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Gerbino, Martina

Normalized to: Gerbino, M.

75 article(s) in total. 1188 co-authors, from 1 to 50 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 52,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2007.01650  [pdf] - 2127582
Cornering (quasi) degenerate neutrinos with cosmology
Comments: 19 pages, 6 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2020-07-03
In light of the improved sensitivities of cosmological observations, we examine the status of quasi-degenerate neutrino mass scenarios. Within the simplest extension of the standard cosmological model with massive neutrinos, we find that quasi-degenerate neutrinos are severely constrained by present cosmological data and neutrino oscillation experiments. % % We find that Planck 2018 observations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies disfavour quasi-degenerate neutrino masses at $2.4$ Gaussian $\sigma$'s, while adding Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) data brings the rejection to 5.9$\sigma$'s. % The highest statistical significance with which one would be able to rule out quasi-degeneracy would arise if the sum of neutrino masses is $\Sigma m_\nu = 60$ \meV (the minimum allowed by neutrino oscillation experiments); % indeed a sensitivity of 15 meV, as expected from a combination of future cosmological probes, would further improve the rejection level up to 17$\sigma$. % We discuss the robustness of these projections with respect to assumptions on the underlying cosmological model, and also compare them with bounds from $\beta$ decay endpoint and neutrinoless double beta decay studies.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.12646  [pdf] - 2071919
Planck intermediate results. LVI. Detection of the CMB dipole through modulation of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect: Eppur si muove II
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Casaponsa, B.; Chiang, H. C.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sullivan, R. M.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2020-03-27
The largest temperature anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is the dipole, which has been measured with increasing accuracy for more than three decades, particularly with the Planck satellite. The simplest interpretation of the dipole is that it is due to our motion with respect to the rest frame of the CMB. Since current CMB experiments infer temperature anisotropies from angular intensity variations, the dipole modulates the temperature anisotropies with the same frequency dependence as the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect. We present the first (and significant) detection of this signal in the tSZ maps, and find that it is consistent with direct measurements of the CMB dipole, as expected. The signal contributes power in the tSZ maps, modulated in a quadrupolar pattern, and we estimate its contribution to the tSZ bispectrum, noting that it contributes negligible noise to the bispectrum at relevant scales.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.02289  [pdf] - 2059733
Bounds on light sterile neutrino mass and mixing from cosmology and laboratory searches
Comments: 29 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2020-03-04
We provide a consistent framework to set limits on properties of light sterile neutrinos coupled to all three active neutrinos using a combination of the latest cosmological data and terrestrial measurements from oscillations, $\beta$-decay and neutrinoless double-$\beta$ decay ($0\nu\beta\beta$) experiments. We directly constrain the full $3+1$ active-sterile mixing matrix elements $|U_{\alpha4}|^2$, with $\alpha \in ( e,\mu ,\tau )$, and the mass-squared splitting $\Delta m^2_{41} \equiv m_4^2-m_1^2$. We find that results for a $3+1$ case differ from previously studied $1+1$ scenarios where the sterile is only coupled to one of the neutrinos, which is largely explained by parameter space volume effects. Limits on the mass splitting and the mixing matrix elements are currently dominated by the cosmological data sets. The exact results are slightly prior dependent, but we reliably find all matrix elements to be constrained below $|U_{\alpha4}|^2 \lesssim 10^{-3}$. Short-baseline neutrino oscillation hints in favor of eV-scale sterile neutrinos are in serious tension with these bounds, irrespective of prior assumptions. We also translate the bounds from the cosmological analysis into constraints on the parameters probed by laboratory searches, such as $m_\beta$ or $m_{\beta \beta}$, the effective mass parameters probed by $\beta$-decay and $0\nu\beta\beta$ searches, respectively. When allowing for mixing with a light sterile neutrino, cosmology leads to upper bounds of $m_\beta < 0.09$ eV and $m_{\beta \beta} < 0.07$ eV at 95\% C.L, more stringent than the limits from current laboratory experiments.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.09375  [pdf] - 2032837
Likelihood methods for CMB experiments
Comments: 71 pages, 5 figures. Matching version to be published in Frontiers in Physics, section Cosmology, as a contribution to the collection "Status and Prospects of Cosmic Microwave Background Analysis"
Submitted: 2019-09-20, last modified: 2020-01-17
A great deal of experimental effort is currently being devoted to the precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky in temperature and polarisation. Satellites, balloon-borne, and ground-based experiments scrutinize the CMB sky at multiple scales, and therefore enable to investigate not only the evolution of the early Universe, but also its late-time physics with unprecedented accuracy. The pipeline leading from time ordered data as collected by the instrument to the final product is highly structured. Moreover, it has also to provide accurate estimates of statistical and systematic uncertainties connected to the specific experiment. In this paper, we review likelihood approaches targeted to the analysis of the CMB signal at different scales, and to the estimation of key cosmological parameters. We consider methods that analyze the data in the spatial (i.e., pixel-based) or harmonic domain. We highlight the most relevant aspects of each approach and compare their performance.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06205  [pdf] - 2009439
Planck 2018 results. I. Overview and the cosmological legacy of Planck
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Casaponsa, B.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leahy, J. P.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meerburg, P. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shiraishi, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 61 pages, 40 figures, matches version accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2019-12-03
The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, which was dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched on 14 May 2009. It scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12 August 2009 and 23 October 2013, producing deep, high-resolution, all-sky maps in nine frequency bands from 30 to 857GHz. This paper presents the cosmological legacy of Planck, which currently provides our strongest constraints on the parameters of the standard cosmological model and some of the tightest limits available on deviations from that model. The 6-parameter LCDM model continues to provide an excellent fit to the cosmic microwave background data at high and low redshift, describing the cosmological information in over a billion map pixels with just six parameters. With 18 peaks in the temperature and polarization angular power spectra constrained well, Planck measures five of the six parameters to better than 1% (simultaneously), with the best-determined parameter (theta_*) now known to 0.03%. We describe the multi-component sky as seen by Planck, the success of the LCDM model, and the connection to lower-redshift probes of structure formation. We also give a comprehensive summary of the major changes introduced in this 2018 release. The Planck data, alone and in combination with other probes, provide stringent constraints on our models of the early Universe and the large-scale structure within which all astrophysical objects form and evolve. We discuss some lessons learned from the Planck mission, and highlight areas ripe for further experimental advances.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.11148  [pdf] - 2080935
Probing the Weak Gravity Conjecture in the Cosmic Microwave Background
Comments: 29 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2019-11-25
The weak gravity conjecture imposes severe constraints on natural inflation. A trans-Planckian axion decay constant can only be realized if the potential exhibits an additional (subdominant) modulation with sub-Planckian periodicity. The resulting wiggles in the axion potential generate a characteristic modulation in the scalar power spectrum of inflation which is logarithmic in the angular scale. The compatibility of this modulation is tested against the most recent Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data by Planck and BICEP/Keck. Intriguingly, we find that the modulation completely resolves the tension of natural inflation with the CMB. A Bayesian model comparison reveals that natural inflation with modulations describes all existing data equally well as the cosmological standard model $\Lambda$CDM. In addition, the bound of a tensor-to-scalar ratio r > 0.002 correlated with a striking small-scale suppression of the scalar power spectrum occurs. Future CMB experiments could directly probe the modulation through their improved sensitivity to smaller angular scales and possibly the measurement of spectral distortions. They could, thus, verify a key prediction of the weak gravity conjecture and provide dramatic new insights into the theory of quantum gravity.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06209  [pdf] - 1965163
Planck 2018 results. VI. Cosmological parameters
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Farhang, M.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Lemos, P.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 72 pages; some updated external data including BK15, Planck-only results unchanged. Parameter tables and chains available at https://wiki.cosmos.esa.int/planck-legacy-archive/index.php/Cosmological_Parameters
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2019-09-20
We present cosmological parameter results from the final full-mission Planck measurements of the CMB anisotropies. We find good consistency with the standard spatially-flat 6-parameter $\Lambda$CDM cosmology having a power-law spectrum of adiabatic scalar perturbations (denoted "base $\Lambda$CDM" in this paper), from polarization, temperature, and lensing, separately and in combination. A combined analysis gives dark matter density $\Omega_c h^2 = 0.120\pm 0.001$, baryon density $\Omega_b h^2 = 0.0224\pm 0.0001$, scalar spectral index $n_s = 0.965\pm 0.004$, and optical depth $\tau = 0.054\pm 0.007$ (in this abstract we quote $68\,\%$ confidence regions on measured parameters and $95\,\%$ on upper limits). The angular acoustic scale is measured to $0.03\,\%$ precision, with $100\theta_*=1.0411\pm 0.0003$. These results are only weakly dependent on the cosmological model and remain stable, with somewhat increased errors, in many commonly considered extensions. Assuming the base-$\Lambda$CDM cosmology, the inferred late-Universe parameters are: Hubble constant $H_0 = (67.4\pm 0.5)$km/s/Mpc; matter density parameter $\Omega_m = 0.315\pm 0.007$; and matter fluctuation amplitude $\sigma_8 = 0.811\pm 0.006$. We find no compelling evidence for extensions to the base-$\Lambda$CDM model. Combining with BAO we constrain the effective extra relativistic degrees of freedom to be $N_{\rm eff} = 2.99\pm 0.17$, and the neutrino mass is tightly constrained to $\sum m_\nu< 0.12$eV. The CMB spectra continue to prefer higher lensing amplitudes than predicted in base -$\Lambda$CDM at over $2\,\sigma$, which pulls some parameters that affect the lensing amplitude away from the base-$\Lambda$CDM model; however, this is not supported by the lensing reconstruction or (in models that also change the background geometry) BAO data. (Abridged)
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06211  [pdf] - 1927941
Planck 2018 results. X. Constraints on inflation
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Hooper, D. C.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; Lpez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meerburg, P. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Münchmeyer, M.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shiraishi, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, S. D. M.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments: References added and minor improvements. BICEP2/Keck Array BK15 is used in the place of BICEP2/Keck Array BK14
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2019-08-02
We report on the implications for cosmic inflation of the 2018 Release of the Planck CMB anisotropy measurements. The results are fully consistent with the two previous Planck cosmological releases, but have smaller uncertainties thanks to improvements in the characterization of polarization at low and high multipoles. Planck temperature, polarization, and lensing data determine the spectral index of scalar perturbations to be $n_\mathrm{s}=0.9649\pm 0.0042$ at 68% CL and show no evidence for a scale dependence of $n_\mathrm{s}.$ Spatial flatness is confirmed at a precision of 0.4% at 95% CL with the combination with BAO data. The Planck 95% CL upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r_{0.002}<0.10$, is further tightened by combining with the BICEP2/Keck Array BK15 data to obtain $r_{0.002}<0.056$. In the framework of single-field inflationary models with Einstein gravity, these results imply that: (a) slow-roll models with a concave potential, $V" (\phi) < 0,$ are increasingly favoured by the data; and (b) two different methods for reconstructing the inflaton potential find no evidence for dynamics beyond slow roll. Non-parametric reconstructions of the primordial power spectrum consistently confirm a pure power law. A complementary analysis also finds no evidence for theoretically motivated parameterized features in the Planck power spectrum, a result further strengthened for certain oscillatory models by a new combined analysis that includes Planck bispectrum data. The new Planck polarization data provide a stringent test of the adiabaticity of the initial conditions. The polarization data also provide improved constraints on inflationary models that predict a small statistically anisotropic quadrupolar modulation of the primordial fluctuations. However, the polarization data do not confirm physical models for a scale-dependent dipolar modulation.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.01062  [pdf] - 1928247
CMB-S4 Decadal Survey APC White Paper
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Amin, Mustafa A.; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bock, James J.; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Project White Paper submitted to the 2020 Decadal Survey, 10 pages plus references. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1907.04473
Submitted: 2019-07-31
We provide an overview of the science case, instrument configuration and project plan for the next-generation ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4, for consideration by the 2020 Decadal Survey.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.12875  [pdf] - 1925231
Planck 2018 results. V. CMB power spectra and likelihoods
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Casaponsa, B.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Code and data products are available on the Planck Legacy Archive (https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/planck/pla)
Submitted: 2019-07-30
This paper describes the 2018 Planck CMB likelihoods, following a hybrid approach similar to the 2015 one, with different approximations at low and high multipoles, and implementing several methodological and analysis refinements. With more realistic simulations, and better correction and modelling of systematics, we can now make full use of the High Frequency Instrument polarization data. The low-multipole 100x143 GHz EE cross-spectrum constrains the reionization optical-depth parameter $\tau$ to better than 15% (in combination with with the other low- and high-$\ell$ likelihoods). We also update the 2015 baseline low-$\ell$ joint TEB likelihood based on the Low Frequency Instrument data, which provides a weaker $\tau$ constraint. At high multipoles, a better model of the temperature-to-polarization leakage and corrections for the effective calibrations of the polarization channels (polarization efficiency or PE) allow us to fully use the polarization spectra, improving the constraints on the $\Lambda$CDM parameters by 20 to 30% compared to TT-only constraints. Tests on the modelling of the polarization demonstrate good consistency, with some residual modelling uncertainties, the accuracy of the PE modelling being the main limitation. Using our various tests, simulations, and comparison between different high-$\ell$ implementations, we estimate the consistency of the results to be better than the 0.5$\sigma$ level. Minor curiosities already present before (differences between $\ell$<800 and $\ell$>800 parameters or the preference for more smoothing of the $C_\ell$ peaks) are shown to be driven by the TT power spectrum and are not significantly modified by the inclusion of polarization. Overall, the legacy Planck CMB likelihoods provide a robust tool for constraining the cosmological model and represent a reference for future CMB observations. (Abridged)
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06210  [pdf] - 1924023
Planck 2018 results. VIII. Gravitational lensing
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Abstract abridged for arxiv submission. Lensing data products available at https://wiki.cosmos.esa.int/planck-legacy-archive/index.php/Lensing. Matches version accepted by A&A, with minor updates from v1
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2019-07-29
We present measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing potential using the final $\textit{Planck}$ 2018 temperature and polarization data. We increase the significance of the detection of lensing in the polarization maps from $5\,\sigma$ to $9\,\sigma$. Combined with temperature, lensing is detected at $40\,\sigma$. We present an extensive set of tests of the robustness of the lensing-potential power spectrum, and construct a minimum-variance estimator likelihood over lensing multipoles $8 \le L \le 400$. We find good consistency between lensing constraints and the results from the $\textit{Planck}$ CMB power spectra within the $\rm{\Lambda CDM}$ model. Combined with baryon density and other weak priors, the lensing analysis alone constrains $\sigma_8 \Omega_{\rm m}^{0.25}=0.589\pm 0.020$ ($1\,\sigma$ errors). Also combining with baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data, we find tight individual parameter constraints, $\sigma_8=0.811\pm0.019$, $H_0=67.9_{-1.3}^{+1.2}\,\text{km}\,\text{s}^{-1}\,\rm{Mpc}^{-1}$, and $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.303^{+0.016}_{-0.018}$. Combining with $\textit{Planck}$ CMB power spectrum data, we measure $\sigma_8$ to better than $1\,\%$ precision, finding $\sigma_8=0.811\pm 0.006$. We find consistency with the lensing results from the Dark Energy Survey, and give combined lensing-only parameter constraints that are tighter than joint results using galaxy clustering. Using $\textit{Planck}$ cosmic infrared background (CIB) maps we make a combined estimate of the lensing potential over $60\,\%$ of the sky with considerably more small-scale signal. We demonstrate delensing of the $\textit{Planck}$ power spectra, detecting a maximum removal of $40\,\%$ of the lensing-induced power in all spectra. The improvement in the sharpening of the acoustic peaks by including both CIB and the quadratic lensing reconstruction is detected at high significance (abridged).
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.08284  [pdf] - 1976842
The Simons Observatory: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Adachi, Shunsuke; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Atkins, Zachary; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Lizancos, Anton Baleato; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bhandarkar, Tanay; Bhimani, Sanah; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bolliet, Boris; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Carl, Fred. M; Cayuso, Juan; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Clark, Susan; Clarke, Philip; Contaldi, Carlo; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Coulton, Will; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Bouhargani, Hamza El; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Fergusson, James; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Halpern, Mark; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hensley, Brandon; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hoang, Thuong D.; Hoh, Jonathan; Hotinli, Selim C.; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Johnson, Matthew; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Kofman, Anna; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kusaka, Akito; LaPlante, Phil; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Liu, Jia; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McCarrick, Heather; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Mertens, James; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Moore, Jenna; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Murata, Masaaki; Naess, Sigurd; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Nicola, Andrina; Niemack, Mike; Nishino, Haruki; Nishinomiya, Yume; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Pagano, Luca; Partridge, Bruce; Perrotta, Francesca; Phakathi, Phumlani; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Rotti, Aditya; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Saunders, Lauren; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Shellard, Paul; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sifon, Cristobal; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Smith, Kendrick; Sohn, Wuhyun; Sonka, Rita; Spergel, David; Spisak, Jacob; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Treu, Jesse; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Wang, Yuhan; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Young, Edward; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zannoni, Mario; Zhang, Hezi; Zheng, Kaiwen; Zhu, Ningfeng; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1808.07445
Submitted: 2019-07-16
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment sited on Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert in Chile that promises to provide breakthrough discoveries in fundamental physics, cosmology, and astrophysics. Supported by the Simons Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and with contributions from collaborating institutions, SO will see first light in 2021 and start a five year survey in 2022. SO has 287 collaborators from 12 countries and 53 institutions, including 85 students and 90 postdocs. The SO experiment in its currently funded form ('SO-Nominal') consists of three 0.4 m Small Aperture Telescopes (SATs) and one 6 m Large Aperture Telescope (LAT). Optimized for minimizing systematic errors in polarization measurements at large angular scales, the SATs will perform a deep, degree-scale survey of 10% of the sky to search for the signature of primordial gravitational waves. The LAT will survey 40% of the sky with arc-minute resolution. These observations will measure (or limit) the sum of neutrino masses, search for light relics, measure the early behavior of Dark Energy, and refine our understanding of the intergalactic medium, clusters and the role of feedback in galaxy formation. With up to ten times the sensitivity and five times the angular resolution of the Planck satellite, and roughly an order of magnitude increase in mapping speed over currently operating ("Stage 3") experiments, SO will measure the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations to exquisite precision in six frequency bands from 27 to 280 GHz. SO will rapidly advance CMB science while informing the design of future observatories such as CMB-S4.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.04473  [pdf] - 1914295
CMB-S4 Science Case, Reference Design, and Project Plan
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; McQuinn, Matthew; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: 287 pages, 82 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-09
We present the science case, reference design, and project plan for the Stage-4 ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.02552  [pdf] - 1896098
Planck 2018 results. VII. Isotropy and Statistics of the CMB
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Casaponsa, B.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Sirignano, C.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Paper VII of the Planck 2018 release. 67 pages. Accepted for publication in section 3. Cosmology (including clusters of galaxies) of Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2019-06-06
Analysis of the Planck 2018 data set indicates that the statistical properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies are in excellent agreement with previous studies using the 2013 and 2015 data releases. In particular, they are consistent with the Gaussian predictions of the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model, yet also confirm the presence of several so-called "anomalies" on large angular scales. The novelty of the current study, however, lies in being a first attempt at a comprehensive analysis of the statistics of the polarization signal over all angular scales, using either maps of the Stokes parameters, $Q$ and $U$, or the $E$-mode signal derived from these using a new methodology (which we describe in an appendix). Although remarkable progress has been made in reducing the systematic effects that contaminated the 2015 polarization maps on large angular scales, it is still the case that residual systematics (and our ability to simulate them) can limit some tests of non-Gaussianity and isotropy. However, a detailed set of null tests applied to the maps indicates that these issues do not dominate the analysis on intermediate and large angular scales (i.e., $\ell \lesssim 400$). In this regime, no unambiguous detections of cosmological non-Gaussianity, or of anomalies corresponding to those seen in temperature, are claimed. Notably, the stacking of CMB polarization signals centred on the positions of temperature hot and cold spots exhibits excellent agreement with the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model, and also gives a clear indication of how Planck provides state-of-the-art measurements of CMB temperature and polarization on degree scales.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.05697  [pdf] - 1882757
Planck 2018 results. IX. Constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Casaponsa, B.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Jung, G.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meerburg, P. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Münchmeyer, M.; Natoli, P.; Oppizzi, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shiraishi, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Smith, K.; Spencer, L. D.; Stanco, L.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 50 pages, 20 figures
Submitted: 2019-05-14
We analyse the Planck full-mission cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and E-mode polarization maps to obtain constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (NG). We compare estimates obtained from separable template-fitting, binned, and modal bispectrum estimators, finding consistent values for the local, equilateral, and orthogonal bispectrum amplitudes. Our combined temperature and polarization analysis produces the following results: f_NL^local = -0.9 +\- 5.1; f_NL^equil = -26 +\- 47; and f_NL^ortho = - 38 +\- 24 (68%CL, statistical). These results include the low-multipole (4 <= l < 40) polarization data, not included in our previous analysis, pass an extensive battery of tests, and are stable with respect to our 2015 measurements. Polarization bispectra display a significant improvement in robustness; they can now be used independently to set NG constraints. We consider a large number of additional cases, e.g. scale-dependent feature and resonance bispectra, isocurvature primordial NG, and parity-breaking models, where we also place tight constraints but do not detect any signal. The non-primordial lensing bispectrum is detected with an improved significance compared to 2015, excluding the null hypothesis at 3.5 sigma. We present model-independent reconstructions and analyses of the CMB bispectrum. Our final constraint on the local trispectrum shape is g_NLl^local = (-5.8 +\-6.5) x 10^4 (68%CL, statistical), while constraints for other trispectra are also determined. We constrain the parameter space of different early-Universe scenarios, including general single-field models of inflation, multi-field and axion field parity-breaking models. Our results provide a high-precision test for structure-formation scenarios, in complete agreement with the basic picture of the LambdaCDM cosmology regarding the statistics of the initial conditions (abridged).
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.09208  [pdf] - 1854198
Inflation and Dark Energy from spectroscopy at $z > 2$
Ferraro, Simone; Wilson, Michael J.; Abidi, Muntazir; Alonso, David; Ansarinejad, Behzad; Armstrong, Robert; Asorey, Jacobo; Avelino, Arturo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bandura, Kevin; Battaglia, Nicholas; Bavdhankar, Chetan; Bernal, José Luis; Beutler, Florian; Biagetti, Matteo; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blazek, Jonathan; Bolton, Adam S.; Borrill, Julian; Frye, Brenda; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Bull, Philip; Burgess, Cliff; Byrnes, Christian T.; Cai, Zheng; Castander, Francisco J; Castorina, Emanuele; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Chaves-Montero, Jonás; Chen, Shi-Fan; Chen, Xingang; Balland, Christophe; Yèche, Christophe; Cohn, J. D.; Coulton, William; Courtois, Helene; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; D'Amico, Guido; Dawson, Kyle; Delabrouille, Jacques; Dey, Arjun; Doré, Olivier; Douglass, Kelly A.; Yutong, Duan; Dvorkin, Cora; Eggemeier, Alexander; Eisenstein, Daniel; Fan, Xiaohui; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foreman, Simon; García-Bellido, Juan; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Green, Daniel; Guy, Julien; Hahn, ChangHoon; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hathi, Nimish; Hawken, Adam J.; Hernández-Aguayo, César; Hložek, Renée; Huterer, Dragan; Ishak, Mustapha; Kamionkowski, Marc; Karagiannis, Dionysios; Keeley, Ryan E.; Kehoe, Robert; Khatri, Rishi; Kim, Alex; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Krause, Elisabeth; Krolewski, Alex; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Landriau, Martin; Levi, Michael; Liguori, Michele; Linder, Eric; Lukić, Zarija; de la Macorra, Axel; Plazas, Andrés A.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Martini, Paul; Masui, Kiyoshi; McDonald, Patrick; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Newburgh, Laura; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Niz, Gustavo; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Palunas, Povilas; Percival, Will J.; Piacentini, Francesco; Pieri, Matthew M.; Piro, Anthony L.; Prakash, Abhishek; Rhodes, Jason; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Rudie, Gwen C.; Samushia, Lado; Sasaki, Misao; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schlegel, David J.; Schmittfull, Marcel; Schubnell, Michael; Sehgal, Neelima; Senatore, Leonardo; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shafieloo, Arman; Shan, Huanyuan; Simon, Joshua D.; Simon, Sara; Slepian, Zachary; Slosar, Anže; Sridhar, Srivatsan; Stebbins, Albert; Escoffier, Stephanie; Switzer, Eric R.; Tarlé, Gregory; Trodden, Mark; Uhlemann, Cora; Urenña-López, L. Arturo; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Vargas-Magaña, M.; Wang, Yi; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Xu, Weishuang; Yu, Byeonghee; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Zhu, Hong-Ming
Comments: Science white paper submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey
Submitted: 2019-03-21
The expansion of the Universe is understood to have accelerated during two epochs: in its very first moments during a period of Inflation and much more recently, at $z < 1$, when Dark Energy is hypothesized to drive cosmic acceleration. The undiscovered mechanisms behind these two epochs represent some of the most important open problems in fundamental physics. The large cosmological volume at $2 < z < 5$, together with the ability to efficiently target high-$z$ galaxies with known techniques, enables large gains in the study of Inflation and Dark Energy. A future spectroscopic survey can test the Gaussianity of the initial conditions up to a factor of ~50 better than our current bounds, crossing the crucial theoretical threshold of $\sigma(f_{NL}^{\rm local})$ of order unity that separates single field and multi-field models. Simultaneously, it can measure the fraction of Dark Energy at the percent level up to $z = 5$, thus serving as an unprecedented test of the standard model and opening up a tremendous discovery space.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04409  [pdf] - 1849245
Primordial Non-Gaussianity
Meerburg, P. Daniel; Green, Daniel; Abidi, Muntazir; Amin, Mustafa A.; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Alonso, David; Ansarinejad, Behzad; Armstrong, Robert; Avila, Santiago; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baldauf, Tobias; Ballardini, Mario; Bandura, Kevin; Bartolo, Nicola; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baumann, Daniel; Bavdhankar, Chetan; Bernal, José Luis; Beutler, Florian; Biagetti, Matteo; Bischoff, Colin; Blazek, Jonathan; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Bull, Philip; Burgess, Cliff; Byrnes, Christian; Calabrese, Erminia; Carlstrom, John E.; Castorina, Emanuele; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Chaves-Montero, Jonas; Chen, Xingang; Yeche, Christophe; Cooray, Asantha; Coulton, William; Crawford, Thomas; Chisari, Elisa; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; D'Amico, Guido; de Bernardis, Paolo; de la Macorra, Axel; Doré, Olivier; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Joanna; Dvorkin, Cora; Eggemeier, Alexander; Escoffier, Stephanie; Essinger-Hileman, Tom; Fasiello, Matteo; Ferraro, Simone; Flauger, Raphael; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foreman, Simon; Friedrich, Oliver; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goon, Garrett; Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Gupta, Nikhel; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hawken, Adam J.; Hill, J. Colin; Hirata, Christopher M.; Hložek, Renée; Holder, Gilbert; Huterer, Dragan; Kamionkowski, Marc; Karkare, Kirit S.; Keeley, Ryan E.; Kinney, William; Kisner, Theodore; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Knox, Lloyd; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Koyama, Kazuya; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Lahav, Ofer; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Lee, Hayden; Liguori, Michele; Loverde, Marilena; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Maldacena, Juan; Marsh, M. C. David; Masui, Kiyoshi; Matarrese, Sabino; McAllister, Liam; McMahon, Jeff; McQuinn, Matthew; Meyers, Joel; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad; Motloch, Pavel; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Muñoz, Julian B.; Myers, Adam D.; Nagy, Johanna; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Newburgh; Nicolis, Alberto; Niemack, Michael D.; Niz, Gustavo; Nomerotski, Andrei; Page, Lyman; Pajer, Enrico; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Palma, Gonzalo A.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Percival, Will J.; Piacentni, Francesco; Pimentel, Guilherme L.; Pogosian, Levon; Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Stompor, Radek; Raveri, Marco; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Gracca; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruhl, John; Sasaki, Misao; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Senatore, Leonardo; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shan, Huanyuan; Shandera, Sarah; Sherwin, Blake D.; Silverstein, Eva; Simon, Sara; Slosar, Anže; Staggs, Suzanne; Starkman, Glenn; Stebbins, Albert; Suzuki, Aritoki; Switzer, Eric R.; Timbie, Peter; Tolley, Andrew J.; Tomasi, Maurizio; Tristram, Matthieu; Trodden, Mark; Tsai, Yu-Dai; Uhlemann, Cora; Umilta, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vargas-Magaña, M.; Vieregg, Abigail; Wallisch, Benjamin; Wands, David; Wandelt, Benjamin; Wang, Yi; Watson, Scott; Wise, Mark; Wu, W. L. K.; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi; Xu, Weishuang; Yasini, Siavash; Young, Sam; Yutong, Duan; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zemcov, Michael; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Zhu, Ningfeng
Comments: 5 pages + references; Submitted to the Astro2020 call for science white papers. This version: fixed author list
Submitted: 2019-03-11, last modified: 2019-03-14
Our current understanding of the Universe is established through the pristine measurements of structure in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the distribution and shapes of galaxies tracing the large scale structure (LSS) of the Universe. One key ingredient that underlies cosmological observables is that the field that sources the observed structure is assumed to be initially Gaussian with high precision. Nevertheless, a minimal deviation from Gaussianityis perhaps the most robust theoretical prediction of models that explain the observed Universe; itis necessarily present even in the simplest scenarios. In addition, most inflationary models produce far higher levels of non-Gaussianity. Since non-Gaussianity directly probes the dynamics in the early Universe, a detection would present a monumental discovery in cosmology, providing clues about physics at energy scales as high as the GUT scale.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04763  [pdf] - 1847076
Messengers from the Early Universe: Cosmic Neutrinos and Other Light Relics
Green, Daniel; Amin, Mustafa A.; Meyers, Joel; Wallisch, Benjamin; Abazajian, Kevork N.; Abidi, Muntazir; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Ansarinejad, Behzad; Armstrong, Robert; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bandura, Kevin; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baumann, Daniel; Bechtol, Keith; Bennett, Charles; Benson, Bradford; Beutler, Florian; Bischoff, Colin; Bleem, Lindsey; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Burgess, Cliff; Carlstrom, John E.; Castorina, Emanuele; Challinor, Anthony; Chen, Xingang; Cooray, Asantha; Coulton, William; Craig, Nathaniel; Crawford, Thomas; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; D'Amico, Guido; Demarteau, Marcel; Doré, Olivier; Yutong, Duan; Dunkley, Joanna; Dvorkin, Cora; Ellison, John; van Engelen, Alexander; Escoffier, Stephanie; Essinger-Hileman, Tom; Fabbian, Giulio; Filippini, Jeffrey; Flauger, Raphael; Foreman, Simon; Fuller, George; Garcia, Marcos A. G.; García-Bellido, Juan; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Górski, Krzysztof M.; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hill, J. Colin; Hirata, Christopher M.; Hložek, Renée; Holder, Gilbert; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Huterer, Dragan; Kadota, Kenji; Kamionkowski, Marc; Keeley, Ryan E.; Khatri, Rishi; Kisner, Theodore; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Knox, Lloyd; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Kovetz, Ely D.; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Lahav, Ofer; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Lee, Hayden; Liguori, Michele; Lin, Tongyan; Loverde, Marilena; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Masui, Kiyoshi; McMahon, Jeff; McQuinn, Matthew; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Motloch, Pavel; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Munõz, Julian B.; Nagy, Johanna; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nomerotski, Andrei; Page, Lyman; Piacentni, Francesco; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Stompor, Radek; Raveri, Marco; Reichardt, Christian L.; Rose, Benjamin; Rossi, Graziano; Ruhl, John; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schubnell, Michael; Schutz, Katelin; Sehgal, Neelima; Senatore, Leonardo; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sherwin, Blake D.; Simon, Sara; Slosar, Anže; Staggs, Suzanne; Stebbins, Albert; Suzuki, Aritoki; Switzer, Eric R.; Timbie, Peter; Tristram, Matthieu; Trodden, Mark; Tsai, Yu-Dai; Umiltà, Caterina; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Vargas-Magaña, M.; Vieregg, Abigail; Watson, Scott; Weiler, Thomas; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wu, W. L. K.; Xu, Weishuang; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zhu, Ningfeng; Zuntz, Joe
Comments: 5 pages + references; 1 figure; science white paper submitted to the Astro2020 decadal survey
Submitted: 2019-03-12
The hot dense environment of the early universe is known to have produced large numbers of baryons, photons, and neutrinos. These extreme conditions may have also produced other long-lived species, including new light particles (such as axions or sterile neutrinos) or gravitational waves. The gravitational effects of any such light relics can be observed through their unique imprint in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the large-scale structure, and the primordial light element abundances, and are important in determining the initial conditions of the universe. We argue that future cosmological observations, in particular improved maps of the CMB on small angular scales, can be orders of magnitude more sensitive for probing the thermal history of the early universe than current experiments. These observations offer a unique and broad discovery space for new physics in the dark sector and beyond, even when its effects would not be visible in terrestrial experiments or in astrophysical environments. A detection of an excess light relic abundance would be a clear indication of new physics and would provide the first direct information about the universe between the times of reheating and neutrino decoupling one second later.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04425  [pdf] - 1846071
Dark Matter Science in the Era of LSST
Bechtol, Keith; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Abazajian, Kevork N.; Abidi, Muntazir; Adhikari, Susmita; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Annis, James; Ansarinejad, Behzad; Armstrong, Robert; Asorey, Jacobo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Banerjee, Arka; Banik, Nilanjan; Bennett, Charles; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Simeon; Birrer, Simon; Biswas, Rahul; Biviano, Andrea; Blazek, Jonathan; Boddy, Kimberly K.; Bonaca, Ana; Borrill, Julian; Bose, Sownak; Bovy, Jo; Frye, Brenda; Brooks, Alyson M.; Buckley, Matthew R.; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Bulbul, Esra; Burchat, Patricia R.; Burgess, Cliff; Calore, Francesca; Caputo, Regina; Castorina, Emanuele; Chang, Chihway; Chapline, George; Charles, Eric; Chen, Xingang; Clowe, Douglas; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; D'Amico, Guido; Davis, Tamara M; Dawson, William A.; de la Macorra, Axel; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Rivero, Ana Díaz; Digel, Seth; Dodelson, Scott; Doré, Olivier; Dvorkin, Cora; Eckner, Christopher; Ellison, John; Erkal, Denis; Farahi, Arya; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Flaugher, Brenna; Foreman, Simon; Friedrich, Oliver; Frieman, Joshua; García-Bellido, Juan; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Giannotti, Maurizio; Gill, Mandeep S. S.; Gluscevic, Vera; Golovich, Nathan; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; González-Morales, Alma X.; Grin, Daniel; Gruen, Daniel; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hendel, David; Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Hirata, Christopher M.; Hložek, Renee; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jee, M. James; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Keeley, Ryan E.; Keeton, Charles R.; Khatri, Rishi; Koposov, Sergey E.; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Lahav, Ofer; Lam, Casey; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Li, Ting S.; Liguori, Michele; Lin, Tongyan; Lisanti, Mariangela; LoVerde, Marilena; Lu, Jessica R.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Mao, Yao-Yuan; McDermott, Samuel D.; McNanna, Mitch; Medford, Michael; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyer, Manuel; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Marc, Moniez; More, Surhud; Moustakas, John; Muñoz, Julian B.; Murgia, Simona; Myers, Adam D.; Nadler, Ethan O.; Necib, Lina; Newburgh, Laura; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nord, Brian; Nourbakhsh, Erfan; Nuss, Eric; O'Connor, Paul; Pace, Andrew B.; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Palmese, Antonella; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Peter, Annika H. G.; Piacentni, Francesco; Piacentini, Francesco; Plazas, Andrés; Polin, Daniel A.; Prakash, Abhishek; Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Read, Justin I.; Ritz, Steven; Robertson, Brant E.; Rose, Benjamin; Rosenfeld, Rogerio; Rossi, Graziano; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Javier; Sánchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Schaan, Emmanuel; Sehgal, Neelima; Senatore, Leonardo; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shafieloo, Arman; Shan, Huanyuan; Shipp, Nora; Simon, Joshua D.; Simon, Sara; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Slosar, Anže; Sridhar, Srivatsan; Stebbins, Albert; Straniero, Oscar; Strigari, Louis E.; Tait, Tim M. P.; Tollerud, Erik; Troxel, M. A.; Tyson, J. Anthony; Uhlemann, Cora; Urenña-López, L. Arturo; Verma, Aprajita; Vilalta, Ricardo; Walter, Christopher W.; Wang, Mei-Yu; Watson, Scott; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wittman, David; Xu, Weishuang; Yanny, Brian; Young, Sam; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zaharijas, Gabrijela; Zentner, Andrew R.; Zuntz, Joe
Comments: 11 pages, 2 figures, Science Whitepaper for Astro 2020, more information at https://lsstdarkmatter.github.io
Submitted: 2019-03-11
Astrophysical observations currently provide the only robust, empirical measurements of dark matter. In the coming decade, astrophysical observations will guide other experimental efforts, while simultaneously probing unique regions of dark matter parameter space. This white paper summarizes astrophysical observations that can constrain the fundamental physics of dark matter in the era of LSST. We describe how astrophysical observations will inform our understanding of the fundamental properties of dark matter, such as particle mass, self-interaction strength, non-gravitational interactions with the Standard Model, and compact object abundances. Additionally, we highlight theoretical work and experimental/observational facilities that will complement LSST to strengthen our understanding of the fundamental characteristics of dark matter.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.03689  [pdf] - 1845995
Neutrino Mass from Cosmology: Probing Physics Beyond the Standard Model
Comments: Science White Paper submitted to the US Astro2020 Decadal Survey
Submitted: 2019-03-08
Recent advances in cosmic observations have brought us to the verge of discovery of the absolute scale of neutrino masses. Nonzero neutrino masses are known evidence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Our understanding of the clustering of matter in the presence of massive neutrinos has significantly improved over the past decade, yielding cosmological constraints that are tighter than any laboratory experiment, and which will improve significantly over the next decade, resulting in a guaranteed detection of the absolute neutrino mass scale.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06212  [pdf] - 1844974
Planck 2018 results. XII. Galactic astrophysics using polarized dust emission
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M. I. R.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Green, G.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2019-03-07
We present 353 GHz full-sky maps of the polarization fraction $p$, angle $\psi$, and dispersion of angles $S$ of Galactic dust thermal emission produced from the 2018 release of Planck data. We confirm that the mean and maximum of $p$ decrease with increasing $N_H$. The uncertainty on the maximum polarization fraction, $p_\mathrm{max}=22.0$% at 80 arcmin resolution, is dominated by the uncertainty on the zero level in total intensity. The observed inverse behaviour between $p$ and $S$ is interpreted with models of the polarized sky that include effects from only the topology of the turbulent Galactic magnetic field. Thus, the statistical properties of $p$, $\psi$, and $S$ mostly reflect the structure of the magnetic field. Nevertheless, we search for potential signatures of varying grain alignment and dust properties. First, we analyse the product map $S \times p$, looking for residual trends. While $p$ decreases by a factor of 3--4 between $N_H=10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $N_H=2\times 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$, $S \times p$ decreases by only about 25%, a systematic trend observed in both the diffuse ISM and molecular clouds. Second, we find no systematic trend of $S \times p$ with the dust temperature, even though in the diffuse ISM lines of sight with high $p$ and low $S$ tend to have colder dust. We also compare Planck data with starlight polarization in the visible at high latitudes. The agreement in polarization angles is remarkable. Two polarization emission-to-extinction ratios that characterize dust optical properties depend only weakly on $N_H$ and converge towards the values previously determined for translucent lines of sight. We determine an upper limit for the polarization fraction in extinction of 13%, compatible with the $p_\mathrm{max}$ observed in emission. These results provide strong constraints for models of Galactic dust in diffuse gas.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.03263  [pdf] - 1845116
Science from an Ultra-Deep, High-Resolution Millimeter-Wave Survey
Comments: 5 pages + references; Submitted to the Astro2020 call for science white papers
Submitted: 2019-03-07
Opening up a new window of millimeter-wave observations that span frequency bands in the range of 30 to 500 GHz, survey half the sky, and are both an order of magnitude deeper (about 0.5 uK-arcmin) and of higher-resolution (about 10 arcseconds) than currently funded surveys would yield an enormous gain in understanding of both fundamental physics and astrophysics. In particular, such a survey would allow for major advances in measuring the distribution of dark matter and gas on small-scales, and yield needed insight on 1.) dark matter particle properties, 2.) the evolution of gas and galaxies, 3.) new light particle species, 4.) the epoch of inflation, and 5.) the census of bodies orbiting in the outer Solar System.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.07445  [pdf] - 1841339
The Simons Observatory: Science goals and forecasts
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Dusatko, John; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Fuzia, Brittany; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; He, Yizhou; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Howe, Logan; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Kernasovskiy, Sarah S.; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kuenstner, Stephen E.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Kusaka, Akito; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Leon, David; Leung, Jason S. -Y.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lowry, Lindsay; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Niemack, Michael; Nishino, Haruki; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Page, Lyman; Partridge, Bruce; Peloton, Julien; Perrotta, Francesca; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Siritanasak, Praween; Smith, Kendrick; Smith, Stephen R.; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward J.; Xu, Zhilei; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zhang, Hezi; Zhu, Ningfeng
Comments: This paper presents an overview of the Simons Observatory science goals, details about the instrument will be presented in a companion paper. The author contribution to this paper is available at https://simonsobservatory.org/publications.php (Abstract abridged) -- matching version published in JCAP
Submitted: 2018-08-22, last modified: 2019-03-01
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a new cosmic microwave background experiment being built on Cerro Toco in Chile, due to begin observations in the early 2020s. We describe the scientific goals of the experiment, motivate the design, and forecast its performance. SO will measure the temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background in six frequency bands: 27, 39, 93, 145, 225 and 280 GHz. The initial configuration of SO will have three small-aperture 0.5-m telescopes (SATs) and one large-aperture 6-m telescope (LAT), with a total of 60,000 cryogenic bolometers. Our key science goals are to characterize the primordial perturbations, measure the number of relativistic species and the mass of neutrinos, test for deviations from a cosmological constant, improve our understanding of galaxy evolution, and constrain the duration of reionization. The SATs will target the largest angular scales observable from Chile, mapping ~10% of the sky to a white noise level of 2 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, to measure the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, at a target level of $\sigma(r)=0.003$. The LAT will map ~40% of the sky at arcminute angular resolution to an expected white noise level of 6 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, overlapping with the majority of the LSST sky region and partially with DESI. With up to an order of magnitude lower polarization noise than maps from the Planck satellite, the high-resolution sky maps will constrain cosmological parameters derived from the damping tail, gravitational lensing of the microwave background, the primordial bispectrum, and the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects, and will aid in delensing the large-angle polarization signal to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio. The survey will also provide a legacy catalog of 16,000 galaxy clusters and more than 20,000 extragalactic sources.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.04633  [pdf] - 1764498
Development of Calibration Strategies for the Simons Observatory
Comments: 13 pages, 4 figures, SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2018
Submitted: 2018-10-10
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a set of cosmic microwave background instruments that will be deployed in the Atacama Desert in Chile. The key science goals include setting new constraints on cosmic inflation, measuring large scale structure with gravitational lensing, and constraining neutrino masses. Meeting these science goals with SO requires high sensitivity and improved calibration techniques. In this paper, we highlight a few of the most important instrument calibrations, including spectral response, gain stability, and polarization angle calibrations. We present their requirements for SO and experimental techniques that can be employed to reach those requirements.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.08553  [pdf] - 1797624
Constraints on the sum of the neutrino masses in dynamical dark energy models with $w(z) \geq -1$ are tighter than those obtained in $\Lambda$CDM
Comments: 20 pages, 6 figures, added substantial discussion in text and Appendix A showing that including information from neutrino oscillations does not impact our results, accepted for publication in Phys. Rev. D. The busy reader who wants to see the main results should look at Table 1, Figure 1, and Figure 4
Submitted: 2018-01-25, last modified: 2018-09-16
We explore cosmological constraints on the sum of the three active neutrino masses $M_{\nu}$ in the context of dynamical dark energy (DDE) models with equation of state (EoS) parametrized as a function of redshift $z$ by $w(z)=w_0+w_a\,z/(1+z)$, and satisfying $w(z)\geq-1$ for all $z$. We perform a Bayesian analysis and show that, within these models, the bounds on $M_{\nu}$ \textit{do not degrade} with respect to those obtained in the $\Lambda$CDM case; in fact the bounds are slightly tighter, despite the enlarged parameter space. We explain our results based on the observation that, for fixed choices of $w_0\,,w_a$ such that $w(z)\geq-1$ (but not $w=-1$ for all $z$), the upper limit on $M_{\nu}$ is tighter than the $\Lambda$CDM limit because of the well-known degeneracy between $w$ and $M_{\nu}$. The Bayesian analysis we have carried out then integrates over the possible values of $w_0$-$w_a$ such that $w(z)\geq-1$, all of which correspond to tighter limits on $M_{\nu}$ than the $\Lambda$CDM limit. We find a 95\% confidence level (C.L.) upper bound of $M_{\nu}<0.13\,\mathrm{eV}$. This bound can be compared with $M_{\nu}<0.16\,\mathrm{eV}$ at 95\%~C.L., obtained within the $\Lambda$CDM model, and $M_{\nu}<0.41\,\mathrm{eV}$ at 95\%~C.L., obtained in a DDE model with arbitrary EoS (which allows values of $w < -1$). Contrary to the results derived for DDE models with arbitrary EoS, we find that a dark energy component with $w(z)\geq-1$ is unable to alleviate the tension between high-redshift observables and direct measurements of the Hubble constant $H_0$. Finally, in light of the results of this analysis, we also discuss the implications for DDE models of a possible determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy by laboratory searches. (abstract abridged)
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06206  [pdf] - 1747982
Planck 2018 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Argüeso, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Molinari, D.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Peel, M.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seljebotn, D. S.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2018-09-11
We present a final description of the data-processing pipeline for the Planck, Low Frequency Instrument (LFI), implemented for the 2018 data release. Several improvements have been made with respect to the previous release, especially in the calibration process and in the correction of instrumental features such as the effects of nonlinearity in the response of the analogue-to-digital converters. We provide a brief pedagogical introduction to the complete pipeline, as well as a detailed description of the important changes implemented. Self-consistency of the pipeline is demonstrated using dedicated simulations and null tests. We present the final version of the LFI full sky maps at 30, 44, and 70 GHz, both in temperature and polarization, together with a refined estimate of the Solar dipole and a final assessment of the main LFI instrumental parameters.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.08649  [pdf] - 1783719
Planck intermediate results. LIV. The Planck Multi-frequency Catalogue of Non-thermal Sources
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Argüeso, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 24 pages, 15 figures. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2018-02-23, last modified: 2018-09-11
This paper presents the Planck Multi-frequency Catalogue of Non-thermal (i.e. synchrotron-dominated) Sources (PCNT) observed between 30 and 857 GHz by the ESA Planck mission. This catalogue was constructed by selecting objects detected in the full mission all-sky temperature maps at 30 and 143 GHz, with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N)>3 in at least one of the two channels after filtering with a particular Mexican hat wavelet. As a result, 29400 source candidates were selected. Then, a multi-frequency analysis was performed using the Matrix Filters methodology at the position of these objects, and flux densities and errors were calculated for all of them in the nine Planck channels. The present catalogue is the first unbiased, full-sky catalogue of synchrotron-dominated sources published at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths and constitutes a powerful database for statistical studies of non-thermal extragalactic sources, whose emission is dominated by the central active galactic nucleus. Together with the full multi-frequency catalogue, we also define the Bright Planck Multi-frequency Catalogue of Non-thermal Sources PCNTb, where only those objects with a S/N>4 at both 30 and 143 GHz were selected. In this catalogue 1146 compact sources are detected outside the adopted Planck GAL070 mask; thus, these sources constitute a highly reliable sample of extragalactic radio sources. We also flag the high-significance subsample PCNThs, a subset of 151 sources that are detected with S/N>4 in all nine Planck channels, 75 of which are found outside the Planck mask adopted here. The remaining 76 sources inside the Galactic mask are very likely Galactic objects.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.04672  [pdf] - 1797159
Bias due to neutrinos must not uncorrect'd go
Comments: 12 pages, 2 figures, abstract abridged. Version accepted for publication in JCAP. The busy reader should skip to Sec. IID, V, and the figures. A "Note added" between conclusions and acknowledgements explains our choice of title
Submitted: 2018-07-12, last modified: 2018-08-24
In cosmologies with massive neutrinos, the galaxy bias defined with respect to the total matter field (cold dark matter, baryons, and non-relativistic neutrinos) depends on the sum of the neutrino masses $M_{\nu}$, and becomes scale-dependent even on large scales. This effect has been usually neglected given the sensitivity of current surveys, but becomes a severe systematic for future surveys aiming to provide the first detection of non-zero $M_{\nu}$. The effect can be corrected for by defining the bias with respect to the density field of cold dark matter and baryons instead of the total matter field. In this work, we provide a simple prescription for correctly mitigating the neutrino-induced scale-dependent bias effect in a practical way. We clarify a number of subtleties regarding how to properly implement this correction in the presence of redshift-space distortions and non-linear evolution of perturbations. We perform a MCMC analysis on simulated galaxy clustering data that match the expected sensitivity of the \textit{Euclid} survey. We find that the neutrino-induced scale-dependent bias can lead to important shifts in both the inferred mean value of $M_{\nu}$, as well as its uncertainty. We show how these shifts propagate to other cosmological parameters correlated with $M_{\nu}$, such as the cold dark matter physical density $\Omega_{cdm} h^2$ and the scalar spectral index $n_s$. In conclusion, we find that correctly accounting for the neutrino-induced scale-dependent bias will be of crucial importance for future galaxy clustering analyses. We encourage the cosmology community to correctly account for this effect using the simple prescription we present in our work. The tools necessary to easily correct for the neutrino-induced scale-dependent bias will be made publicly available in an upcoming release of the Boltzmann solver \texttt{CLASS}.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.00132  [pdf] - 1755826
Planck intermediate results. LIII. Detection of velocity dispersion from the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gerbino, M.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Stanco, L.; Sunyaev, R.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 20 pages, 12 figures and 8 tables, A&A in press
Submitted: 2017-07-01, last modified: 2018-08-23
Using the ${\it Planck}$ full-mission data, we present a detection of the temperature (and therefore velocity) dispersion due to the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect from clusters of galaxies. To suppress the primary CMB and instrumental noise we derive a matched filter and then convolve it with the ${\it Planck}$ foreground-cleaned `${\tt 2D-ILC\,}$' maps. By using the Meta Catalogue of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC), we determine the normalized ${\it rms}$ dispersion of the temperature fluctuations at the positions of clusters, finding that this shows excess variance compared with the noise expectation. We then build an unbiased statistical estimator of the signal, determining that the normalized mean temperature dispersion of $1526$ clusters is $\langle \left(\Delta T/T \right)^{2} \rangle = (1.64 \pm 0.48) \times 10^{-11}$. However, comparison with analytic calculations and simulations suggest that around $0.7\,\sigma$ of this result is due to cluster lensing rather than the kSZ effect. By correcting this, the temperature dispersion is measured to be $\langle \left(\Delta T/T \right)^{2} \rangle = (1.35 \pm 0.48) \times 10^{-11}$, which gives a detection at the $2.8\,\sigma$ level. We further convert uniform-weight temperature dispersion into a measurement of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion, by using estimates of the optical depth of each cluster (which introduces additional uncertainty into the estimate). We find that the velocity dispersion is $\langle v^{2} \rangle =(123\,000 \pm 71\,000)\,({\rm km}\,{\rm s}^{-1})^{2}$, which is consistent with findings from other large-scale structure studies, and provides direct evidence of statistical homogeneity on scales of $600\,h^{-1}{\rm Mpc}$. Our study shows the promise of using cross-correlations of the kSZ effect with large-scale structure in order to constrain the growth of structure.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.07442  [pdf] - 1737618
Studies of Systematic Uncertainties for Simons Observatory: Polarization Modulator Related Effects
Comments: 22 pages, 10 figures. Submitted to the Proceedings of SPIE: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy IX
Submitted: 2018-08-22
The Simons Observatory (SO) will observe the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) over a wide range of frequencies (27 to 270 GHz) and angular scales by using both small (0.5 m) and large (6 m) aperture telescopes. The SO small aperture telescopes will target degree angular scales where the primordial B-mode polarization signal is expected to peak. The incoming polarization signal of the small aperture telescopes will be modulated by a cryogenic, continuously-rotating half-wave plate (CRHWP) to mitigate systematic effects arising from slowly varying noise and detector pair-differencing. In this paper, we present an assessment of some systematic effects arising from using a CRHWP in the SO small aperture systems. We focus on systematic effects associated with structural properties of the HWP and effects arising when operating a HWP, including the amplitude of the HWP synchronous signal (HWPSS), and I -> P (intensity to polarization) leakage that arises from detector non-linearity in the presence of a large HWPSS. We demonstrate our ability to simulate the impact of the aforementioned systematic effects in the time domain. This important step will inform mitigation strategies and design decisions to ensure that SO will meet its science goals.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.04493  [pdf] - 1935462
The Simons Observatory: Instrument Overview
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-08-13
The Simons Observatory (SO) will make precise temperature and polarization measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using a set of telescopes which will cover angular scales between 1 arcminute and tens of degrees, contain over 60,000 detectors, and observe at frequencies between 27 and 270 GHz. SO will consist of a 6 m aperture telescope coupled to over 30,000 transition-edge sensor bolometers along with three 42 cm aperture refractive telescopes, coupled to an additional 30,000+ detectors, all of which will be located in the Atacama Desert at an altitude of 5190 m. The powerful combination of large and small apertures in a CMB observatory will allow us to sample a wide range of angular scales over a common survey area. SO will measure fundamental cosmological parameters of our universe, constrain primordial fluctuations, find high redshift clusters via the Sunyaev-Zel`dovich effect, constrain properties of neutrinos, and trace the density and velocity of the matter in the universe over cosmic time. The complex set of technical and science requirements for this experiment has led to innovative instrumentation solutions which we will discuss. The large aperture telescope will couple to a cryogenic receiver that is 2.4 m in diameter and nearly 3 m long, creating a number of technical challenges. Concurrently, we are designing the array of cryogenic receivers housing the 42 cm aperture telescopes. We will discuss the sensor technology SO will use and we will give an overview of the drivers for and designs of the SO telescopes and receivers, with their cold optical components and detector arrays.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06207  [pdf] - 1717310
Planck 2018 results. III. High Frequency Instrument data processing and frequency maps
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Accepted for publication on A&A (AA/2018/32909)
Submitted: 2018-07-17
This paper presents the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) data processing procedures for the Planck 2018 release. Major improvements in mapmaking have been achieved since the previous 2015 release. They enabled the first significant measurement of the reionization optical depth parameter using HFI data. This paper presents an extensive analysis of systematic effects, including the use of simulations to facilitate their removal and characterize the residuals. The polarized data, which presented a number of known problems in the 2015 Planck release, are very significantly improved. Calibration, based on the CMB dipole, is now extremely accurate and in the frequency range 100 to 353 GHz reduces intensity-to-polarization leakage caused by calibration mismatch. The Solar dipole direction has been determined in the three lowest HFI frequency channels to within one arc minute, and its amplitude has an absolute uncertainty smaller than $0.35\mu$K, an accuracy of order $10^{-4}$. This is a major legacy from the HFI for future CMB experiments. The removal of bandpass leakage has been improved by extracting the bandpass-mismatch coefficients for each detector as part of the mapmaking process; these values in turn improve the intensity maps. This is a major change in the philosophy of "frequency maps", which are now computed from single detector data, all adjusted to the same average bandpass response for the main foregrounds. Simulations reproduce very well the relative gain calibration of detectors, as well as drifts within a frequency induced by the residuals of the main systematic effect. Using these simulations, we measure and correct the small frequency calibration bias induced by this systematic effect at the $10^{-4}$ level. There is no detectable sign of a residual calibration bias between the first and second acoustic peaks in the CMB channels, at the $10^{-3}$ level.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06208  [pdf] - 1717311
Planck 2018 results. IV. Diffuse component separation
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Casaponsa, B.; Challinor, A.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Herranz, D.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Natoli, P.; Oppizzi, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Peel, M.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seljebotn, D. S.; Sirignano, C.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Thommesen, H.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 74 pages, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2018-07-17
We present full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and polarized synchrotron and thermal dust emission, derived from the third set of Planck frequency maps. These products have significantly lower contamination from instrumental systematic effects than previous versions. The methodologies used to derive these maps follow closely those described in earlier papers, adopting four methods (Commander, NILC, SEVEM, and SMICA) to extract the CMB component, as well as three methods (Commander, GNILC, and SMICA) to extract astrophysical components. Our revised CMB temperature maps agree with corresponding products in the Planck 2015 delivery, whereas the polarization maps exhibit significantly lower large-scale power, reflecting the improved data processing described in companion papers; however, the noise properties of the resulting data products are complicated, and the best available end-to-end simulations exhibit relative biases with respect to the data at the few percent level. Using these maps, we are for the first time able to fit the spectral index of thermal dust independently over 3 degree regions. We derive a conservative estimate of the mean spectral index of polarized thermal dust emission of beta_d = 1.55 +/- 0.05, where the uncertainty marginalizes both over all known systematic uncertainties and different estimation techniques. For polarized synchrotron emission, we find a mean spectral index of beta_s = -3.1 +/- 0.1, consistent with previously reported measurements. We note that the current data processing does not allow for construction of unbiased single-bolometer maps, and this limits our ability to extract CO emission and correlated components. The foreground results for intensity derived in this paper therefore do not supersede corresponding Planck 2015 products. For polarization the new results supersede the corresponding 2015 products in all respects.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.11545  [pdf] - 1658336
Neutrino properties from cosmology
Comments: Talk presented at NuPhys2017 (London, 20-22 December 2017). 8 pages, LaTeX, no figures
Submitted: 2018-03-30
Precision cosmology enables to test fundamental physics, including neutrino properties, with unprecedented accuracy. In this work, I review the basics of neutrino cosmology. I briefly describe how neutrinos affect cosmological observables, such as anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background and fluctuations in the matter field. I show current constraints and projected sensitivities on the sum of the neutrino masses $\Sigma m_\nu$ and on the number of relativistic species $N_\mathrm{eff}$ from a selection of cosmological data. I finally comment about the implications of those bounds for neutrino physics.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.07109  [pdf] - 1605472
Status of neutrino properties and future prospects - Cosmological and astrophysical constraints
Comments: 73 pages, 6 figures, 4 tables. To appear in Frontiers in Physics
Submitted: 2017-12-19
Cosmological observations are a powerful probe of neutrino properties, and in particular of their mass. In this review, we first discuss the role of neutrinos in shaping the cosmological evolution at both the background and perturbation level, and describe their effects on cosmological observables such as the cosmic microwave background and the distribution of matter at large scale. We then present the state of the art concerning the constraints on neutrino masses from those observables, and also review the prospects for future experiments. We also briefly discuss the prospects for determining the neutrino hierarchy from cosmology, the complementarity with laboratory experiments, and the constraints on neutrino properties beyond their mass.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.08172  [pdf] - 1797120
Unveiling $\nu$ secrets with cosmological data: neutrino masses and mass hierarchy
Comments: Accepted for publication in PRD. Major structural changes from V1, some discussions moved to appendices, but conclusions completely unchanged. 27 pages, 7 figures. Comments are very welcome
Submitted: 2017-01-27, last modified: 2017-11-15
Using some of the latest cosmological datasets publicly available, we derive the strongest bounds in the literature on the sum of the three active neutrino masses, $M_\nu$, within the assumption of a background flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. In the most conservative scheme, combining Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) data, as well as the up-to-date constraint on the optical depth to reionization ($\tau$), the tightest $95\%$ confidence level (C.L.) upper bound we find is $M_\nu<0.151$~eV. The addition of Planck high-$\ell$ polarization data, which however might still be contaminated by systematics, further tightens the bound to $M_\nu<0.118$~eV. A proper model comparison treatment shows that the two aforementioned combinations disfavor the IH at $\sim 64\%$~C.L. and $\sim 71\%$~C.L. respectively. In addition, we compare the constraining power of measurements of the full-shape galaxy power spectrum versus the BAO signature, from the BOSS survey. Even though the latest BOSS full shape measurements cover a larger volume and benefit from smaller error bars compared to previous similar measurements, the analysis method commonly adopted results in their constraining power still being less powerful than that of the extracted BAO signal. Our work uses only cosmological data; imposing the constraint $M_\nu>0.06\,{\rm eV}$ from oscillations data would raise the quoted upper bounds by ${\cal O}(0.1\sigma)$ and would not affect our conclusions.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.07847  [pdf] - 1628148
A novel approach to quantifying the sensitivity of current and future cosmological datasets to the neutrino mass ordering through Bayesian hierarchical modeling
Comments: 19 pages, 7 figures, 3 tables. Abstract abridged. Comments welcome. Added discussion of the results obtained with a log prior on the lightest mass. Matching published version in PLB
Submitted: 2016-11-23, last modified: 2017-11-03
We present a novel approach to derive constraints on neutrino masses from cosmological data, while taking into account our ignorance of the neutrino mass ordering. We derive constraints from a combination of current and future cosmological datasets on the total neutrino mass $M_\nu$ and on the mass fractions carried by each of the mass eigenstates, after marginalizing over the (unknown) neutrino mass ordering, either normal (NH) or inverted (IH). The bounds take therefore into account the uncertainty related to our ignorance of the mass hierarchy. This novel approach is carried out in the framework of Bayesian analysis of a typical hierarchical problem. In this context, the choice of the neutrino mass ordering is modeled via the discrete hyperparameter $h_{type}$. The preference for either the NH or the IH scenarios is then encoded in the posterior distribution of $h_{type}$ itself. Current CMB measurements assign equal odds to the two hierarchies, and are thus unable to distinguish between them. However, after the addition of BAO measurements, a weak preference for NH appears, with odds of 4:3 from Planck temperature and large-scale polarization in combination with BAO (3:2 if small-scale polarization is also included). Forecasts suggest that the combination of upcoming CMB (COrE) and BAO surveys (DESI) may determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a high statistical significance if the mass is very close to the minimal value allowed by oscillations, as for NH and $M_\nu=0.06$ eV there is a 9:1 preference of NH vs IH. On the contrary, if $M_\nu$ is of the order of 0.1 eV or larger, even future cosmological observations will be inconclusive. The unbiased limit on $M_\nu$ we obtain with this innovative statistical strategy is crucial for ongoing and planned neutrinoless double beta decay searches.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.05764  [pdf] - 1935353
Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: effects of observer peculiar motion
Burigana, C.; Carvalho, C. S.; Trombetti, T.; Notari, A.; Quartin, M.; De Gasperis, G.; Buzzelli, A.; Vittorio, N.; De Zotti, G.; de Bernardis, P.; Chluba, J.; Bilicki, M.; Danese, L.; Delabrouille, J.; Toffolatti, L.; Lapi, A.; Negrello, M.; Mazzotta, P.; Scott, D.; Contreras, D.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Cabella, P.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Castellano, G.; Challinor, A.; Clesse, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; Diego, J. -M.; Di Marco, A.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 61+5 pages, 17 figures, 25 tables, 8 sections, 5 appendices. In press on JCAP - Version 3 - Minor changes, affiliations fixed, references updated - version in line with corrected proofs
Submitted: 2017-04-19, last modified: 2017-08-30
We discuss the effects on the CMB, CIB, and thermal SZ effect due to the peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame, which induces boosting effects. We investigate the scientific perspectives opened by future CMB space missions, focussing on the CORE proposal. The improvements in sensitivity offered by a mission like CORE, together with its high resolution over a wide frequency range, will provide a more accurate estimate of the CMB dipole. The extension of boosting effects to polarization and cross-correlations will enable a more robust determination of purely velocity-driven effects that are not degenerate with the intrinsic CMB dipole, allowing us to achieve a S/N ratio of 13; this improves on the Planck detection and essentially equals that of an ideal cosmic-variance-limited experiment up to a multipole l of 2000. Precise inter-frequency calibration will offer the opportunity to constrain or even detect CMB spectral distortions, particularly from the cosmological reionization, because of the frequency dependence of the dipole spectrum, without resorting to precise absolute calibration. The expected improvement with respect to COBE-FIRAS in the recovery of distortion parameters (in principle, a factor of several hundred for an ideal experiment with the CORE configuration) ranges from a factor of several up to about 50, depending on the quality of foreground removal and relative calibration. Even for 1% accuracy in both foreground removal and relative calibration at an angular scale of 1 deg, we find that dipole analyses for a mission like CORE will be able to improve the recovery of the CIB spectrum amplitude by a factor of 17 in comparison with current results based on FIRAS. In addition to the scientific potential of a mission like CORE for these analyses, synergies with other planned and ongoing projects are also discussed.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.04224  [pdf] - 1935371
Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: mitigation of systematic effects
Natoli, P.; Ashdown, M.; Banerji, R.; Borrill, J.; Buzzelli, A.; de Gasperis, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Hivon, E.; Molinari, D.; Patanchon, G.; Polastri, L.; Tomasi, M.; Bouchet, F. R.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hoang, D. T.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Lindholm, V.; McCarthy, D.; Piacentini, F.; Perdereau, O.; Polenta, G.; Tristram, M.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Baselmans, J.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. -S.; Castellano, G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. -M.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Gruppuso, A.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Keihänen, E.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Migliaccio, M.; Monfardini, A.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Pagano, L.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rossi, G.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Signorelli, G.; Tartari, A.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Wallis, C.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 54 pages, 26 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2017-07-13
We present an analysis of the main systematic effects that could impact the measurement of CMB polarization with the proposed CORE space mission. We employ timeline-to-map simulations to verify that the CORE instrumental set-up and scanning strategy allow us to measure sky polarization to a level of accuracy adequate to the mission science goals. We also show how the CORE observations can be processed to mitigate the level of contamination by potentially worrying systematics, including intensity-to-polarization leakage due to bandpass mismatch, asymmetric main beams, pointing errors and correlated noise. We use analysis techniques that are well validated on data from current missions such as Planck to demonstrate how the residual contamination of the measurements by these effects can be brought to a level low enough not to hamper the scientific capability of the mission, nor significantly increase the overall error budget. We also present a prototype of the CORE photometric calibration pipeline, based on that used for Planck, and discuss its robustness to systematics, showing how CORE can achieve its calibration requirements. While a fine-grained assessment of the impact of systematics requires a level of knowledge of the system that can only be achieved in a future study phase, the analysis presented here strongly suggests that the main areas of concern for the CORE mission can be addressed using existing knowledge, techniques and algorithms.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.02259  [pdf] - 1935367
Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: gravitational lensing of the CMB
Challinor, Anthony; Allison, Rupert; Carron, Julien; Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen; Kitching, Thomas; Lesgourgues, Julien; Lewis, Antony; Zubeldía, Íñigo; Achucarro, Ana; Ade, Peter; Ashdown, Mark; Ballardini, Mario; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, Ranajoy; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Basak, Soumen; Baumann, Daniel; Bersanelli, Marco; Bonaldi, Anna; Bonato, Matteo; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brinckmann, Thejs; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Buzzelli, Alessandro; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Calvo, Martino; Carvalho, Carla-Sofia; Castellano, Gabriella; Chluba, Jens; Clesse, Sebastien; Colantoni, Ivan; Coppolecchia, Alessandro; Crook, Martin; d'Alessandro, Giuseppe; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Gasperis, Giancarlo; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Diego, Jose-Maria; Fernandez-Cobos, Raul; Ferraro, Simone; Finelli, Fabio; Forastieri, Francesco; Galli, Silvia; Genova-Santos, Ricardo; Gerbino, Martina; González-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grandis, Sebastian; Greenslade, Joshua; Hagstotz, Steffen; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hervías-Caimapo, Carlos; Hills, Matthew; Hivon, Eric; Kiiveri, Kimmo; Kisner, Ted; Kunz, Martin; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Lamagna, Luca; Lasenby, Anthony; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Liguori, Michele; Lindholm, Valtteri; López-Caniego, Marcos; Luzzi, Gemma; Maffei, Bruno; Martinez-González, Enrique; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; McCarthy, Darragh; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Molinari, Diego; Monfardini, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Notari, Alessio; Paiella, Alessandro; Paoletti, Daniela; Patanchon, Guillaume; Piat, Michel; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polastri, Linda; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Poulin, Vivian; Quartin, Miguel; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Roman, Matthieu; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salvati, Laura; Tartari, Andrea; Tomasi, Maurizio; Tramonte, Denis; Trappe, Neil; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucker, Carole; Valiviita, Jussi; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; van Tent, Bartjan; Vennin, Vincent; Vielva, Patricio; Vittorio, Nicola; Young, Karl; Zannoni, Mario
Comments: 44 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2017-07-07
Lensing of the CMB is now a well-developed probe of large-scale clustering over a broad range of redshifts. By exploiting the non-Gaussian imprints of lensing in the polarization of the CMB, the CORE mission can produce a clean map of the lensing deflections over nearly the full-sky. The number of high-S/N modes in this map will exceed current CMB lensing maps by a factor of 40, and the measurement will be sample-variance limited on all scales where linear theory is valid. Here, we summarise this mission product and discuss the science that it will enable. For example, the summed mass of neutrinos will be determined to an accuracy of 17 meV combining CORE lensing and CMB two-point information with contemporaneous BAO measurements, three times smaller than the minimum total mass allowed by neutrino oscillations. In the search for B-mode polarization from primordial gravitational waves with CORE, lens-induced B-modes will dominate over instrument noise, limiting constraints on the gravitational wave power spectrum amplitude. With lensing reconstructed by CORE, one can "delens" the observed polarization internally, reducing the lensing B-mode power by 60%. This improves to 70% by combining lensing and CIB measurements from CORE, reducing the error on the gravitational wave amplitude by 2.5 compared to no delensing (in the null hypothesis). Lensing measurements from CORE will allow calibration of the halo masses of the 40000 galaxy clusters that it will find, with constraints dominated by the clean polarization-based estimators. CORE can accurately remove Galactic emission from CMB maps with its 19 frequency channels. We present initial findings that show that residual Galactic foreground contamination will not be a significant source of bias for lensing power spectrum measurements with CORE. [abridged]
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.04501  [pdf] - 1935352
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: B-mode Component Separation
Remazeilles, M.; Banday, A. J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Basak, S.; Bonaldi, A.; De Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K.; Errard, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Fuskeland, U.; Hervías-Caimapo, C.; López-Caniego, M.; Martinez-González, E.; Roman, M.; Vielva, P.; Wehus, I.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banerji, R.; Bartolo, N.; Bartlett, J.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. -S.; Castellano, G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Diego, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Feeney, S.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melin, J. -B.; Melchiorri, A.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vittorio, N.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 87 pages, 32 figures, 4 tables, expanded abstract. Updated to match version accepted by JCAP
Submitted: 2017-04-14, last modified: 2017-06-19
We demonstrate that, for the baseline design of the CORE satellite mission, the polarized foregrounds can be controlled at the level required to allow the detection of the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) $B$-mode polarization with the desired accuracy at both reionization and recombination scales, for tensor-to-scalar ratio values of ${r\gtrsim 5\times 10^{-3}}$. We consider detailed sky simulations based on state-of-the-art CMB observations that consist of CMB polarization with $\tau=0.055$ and tensor-to-scalar values ranging from $r=10^{-2}$ to $10^{-3}$, Galactic synchrotron, and thermal dust polarization with variable spectral indices over the sky, polarized anomalous microwave emission, polarized infrared and radio sources, and gravitational lensing effects. Using both parametric and blind approaches, we perform full component separation and likelihood analysis of the simulations, allowing us to quantify both uncertainties and biases on the reconstructed primordial $B$-modes. Under the assumption of perfect control of lensing effects, CORE would measure an unbiased estimate of $r=\left(5 \pm 0.4\right)\times 10^{-3}$ after foreground cleaning. In the presence of both gravitational lensing effects and astrophysical foregrounds, the significance of the detection is lowered, with CORE achieving a $4\sigma$-measurement of $r=5\times 10^{-3}$ after foreground cleaning and $60$% delensing. For lower tensor-to-scalar ratios ($r=10^{-3}$) the overall uncertainty on $r$ is dominated by foreground residuals, not by the 40% residual of lensing cosmic variance. Moreover, the residual contribution of unprocessed polarized point-sources can be the dominant foreground contamination to primordial B-modes at this $r$ level, even on relatively large angular scales, $\ell \sim 50$. Finally, we report two sources of potential bias for the detection of the primordial $B$-modes.[abridged]
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.04516  [pdf] - 1935364
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Survey requirements and mission design
Delabrouille, J.; de Bernardis, P.; Bouchet, F. R.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Allison, R.; Arroja, F.; Artal, E.; Ashdown, M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Barbosa, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Basu, K.; Battistelli, E. S.; Battye, R.; Baumann, D.; Benoît, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Bideaud, A.; Biesiada, M.; Bilicki, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cabass, G.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Caputo, A.; Carvalho, C. -S.; Casas, F. J.; Castellano, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Charles, I.; Chluba, J.; Clements, D. L.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Contreras, D.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; D'Amico, G.; da Silva, A.; de Avillez, M.; de Gasperis, G.; De Petris, M.; de Zotti, G.; Danese, L.; Désert, F. -X.; Desjacques, V.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doyle, S.; Durrer, R.; Dvorkin, C.; Eriksen, H. -K.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Franceschet, C.; Fuskeland, U.; Galli, S.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Giusarma, E.; Gomez, A.; González-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Goupy, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hindmarsh, M.; Hivon, E.; Hoang, D. T.; Hooper, D. C.; Hu, B.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamagna, L.; Lapi, A.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Brun, A. M. C. Le; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lizarraga, J.; Luzzi, G.; Macìas-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martin, S.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mennella, A.; Mohr, J.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Montier, L.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Noviello, F.; Oppizzi, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Pagano, L.; Paiella, A.; Pajer, E.; Paoletti, D.; Paradiso, S.; Partridge, R. B.; Patanchon, G.; Patil, S. P.; Perdereau, O.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Ponthieu, N.; Poulin, V.; Prêle, D.; Quartin, M.; Ravenni, A.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ringeval, C.; Roest, D.; Roman, M.; Roukema, B. F.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Scott, D.; Serjeant, S.; Signorelli, G.; Starobinsky, A. A.; Sunyaev, R.; Tan, C. Y.; Tartari, A.; Tasinato, G.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torrado, J.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tucker, C.; Urrestilla, J.; Väliviita, J.; Van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Verde, L.; Vermeulen, G.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Voisin, F.; Wallis, C.; Wandelt, B.; Wehus, I.; Weller, J.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 79 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2017-06-14
Future observations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarisation have the potential to answer some of the most fundamental questions of modern physics and cosmology. In this paper, we list the requirements for a future CMB polarisation survey addressing these scientific objectives, and discuss the design drivers of the CORE space mission proposed to ESA in answer to the "M5" call for a medium-sized mission. The rationale and options, and the methodologies used to assess the mission's performance, are of interest to other future CMB mission design studies. CORE is designed as a near-ultimate CMB polarisation mission which, for optimal complementarity with ground-based observations, will perform the observations that are known to be essential to CMB polarisation scienceand cannot be obtained by any other means than a dedicated space mission.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.02170  [pdf] - 1935357
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: The Instrument
de Bernardis, P.; Ade, P. A. R.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Battistelli, E. S.; Benoit, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Bideaud, A.; Calvo, M.; Casas, F. J.; Castellano, G.; Catalano, A.; Charles, I.; Colantoni, I.; Columbro, F.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; De Petris, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Doyle, S.; Franceschet, C.; Gomez, A.; Goupy, J.; Hanany, S.; Hills, M.; Lamagna, L.; Macias-Perez, J.; Maffei, B.; Martin, S.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Mennella, A.; Monfardini, A.; Noviello, F.; Paiella, A.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Signorelli, G.; Tan, C. Y.; Tartari, A.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tucker, C.; Vermeulen, G.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.; Achúcarro, A.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z. Y.; Carvalho, C. S.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; De Gasperis, G.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Génova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Greenslade, J.; Handley, W.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Luzzi, G.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. B.; Molinari, D.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Salvati, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Trombetti, T.; Väliviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.
Comments: 43 pages
Submitted: 2017-05-05, last modified: 2017-05-22
We describe a space-borne, multi-band, multi-beam polarimeter aiming at a precise and accurate measurement of the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. The instrument is optimized to be compatible with the strict budget requirements of a medium-size space mission within the Cosmic Vision Programme of the European Space Agency. The instrument has no moving parts, and uses arrays of diffraction-limited Kinetic Inductance Detectors to cover the frequency range from 60 GHz to 600 GHz in 19 wide bands, in the focal plane of a 1.2 m aperture telescope cooled at 40 K, allowing for an accurate extraction of the CMB signal from polarized foreground emission. The projected CMB polarization survey sensitivity of this instrument, after foregrounds removal, is 1.7 {\mu}K$\cdot$arcmin. The design is robust enough to allow, if needed, a downscoped version of the instrument covering the 100 GHz to 600 GHz range with a 0.8 m aperture telescope cooled at 85 K, with a projected CMB polarization survey sensitivity of 3.2 {\mu}K$\cdot$arcmin.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.07263  [pdf] - 1935304
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Extragalactic sources in Cosmic Microwave Background maps
De Zotti, G.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Negrello, M.; Greenslade, J.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Delabrouille, J.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Bonato, M.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Biesiada, M.; Bilicki, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. S.; Castellano, M. G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clements, D. L.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Diego, J. M.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S. M.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Grandis, S.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Brun, A. Le; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, R. B.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rossi, G.; Roukema, B. F.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Scott, D.; Serjeant, S.; Tartari, A.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Young, K.
Comments: 40 pages, 9 figures, text expanded, co-authors added, to be submitted to JCAP
Submitted: 2016-09-23, last modified: 2017-05-18
We discuss the potential of a next generation space-borne Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment for studies of extragalactic sources. Our analysis has particular bearing on the definition of the future space project, CORE, that has been submitted in response to ESA's call for a Medium-size mission opportunity as the successor of the Planck satellite. Even though the effective telescope size will be somewhat smaller than that of Planck, CORE will have a considerably better angular resolution at its highest frequencies, since, in contrast with Planck, it will be diffraction limited at all frequencies. The improved resolution implies a considerable decrease of the source confusion, i.e. substantially fainter detection limits. In particular, CORE will detect thousands of strongly lensed high-z galaxies distributed over the full sky. The extreme brightness of these galaxies will make it possible to study them, via follow-up observations, in extraordinary detail. Also, the CORE resolution matches the typical sizes of high-z galaxy proto-clusters much better than the Planck resolution, resulting in a much higher detection efficiency; these objects will be caught in an evolutionary phase beyond the reach of surveys in other wavebands. Furthermore, CORE will provide unique information on the evolution of the star formation in virialized groups and clusters of galaxies up to the highest possible redshifts. Finally, thanks to its very high sensitivity, CORE will detect the polarized emission of thousands of radio sources and, for the first time, of dusty galaxies, at mm and sub-mm wavelengths, respectively.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.02704  [pdf] - 1582442
POLOCALC: a Novel Method to Measure the Absolute Polarization Orientation of the Cosmic Microwave Background
Comments: 15 pages, 5 figures, Accepted by Journal of Astronomical Instrumentation
Submitted: 2017-04-10, last modified: 2017-05-12
We describe a novel method to measure the absolute orientation of the polarization plane of the CMB with arcsecond accuracy, enabling unprecedented measurements for cosmology and fundamental physics. Existing and planned CMB polarization instruments looking for primordial B-mode signals need an independent, experimental method for systematics control on the absolute polarization orientation. The lack of such a method limits the accuracy of the detection of inflationary gravitational waves, the constraining power on the neutrino sector through measurements of gravitational lensing of the CMB, the possibility of detecting Cosmic Birefringence, and the ability to measure primordial magnetic fields. Sky signals used for calibration and direct measurements of the detector orientation cannot provide an accuracy better than 1 deg. Self-calibration methods provide better accuracy, but may be affected by foreground signals and rely heavily on model assumptions. The POLarization Orientation CALibrator for Cosmology, POLOCALC, will dramatically improve instrumental accuracy by means of an artificial calibration source flying on balloons and aerial drones. A balloon-borne calibrator will provide far-field source for larger telescopes, while a drone will be used for tests and smaller polarimeters. POLOCALC will also allow a unique method to measure the telescopes' polarized beam. It will use microwave emitters between 40 and 150 GHz coupled to precise polarizing filters. The orientation of the source polarization plane will be registered to sky coordinates by star cameras and gyroscopes with arcsecond accuracy. This project can become a rung in the calibration ladder for the field: any existing or future CMB polarization experiment observing our polarization calibrator will enable measurements of the polarization angle for each detector with respect to absolute sky coordinates.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.02487  [pdf] - 1580129
Planck intermediate results. LI. Features in the cosmic microwave background temperature power spectrum and shifts in cosmological parameters
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Narimani, A.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Stanco, L.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 22 pages, 17 figures, abstract abridged for Arxiv submission
Submitted: 2016-08-08, last modified: 2017-04-21
The six parameters of the standard $\Lambda$CDM model have best-fit values derived from the Planck temperature power spectrum that are shifted somewhat from the best-fit values derived from WMAP data. These shifts are driven by features in the Planck temperature power spectrum at angular scales that had never before been measured to cosmic-variance level precision. We investigate these shifts to determine whether they are within the range of expectation and to understand their origin in the data. Taking our parameter set to be the optical depth of the reionized intergalactic medium $\tau$, the baryon density $\omega_{\rm b}$, the matter density $\omega_{\rm m}$, the angular size of the sound horizon $\theta_*$, the spectral index of the primordial power spectrum, $n_{\rm s}$, and $A_{\rm s}e^{-2\tau}$ (where $A_{\rm s}$ is the amplitude of the primordial power spectrum), we examine the change in best-fit values between a WMAP-like large angular-scale data set (with multipole moment $\ell<800$ in the Planck temperature power spectrum) and an all angular-scale data set ($\ell<2500$ Planck temperature power spectrum), each with a prior on $\tau$ of $0.07\pm0.02$. We find that the shifts, in units of the 1$\sigma$ expected dispersion for each parameter, are $\{\Delta \tau, \Delta A_{\rm s} e^{-2\tau}, \Delta n_{\rm s}, \Delta \omega_{\rm m}, \Delta \omega_{\rm b}, \Delta \theta_*\} = \{-1.7, -2.2, 1.2, -2.0, 1.1, 0.9\}$, with a $\chi^2$ value of 8.0. We find that this $\chi^2$ value is exceeded in 15% of our simulated data sets, and that a parameter deviates by more than 2.2$\sigma$ in 9% of simulated data sets, meaning that the shifts are not unusually large. Comparing $\ell<800$ instead to $\ell>800$, or splitting at a different multipole, yields similar results. We examine the $\ell<800$ model residuals in the $\ell>800$ power spectrum data and find that the features there... [abridged]
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.08270  [pdf] - 1670406
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Inflation
CORE Collaboration; Finelli, Fabio; Bucher, Martin; Achúcarro, Ana; Ballardini, Mario; Bartolo, Nicola; Baumann, Daniel; Clesse, Sébastien; Errard, Josquin; Handley, Will; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kiiveri, Kimmo; Kunz, Martin; Lasenby, Anthony; Liguori, Michele; Paoletti, Daniela; Ringeval, Christophe; Väliviita, Jussi; van Tent, Bartjan; Vennin, Vincent; Allison, Rupert; Arroja, Frederico; Ashdown, Marc; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, Ranajoy; Bartlett, James G.; Basak, Soumen; Baselmans, Jochem; de Bernardis, Paolo; Bersanelli, Marco; Bonaldi, Anna; Borril, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Boulanger, François; Brinckmann, Thejs; Burigana, Carlo; Buzzelli, Alessandro; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Calvo, Martino; Carvalho, Carla Sofia; Castellano, Gabriella; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Colantoni, Ivan; Crook, Martin; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; D'Amico, Guido; Delabrouille, Jacques; Desjacques, Vincent; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Diego, Jose Maria; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Feeney, Stephen; Fergusson, James R.; Fernandez-Cobos, Raul; Ferraro, Simone; Forastieri, Francesco; Galli, Silvia; García-Bellido, Juan; de Gasperis, Giancarlo; Génova-Santos, Ricardo T.; Gerbino, Martina; González-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grandis, Sebastian; Greenslade, Josh; Hagstotz, Steffen; Hanany, Shaul; Hazra, Dhiraj K.; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hills, Matthew; Hivon, Eric; Hu, Bin; Kisner, Ted; Kitching, Thomas; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Lesgourgues, Julien; Lewis, Antony; Lindholm, Valtteri; Lizarraga, Joanes; López-Caniego, Marcos; Luzzi, Gemma; Maffei, Bruno; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Martínez-González, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; McCarthy, Darragh; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Molinari, Diego; Monfardini, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Notari, Alessio; Oppizzi, Filippo; Paiella, Alessandro; Pajer, Enrico; Patanchon, Guillaume; Patil, Subodh P.; Piat, Michael; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polastri, Linda; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Poulin, Vivian; Quartin, Miguel; Ravenni, Andrea; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Renzi, Alessandro; Roest, Diederik; Roman, Matthieu; Rubiño-Martin, Jose Alberto; Salvati, Laura; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Tartari, Andrea; Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Tomasi, Maurizio; Torrado, Jesús; Trappe, Neil; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucker, Carole; Tucci, Marco; Urrestilla, Jon; van de Weygaert, Rien; Vielva, Patricio; Vittorio, Nicola; Young, Karl
Comments: Latex 107 pages, revised with updated author list and minor modifications
Submitted: 2016-12-25, last modified: 2017-04-05
We forecast the scientific capabilities to improve our understanding of cosmic inflation of CORE, a proposed CMB space satellite submitted in response to the ESA fifth call for a medium-size mission opportunity. The CORE satellite will map the CMB anisotropies in temperature and polarization in 19 frequency channels spanning the range 60-600 GHz. CORE will have an aggregate noise sensitivity of $1.7 \mu$K$\cdot \,$arcmin and an angular resolution of 5' at 200 GHz. We explore the impact of telescope size and noise sensitivity on the inflation science return by making forecasts for several instrumental configurations. This study assumes that the lower and higher frequency channels suffice to remove foreground contaminations and complements other related studies of component separation and systematic effects, which will be reported in other papers of the series "Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE." We forecast the capability to determine key inflationary parameters, to lower the detection limit for the tensor-to-scalar ratio down to the $10^{-3}$ level, to chart the landscape of single field slow-roll inflationary models, to constrain the epoch of reheating, thus connecting inflation to the standard radiation-matter dominated Big Bang era, to reconstruct the primordial power spectrum, to constrain the contribution from isocurvature perturbations to the $10^{-3}$ level, to improve constraints on the cosmic string tension to a level below the presumptive GUT scale, and to improve the current measurements of primordial non-Gaussianities down to the $f_{NL}^{\rm local} < 1$ level. For all the models explored, CORE alone will improve significantly on the present constraints on the physics of inflation. Its capabilities will be further enhanced by combining with complementary future cosmological observations.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.00021  [pdf] - 1935328
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Cosmological Parameters
Di Valentino, Eleonora; Brinckmann, Thejs; Gerbino, Martina; Poulin, Vivian; Bouchet, François R.; Lesgourgues, Julien; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Chluba, Jens; Clesse, Sebastien; Delabrouille, Jacques; Dvorkin, Cora; Forastieri, Francesco; Galli, Silvia; Hooper, Deanna C.; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Salvati, Laura; Cabass, Giovanni; Caputo, Andrea; Giusarma, Elena; Hivon, Eric; Natoli, Paolo; Pagano, Luca; Paradiso, Simone; Rubino-Martin, Jose Alberto; Achucarro, Ana; Ade, Peter; Allison, Rupert; Arroja, Frederico; Ashdown, Marc; Ballardini, Mario; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, Ranajoy; Bartolo, Nicola; Bartlett, James G.; Basak, Soumen; Baselmans, Jochem; Baumann, Daniel; de Bernardis, Paolo; Bersanelli, Marco; Bonaldi, Anna; Bonato, Matteo; Borrill, Julian; Boulanger, François; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Buzzelli, Alessandro; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Calvo, Martino; Carvalho, Carla Sofia; Castellano, Gabriella; Challinor, Anthony; Charles, Ivan; Colantoni, Ivan; Coppolecchia, Alessandro; Crook, Martin; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; De Petris, Marco; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Diego, Josè Maria; Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen; Fernandez-Cobos, Raul; Ferraro, Simone; Finelli, Fabio; de Gasperis, Giancarlo; Génova-Santos, Ricardo T.; González-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grandis, Sebastian; Greenslade, Josh; Hagstotz, Steffen; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hazra, Dhiraj K.; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hills, Matthew; Kiiveri, Kimmo; Kisner, Ted; Kitching, Thomas; Kunz, Martin; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Lamagna, Luca; Lasenby, Anthony; Lewis, Antony; Liguori, Michele; Lindholm, Valtteri; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Luzzi, Gemma; Maffei, Bruno; Martin, Sylvain; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Masi, Silvia; McCarthy, Darragh; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mohr, Joseph J.; Molinari, Diego; Monfardini, Alessandro; Negrello, Mattia; Notari, Alessio; Paiella, Alessandro; Paoletti, Daniela; Patanchon, Guillaume; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michael; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polastri, Linda; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Quartin, Miguel; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Roman, Matthieu; Ringeval, Christophe; Tartari, Andrea; Tomasi, Maurizio; Tramonte, Denis; Trappe, Neil; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucker, Carole; Väliviita, Jussi; van de Weygaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Vennin, Vincent; Vermeulen, Gérard; Vielva, Patricio; Vittorio, Nicola; Young, Karl; Zannoni, Mario
Comments: 90 pages, 25 Figures. Revised version with new authors list and references
Submitted: 2016-11-30, last modified: 2017-04-05
We forecast the main cosmological parameter constraints achievable with the CORE space mission which is dedicated to mapping the polarisation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). CORE was recently submitted in response to ESA's fifth call for medium-sized mission proposals (M5). Here we report the results from our pre-submission study of the impact of various instrumental options, in particular the telescope size and sensitivity level, and review the great, transformative potential of the mission as proposed. Specifically, we assess the impact on a broad range of fundamental parameters of our Universe as a function of the expected CMB characteristics, with other papers in the series focusing on controlling astrophysical and instrumental residual systematics. In this paper, we assume that only a few central CORE frequency channels are usable for our purpose, all others being devoted to the cleaning of astrophysical contaminants. On the theoretical side, we assume LCDM as our general framework and quantify the improvement provided by CORE over the current constraints from the Planck 2015 release. We also study the joint sensitivity of CORE and of future Baryon Acoustic Oscillation and Large Scale Structure experiments like DESI and Euclid. Specific constraints on the physics of inflation are presented in another paper of the series. In addition to the six parameters of the base LCDM, which describe the matter content of a spatially flat universe with adiabatic and scalar primordial fluctuations from inflation, we derive the precision achievable on parameters like those describing curvature, neutrino physics, extra light relics, primordial helium abundance, dark matter annihilation, recombination physics, variation of fundamental constants, dark energy, modified gravity, reionization and cosmic birefringence. (ABRIDGED)
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.10456  [pdf] - 1935351
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Cluster Science
Melin, J. -B.; Bonaldi, A.; Remazeilles, M.; Hagstotz, S.; Diego, J. M.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Luzzi, G.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Grandis, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Bartlett, J. G.; Delabrouille, J.; Ferraro, S.; Tramonte, D.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Macìas-Pérez, J. F.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Baselmans, J.; Basu, K.; Battye, R. A.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. S.; Castellano, M. G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; De Petris, M.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S. M.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Greenslade, J.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Brun, A. M. C. Le; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Maffei, B.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Roman, M.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Väliviita, J.; van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Weller, J.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 35 pages, 15 figures, to be submitted to JCAP
Submitted: 2017-03-30
We examine the cosmological constraints that can be achieved with a galaxy cluster survey with the future CORE space mission. Using realistic simulations of the millimeter sky, produced with the latest version of the Planck Sky Model, we characterize the CORE cluster catalogues as a function of the main mission performance parameters. We pay particular attention to telescope size, key to improved angular resolution, and discuss the comparison and the complementarity of CORE with ambitious future ground-based CMB experiments that could be deployed in the next decade. A possible CORE mission concept with a 150 cm diameter primary mirror can detect of the order of 50,000 clusters through the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE). The total yield increases (decreases) by 25% when increasing (decreasing) the mirror diameter by 30 cm. The 150 cm telescope configuration will detect the most massive clusters ($>10^{14}\, M_\odot$) at redshift $z>1.5$ over the whole sky, although the exact number above this redshift is tied to the uncertain evolution of the cluster SZE flux-mass relation; assuming self-similar evolution, CORE will detect $\sim 500$ clusters at redshift $z>1.5$. This changes to 800 (200) when increasing (decreasing) the mirror size by 30 cm. CORE will be able to measure individual cluster halo masses through lensing of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies with a 1-$\sigma$ sensitivity of $4\times10^{14} M_\odot$, for a 120 cm aperture telescope, and $10^{14} M_\odot$ for a 180 cm one. [abridged]
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.04585  [pdf] - 1547771
Comment on "Strong Evidence for the Normal Neutrino Hierarchy"
Comments: 2 pages, no figures, comment on arXiv:1703.03425
Submitted: 2017-03-14
In the preprint arxiv:1703.03425 "strong evidence" for the normal neutrino mass ordering is claimed. The authors obtain Bayesian odds of 42:1 in favour of the normal ordering. Their conclusion is based on adopting a flat logarithmic prior for the three neutrino masses. Such an assumption favours a hierarchical spectrum for the masses, which is much easier to accommodate for the normal mass ordering, and hence their prior assumption makes the inverted ordering much less likely a priori. We argue that the claimed "evidence" for normal ordering is almost entirely driven by the adopted prior and not due to the data itself.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.07151  [pdf] - 1593486
Planck intermediate results. LII. Planet flux densities
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Lellouch, E.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.
Comments: 20 pages, 14 figures, abstract abridged for arXiv submission
Submitted: 2016-12-21
Measurements of flux density are described for five planets, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, across the six Planck High Frequency Instrument frequency bands (100-857 GHz) and these are then compared with models and existing data. In our analysis, we have also included estimates of the brightness of Jupiter and Saturn at the three frequencies of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (30, 44, and 70 GHz). The results provide constraints on the intrinsic brightness and the brightness time-variability of these planets. The majority of the planet flux density estimates are limited by systematic errors, but still yield better than 1% measurements in many cases. Applying data from Planck HFI, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) to a model that incorporates contributions from Saturn's rings to the planet's total flux density suggests a best fit value for the spectral index of Saturn's ring system of $\beta _\mathrm{ring} = 2.30\pm0.03$ over the 30-1000 GHz frequency range. The average ratio between the Planck-HFI measurements and the adopted model predictions for all five planets (excluding Jupiter observations for 353 GHz) is 0.997, 0.997, 1.018, and 1.032 for 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz, respectively. Model predictions for planet thermodynamic temperatures are therefore consistent with the absolute calibration of Planck-HFI detectors at about the three-percent-level. We compare our measurements with published results from recent cosmic microwave background experiments. In particular, we observe that the flux densities measured by Planck HFI and WMAP agree to within 2%. These results allow experiments operating in the mm-wavelength range to cross-calibrate against Planck and improve models of radiative transport used in planetary science.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.01123  [pdf] - 1542783
On the impact of large angle CMB polarization data on cosmological parameters
Comments: 19 pages, 4 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2016-11-03
(abridged) We study the impact of the large-angle CMB polarization datasets publicly released by the WMAP and Planck satellites on the estimation of cosmological parameters of the $\Lambda$CDM model. To complement large-angle polarization, we consider the high-resolution CMB datasets from either WMAP or Planck, as well as CMB lensing as traced by Planck. In the case of WMAP, we compute the large-angle polarization likelihood starting over from low-resolution frequency maps and their covariance matrices, and perform our own foreground mitigation technique, which includes as a possible alternative Planck 353 GHz data to trace polarized dust. We find that the latter choice induces a downward shift in the optical depth $\tau$, of order ~$2\sigma$, robust to the choice of the complementary high-l dataset. When the Planck 353 GHz is consistently used to minimize polarized dust emission, WMAP and Planck 70 GHz large-angle polarization data are in remarkable agreement: by combining them we find $\tau = 0.066 ^{+0.012}_{-0.013}$, again very stable against the particular choice for high-$\ell$ data. We find that the amplitude of primordial fluctuations $A_s$, notoriously degenerate with $\tau$, is the parameter second most affected by the assumptions on polarized dust removal, but the other parameters are also affected, typically between $0.5$ and $1\sigma$. In particular, cleaning dust with \planck's 353 GHz data imposes a $1\sigma$ downward shift in the value of the Hubble constant $H_0$, significantly contributing to the tension reported between CMB based and direct measurements of $H_0$. On the other hand, we find that the appearance of the so-called low $\ell$ anomaly, a well-known tension between the high- and low-resolution CMB anisotropy amplitude, is not significantly affected by the details of large-angle polarization, or by the particular high-$\ell$ dataset employed.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.06968  [pdf] - 1507586
Breaking Be: a sterile neutrino solution to the cosmological lithium problem
Comments: 28 pages, 13 figures, 4 tables, matching the published version
Submitted: 2016-06-22, last modified: 2016-11-02
The possibility that the so-called "lithium problem", i.e. the disagreement between the theoretical abundance predicted for primordial $^7$Li assuming standard nucleosynthesis and the value inferred from astrophysical measurements, can be solved through a non-thermal BBN mechanism has been investigated by several authors. In particular, it has been shown that the decay of a MeV-mass particle, like, e.g., a sterile neutrino, decaying after BBN not only solves the lithium problem, but also satisfies cosmological and laboratory bounds, making such a scenario worth to be investigated in further detail. In this paper, we constrain the parameters of the model with the combination of current data, including Planck 2015 measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB, FIRAS limits on spectral distortions, astrophysical measurements of primordial abundances and laboratory constraints. We find that a sterile neutrino with mass $M_S=4.35_{-0.17}^{+0.13}\,MeV$ (at $95\%$ c.l.), a decay time $\tau_S=1.8_{-1.3}^{+2.5}\cdot 10^5\,s$ (at $95\%$ c.l.) and an initial density $\bar{n}_S/\bar{n}_{cmb}=1.7_{-0.6}^{+3.5}\cdot 10^{-4}$ (at $95\%$ c.l.) in units of the number density of CMB photons, perfectly accounts for the difference between predicted and observed $^7$Li primordial abundance. This model also predicts an increase of the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom at the time of CMB decoupling $\Delta N_{eff}^{cmb}\equiv N_{eff}^{cmb}-3.046=0.34_{-0.14}^{+0.16}$ at $95\%$ c.l.. The required abundance of sterile neutrinos is incompatible with the standard thermal history of the Universe, but could be realized in a low reheating temperature scenario. We provide forecasts for future experiments finding that the combination of measurements from the COrE+ and PIXIE missions will allow to significantly reduce the permitted region for the sterile lifetime and density.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.08830  [pdf] - 1797118
Impact of neutrino properties on the estimation of inflationary parameters from current and future observations
Comments: 24 pages, 12 figures; abstract abridged
Submitted: 2016-10-27
We study the impact of assumptions about neutrino properties on the estimation of inflationary parameters from cosmological data, with a specific focus on the allowed contours in the $n_s/r$ plane. We study the following neutrino properties: (i) the total neutrino mass $ M_\nu =\sum_i m_i$; (ii) the number of relativistic degrees of freedom $N_{eff}$; and (iii) the neutrino hierarchy: whereas previous literature assumed 3 degenerate neutrino masses or two massless neutrino species (that do not match neutrino oscillation data), we study the cases of normal and inverted hierarchy. Our basic result is that these three neutrino properties induce $< 1 \sigma$ shift of the probability contours in the $n_s/r$ plane with both current or upcoming data. We find that the choice of neutrino hierarchy has a negligible impact. However, the minimal cutoff on the total neutrino mass $M_{\nu,{min}}=0 $ that accompanies previous works using the degenerate hierarchy does introduce biases in the $n_s/r$ plane and should be replaced by $M_{\nu,min}= 0.059$ eV as required by oscillation data. Using current CMB data from Planck and Bicep/Keck, marginalizing over $ M_\nu$ and over $r$ can lead to a shift in the mean value of $n_s$ of $\sim0.3\sigma$ towards lower values. However, once BAO measurements are included, the standard contours in the $n_s/r$ plane are basically reproduced. Larger shifts of the contours in the $n_s/r$ plane (up to 0.8$\sigma$) arise for nonstandard values of $N_{eff}$. We also provide forecasts for the future CMB experiments COrE and Stage-IV and show that the incomplete knowledge of neutrino properties, taken into account by a marginalization over $M_\nu$, could induce a shift of $\sim0.4\sigma$ towards lower values in the determination of $n_s$ (or a $\sim 0.8\sigma$ shift if one marginalizes over $N_{eff}$). Comparison to specific inflationary models is shown.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.03507  [pdf] - 1530686
Planck intermediate results. XLVII. Planck constraints on reionization history
Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Ili_, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirri, G.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 19 pages, 18 figures. accepted in A&A
Submitted: 2016-05-11, last modified: 2016-09-05
We investigate constraints on cosmic reionization extracted from the Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We combine the Planck CMB anisotropy data in temperature with the low-multipole polarization data to fit LCDM models with various parameterizations of the reionization history. We obtain a Thomson optical depth tau=0.058 +/- 0.012 for the commonly adopted instantaneous reionization model. This confirms, with only data from CMB anisotropies, the low value suggested by combining Planck 2015 results with other data sets and also reduces the uncertainties. We reconstruct the history of the ionization fraction using either a symmetric or an asymmetric model for the transition between the neutral and ionized phases. To determine better constraints on the duration of the reionization process, we also make use of measurements of the amplitude of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect using additional information from the high resolution Atacama Cosmology Telescope and South Pole Telescope experiments. The average redshift at which reionization occurs is found to lie between z=7.8 and 8.8, depending on the model of reionization adopted. Using kSZ constraints and a redshift-symmetric reionization model, we find an upper limit to the width of the reionization period of Dz < 2.8. In all cases, we find that the Universe is ionized at less than the 10% level at redshifts above z~10. This suggests that an early onset of reionization is strongly disfavoured by the Planck data. We show that this result also reduces the tension between CMB-based analyses and constraints from other astrophysical sources.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.09357  [pdf] - 1457351
Testing chirality of primordial gravitational waves with Planck and future CMB data: no hope from angular power spectra
Comments: 15 pages, 3 figures. Updated to match published version
Submitted: 2016-05-30, last modified: 2016-08-16
We use the 2015 Planck likelihood in combination with the Bicep2/Keck likelihood (BKP and BK14) to constrain the chirality, $\chi$, of primordial gravitational waves in a scale-invariant scenario. In this framework, the parameter $\chi$ enters theory always coupled to the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, e.g. in combination of the form $\chi \cdot r$. Thus, the capability to detect $\chi$ critically depends on the value of $r$. We find that with present data set $\chi$ is \textit{de facto}unconstrained. We also provide forecasts for $\chi$ from future CMB experiments, including COrE+, exploring several fiducial values of $r$. We find that the current limit on $r$ is tight enough to disfavor a neat detection of $\chi$. For example, in the unlikely case in which $r\sim0.1(0.05)$, the maximal chirality case, i.e. $\chi = \pm1$, could be detected with a significance of $\sim2.5(1.5)\sigma$ at best. We conclude that the two-point statistics at the basis of CMB likelihood functions is currently unable to constrain chirality and may only provide weak limits on $\chi$ in the most optimistic scenarios. Hence, it is crucial to investigate the use of other observables, e.g. provided by higher order statistics, to constrain these kind of parity violating theories with the CMB.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.09387  [pdf] - 1530762
Planck intermediate results. XLVIII. Disentangling Galactic dust emission and cosmic infrared background anisotropies
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 26 pages, 25 figures (reduced in quality for arXiv), 1 table. Updated to match version accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2016-05-30, last modified: 2016-08-09
Using the Planck 2015 data release (PR2) temperature maps, we separate Galactic thermal dust emission from cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies. For this purpose, we implement a specifically tailored component-separation method, the so-called generalized needlet internal linear combination (GNILC) method, which uses spatial information (the angular power spectra) to disentangle the Galactic dust emission and CIB anisotropies. We produce significantly improved all-sky maps of Planck thermal dust emission, with reduced CIB contamination, at 353, 545, and 857 GHz. By reducing the CIB contamination of the thermal dust maps, we provide more accurate estimates of the local dust temperature and dust spectral index over the sky with reduced dispersion, especially at high Galactic latitudes above $b = \pm 20{\deg}$. We find that the dust temperature is $T = (19.4 \pm 1.3)$ K and the dust spectral index is $\beta = 1.6 \pm 0.1$ averaged over the whole sky, while $T = (19.4 \pm 1.5)$ K and $\beta = 1.6 \pm 0.2$ on 21 % of the sky at high latitudes. Moreover, subtracting the new CIB-removed thermal dust maps from the CMB-removed Planck maps gives access to the CIB anisotropies over 60 % of the sky at Galactic latitudes $|b| > 20{\deg}$. Because they are a significant improvement over previous Planck products, the GNILC maps are recommended for thermal dust science. The new CIB maps can be regarded as indirect tracers of the dark matter and they are recommended for exploring cross-correlations with lensing and large-scale structure optical surveys. The reconstructed GNILC thermal dust and CIB maps are delivered as Planck products.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.08633  [pdf] - 1530749
Planck intermediate results. XLIX. Parity-violation constraints from polarization data
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures. Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-05-27, last modified: 2016-08-05
Parity violating extensions of the standard electromagnetic theory cause in vacuo rotation of the plane of polarization of propagating photons. This effect, also known as cosmic birefringence, impacts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy angular power spectra, producing non-vanishing $T$--$B$ and $E$--$B$ correlations that are otherwise null when parity is a symmetry. Here we present new constraints on an isotropic rotation, parametrized by the angle $\alpha$, derived from Planck 2015 CMB polarization data. To increase the robustness of our analyses, we employ two complementary approaches, in harmonic space and in map space, the latter based on a peak stacking technique. The two approaches provide estimates for $\alpha$ that are in agreement within statistical uncertainties and very stable against several consistency tests. Considering the $T$--$B$ and $E$--$B$ information jointly, we find $\alpha = 0.31^{\circ} \pm 0.05^{\circ} \, ({\rm stat.})\, \pm 0.28^{\circ} \, ({\rm syst.})$ from the harmonic analysis and $\alpha = 0.35^{\circ} \pm 0.05^{\circ} \, ({\rm stat.})\, \pm 0.28^{\circ} \, ({\rm syst.})$ from the stacking approach. These constraints are compatible with no parity violation and are dominated by the systematic uncertainty in the orientation of Planck's polarization-sensitive bolometers.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.02704  [pdf] - 1483210
Planck 2015 results. XI. CMB power spectra, likelihoods, and robustness of parameters
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Gerbino, M.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B. Rouillé; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: This paper is associated with the 2015 Planck release (see http://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/planck/publications). Likelihood code & data available at http://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/planck/pla. Version accepted by A&A. Substancially extended (104 pages) with analysis of end-to-simulations of systematics further confirming the results. Abstract abridged
Submitted: 2015-07-09, last modified: 2016-06-30
This paper presents the Planck 2015 likelihoods, statistical descriptions of the 2-point correlations of CMB data, using the hybrid approach employed previously: pixel-based at $\ell<30$ and a Gaussian approximation to the distribution of spectra at higher $\ell$. The main improvements are the use of more and better processed data and of Planck polarization data, and more detailed foreground and instrumental models, allowing further checks and enhanced immunity to systematics. Progress in foreground modelling enables a larger sky fraction. Improvements in processing and instrumental models further reduce uncertainties. For temperature, we perform an analysis of end-to-end instrumental simulations fed into the data processing pipeline; this does not reveal biases from residual instrumental systematics. The $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model continues to offer a very good fit to Planck data. The slope of primordial scalar fluctuations, $n_s$, is confirmed smaller than unity at more than 5{\sigma} from Planck alone. We further validate robustness against specific extensions to the baseline cosmology. E.g., the effective number of neutrino species remains compatible with the canonical value of 3.046. This first detailed analysis of Planck polarization concentrates on E modes. At low $\ell$ we use temperature at all frequencies and a subset of polarization. The frequency range improves CMB-foreground separation. Within the baseline model this requires a reionization optical depth $\tau=0.078\pm0.019$, significantly lower than without high-frequency data for explicit dust monitoring. At high $\ell$ we detect residual errors in E, typically O($\mu$K$^2$); we recommend temperature alone as the high-$\ell$ baseline. Nevertheless, Planck high-$\ell$ polarization allows a separate determination of $\Lambda$CDM parameters consistent with those from temperature alone.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.07335  [pdf] - 1538905
Planck intermediate results. L. Evidence for spatial variation of the polarized thermal dust spectral energy distribution and implications for CMB $B$-mode analysis
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Stanco, L.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-06-23
The characterization of the Galactic foregrounds has been shown to be the main obstacle in the challenging quest to detect primordial B-modes in the polarized microwave sky. We make use of the Planck-HFI 2015 data release at high frequencies to place new constraints on the properties of the polarized thermal dust emission at high Galactic latitudes. Here, we specifically study the spatial variability of the dust polarized spectral energy distribution, and its potential impact on the determination of the tensor-to-scalar ratio. We use the correlation ratio of the $C_\ell^{BB}$ angular power spectra between the 217- and 353-GHz channels as a tracer of these potential variations, computed on different high Galactic latitude regions, ranging from 80% to 20% of the sky. The new insight from Planck data is a departure of the correlation ratio from unity that cannot be attributed to a spurious decorrelation due to the cosmic microwave background, instrumental noise, or instrumental systematics. The effect is marginally detected on each region, but the statistical combination of all the regions gives more than 99% confidence for this variation in polarized dust properties. In addition, we show that the decorrelation increases when there is a decrease in the mean column density of the region of the sky being considered, and we propose a simple power-law empirical model for this dependence, which matches what is seen in the Planck data. We explore the effect that this measured decorrelation has on simulations of the BICEP2-Keck Array/Planck analysis and show that the 2015 constraints from those data still allow a decorrelation between the dust at 150 and 353GHz of the order of the one we measure. Finally we show that either spatial variation of the dust SED or of the dust polarization angle could produce decorrelations between 217- and 353-GHz data similar to those we observe in the data.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01589  [pdf] - 1483195
Planck 2015 results. XIII. Cosmological parameters
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Desert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Farhang, M.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Turler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Abstract severely abridged. Revised to match version accepted by Astronomy & Astrophysics. Many minor changes, but basic results remain unchanged
Submitted: 2015-02-05, last modified: 2016-06-17
We present results based on full-mission Planck observations of temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB. These data are consistent with the six-parameter inflationary LCDM cosmology. From the Planck temperature and lensing data, for this cosmology we find a Hubble constant, H0= (67.8 +/- 0.9) km/s/Mpc, a matter density parameter Omega_m = 0.308 +/- 0.012 and a scalar spectral index with n_s = 0.968 +/- 0.006. (We quote 68% errors on measured parameters and 95% limits on other parameters.) Combined with Planck temperature and lensing data, Planck LFI polarization measurements lead to a reionization optical depth of tau = 0.066 +/- 0.016. Combining Planck with other astrophysical data we find N_ eff = 3.15 +/- 0.23 for the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom and the sum of neutrino masses is constrained to < 0.23 eV. Spatial curvature is found to be |Omega_K| < 0.005. For LCDM we find a limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r <0.11 consistent with the B-mode constraints from an analysis of BICEP2, Keck Array, and Planck (BKP) data. Adding the BKP data leads to a tighter constraint of r < 0.09. We find no evidence for isocurvature perturbations or cosmic defects. The equation of state of dark energy is constrained to w = -1.006 +/- 0.045. Standard big bang nucleosynthesis predictions for the Planck LCDM cosmology are in excellent agreement with observations. We investigate annihilating dark matter and deviations from standard recombination, finding no evidence for new physics. The Planck results for base LCDM are in agreement with BAO data and with the JLA SNe sample. However the amplitude of the fluctuations is found to be higher than inferred from rich cluster counts and weak gravitational lensing. Apart from these tensions, the base LCDM cosmology provides an excellent description of the Planck CMB observations and many other astrophysical data sets.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.02985  [pdf] - 1530681
Planck intermediate results. XLVI. Reduction of large-scale systematic effects in HFI polarization maps and estimation of the reionization optical depth
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Ilic, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirri, G.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 53 pages, corresponding author: J.-L. Puget, submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-05-10, last modified: 2016-05-26
This paper describes the identification, modelling, and removal of previously unexplained systematic effects in the polarization data of the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) on large angular scales, including new mapmaking and calibration procedures, new and more complete end-to-end simulations, and a set of robust internal consistency checks on the resulting maps. These maps, at 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz, are early versions of those that will be released in final form later in 2016. The improvements allow us to determine the cosmic reionization optical depth $\tau$ using, for the first time, the low-multipole $EE$ data from HFI, reducing significantly the central value and uncertainty, and hence the upper limit. Two different likelihood procedures are used to constrain $\tau$ from two estimators of the CMB $E$- and $B$-mode angular power spectra at 100 and 143 GHz, after debiasing the spectra from a small remaining systematic contamination. These all give fully consistent results. A further consistency test is performed using cross-correlations derived from the Low Frequency Instrument maps of the Planck 2015 data release and the new HFI data. For this purpose, end-to-end analyses of systematic effects from the two instruments are used to demonstrate the near independence of their dominant systematic error residuals. The tightest result comes from the HFI-based $\tau$ posterior distribution using the maximum likelihood power spectrum estimator from $EE$ data only, giving a value $0.055\pm 0.009$. In a companion paper these results are discussed in the context of the best-fit Planck $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model and recent models of reionization.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.07557  [pdf] - 1411301
Dark Radiation and Inflationary Freedom after Planck 2015
Comments: 22 pages, 17 figures, 11 tables. Updated to match the published version. Text abridged upon the referee's requests
Submitted: 2016-01-27, last modified: 2016-05-24
The simplest inflationary models predict a primordial power spectrum (PPS) of the curvature fluctuations that can be described by a power-law function that is nearly scale-invariant. It has been shown, however, that the low-multipole spectrum of the CMB anisotropies may hint the presence of some features in the shape of the scalar PPS, which could deviate from its canonical power-law form. We study the possible degeneracies of this non-standard PPS with the neutrino anisotropies, the neutrino masses, the effective number of relativistic species and a sterile neutrino or a thermal axion mass. The limits on these additional parameters are less constraining in a model with a non-standard PPS when only including the temperature auto-correlation spectrum measurements in the data analyses. The inclusion of the polarization spectra noticeably helps in reducing the degeneracies, leading to results that typically show no deviation from the $\Lambda$CDM model with a standard power-law PPS.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.04320  [pdf] - 1797117
On the improvement of cosmological neutrino mass bounds
Comments: 9 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2016-05-13
The most recent measurements of the temperature and low-multipole polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from the Planck satellite, when combined with galaxy clustering data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) in the form of the full shape of the power spectrum, and with Baryon Acoustic Oscillation measurements, provide a $95\%$ confidence level (CL) upper bound on the sum of the three active neutrinos $\sum m _\nu< 0.183$ eV, among the tightest neutrino mass bounds in the literature, to date, when the same datasets are taken into account. This very same data combination is able to set, at $\sim70\%$ CL, an upper limit on $\sum m _\nu$ of $0.0968$ eV, a value that approximately corresponds to the minimal mass expected in the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy scenario. If high-multipole polarization data from Planck is also considered, the $95\%$ CL upper bound is tightened to $\sum m _\nu< 0.176$ eV. Further improvements are obtained by considering recent measurements of the Hubble parameter. These limits are obtained assuming a specific non-degenerate neutrino mass spectrum; they slightly worsen when considering other degenerate neutrino mass schemes. Current cosmological data, therefore, start to be mildly sensitive to the neutrino mass ordering. Low-redshift quantities, such as the Hubble constant or the reionization optical depth, play a very important role when setting the neutrino mass constraints. We also comment on the eventual shifts in the cosmological bounds on $\sum m_\nu$ when possible variations in the former two quantities are addressed.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.03819  [pdf] - 1411496
Recent results and perspectives on cosmology and fundamental physics from microwave surveys
Comments: 27 pages, 9 figures. Review Article. International Journal of Modern Physics D, in press. [Will appear also on the proceedings of the Fourteenth Marcel Grossmann Meeting University of Rome "La Sapienza" - Rome, July 12-18, 2015 (http://www.icra.it/mg/mg14/), eds. Robert T. Jantzen, Kjell Rosquist, Remo Ruffini. World Scientific, Singapore]
Submitted: 2016-04-13
Recent cosmic microwave background data in temperature and polarization have reached high precision in estimating all the parameters that describe the current so-called standard cosmological model. Recent results about the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect from cosmic microwave background anisotropies, galaxy surveys, and their cross-correlations are presented. Looking at fine signatures in the cosmic microwave background, such as the lack of power at low multipoles, the primordial power spectrum and the bounds on non-Gaussianities, complemented by galaxy surveys, we discuss inflationary physics and the generation of primordial perturbations in the early Universe. Three important topics in particle physics, the bounds on neutrinos masses and parameters, on thermal axion mass and on the neutron lifetime derived from cosmological data are reviewed, with attention to the comparison with laboratory experiment results. Recent results from cosmic polarization rotation analyses aimed at testing the Einstein equivalence principle are presented. Finally, we discuss the perspectives of next radio facilities for the improvement of the analysis of future cosmic microwave background spectral distortion experiments.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.01029  [pdf] - 1530576
Planck intermediate results. XLIV. The structure of the Galactic magnetic field from dust polarization maps of the southern Galactic cap
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arzoumanian, D.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Neveu, J.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Soler, J. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-04-04
We study the statistical properties of interstellar dust polarization at high Galactic latitude, using the Stokes parameter Planck maps at 353 GHz. Our aim is to advance the understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM), and to provide a model of the polarized dust foreground for cosmic microwave background component-separation procedures. Focusing on the southern Galactic cap, we examine the statistical distributions of the polarization fraction ($p$) and angle ($\psi$) to characterize the ordered and turbulent components of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) in the solar neighbourhood. We relate patterns at large angular scales in polarization to the orientation of the mean (ordered) GMF towards Galactic coordinates $(l_0,b_0)=(70^\circ \pm 5^\circ,24^\circ \pm 5^\circ)$. The histogram of $p$ shows a wide dispersion up to 25 %. The histogram of $\psi$ has a standard deviation of $12^\circ$ about the regular pattern expected from the ordered GMF. We use these histograms to build a phenomenological model of the turbulent component of the GMF, assuming a uniform effective polarization fraction ($p_0$) of dust emission. To model the Stokes parameters, we approximate the integration along the line of sight (LOS) as a sum over a set of $N$ independent polarization layers, in each of which the turbulent component of the GMF is obtained from Gaussian realizations of a power-law power spectrum. We are able to reproduce the observed $p$ and $\psi$ distributions using: a $p_0$ value of (26 $\pm$ 3)%; a ratio of 0.9 $\pm$ 0.1 between the strengths of the turbulent and mean components of the GMF; and a small value of $N$. We relate the polarization layers to the density structure and to the correlation length of the GMF along the LOS.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.07586  [pdf] - 1368092
Constraints on the Early and Late Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effects from Planck 2015 Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies angular power spectra
Comments: 10 pages, 13 figures and 5 tables. Matches published version
Submitted: 2015-07-27, last modified: 2016-03-03
The Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect predicts additional anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background due to time variation of the gravitational potential when the expansion of the universe is not matter dominated. The ISW effect is therefore expected in the early universe, due to the presence of relativistic particles at recombination, and in the late universe, when dark energy starts to dominate the expansion. Deviations from the standard picture can be parameterized by $A_{e\text{ISW}}$ and $A_{l\text{ISW}}$, which rescale the overall amplitude of the early and late ISW effects. Analyzing the most recent CMB temperature spectra from the Planck 2015 release, we detect the presence of the early ISW at high significance with $A_{e\mathrm{ISW}} = 1.06\pm0.04$ at 68% CL and an upper limit for the late ISW of $A_{l\mathrm{ISW}} < 1.1$ at 95% CL. The inclusion of the recent polarization data from the Planck experiment results in $A_{e\mathrm{ISW}} = 0.999\pm0.028$ at 68% CL, in better agreement with the value $A_{e\mathrm{ISW}} = 1$ of a standard cosmology. When considering the recent detections of the late ISW coming from correlations between CMB temperature anisotropies and weak lensing, a value of $A_{l\mathrm{ISW}}=0.85\pm0.21$ is predicted at 68% CL, showing a $4\sigma$ evidence. We discuss the stability of our result in the case of an extra relativistic energy component parametrized by the effective neutrino number $N_\mathrm{eff}$ and of a CMB lensing amplitude $A_\mathrm{L}$.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.05146  [pdf] - 1378692
Updated Constraints and Forecasts on Primordial Tensor Modes
Comments: 12 + 7 pages, 6 figures, 6 tables. Matches published version
Submitted: 2015-11-16, last modified: 2016-03-03
We present new, tight, constraints on the cosmological background of gravitational waves (GWs) using the latest measurements of CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies provided by the Planck, BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments. These constraints are further improved when the GW contribution $N^{\rm GW}_{\rm eff}$ to the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom $N_{\rm eff}$ is also considered. Parametrizing the tensor spectrum as a power law with tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$, tilt $n_\mathrm{t}$ and pivot $0.01\,\mathrm{Mpc}^{-1}$, and assuming a minimum value of $r=0.001$, we find $r < 0.089$, $n_\mathrm{t} = 1.7^{+2.1}_{-2.0}$ ($95\%\,\mathrm{CL}$, no $N^{\rm GW}_{\rm eff}$) and $r < 0.082$, $n_\mathrm{t} = -0.05^{+0.58}_{-0.87}$ ($95\%\,\mathrm{CL}$, with $N^{\rm GW}_{\rm eff}$). When the recently released $95\,\mathrm{GHz}$ data from Keck Array are added to the analysis, the constraints on $r$ are improved to $r < 0.067$ ($95\%\,\mathrm{CL}$, no $N^{\rm GW}_{\rm eff}$), $r < 0.061$ ($95\%\,\mathrm{CL}$, with $N^{\rm GW}_{\rm eff}$). We discuss the limits coming from direct detection experiments such as LIGO-Virgo, pulsar timing (European Pulsar Timing Array) and CMB spectral distortions (FIRAS). Finally, we show future constraints achievable from a COrE-like mission: if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is of order $10^{-2}$ and the inflationary consistency relation $n_\mathrm{t} = -r/8$ holds, COrE will be able to constrain $n_\mathrm{t}$ with an error of $0.16$ at $95\%\,\mathrm{CL}$. In the case that lensing $B$-modes can be subtracted to $10\%$ of their power, a feasible goal for COrE, these limits will be improved to $0.11$ at $95\%\,\mathrm{CL}$.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.08614  [pdf] - 1354802
The $\nu$ generation: present and future constraints on neutrino masses from cosmology and laboratory experiments
Comments: v2: 6 pages, 3 figures, 1 table; added definition of parameter minimal value from oscillation measurements; corrected confidence interval, that in v1 were reported at 90% C.L. and misidentified as 95% C.L.; accepted for publication
Submitted: 2015-07-30, last modified: 2016-01-22
We perform a joint analysis of current data from cosmology and laboratory experiments to constrain the neutrino mass parameters in the framework of bayesian statistics, also accounting for uncertainties in nuclear modeling, relevant for neutrinoless double $\beta$ decay ($0\nu2\beta$) searches. We find that a combination of current oscillation, cosmological and $0\nu2\beta$ data constrains $m_{\beta\beta}~<~0.045\,\mathrm{eV}$ ($0.014 \, \mathrm{eV} < m_{\beta\beta} < 0.066 \,\mathrm{eV}$) at 95\% C.L. for normal (inverted) hierarchy. This result is in practice dominated by the cosmological and oscillation data, so it is not affected by uncertainties related to the interpretation of $0\nu2\beta$ data, like nuclear modeling, or the exact particle physics mechanism underlying the process. We then perform forecasts for forthcoming and next-generation experiments, and find that in the case of normal hierarchy, given a total mass of $0.1\,$ eV, and assuming a factor-of-two uncertainty in the modeling of the relevant nuclear matrix elements, it will be possible to measure the total mass itself, the effective Majorana mass and the effective electron mass with an accuracy (at 95\% C.L.) of $0.05$, $0.015$, $0.02\,\mathrm{eV}$ respectively, as well as to be sensitive to one of the Majorana phases. This assumes that neutrinos are Majorana particles and that the mass mechanism gives the dominant contribution to $0\nu2\beta$ decay. We argue that more precise nuclear modeling will be crucial to improve these sensitivities.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.04157  [pdf] - 1418719
Constraints on cosmological birefringence from Planck and Bicep2/Keck data
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2015-09-14
The polarization of cosmic microwave background (CMB) can be used to constrain cosmological birefringence, the rotation of the linear polarization of CMB photons potentially induced by parity violating physics beyond the standard model. This effect produces non-null CMB cross correlations between temperature and B mode-polarization, and between E- and B-mode polarization. Both cross-correlations are otherwise null in the standard cosmological model. We use the recently released 2015 Planck likelihood in combination with the Bicep2/Keck/Planck (BKP) likelihood to constrain the birefringence angle $\alpha$. Our findings, that are compatible with no detection, read $\alpha = 0.0^{\circ} \pm 1.3^{\circ} \mbox{ (stat)} \pm 1^{\circ} \mbox{ (sys)} $ for {\sc Planck} data and $\alpha = 0.30^{\circ} \pm 0.27^{\circ} \mbox{ (stat)} \pm 1^{\circ} \mbox{(sys)} $ for BKP data. We finally forecast the expected improvements over present constraints when the Planck BB, TB and EB spectra at high $\ell$ will be included in the analysis.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01582  [pdf] - 1486774
Planck 2015 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results
Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Farhang, M.; Feeney, S.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Florido, E.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jin, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leahy, J. P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Müenchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Oppermann, N.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Pelkonen, V. -M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B. Rouillé; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Sanghera, H. S.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Shiraishi, M.; Smith, K.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tristram, M.; Troja, A.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vidal, M.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 40 pages, 24 figures
Submitted: 2015-02-05, last modified: 2015-08-09
The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14~May 2009 and scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12~August 2009 and 23~October 2013. In February~2015, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based on data from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data and the data products in the release, as well as the associated cosmological and astrophysical science results and papers. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and diffuse foregrounds in temperature and polarization, catalogues of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic cold clumps), and extensive simulations of signals and noise used in assessing the performance of the analysis methods and assessment of uncertainties. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data are described, as well as a CMB lensing likelihood. Scientific results include cosmological parameters deriving from CMB power spectra, gravitational lensing, and cluster counts, as well as constraints on inflation, non-Gaussianity, primordial magnetic fields, dark energy, and modified gravity.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.5732  [pdf] - 860744
Blue Gravity Waves from BICEP2 ?
Comments: 3 Pages, 4 Figures
Submitted: 2014-03-23
We present new constraints on the spectral index n_T of tensor fluctuations from the recent data obtained by the BICEP2 experiment. We found that the BICEP2 data alone slightly prefers a positive, "blue", spectral index with n_T=1.36\pm0.83 at 68 % c.l.. However, when a TT prior on the tensor amplitude coming from temperature anisotropy measurements is assumed we get n_T=1.67\pm0.53 at 68 % c.l., ruling out a scale invariant $n_T=0$ spectrum at more than three standard deviations. These results are at odds with current bounds on the tensor spectral index coming from pulsar timing, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, and direct measurements from the LIGO experiment. Considering only the possibility of a "red", n_T<0 spectral index we obtain the lower limit n_T > -0.76 at 68 % c.l. (n_T>-0.09 when a TT prior is included).
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.7400  [pdf] - 738995
Neutrino Anisotropies after Planck
Comments: 10 pages, 8 captioned figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2013-04-27, last modified: 2013-09-04
We present new constraints on the rest-frame sound speed, c_{eff}^2, and the viscosity parameter, c_{vis}^2, of the Cosmic Neutrino Background from the recent measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies provided by the Planck satellite. While broadly consistent with the expectations of c_{eff}^2=c_{vis}^2=1/3 in the standard scenario, the Planck dataset hints at a higher value of the viscosity parameter, with c_{vis}^2=0.60+/-0.18 at 68% c.l., and a lower value of the sound speed, with c_{eff}^2=0.304+/-0.013 at 68% c.l.. We find a correlation between the neutrino parameters and the lensing amplitude of the temperature power spectrum A_L. When the latter parameter is allowed to vary, we find a better consistency with the standard model with c_{vis}^2=0.51+/-0.22, c_{eff}^2=0.311+/-0.019 and A_L=1.08+/-0.18 at 68% c.l.. This result indicates that the anomalous large value of A_L measured by Planck could be connected to non-standard neutrino properties. Including additional datasets from Baryon Acoustic Oscillation surveys and the Hubble Space Telescope constraint on the Hubble constant, we obtain c_{vis}^2=0.40+/-0.19, c_{eff}^2=0.319+/-0.019, and A_{L}=1.15+/-0.17 at 68% c.l.; including the lensing power spectrum, we obtain c_{vis}^2=0.50+/-0.19, c_{eff}^2=0.314+/-0.015, and A_L=1.025+/-0.076 at 68% c.l.. Finally, we investigate further degeneracies between the clustering parameters and other cosmological parameters.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.6217  [pdf] - 704688
Dark Radiation after Planck
Comments: 5 pages, 6 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2013-04-23
We present new constraints on the relativistic neutrino effective number N_eff and on the Cosmic Microwave Background power spectrum lensing amplitude A_L from the recent Planck 2013 data release. Including observations of the CMB large angular scale polarization from the WMAP satellite, we obtain the bounds N_eff = 3.71 +/- 0.40 and A_L = 1.25 +/- 0.13 at 68% c.l.. The Planck dataset alone is therefore suggesting the presence of a dark radiation component at 91.1% c.l. and hinting for a higher power spectrum lensing amplitude at 94.3% c.l.. We discuss the agreement of these results with the previous constraints obtained from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). Considering the constraints on the cosmological parameters, we found a very good agreement with the previous WMAP+SPT analysis but a tension with the WMAP+ACT results, with the only exception of the lensing amplitude.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.4317  [pdf] - 1165337
Cosmological data and indications for new physics
Comments: 13 pages, 5 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2013-03-18
Data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and the South Pole Telescope (SPT), combined with the nine-year data release from the WMAP satellite, provide very precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular anisotropies down to very small angular scales. Augmented with measurements from Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations surveys and determinations of the Hubble constant, we investigate whether there are indications for new physics beyond a Harrison-Zel'dovich model for primordial perturbations and the standard number of relativistic degrees of freedom at primordial recombination. All combinations of datasets point to physics beyond the minimal Harrison-Zel'dovich model in the form of either a scalar spectral index different from unity or additional relativistic degrees of freedom at recombination (e.g., additional light neutrinos). Beyond that, the extended datasets including either ACT or SPT provide very different indications: while the extended-ACT (eACT) dataset is perfectly consistent with the predictions of standard slow-roll inflation, the extended-SPT (eSPT) dataset prefers a non-power-law scalar spectral index with a very large variation with scale of the spectral index. Both eACT and eSPT favor additional light degrees of freedom. eACT is consistent with zero neutrino masses, while eSPT favors nonzero neutrino masses at more than 95% confidence.