figure, and conference proceeding for IDM Sweden
Submitted: 2009-01-28
The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the universe may be Dark Stars, powered by dark matter heating rather than by fusion. Weakly interacting massive particles, which are their own antiparticles, can annihilate and provide an important heat source for the first stars in the universe. This and the previous contribution present the story of Dark Stars. In this second part, we describe the structure of Dark Stars and predict that they are very massive ($\sim 800 M_\odot$), cool (6000 K), bright ($\sim 10^6 L_\odot$), long-lived ($\sim 10^6$ years), and probable precursors to (otherwise unexplained) supermassive black holes. Later, once the initial dark matter fuel runs out and fusion sets in, dark matter annihilation can predominate again if the scattering cross section is strong enough, so that a Dark Star is born again.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.4578  [pdf] - 121229
Dark Stars: Begynnelsen
Comments: 3 pages, 2 figures, and proceeding for IDM 2008
Submitted: 2009-01-28
The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the universe may be Dark Stars, powered by dark matter heating rather than by fusion. Weakly interacting massive particles, which are their own antiparticles, can annihilate and provide an important heat source for the first stars in the universe. This and the following contribution present the story of Dark Stars. In this first part, we describe the conditions under which dark stars form in the early universe: 1) high dark matter densities, 2) the annihilation products get stuck inside the star, and 3) dark matter heating wins over all other cooling or heating mechanisms.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.3607  [pdf] - 900378
Compatibility of DAMA/LIBRA dark matter detection with other searches
Comments: 45 pages, 23 figures. v2: Added references and minor revisions. v3: improvements to some null experiment analyses and DAMA g.o.f. statistical constraints; added DAMA total event rate constraint
Submitted: 2008-08-26, last modified: 2009-01-27
The DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation data, which may be interpreted as a signal for the existence of weakly interacting dark matter (WIMPs) in our galactic halo, are examined in light of null results from other experiments. We use the energy spectrum of the combined DAMA modulation data given in 36 bins, and include the effect of channeling. Several statistical tools are implemented in our study: likelihood ratio with a global fit and with raster scans in the WIMP mass and goodness-of-fit (g.o.f.). These approaches allow us to differentiate between the preferred (global best fit) and allowed (g.o.f.) parameter regions. It is hard to find WIMP masses and couplings consistent with all existing data sets. For spin-independent (SI) interactions, the best fit DAMA regions are ruled out to the 3$\sigma$ C.L., even with channeling taken into account. However, for WIMP masses of ~8 GeV some parameters outside these regions still yield a moderately reasonable fit to the DAMA data and are compatible with all 90% C.L. upper limits from negative searches, when channeling is included. For spin-dependent (SD) interactions with proton-only couplings, a range of masses below 10 GeV is compatible with DAMA and other experiments, with and without channeling, when SuperK indirect detection constraints are included; without the SuperK constraints, masses as high as ~20 GeV are compatible. For SD neutron-only couplings we find no parameters compatible with all the experiments. Mixed SD couplings are examined: e.g. ~8 GeV mass WIMPs with a_n = +/- a_p are found to be consistent with all experiments. In short, there are surviving regions at low mass for both SI and SD interactions; if indirect detection limits are relaxed, some SD proton-only couplings at high masses also survive.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:0812.4844  [pdf] - 1001244
Dark Stars: the First Stars in the Universe may be powered by Dark Matter Heating
Comments: 6 pages, Eighth UCLA Symposium: Sources and Detection of Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe, proceedings
Submitted: 2008-12-28
A new line of research on Dark Stars is reviewed, which suggests that the first stars to exist in the universe were powered by dark matter heating rather than by fusion. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, which may be there own antipartmers, collect inside the first stars and annihilate to produce a heat source that can power the stars. A new stellar phase results, a Dark Star, powered by dark matter annihilation as long as there is dark matter fuel.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:0812.0795  [pdf] - 19129
Section on Prospects for Dark Matter Detection of the White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-Based TeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy
Comments: Report from the Dark Matter Science Working group of the APS commissioned White paper on ground-based TeV gamma ray astronomy (19 pages, 9 figures)
Submitted: 2008-12-03
This is a report on the findings of the dark matter science working group for the white paper on the status and future of TeV gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper was commissioned by the American Physical Society, and the full white paper can be found on astro-ph (arXiv:0810.0444). This detailed section discusses the prospects for dark matter detection with future gamma-ray experiments, and the complementarity of gamma-ray measurements with other indirect, direct or accelerator-based searches. We conclude that any comprehensive search for dark matter should include gamma-ray observations, both to identify the dark matter particle (through the charac- teristics of the gamma-ray spectrum) and to measure the distribution of dark matter in galactic halos.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.4551  [pdf] - 17810
DUSEL Theory White Paper
Comments: In order to assess the physics interest in the DUSEL project we have posted the DUSEL Theory White paper on the following CCAPP link (http://ccapp.osu.edu/whitepaper.html). Please read the white paper and, if you are interested, use the link to show your support by co- signing the white paper
Submitted: 2008-10-24
The NSF has chosen the site for the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) to be in Lead, South Dakota. In fact, the state of South Dakota has already stepped up to the plate and contributed its own funding for the proposed lab, see http://www.sanfordlaboratoryathomestake.org/index.html. The final decision by NSF for funding the Initial Suite of Experiments for DUSEL will be made early in 2009. At that time the NSF Science Board must make a decision. Of order 200 experimentalists have already expressed an interest in performing experiments at DUSEL. In order to assess the interest of the theoretical community, the Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics (CCAPP) at The Ohio State University (OSU) organized a 3-day DUSEL Theory Workshop in Columbus, Ohio from April 4 - 6, 2008. The workshop focused on the scientific case for six proposed experiments for DUSEL: long baseline neutrino oscillations, proton decay, dark matter, astrophysical neutrinos, neutrinoless double beta decay and N-Nbar oscillations. The outcome of this workshop is the DUSEL Theory White paper addressing the scientific case at a level which may be useful in the decision making process for policy makers at the NSF and in the U.S. Congress. In order to assess the physics interest in the DUSEL project we have posted the DUSEL Theory White paper on the following CCAPP link http://ccapp.osu.edu/whitepaper.html . Please read the white paper and, if you are interested, use the link to show your support by co-signing the white paper.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:0806.0617  [pdf] - 314948
Stellar Structure of Dark Stars: a first phase of Stellar Evolution due to Dark Matter Annihilation
Comments: 14 pages, 1 figure, 1 table, shortened manuscript for publication, updated mansucript in accordance with referee's report
Submitted: 2008-06-03, last modified: 2008-09-21
Dark Stars are the very first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the universe: the first stars to form (typically at redshifts $z \sim 10-50$) are powered by heating from dark matter (DM) annihilation instead of fusion (if the DM is made of particles which are their own antiparticles). We find equilibrium polytropic configurations for these stars; we start from the time DM heating becomes important ($M \sim 1-10 M_\odot$) and build up the star via accretion up to 1000 M$_\odot$. The dark stars, with an assumed particle mass of 100 GeV, are found to have luminosities of a few times $10^6$ L$_\odot$, surface temperatures of 4000--10,000 K, radii $\sim 10^{14}$ cm, lifetimes of at least $ 0.5$ Myr, and are predicted to show lines of atomic and molecular hydrogen. Dark stars look quite different from standard metal-free stars without DM heating: they are far more massive (e.g. $\sim 800 M_\odot$ for 100 GeV WIMPs), cooler, and larger, and can be distinguished in future observations, possibly even by JWST or TMT.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.2349  [pdf] - 10991
Ultra-cold WIMPs: relics of non-standard pre-BBN cosmologies
Comments: Six pages, one figure- Extensive additions and rewriting with respect to v1. Figure changed
Submitted: 2008-03-17, last modified: 2008-08-20
Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are one of very few probes of cosmology before Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). We point out that in scenarios in which the Universe evolves in a non-standard manner during and after WIMP kinetic decoupling, the horizon mass scale at decoupling can be smaller and the dark matter WIMPs can be colder than in standard cosmology. This would lead to much smaller first objects in hierarchical structure formation. In low reheating temperature scenarios the effect may be large enough as to noticeably enhance indirect detection signals in GLAST and other detectors, by up to two orders of magnitude.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.0472  [pdf] - 15125
Dark Stars: Dark Matter in the First Stars leads to a New Phase of Stellar Evolution
Comments: 5 pages, Conference Proceeding for IAU Symposium 255: Low-Metallicity Star Formaion: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies
Submitted: 2008-08-04
The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the universe may be Dark Stars, powered by dark matter heating rather than by fusion. Weakly interacting massive particles, which are their own antiparticles, can annihilate and provide an important heat source for the first stars in the the universe. This talk presents the story of these Dark Stars. We make predictions that the first stars are very massive ($\sim 800 M_\odot$), cool (6000 K), bright ($\sim 10^6 L_\odot$), long-lived ($\sim 10^6$ years), and probable precursors to (otherwise unexplained) supermassive black holes. Later, once the initial DM fuel runs out and fusion sets in, DM annihilation can predominate again if the scattering cross section is strong enough, so that a Dark Star is born again.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.3540  [pdf] - 314936
Dark Matter Densities during the Formation of the First Stars and in Dark Stars
Comments: 14 pages, 3 figures, and 1 table
Submitted: 2008-05-22
The first stars in the universe form inside $\sim 10^6 M_\odot$ dark matter (DM) haloes whose initial density profiles are laid down by gravitational collapse in hierarchical structure formation scenarios. During the formation of the first stars in the universe, the baryonic infall compresses the dark matter further. The resultant dark matter density is presented here, using an algorithm originally developed by Young to calculate changes to the profile as the result of adiabatic infall in a spherical halo model; the Young prescription takes into account the non-circular motions of halo particles. The density profiles obtained in this way are found to be within a factor of two of those obtained using the simple adiabatic contraction prescription of Blumenthal et al. Our results hold regardless of the nature of the dark matter or its interactions and rely merely on gravity. If the dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles, which are their own antiparticles, their densities are high enough that their annihilation in the first protostars can indeed provide an important heat source and prevent the collapse all the way to fusion. In short, a ``Dark Star'' phase of stellar evolution, powered by DM annihilation, may indeed describe the first stars in the universe.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:0712.0053  [pdf] - 7623
Directional recoil rates for WIMP direct detection
Comments: 39 pages, 15 figures
Submitted: 2007-12-02, last modified: 2008-03-02
New techniques for the laboratory direct detection of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are sensitive to the recoil direction of the struck nuclei. We compute and compare the directional recoil rates ${dR}/{d\cos\theta}$ (where $\theta$ is the angle measured from a reference direction in the sky) for several WIMP velocity distributions including the standard dark halo and anisotropic models such as Sikivie's late-infall halo model and logarithmic-ellipsoidal models. Since some detectors may be unable to distinguish the beginning of the recoil track from its end (lack of head-tail discrimination), we introduce a ``folded'' directional recoil rate ${dR}/{d|\cos\theta|}$, where $|\cos\theta|$ does not distinguish the head from the tail of the track. We compute the CS$_2$ and CF$_4$ exposures required to distinguish a signal from an isotropic background noise, and find that ${dR}/{d|\cos\theta|}$ is effective for the standard dark halo and some but not all anisotropic models.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:0705.0521  [pdf] - 982
Dark matter and the first stars: a new phase of stellar evolution
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures; replaced with accepted version
Submitted: 2007-05-03, last modified: 2007-12-04
A mechanism is identified whereby dark matter (DM) in protostellar halos dramatically alters the current theoretical framework for the formation of the first stars. Heat from neutralino DM annihilation is shown to overwhelm any cooling mechanism, consequently impeding the star formation process and possibly leading to a new stellar phase. A "dark star'' may result: a giant ($\gtrsim 1$ AU) hydrogen-helium star powered by DM annihilation instead of nuclear fusion. Observational consequences are discussed.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:0709.2369  [pdf] - 4980
The Effect of Dark Matter on the First Stars: A New Phase of Stellar Evolution
Comments: 3 pages, 2 figures, Proceedings for First Stars 2007 Conference in Santa Fe, NM, July 2007
Submitted: 2007-09-14
Dark matter (DM) in protostellar halos can dramatically alter the current theoretical framework for the formation of the first stars. Heat from supersymmetric DM annihilation can overwhelm any cooling mechanism, consequently impeding the star formation process and possibly leading to a new stellar phase. The first stars to form in the universe may be ``dark stars''; i.e., giant (larger than 1 AU) hydrogen-helium stars powered by DM annihilation instead of nuclear fusion. Possibilities for detecting dark stars are discussed.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605719  [pdf] - 82406
Deep Underground Science and Engineering Lab: S1 Dark Matter Working Group
Comments: Final working group report of 17 Feb 2007 updated to address reviewer comments (Latex, 32 pages)
Submitted: 2006-05-30, last modified: 2007-04-23
A study of the current status of WIMP dark matter searches has been made in the context of scientific and technical planning for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in the U.S. The table of contents follows: 1. Overview 2. WIMP Dark Matter: Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Particle Physics 3. Direct Detection of WIMPs 4. Indirect Detection of WIMPs 5. Dark Matter Candidates and New Physics in the Laboratory 6. Synergies with Other Sub-Fields 7. Direct Detection Experiments: Status and Future Prospects 8. Infrastructure 9. International Context 10. Summary and Outlook 11. Acknowledgments
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0602400  [pdf] - 79976
Stellar Orbit Constraints on Neutralino Annihilation at the Galactic Center
Comments: replaced with accepted version, improved presentation, some figures corrected, results unchanged
Submitted: 2006-02-17, last modified: 2006-08-18
Dark matter annihilation has been proposed to explain the TeV gamma rays observed from the Galactic Center. We study constraints on this hypothesis coming from the mass profile around the Galactic Center measured by observing stellar dynamics. We show that for current particle models, the constraints on the dark matter density profile from measurements of mass by infrared observations are comparable to the constraints from the measurements of the TeV source extension.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0608390  [pdf] - 84267
Phase-space distribution of unbound dark matter near the Sun
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures (better rendered in ps than pdf)
Submitted: 2006-08-18
We resolve discrepancies in previous analyses of the flow of collisionless dark matter particles in the Sun's gravitational field. We determine the phase-space distribution of the flow both numerically, tracing particle trajectories back in time, and analytically, providing a simple correct relation between the velocity of particles at infinity and at the Earth. We use our results to produce sky maps of the distribution of arrival directions of dark matter particles on Earth at various times of the year. We assume various Maxwellian velocity distributions at infinity describing the standard dark halo and streams of dark matter. We illustrate the formation of a ring, analogous to the Einstein ring, when the Earth is directly downstream of the Sun.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0607121  [pdf] - 83324
Annual Modulation of Dark Matter in the Presence of Streams
Comments: 27 pages, 9 figures. v2: Added reference and minor revisions to match PRD version
Submitted: 2006-07-06, last modified: 2006-08-11
In addition to a smooth component of WIMP dark matter in galaxies, there may be streams of material; the effects of WIMP streams on direct detection experiments is examined in this paper. The contribution to the count rate due to the stream cuts off at some characteristic energy. Near this cutoff energy, the stream contribution to the annual modulation of recoils in the detector is comparable to that of the thermalized halo, even if the stream represents only a small portion (~5% or less) of the local halo density. Consequently the total modulation may be quite different than would be expected for the standard halo model alone: it may not be cosine-like and can peak at a different date than expected. The effects of speed, direction, density, and velocity dispersion of a stream on the modulation are examined. We describe how the observation of a modulation can be used to determine these stream parameters. Alternatively, the presence of a dropoff in the recoil spectrum can be used to determine the WIMP mass if the stream speed is known. The annual modulation of the cutoff energy together with the annual modulation of the overall signal provide a "smoking gun" for WIMP detection.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0511046  [pdf] - 77404
New Models for a Triaxial Milky Way Spheroid and Effect on the Microlensing Optical Depth to the Large Magellanic Cloud
Comments: 26 pages, 2 figures. v2: minor revisions. v3: expanded discussion of the local spheroid density and minor revisions to match version published in Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics (JCAP)
Submitted: 2005-11-01, last modified: 2006-06-20
We obtain models for a triaxial Milky Way spheroid based on data by Newberg and Yanny. The best fits to the data occur for a spheroid center that is shifted by 3kpc from the Galactic Center. We investigate effects of the triaxiality on the microlensing optical depth to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The optical depth can be used to ascertain the number of Massive Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs); a larger spheroid contribution would imply fewer Halo MACHOs. On the one hand, the triaxiality gives rise to more spheroid mass along the line of sight between us and the LMC and thus a larger optical depth. However, shifting the spheroid center leads to an effect that goes in the other direction: the best fit to the spheroid center is_away_ from the line of sight to the LMC. As a consequence, these two effects tend to cancel so that the change in optical depth due to the Newberg/Yanny triaxial halo is at most 50%. After subtracting the spheroid contribution in the four models we consider, the MACHO contribution (central value) to the mass of the Galactic Halo varies from \~(8-20)% if all excess lensing events observed by the MACHO collaboration are assumed to be due to MACHOs. Here the maximum is due to the original MACHO collaboration results and the minimum is consistent with 0% at the 1 sigma error level in the data.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0408346  [pdf] - 66837
Can WIMP Spin Dependent Couplings explain DAMA data, in light of Null Results from Other Experiments?
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures. v2: added Baksan results, added references, other minor changes. v3: minor changes to match PRD version
Submitted: 2004-08-18, last modified: 2005-01-14
We examine whether the annual modulation found by the DAMA dark matter experiment can be explained by Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), in light of new null results from other experiments. CDMS II has already ruled out most WIMP-nucleus spin-independent couplings as an explanation for DAMA data. Hence we here focus on spin-dependent (axial vector; SD) couplings of WIMPs to nuclei. We expand upon previous work by (i) considering the general case of coupling to both protons and neutrons and (ii) incorporating bounds from all existing experiments. We note the surprising fact that CMDS II places one of the strongest bounds on the WIMP-neutron cross-section, and show that SD WIMP-neutron scattering alone is excluded. We also show that SD WIMP-proton scattering alone is allowed only for WIMP masses in the 5-13 GeV range. For the general case of coupling to both protons and neutrons, we find that, for WIMP masses above 13 GeV and below 5 GeV, there is no region of parameter space that is compatible with DAMA and all other experiments. In the range (5-13) GeV, we find acceptable regions of parameter space, including ones in which the WIMP-neutron coupling is comparable to the WIMP-proton coupling.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0309279  [pdf] - 59106
Detectability of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles in the Sagittarius Dwarf Tidal Stream
Comments: 26 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2003-09-09, last modified: 2004-08-13
Tidal streams of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr) may be showering dark matter onto the solar system and contributing approx (0.3--23)% of the local density of our Galactic Halo. If the Sagittarius galaxy contains WIMP dark matter, the extra contribution from the stream gives rise to a step-like feature in the energy recoil spectrum in direct dark matter detection. For our best estimate of stream velocity (300 km/sec) and direction (the plane containing the Sgr dwarf and its debris), the count rate is maximum on June 28 and minimum on December 27 (for most recoil energies), and the location of the step oscillates yearly with a phase opposite to that of the count rate. In the CDMS experiment, for 60 GeV WIMPs, the location of the step oscillates between 35 and 42 keV, and for the most favorable stream density, the stream should be detectable at the 11 sigma level in four years of data with 10 keV energy bins. Planned large detectors like XENON, CryoArray and the directional detector DRIFT may also be able to identify the Sgr stream.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0407039  [pdf] - 387157
Markov Chain Monte Carlo Exploration of Minimal Supergravity with Implications for Dark Matter
Comments: 16 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2004-07-02
We explore the full parameter space of Minimal Supergravity (mSUGRA), allowing all four continuous parameters (the scalar mass m_0, the gaugino mass m_1/2, the trilinear coupling A_0, and the ratio of Higgs vacuum expectation values tan beta) to vary freely. We apply current accelerator constraints on sparticle and Higgs masses, and on the b -> s gamma branching ratio, and discuss the impact of the constraints on g_mu-2. To study dark matter, we apply the WMAP constraint on the cold dark matter density. We develop Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to explore the parameter regions consistent with WMAP, finding them to be considerably superior to previously used methods for exploring supersymmetric parameter spaces. Finally, we study the reach of current and future direct detection experiments in light of the WMAP constraint.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0406204  [pdf] - 1468655
DarkSUSY: Computing Supersymmetric Dark Matter Properties Numerically
Comments: 35 pages, no figures
Submitted: 2004-06-08
The question of the nature of the dark matter in the Universe remains one of the most outstanding unsolved problems in basic science. One of the best motivated particle physics candidates is the lightest supersymmetric particle, assumed to be the lightest neutralino - a linear combination of the supersymmetric partners of the photon, the Z boson and neutral scalar Higgs particles. Here we describe DarkSUSY, a publicly-available advanced numerical package for neutralino dark matter calculations. In DarkSUSY one can compute the neutralino density in the Universe today using precision methods which include resonances, pair production thresholds and coannihilations. Masses and mixings of supersymmetric particles can be computed within DarkSUSY or with the help of external programs such as FeynHiggs, ISASUGRA and SUSPECT. Accelerator bounds can be checked to identify viable dark matter candidates. DarkSUSY also computes a large variety of astrophysical signals from neutralino dark matter, such as direct detection in low-background counting experiments and indirect detection through antiprotons, antideuterons, gamma-rays and positrons from the Galactic halo or high-energy neutrinos from the center of the Earth or of the Sun. Here we describe the physics behind the package. A detailed manual will be provided with the computer package.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0405402  [pdf] - 64922
Variable stars towards the bulge of M31: the AGAPE catalogue
Comments: 11 pages, Latex, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2004-05-20
We present the AGAPE astrometric and photometric catalogue of 1579 variable stars in a 14'x10' field centred on M31. This work is the first survey devoted to variable stars in the bulge of M31. The R magnitudes of the objects and the B-R colours suggest that our sample is dominated by red long-period variable stars (LPV), with a possible overlap with Cepheid-like type II stars. Twelve nova candidates are identified. Correlations with other catalogues suggest that 2 novae could be recurrent novae and provide possible optical counterparts for 2 supersoft X-ray sources candidates observed with Chandra.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0310334  [pdf] - 59997
The Effects of the Sagittarius Dwarf Tidal Stream on Dark Matter Detectors
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures. Replaced with version to appear in Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2003-10-13, last modified: 2004-03-12
The Sagittarius dwarf tidal stream may be showering dark matter onto the solar neighborhood, which can change the results and interpretation of WIMP direct detection experiments. Stars in the stream may already have been detected in the solar neighborhood, and the dark matter in the stream is (0.3-25)% of the local density. Experiments should see an annually modulated steplike feature in the energy recoil spectrum that would be a smoking gun for WIMP detection. The total count rate in detectors is not a cosine curve in time and peaks at a different time of year than the standard case.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0403064  [pdf] - 63255
Introduction to Non-Baryonic Dark Matter
Comments: Lectures delivered at the NATO Advanced Study Institute "Frontiers of the Universe", 8-20 Sept 2003, Cargese, France; 50 pages, 28 figures
Submitted: 2004-03-02
These lectures on non-baryonic dark matter matter are divided into two parts. In the first part, I discuss the need for non-baryonic dark matter in light of recent results in cosmology, and I present some of the most popular candidates for non-baryonic dark matter. These include neutrinos, axions, neutralinos, WIMPZILLAs, etc. In the second part, I overview several observational techniques that can be employed to search for WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles) as non-baryonic dark matter. Among these techniques, I discuss the direct detection of WIMP dark matter, and its indirect detection through high-energy neutrinos, gamma-rays, positrons, etc.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0402080  [pdf] - 880707
Probing the Evolution of the Dark Energy Density with Future Supernova Surveys
Comments: submitted to PRD
Submitted: 2004-02-03
The time dependence of the dark energy density can be an important clue to the nature of dark energy in the universe. We show that future supernova data from dedicated telescopes (such as SNAP), when combined with data of nearby supernovae, can be used to determine how the dark energy density $\rho_X(z)$ depends on redshift, if $\rho_X(z)$ is not too close to a constant. For quantitative comparison, we have done an extensive study of a number of dark energy models. Based on these models we have simulated data sets in order to show that we can indeed reconstruct the correct sign of the time dependence of the dark energy density, outside of a degeneracy region centered on $1+w_0 = -w_1 z_{max}/3$ (where $z_{max}$ is the maximum redshift of the survey, e.g., $z_{max}=1.7$ for SNAP). We emphasize that, given the same data, one can obtain much more information about the dark energy density directly (and its time dependence) than about its equation of state.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0310845  [pdf] - 60508
Microlensing Candidates in M87 and the Virgo Cluster with the Hubble Space Telescope
Comments: 22 pages, 9 figures, revised version submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2003-10-29, last modified: 2003-12-12
The position of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 at the center of the Virgo Cluster means that the inferred column density of dark matter associated with both the cluster halo and the galaxy halo is quite large. This system is thus an important laboratory for studying massive dark objects in elliptical galaxies and galaxy clusters by gravitational microlensing, strongly complementing the studies of spiral galaxy halos performed in the Local Group. We have performed a microlensing survey of M87 with the WFPC2 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. Over a period of thirty days, with images taken once daily, we discover seven variable sources. Four are variable stars of some sort, two are consistent with classical novae, and one exhibits an excellent microlensing lightcurve, though with a very blue color implying the somewhat disfavored possibility of a horizontal branch source being lensed. Based on sensitivity calculations from artificial stars and from artificial lightcurves, we estimate the expected microlensing rate. We find that the detection of one event is consistent with a dark halo with a 20% contribution of microlensing objects for both M87 and the Virgo Cluster, similar to the value found from observations in the Local Group. Further work is required to test the hypothesized microlensing component to the cluster.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0209322  [pdf] - 114232
Fluid Interpretation of Cardassian Expansion
Comments: 25 pages, 1 figure. Replaced with published version. Title changed in journal
Submitted: 2002-09-26, last modified: 2003-10-13
A fluid interpretation of Cardassian expansion is developed. Here, the Friedmann equation takes the form $H^2 = g(\rho_M)$ where $\rho_M$ contains only matter and radiation (no vacuum). The function $g(\rhom)$ returns to the usual $8\pi\rhom/(3 m_{pl}^2)$ during the early history of the universe, but takes a different form that drives an accelerated expansion after a redshift $z \sim 1$. One possible interpretation of this function (and of the right hand side of Einstein's equations) is that it describes a fluid with total energy density $\rho_{tot} = {3 m_{pl}^2 \over 8 \pi} g(\rhom) = \rhom + \rho_K$ containing not only matter density (mass times number density) but also interaction terms $\rho_K$. These interaction terms give rise to an effective negative pressure which drives cosmological acceleration. These interactions may be due to interacting dark matter, e.g. with a fifth force between particles $F \sim r^{\alpha -1}$. Such interactions may be intrinsically four dimensional or may result from higher dimensional physics. A fully relativistic fluid model is developed here, with conservation of energy, momentum, and particle number. A modified Poisson's equation is derived. A study of fluctuations in the early universe is presented, although a fully relativistic treatment of the perturbations including gauge choice is as yet incomplete.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302064  [pdf] - 54691
Future Type Ia Supernova Data as Tests of Dark Energy from Modified Friedmann Equations
Comments: revised version accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2003-02-04, last modified: 2003-06-09
In the Cardassian model, dark energy density arises from modifications to the Friedmann equation, which becomes $H^2 = g(\rhom)$, where $g(\rhom)$ is a new function of the energy density. The universe is flat, matter dominated, and accelerating. The distance redshift relation predictions of generalized Cardassian models can be very different from generic quintessence models, and can be differentiated with data from upcoming pencil beam surveys of Type Ia Supernovae such as SNAP. We have found the interesting result that, once $\Omega_m$ is known to 10% accuracy, SNAP will be able to determine the sign of the time dependence of the dark energy density. Knowledge of this sign (which is related to the weak energy condition) will provide a first discrimination between various cosmological models that fit the current observational data (cosmological constant, quintessence, Cardassian expansion). Further, we have performed Monte Carlo simulations to illustrate how well one can reproduce the form of the dark energy density with SNAP. To be concrete we study a class of two parameter ($n$,$q$) generalized Cardassian models that includes the original Cardassian model (parametrized by $n$ only) as a special case. Examples are given of MP Cardassian models that fit current supernovae and CMB data, and prospects for differentiating between MP Cardassian and other models in future data are discussed. We also note that some Cardassian models can satisfy the weak energy condition $w>-1$ even with a dark energy component that has an effective equation of state $w_X < -1$.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0301106  [pdf] - 114340
Accurate relic densities with neutralino, chargino and sfermion coannihilations in mSUGRA
Comments: 32 pages, 14 figures, LaTeX, uses JHEP3.cls, Changes: references added, text clarified, conclusions unchanged
Submitted: 2003-01-15, last modified: 2003-03-26
Neutralinos arise as natural dark matter candidates in many supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model. We present a novel calculation of the neutralino relic abundance in which we include all so called coannihilation processes between neutralinos, charginos and sfermions, and, at the same time, we apply the state of the art technique to trace the freeze-out of a species in the early Universe. As a first application, we discuss here results valid in the mSUGRA framework; we enlight general trends as well as perform a detailed study of the neutralino relic densities in the mSUGRA parameter space. The emerging picture is fair agreement with previous analyses in the same framework, however we have the power to discuss it in many more details than previously done. E.g., we find that the cosmological bound on the neutralino mass is pushed up to ~565 GeV in the stau coannihilation region and to ~1500 GeV in the chargino coannihilation region.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0211238  [pdf] - 1591939
DarkSUSY - A numerical package for supersymmetric dark matter calculations
Comments: LaTeX, 6 pages, proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Identification of Dark Matter (idm2002), York, England, 2-6 September, 2002
Submitted: 2002-11-12
The question of the nature of dark matter in the Universe remains one of the most outstanding unsolved problems in basic science. One of the best motivated particle physics candidates is the lightest supersymmetric particle, assumed to be the lightest neutralino. We here describe DarkSUSY, an advanced numerical FORTRAN package for supersymmetric dark matter calculations. With DarkSUSY one can: (i) compute masses and compositions of various supersymmetric particles; (ii) compute the relic density of the lightest neutralino, using accurate methods which include the effects of resonances, pair production thresholds and coannihilations; (iii) check accelerator bounds to identify allowed supersymmetric models; and (iv) obtain neutralino detection rates for a variety of detection methods, including direct detection and indirect detection through antiprotons, gamma-rays and positrons from the Galactic halo or neutrinos from the center of the Earth or the Sun.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0211239  [pdf] - 1591940
The positron excess and supersymmetric dark matter
Comments: 6 pages, LaTeX, proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Identification of Dark Matter (idm2002), York, England, 2-6 September, 2002
Submitted: 2002-11-12
Using a new instrument, the HEAT collaboration has confirmed the excess of cosmic ray positrons that they first detected in 1994. We explore the possibility that this excess is due to the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the galactic halo. We confirm that neutralino annihilation can produce enough positrons to make up the measured excess only if there is an additional enhancement to the signal. We quantify the `boost factor' that is required in the signal for various models in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model parameter space, and find that a boost factor >30 provides good fits to the HEAT data. Such an enhancement in the signal could arise if we live in a clumpy halo.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0207673  [pdf] - 880605
Improved constraints on supersymmetric dark matter from muon g-2
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2002-07-31
The new measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon by the Brookhaven AGS experiment 821 again shows a discrepancy with the Standard Model value. We investigate the consequences of these new data for neutralino dark matter, updating and extending our previous work [E. A. Baltz and P. Gondolo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 5004 (2001)]. The measurement excludes the Standard Model value at 2.6sigma confidence. Taking the discrepancy as a sign of supersymmetry, we find that the lightest superpartner must be relatively light and it must have a relatively high elastic scattering cross section with nucleons, which brings it almost within reach of proposed direct dark matter searches. The SUSY signal from neutrino telescopes correlates fairly well with the elastic scattering cross section. The rate of cosmic ray antideuterons tends to be large in the allowed models, but the constraint has little effect on the rate of gamma ray lines. We stress that being more conservative may eliminate the discrepancy, but it does not eliminate the possibility of high astrophysical detection rates.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0201160  [pdf] - 47104
Gamma-Ray Summary Report
Comments: 28 pages, 18 figures, From Snowmass 2001 "The Future of Particle Physics"
Submitted: 2002-01-10
This paper reviews the field of gamma-ray astronomy and describes future experiments and prospects for advances in fundamental physics and high-energy astrophysics through gamma-ray measurements. We concentrate on recent progress in the understanding of active galaxies, and the use of these sources as probes of intergalactic space. We also describe prospects for future experiments in a number of areas of fundamental physics, including: searches for an annihilation line from neutralino dark matter, understanding the energetics of supermassive black holes, using AGNs as cosmological probes of the primordial radiation fields, constraints on quantum gravity, detection of a new spectral component from GRBs, and the prospects for detecting primordial black holes.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0109318  [pdf] - 44817
The cosmic ray positron excess and neutralino dark matter
Comments: 11 pages, 6 figures, matches published version (PRD)
Submitted: 2001-09-19, last modified: 2001-12-14
Using a new instrument, the HEAT collaboration has confirmed the excess of cosmic ray positrons that they first detected in 1994. We explore the possibility that this excess is due to the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the galactic halo. We confirm that neutralino annihilation can produce enough positrons to make up the measured excess only if there is an additional enhancement to the signal. We quantify the `boost factor' that is required in the signal for various models in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model parameter space, and study the dependence on various parameters. We find models with a boost factor greater than 30. Such an enhancement in the signal could arise if we live in a clumpy halo. We discuss what part of supersymmetric parameter space is favored (in that it gives the largest positron signal), and the consequences for other direct and indirect searches of supersymmetric dark matter.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0106480  [pdf] - 43276
On the direct detection of extragalactic WIMPs
Comments: 24 pages, 5 figures, author added, minor rewording to match published version
Submitted: 2001-06-26, last modified: 2001-10-02
We consider the direct detection of WIMPs reaching the Earth from outside the Milky Way. If these WIMPs form a distinct population they will, although of much lower flux than typical galactic halo WIMPs, have a number of features which might aid in their ultimate detectability: a high and essentially unique velocity ($\sim 600$ km/s in the galactic rest frame) due to their acceleration in entering the Milky Way, and most likely one or two unique flight directions at the Earth. This high velocity may be experimentally advantageous in direct detection experiments, since it gives a recoil signal at relatively high energy where background is generally much reduced. For a density of extragalactic WIMPs comparable to the critical density of the universe the count rate expected is very roughly the same as that of fast galactic WIMPs. If there is an increased density relative to critical associated with the Local Group of galaxies, say 10-30 times the critical density, there is a corresponding increase in rate and the extragalactic WIMPs would show up as a high energy shoulder in the recoil energy distribution. Evidence of such WIMPs as a separate population with these distinct properties would offer interesting information on the formation and prehistory of the galaxy.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9909509  [pdf] - 108545
Binary events and extragalactic planets in pixel microlensing
Comments: 11 pages, 8 figures, version to appear in ApJ combined with astro-ph/9909510
Submitted: 1999-09-30, last modified: 2001-05-29
Pixel microlensing, i.e. gravitational microlensing of unresolved stars, can be used to explore distant stellar systems, and as a bonus may be able to detect extragalactic planets. In these studies, binary-lens events with multiple high-magnification peaks are crucial. Considering only those events which exhibit caustic crossings, we estimate the fraction of binary events in several example pixel microlensing surveys and compare them to the fraction of binary events in a classical survey with resolved stars. We find a considerable enhancement of the relative rate of binary events in pixel microlensing surveys, relative to surveys with resolved sources. We calculate the rate distribution of binary events with respect to the time between caustic crossings. We consider possible surveys of M31 with ground-based telescopes and of M87 with HST and NGST. For the latter, a pixel microlensing survey taking one image a day may observe of order one dozen binary events per month.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0105249  [pdf] - 113810
Muon anomalous magnetic moment and supersymmetric dark matter
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures, to appear in proceedings of PASCOS'01
Submitted: 2001-05-23
The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon has recently been measured to be in conflict with the Standard Model prediction with an excess of 2.6 sigma. Taking this result as a measurement of the supersymmetric contribution, we find that at 95% confidence level it imposes an upper bound of about 500 GeV on the neutralino mass and forbids higgsino dark matter. More interestingly, it predicts an accessible lower bound on the direct detection rate, and it strongly favors models detectable by neutrino telescopes. Cosmic ray antideuterons may also be an interesting probe of such models.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0102147  [pdf] - 113735
Implications of muon anomalous magnetic moment for supersymmetric dark matter
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, revised version accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2001-02-12, last modified: 2001-03-27
The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon has recently been measured to be in conflict with the Standard Model prediction with an excess of 2.6 sigma. Taking the excess at face value as a measurement of the supersymmetric contribution, we find that at 95% confidence level it imposes an upper bound of 500 GeV on the neutralino mass and forbids higgsinos as being the bulk of cold dark matter. Other implications for the astrophysical detection of neutralinos include: an accessible minimum direct detection rate, lower bounds on the indirect detection rate of neutrinos from the Sun and the Earth, and a suppression of the intensity of gamma-ray lines from neutralino annihilations in the galactic halo.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0012234  [pdf] - 1507848
DarkSUSY - A numerical package for dark matter calculations in the MSSM
Comments: 6 pages, no figures. Contribution to the proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on the Identification of Dark Matter (IDM2000) in York, in press
Submitted: 2000-12-11
The question of the nature of the dark matter in the Universe remains one of the most outstanding unsolved problems in basic science. One of the best motivated particle physics candidates is the lightest supersymmetric particle, assumed to be the lightest neutralino. We here describe DarkSUSY, an advanced numerical FORTRAN package for supersymmetric dark matter calculations which we release for public use. With the help of this package, the masses and compositions of various supersymmetric particles can be computed, for given input parameters of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). For the lightest neutralino, the relic density is computed, using accurate methods which include the effects of resonances, pair production thresholds and coannihilations. Accelerator bounds are checked to identify viable dark matter candidates. Finally, detection rates are computed for a variety of detection methods, such as direct detection and indirect detection through antiprotons, gamma-rays and positrons from the Galactic halo or neutrinos from the center of the Earth or the Sun.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0002226  [pdf] - 113459
Either neutralino dark matter or cuspy dark halos
Comments: 12 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2000-02-21
We show that if the neutralino in the minimal supersymmetric standard model is the dark matter in our galaxy, there cannot be a dark matter cusp extending to the galactic center. Conversely, if a dark matter cusp extends to the galactic center, the neutralino cannot be the dark matter in our galaxy. We obtain these results considering the synchrotron emission from neutralino annihilations around the black hole at the galactic center.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9909510  [pdf] - 108546
Searching for extragalactic planets
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 1999-09-30
Are there other planetary systems in our Universe? Indirect evidence has been found for planets orbiting other stars in our galaxy: the gravity of orbiting planets makes the star wobble, and the resulting periodic Doppler shifts have been detected for about a dozen stars. But are there planets in other galaxies, millions of light years away? Here we suggest a method to search for extragalactic planetary systems: gravitational microlensing of unresolved stars. This technique may allow us to discover planets in elliptical galaxies, known to be far older than our own Milky Way, with broad implications for life in the Universe.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9906391  [pdf] - 107112
Dark matter annihilation at the galactic center
Comments: 4 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 1999-06-24
If cold dark matter is present at the galactic center, as in current models of the dark halo, it is accreted by the central black hole into a dense spike. Particle dark matter then annihilates strongly inside the spike, making it a compact source of photons, electrons, positrons, protons, antiprotons, and neutrinos. The spike luminosity depends on the density profile of the inner halo: halos with finite cores have unnoticeable spikes, while halos with inner cusps may have spikes so bright that the absence of a detected neutrino signal from the galactic center already places interesting upper limits on the density slope of the inner halo. Future neutrino telescopes observing the galactic center could probe the inner structure of the dark halo, or indirectly find the nature of dark matter.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9906033  [pdf] - 106754
Indirect Detection of Dark Matter in km-size Neutrino Telescopes
Comments: To be presented at the 26th ICRC, Salt Lake City, August, 1999
Submitted: 1999-06-02
Neutrino telescopes of kilometer size are currently being planned. They will be two or three orders of magnitude larger than presently operating detectors, but they will have a much higher muon energy threshold. We discuss the trade-off between area and energy threshold for indirect detection of neutralino dark matter captured in the Sun and in the Earth and annihilating into high energy neutrinos. We also study the effect of a higher threshold on the complementarity of different searches for supersymmetric dark matter.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9812334  [pdf] - 104441
AgapeZ1: a Large Amplification Microlensing Event or an Odd Variable Star Towards the Inner Bulge of M31
Comments: 4 pages with 5 figures
Submitted: 1998-12-17
AgapeZ1 is the brightest and the shortest duration microlensing candidate event found in the Agape data. It occured only 42" from the center of M31. Our photometry shows that the half intensity duration of the event6 is 4.8 days and at maximum brightness we measure a stellar magnitude of R=18.0 with B-R=0.80 mag color. A search on HST archives produced a single resolved star within the projected event position error box. Its magnitude is R=22.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9811027  [pdf] - 103653
Optical depth evaluation in pixel microlensing
Comments: 13 pages, 2 figures, Ap J Lett (accepted)
Submitted: 1998-11-02
We propose an estimator of the microlensing optical depth from pixel lensing data that involves only measurable quantities. In comparison to the only previously proposed estimator, it has the advantage of not being limited to events with large magnification at maximum, and it applies equally well to satellite and ground-based observations.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9807347  [pdf] - 102341
The Gamma-Ray Halo from Dark Matter Annihilations
Comments: 4 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 1998-07-31
A sophisticated analysis of EGRET data has found evidence for gamma-ray emission from the galactic halo. I entertain the possibility that part of the EGRET signal is due to WIMP annihilations in the halo. I show that a viable candidate with the required properties exists in a model with an extended Higgs sector. The candidate has a mass of 2--4 GeV, a relic density $\Omega \sim 0.1$ (for a Hubble constant of 60 km/s/Mpc), and a scattering cross section off nucleons in the range $10^{-5}$--$10^{-1}$ pb. The model satisfies present observational and experimental constraints, and makes strict predictions on the gamma-ray spectrum of the halo emission.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/9704411  [pdf] - 270519
Limits on R-parity violation from cosmic ray antiprotons
Comments: 11 pages, 4 figures, replaced to match published version
Submitted: 1997-04-26, last modified: 1998-06-10
We constrain the hadronic R-parity violating couplings in extensions to the minimal supersymmetric standard model. These interactions violate baryon and lepton number, and allow the lightest superpartner (LSP) to decay into standard model particles. The observed flux of cosmic ray antiprotons places a strong bound on the lifetime of the LSP in models where the lifetime is longer than the age of the universe. We exclude 10^-18<lambda''<10^-15 and 2x10^-18<lambda'<2x10^-15 except in the case of a top quark, where we can only exclude 4x10^-19<lambda'<4x10^-16.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/9806293  [pdf] - 1462764
Indirect Detection of Dark Matter in km-size Neutrino Telescopes
Comments: 16 pages, 16 figures, uses RevTeX
Submitted: 1998-06-05
Neutrino telescopes of kilometer size are currently being planned. They will be two or three orders of magnitude bigger than presently operating detectors, but they will have a much higher muon energy threshold. We discuss the trade-off between area and energy threshold for indirect detection of neutralino dark matter captured in the Sun and in the Earth and annihilating into high energy neutrinos. We also study the effect of a higher threshold on the complementarity of different searches for supersymmetric dark matter.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9806072  [pdf] - 101665
Clumpy Neutralino Dark Matter
Comments: 19 pages, 10 eps-figures (included), LaTeX, uses RevTeX
Submitted: 1998-06-04
We investigate the possibility to detect neutralino dark matter in a scenario in which the galactic dark halo is clumpy. We find that under customary assumptions on various astrophysical parameters, the antiproton and continuum gamma-ray signals from neutralino annihilation in the halo put the strongest limits on the clumpiness of a neutralino halo. We argue that indirect detection through neutrinos from the Earth and the Sun should not be much affected by clumpiness. We identify situations in parameter space where the gamma-ray line, positron and diffuse neutrino signals from annihilations in the halo may provide interesting signals in upcoming detectors.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/9706538  [pdf] - 116036
Neutralino Annihilation into Two Photons
Comments: Latex, 12 pages
Submitted: 1997-06-30
We compute the annihilation cross-section of two neutralinos at rest into two photons, which is of importance for the indirect detection of neutralino dark matter in the galactic halo through a quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray line. We include all diagrams to one-loop level in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model. We use the helicity formalism, the background-field gauge, and an efficient loop-integral reduction method. We confirm the result recently obtained by Bergstrom and Ullio in a different gauge, which disagrees with other published calculations.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/9704361  [pdf] - 116009
Neutralino Relic Density including Coannihilations
Comments: LaTeX, 14 embedded eps figures, uses epsfig. For paper with full resolution figures, see http://www.teorfys.uu.se/~edsjo/Welcome.html A few typos corrected
Submitted: 1997-04-20, last modified: 1997-06-11
We evaluate the relic density of the lightest neutralino, the lightest supersymmetric particle, in the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). For the first time, we include all coannihilation processes between neutralinos and charginos for any neutralino mass and composition. We use the most sophisticated routines for integrating the cross sections and the Boltzmann equation. We properly treat (sub)threshold and resonant annihilations. We also include one-loop corrections to neutralino masses. We find that coannihilation processes are important not only for light higgsino-like neutralinos, as pointed out before, but also for heavy higgsinos and for mixed and gaugino-like neutralinos. Indeed, coannihilations should be included whenever $|\mu| \lsim 2 |M_1|$, independently of the neutralino composition. When $|\mu| \sim |M_1|$, coannihilations can increase or decrease the relic density in and out of the cosmologically interesting region. We find that there is still a window of light higgsino-like neutralinos that are viable dark matter candidates and that coannihilations shift the cosmological upper bound on the neutralino mass from 3 to 7 TeV.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9607040  [pdf] - 363159
AGAPE: a search for dark matter towards M31 by microlensing effects on unresolved stars
Comments: 15 pages, 15 figures. Text and figures with better definition will also be available at http://cdfinfo.in2p3.fr/Experiences/AGAPE/publis.html Modified according to the requirement of the referee. To appear in A&A
Submitted: 1996-07-06, last modified: 1996-12-10
M31 is a very tempting target for a microlensing search of compact objects in galactic haloes. It is the nearest large galaxy, it probably has its own dark halo, and its tilted position with respect to the line of sight provides an unmistakable signature of microlensing. However most stars of M31 are not resolved and one has to use the ``pixel method'': monitor the pixels of the image rather than the stars. AGAPE is the implementation of this idea. Data have been collected and treated during two autumns of observation at the 2 metre telescope of Pic du Midi. The process of geometric and photometric alignment, which must be performed before constructing pixel light curves, is described. Seeing variations are minimised by working with large super-pixels (2.1) compared with the average seeing. A high level of stability of pixel fluxes, crucial to the approach, is reached. Fluctuations of super-pixels do not exceed 1.7 times the photon noise which is 0.1% of the intensity for the brightest ones. With such stable data, 10 microlensing events are expected for a full ``standard halo''. With a larger field, a regular and short time sampling and a long lever arm in time, the pixel method will be a very efficient tool to explore the halo of M31.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9610010  [pdf] - 95534
AGAPE: a Microlensing Search for Dark Matter by Monitoring Pixels
Comments: presented at the International Conference on "Dark and Visible Matter in Galaxies" (Sesto Pusteria, Italy, 2-5 July 1996), 8 pages, 7 figures, uses paspconf.sty, psfig.sty
Submitted: 1996-10-01
AGAPE is an observational search of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) in the direction of M31 by means of a novel method: the gravitational microlensing of unresolved stars. The search consists in examining CCD pixel light curves for microlensing features. The high level of temporal stability necessary to detect microlensing events has been achieved, with quiet pixels stable within a factor of two of the photon noise (the brightest ones down to a level of 0.001 mag). The data analysis is still in progress, but hundreds of variable objects (cepheids, novae, ...) have already been found. Among them there are several lightcurves that resemble microlensing events.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9602015  [pdf] - 94067
AGAPE, a microlensing search in the direction of M31: status Report
Comments: 5 pages, Latex2e, includes 5 figures, uuencoded gziped tar file. Proceedings of the workshop ``The dark side of the Universe : experimental efforts and theoretical framework'' Roma 13-14 November 1995
Submitted: 1996-02-02
A status report of the microlensing search by the pixel method in the direction of M31, on the 2 meter telescope at Pic du Midi is given. Pixels are stable to a level better than 0.5%. Pixel variations as small as 0.02 magnitude can clearly be detected.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/9510252  [pdf] - 115805
Limits on direct detection of neutralino dark matter from b -> s gamma decays
Comments: uuencoded, gzipped postscript (17 pages), figures available at http://vanosf.physto.se/lbe/bg_figs.uu
Submitted: 1995-10-09
We analyze the rate of detection of minimal supersymmetric neutralino dark matter in germanium, sapphire and sodium iodide detectors, imposing cosmological and recent accelerator bounds including those from \bsg\ decay. We find, in contrast with several other recent analyses, that although the \bsg\ constraint reduces the number of viable models, models still remain where the counting rate in solid state detectors exceeds 10 kg$^{-1}$ day$^{-1}$.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9502102  [pdf] - 1469210
AGAPE, an experiment to detect MACHO's in the direction of the Andromeda galaxy
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure in a separate compressed, tarred, uuencoded uufile. In case ofproblem contact kaplan@lpthe.jussieu.fr
Submitted: 1995-02-27
The status of the Agape experiment to detect Machos in the direction of the andromeda galaxy is presented.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9312011  [pdf] - 91112
Dark Matter Annihilations in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Comments: 2pp, plain TeX, 0
Submitted: 1993-12-06
The flat rotation curve obtained for the outer star clusters of the Large Magellanic Cloud is suggestive of an LMC dark matter halo. From the composite HI and star cluster rotation curve, I estimate the parameters of an isothermal dark matter halo added to a `maximum disk.' I then examine the possibility of detecting high energy gamma-rays from non-baryonic dark matter annihilations in the central region of the Large Magellanic Cloud.