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Fynbo, J. P. U.

Normalized to: Fynbo, J.

410 article(s) in total. 4004 co-authors, from 1 to 182 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 6,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.01950  [pdf] - 2118898
Observational constraints on the optical and near-infrared emission from the neutron star-black hole binary merger S190814bv
Ackley, K.; Amati, L.; Barbieri, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Benetti, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bhirombhakdi, K.; Botticella, M. T.; Branchesi, M.; Brocato, E.; Bruun, S. H.; Bulla, M.; Campana, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chambers, K. C.; Chaty, S.; Chen, T. -W.; Ciolfi, R.; Coleiro, A.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Covino, S.; Cutter, R.; D'Ammando, F.; D'Avanzo, P.; De Cesare, G.; D'Elia, V.; Della Valle, M.; Denneau, L.; De Pasquale, M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Dyer, M. J.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Evans, P. A.; Eyles-Ferris, R. A. J.; Fiore, A.; Fraser, M.; Fruchter, A. S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Galbany, L.; Gall, C.; Galloway, D. K.; Getman, F. I.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gillanders, J. H.; Gomboc, A.; Gompertz, B. P.; González-Fernández, C.; González-Gaitán, S.; Grado, A.; Greco, G.; Gromadzki, M.; Groot, P. J.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Heikkilä, T.; Heintz, K. E.; Hjorth, J.; Hu, Y. -D.; Huber, M. E.; Inserra, C.; Izzo, L.; Japelj, J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Jin, Z. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Kankare, E.; Kann, D. A.; Kennedy, M.; Kim, S.; Klose, S.; Kool, E. C.; Kotak, R.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Lamb, G. P.; Leloudas, G.; Levan, A. J.; Longo, F.; Lowe, T. B.; Lyman, J. D.; Magnier, E.; Maguire, K.; Maiorano, E.; Mandel, I.; Mapelli, M.; Mattila, S.; McBrien, O. R.; Melandri, A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Moran, S.; Nicastro, L.; Nicholl, M.; Guelbenzu, A. Nicuesa; Nuttal, L.; Oates, S. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Onori, F.; Palazzi, E.; Patricelli, B.; Perego, A.; Torres, M. A. P.; Perley, D. A.; Pian, E.; Pignata, G.; Piranomonte, S.; Poshyachinda, S.; Possenti, A.; Pumo, M. L.; Quirola-Vásquez, J.; Ragosta, F.; Ramsay, G.; Rau, A.; Rest, A.; Reynolds, T. M.; Rosetti, S. S.; Rossi, A.; Rosswog, S.; Sabha, N. B.; Carracedo, A. Sagués; Salafia, O. S.; Salmon, L.; Salvaterra, R.; Savaglio, S.; Sbordone, L.; Schady, P.; Schipani, P.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Schweyer, T.; Smartt, S. J.; Smith, K. W.; Smith, M.; Sollerman, J.; Srivastav, S.; Stanway, E. R.; Starling, R. L. C.; Steeghs, D.; Stratta, G.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tanvir, N. R.; Testa, V.; Thrane, E.; Tonry, J. L.; Turatto, M.; Ulaczyk, K.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vergani, S. D.; Walton, N. A.; Watson, D.; Wiersema, K.; Wiik, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Yang, S.; Yi, S. -X.; Young, D. R.
Comments: 52 pages, revised version now accepted for publication in A&A. Abstract abridged to meet arXiv requirements
Submitted: 2020-02-05, last modified: 2020-06-22
On 2019 August 14, the LIGO and Virgo interferometers detected a high-significance event labelled S190814bv. Preliminary analysis of the GW data suggests that the event was likely due to the merger of a compact binary system formed by a BH and a NS. ElectromagNetic counterparts of GRAvitational wave sources at the VEry Large Telescope (ENGRAVE) collaboration members carried out an intensive multi-epoch, multi-instrument observational campaign to identify the possible optical/near infrared counterpart of the event. In addition, the ATLAS, GOTO, GRAWITA-VST, Pan-STARRS and VINROUGE projects also carried out a search on this event. Our observations allow us to place limits on the presence of any counterpart and discuss the implications for the kilonova (KN) possibly generated by this NS-BH merger, and for the strategy of future searches. Altogether, our observations allow us to exclude a KN with large ejecta mass $M\gtrsim 0.1\,\mathrm{M_\odot}$ to a high ($>90\%$) confidence, and we can exclude much smaller masses in a subsample of our observations. This disfavours the tidal disruption of the neutron star during the merger. Despite the sensitive instruments involved in the campaign, given the distance of S190814bv we could not reach sufficiently deep limits to constrain a KN comparable in luminosity to AT 2017gfo on a large fraction of the localisation probability. This suggests that future (likely common) events at a few hundreds Mpc will be detected only by large facilities with both high sensitivity and large field of view. Galaxy-targeted observations can reach the needed depth over a relevant portion of the localisation probability with a smaller investment of resources, but the number of galaxies to be targeted in order to get a fairly complete coverage is large, even in the case of a localisation as good as that of this event.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.09377  [pdf] - 2117071
Lyman continuum leakage in faint star-forming galaxies at redshift z=3-3.5 probed by gamma-ray bursts
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures. Abridged abstract. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2020-06-16
We present the observations of Lyman continuum (LyC) emission in the afterglow spectra of GRB 191004B at $z=3.5055$, together with those of the other two previously known LyC-emitting long gamma-ray bursts (LGRB) (GRB 050908 at $z=3.3467$, and GRB 060607A at $z=3.0749$), to determine their LyC escape fraction and compare their properties. From the afterglow spectrum of GRB 191004B we determine a neutral hydrogen column density at the LGRB redshift of $\log(N_{\rm HI}/cm^{-2})= 17.2 \pm 0.15$, and negligible extinction ($A_{\rm V}=0.03 \pm 0.02$ mag). The only metal absorption lines detected are CIV and SiIV. In contrast to GRB 050908 and GRB 060607A, the host galaxy of GRB 191004B displays significant Ly$\alpha$ emission. From its Ly$\alpha$ emission and the non-detection of Balmer emission lines we constrain its star-formation rate (SFR) to $1 \leq$ SFR $\leq 4.7$ M$_{\odot}\ yr^{-1}$. We fit the Ly$\alpha$ emission with a shell model and find parameters values consistent with the observed ones. The absolute LyC escape fractions we find for GRB 191004B, GRB 050908 and GRB 060607A are of $0.35^{+0.10}_{-0.11}$, $0.08^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$ and $0.20^{+0.05}_{-0.05}$, respectively. We compare the LyC escape fraction of LGRBs to the values of other LyC emitters found from the literature, showing that LGRB afterglows can be powerful tools to study LyC escape for faint high-redshift star-forming galaxies. Indeed we could push LyC leakage studies to much higher absolute magnitudes. The host galaxies of the three LGRB presented here have all $M_{\rm 1600} > -19.5$ mag, with the GRB 060607A host at $M_{\rm 1600} > -16$ mag. LGRB hosts may therefore be particularly suitable for exploring the ionizing escape fraction in galaxies that are too faint or distant for conventional techniques. Furthermore the time investment is very small compared to galaxy studies. [Abridged]
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.07251  [pdf] - 2113441
Observation of inverse Compton emission from a long $\gamma$-ray burst
Acciari, V. A.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Engels, A. Arbet; Baack, D.; Babić, A.; Banerjee, B.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J. A.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Bellizzi, L.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Besenrieder, J.; Bhattacharyya, W.; Bigongiari, C.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnoli, G.; Bošnjak, Ž.; Busetto, G.; Carosi, R.; Ceribella, G.; Chai, Y.; Chilingaryan, A.; Cikota, S.; Colak, S. M.; Colin, U.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; Delfino, M.; Delgado, J.; Depaoli, D.; Di Pierro, F.; Di Venere, L.; Espiñeira, E. Do Souto; Prester, D. Dominis; Donini, A.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Ramazani, V. Fallah; Fattorini, A.; Ferrara, G.; Fidalgo, D.; Foffano, L.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Fukami, S.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Gasparyan, S.; Gaug, M.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Godinović, N.; Green, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Herrera, J.; Hoang, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hütten, M.; Inada, T.; Inoue, S.; Ishio, K.; Iwamura, Y.; Jouvin, L.; Kerszberg, D.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Lamastra, A.; Lelas, D.; Leone, F.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Loporchio, S.; Fraga, B. Machado de Oliveira; Maggio, C.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Mićanović, S.; Miceli, D.; Minev, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Molina, E.; Moralejo, A.; Morcuende, D.; Moreno, V.; Moretti, E.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Neustroev, V.; Nigro, C.; Nilsson, K.; Ninci, D.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Nozaki, S.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Peñil, P.; Peresano, M.; Persic, M.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Righi, C.; Rugliancich, A.; Saha, L.; Sahakyan, N.; Saito, T.; Sakurai, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schmidt, K.; Schweizer, T.; Sitarek, J.; Šnidarić, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Somero, A.; Stamerra, A.; Strom, D.; Strzys, M.; Suda, Y.; Surić, T.; Takahashi, M.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Teshima, M.; Torres-Albà, N.; Tosti, L.; Vagelli, V.; van Scherpenberg, J.; Vanzo, G.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Vigorito, C. F.; Vitale, V.; Vovk, I.; Will, M.; Zarić, D.; Nava, L.; Veres, P.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Cleveland, W. H.; Hamburg, R.; Hui, C. M.; Mailyan, B.; Preece, R. D.; Roberts, O.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Kocevski, D.; Arimoto, M.; Tak, D.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Bissaldi, E.; Dirirsa, F. Fana; Gill, R.; Granot, J.; McEnery, J.; Razzaque, S.; Piron, F.; Racusin, J. L.; Thompson, D. J.; Campana, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Siegel, M. H.; Cenko, S. Bradley; O'Brien, P.; Capalbi, M.; D'Aì, A.; De Pasquale, M.; Gropp, J.; Klingler, N.; Osborne, J. P.; Perri, M.; Starling, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tohuvavohu, A.; Ursi, A.; Tavani, M.; Cardillo, M.; Casentini, C.; Piano, G.; Evangelista, Y.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Parmiggiani, N.; Anderson, G. E.; Anderson, J. P.; Bernardi, G.; Bolmer, J.; Caballero-García, M. D.; Carrasco, I. M.; Castellón, A.; Segura, N. Castro; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Cherukuri, S. V.; Cockeram, A. M.; D'Avanzo, P.; Di Dato, A.; Diretse, R.; Fender, R. P.; Fernández-García, E.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Fruchter, A. S.; Greiner, J.; Gromadzki, M.; Heintz, K. E.; Heywood, I.; van der Horst, A. J.; Hu, Y. -D.; Inserra, C.; Izzo, L.; Jaiswal, V.; Jakobsson, P.; Japelj, J.; Kankare, E.; Kann, D. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Klose, S.; Levan, A. J.; Li, X. Y.; Lotti, S.; Maguire, K.; Malesani, D. B.; Manulis, I.; Marongiu, M.; Martin, S.; Melandri, A.; Michałowski, M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Misra, K.; Moin, A.; Mooley, K. P.; Nasri, S.; Nicholl, M.; Noschese, A.; Novara, G.; Pandey, S. B.; Peretti, E.; del Pulgar, C. J. Pérez; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Perley, D. A.; Piro, L.; Ragosta, F.; Resmi, L.; Ricci, R.; Rossi, A.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Selsing, J.; Schulze, S.; Smartt, S. J.; Smith, I. A.; Sokolov, V. V.; Stevens, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Thóne, C. C.; Tiengo, A.; Tremou, E.; Troja, E.; Postigo, A. de Ugarte; Vergani, S. D.; Wieringa, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Xu, D.; Yaron, O.; Young, D. R.
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-06-12
Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) originate from ultra-relativistic jets launched from the collapsing cores of dying massive stars. They are characterised by an initial phase of bright and highly variable radiation in the keV-MeV band that is likely produced within the jet and lasts from milliseconds to minutes, known as the prompt emission. Subsequently, the interaction of the jet with the external medium generates external shock waves, responsible for the afterglow emission, which lasts from days to months, and occurs over a broad energy range, from the radio to the GeV bands. The afterglow emission is generally well explained as synchrotron radiation by electrons accelerated at the external shock. Recently, an intense, long-lasting emission between 0.2 and 1 TeV was observed from the GRB 190114C. Here we present the results of our multi-frequency observational campaign of GRB~190114C, and study the evolution in time of the GRB emission across 17 orders of magnitude in energy, from $5\times10^{-6}$ up to $10^{12}$\,eV. We find that the broadband spectral energy distribution is double-peaked, with the TeV emission constituting a distinct spectral component that has power comparable to the synchrotron component. This component is associated with the afterglow, and is satisfactorily explained by inverse Compton upscattering of synchrotron photons by high-energy electrons. We find that the conditions required to account for the observed TeV component are not atypical, supporting the possibility that inverse Compton emission is commonly produced in GRBs.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.13554  [pdf] - 2120021
An Unambiguous Separation of Gamma-Ray Bursts into Two Classes from Prompt Emission Alone
Comments: Accepted to Astrophysical Journal Letters, 8 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2020-05-27
The duration of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) is a key indicator of its physics origin, with long bursts perhaps associated with the collapse of massive stars and short bursts with mergers of neutron stars.However, there is substantial overlap in the properties of both short and long GRBs and neither duration nor any other parameter so far considered completely separates the two groups. Here we unambiguously classify every GRB using a machine-learning, dimensionality-reduction algorithm, t-distributed stochastic neighborhood embedding (t-SNE), providing a catalog separating all Swift GRBs into two groups. Although the classification takes place only using prompt emission light curves,every burst with an associated supernova is found in the longer group and bursts with kilonovae in the short, suggesting along with the duration distributions that these two groups are truly long and short GRBs. Two bursts with a clear absence of a supernova belong to the longer class, indicating that these might have been direct-collapse black holes, a proposed phenomenon that may occur in the deaths of more massive stars.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.07325  [pdf] - 2099691
GaiaNIR: Combining optical and Near-Infra-Red (NIR) capabilities with Time-Delay-Integration (TDI) sensors for a future Gaia-like mission
Comments: 27 Pages
Submitted: 2016-09-23, last modified: 2020-05-22
ESA recently called for new "Science Ideas" to be investigated in terms of feasibility and technological developments -- for technologies not yet sufficiently mature. These ideas may in the future become candidates for M or L class missions within the ESA Science Program. With the launch of Gaia in December 2013, Europe entered a new era of space astrometry following in the footsteps of the very successful Hipparcos mission from the early 1990s. Gaia is the successor to Hipparcos, both of which operated in optical wavelengths, and Gaia is two orders of magnitude more accurate in the five astrometric parameters and is surveying four orders of magnitude more stars in a vast volume of the Milky Way. The combination of the Hipparcos/Tycho-2 catalogues with the first early Gaia data release will give improved proper motions over a long ~25 year baseline. The final Gaia solution will also establish a new optical reference frame by means of quasars, by linking the optical counterparts of radio (VLBI) sources defining the orientation of the reference frame, and by using the zero proper motion of quasars to determine a non-rotating frame. A weakness of Gaia is that it only operates at optical wavelengths. However, much of the Galactic centre and the spiral arm regions, important for certain studies, are obscured by interstellar extinction and this makes it difficult for Gaia to deeply probe. Traditionally, this problem is overcome by switching to the infra-red but this was not possible with Gaia's CCDs. Additionally, to scan the entire sky and make global absolute parallax measurements the spacecraft must have a constant rotation and this requires that the CCDs operate in TDI mode, increasing their complexity.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.09660  [pdf] - 2101564
High-redshift Damped Ly-alpha Absorbing Galaxy Model Reproducing the N(HI)-Z Distribution
Comments: Accepted to MNRAS, 8 pages
Submitted: 2020-05-19
We investigate how damped Lyman-$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) at z ~ 2-3, detected in large optical spectroscopic surveys of quasars, trace the population of star-forming galaxies. Building on previous results, we construct a model based on observed and physically motivated scaling relations in order to reproduce the bivariate distributions of metallicity, Z, and HI column density, N(HI). Furthermore, the observed impact parameters for galaxies associated to DLAs are in agreement with the model predictions. The model strongly favours a metallicity gradient, which scales with the luminosity of the host galaxy, with a value of $\gamma$* = -0.019 $\pm$ 0.008 dex kpc$^{-1}$ for L* galaxies that gets steeper for fainter galaxies. We find that DLAs trace galaxies over a wide range of galaxy luminosities, however, the bulk of the DLA cross-section arises in galaxies with L ~ 0.1 L* at z ~ 2.5 broadly consistent with numerical simulations.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.11063  [pdf] - 2097309
The VANDELS survey: A strong correlation between Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width and stellar metallicity at $\mathbf{3\leq z \leq 5}$
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2020-01-29, last modified: 2020-04-16
We present the results of a new study investigating the relationship between observed Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width ($W_{\lambda}$(Ly$\alpha$)) and the metallicity of the ionizing stellar population ($Z_{\star}$) for a sample of $768$ star-forming galaxies at $3 \leq z \leq 5$ drawn from the VANDELS survey. Dividing our sample into quartiles of rest-frame $W_{\lambda}$(Ly$\alpha$) across the range $-58 \unicode{xC5} \lesssim$ $W_{\lambda}$(Ly$\alpha$) $\lesssim 110 \unicode{xC5}$ we determine $Z_{\star}$ from full spectral fitting of composite far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectra and find a clear anti-correlation between $W_{\lambda}$(Ly$\alpha$) and $Z_{\star}$. Our results indicate that $Z_{\star}$ decreases by a factor $\gtrsim 3$ between the lowest $W_{\lambda}$(Ly$\alpha$) quartile ($\langle$$W_{\lambda}$(Ly$\alpha$)$\rangle=-18\unicode{xC5}$) and the highest $W_{\lambda}$(Ly$\alpha$) quartile ($\langle$$W_{\lambda}$(Ly$\alpha$)$\rangle=24\unicode{xC5}$). Similarly, galaxies typically defined as Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs; $W_{\lambda}$(Ly$\alpha$) $>20\unicode{xC5}$) are, on average, metal poor with respect to the non-LAE galaxy population ($W_{\lambda}$(Ly$\alpha$) $\leq20\unicode{xC5}$) with $Z_{\star}$$_{\rm{non-LAE}}\gtrsim 2 \times$ $Z_{\star}$$_{\rm{LAE}}$. Finally, based on the best-fitting stellar models, we estimate that the increasing strength of the stellar ionizing spectrum towards lower $Z_{\star}$ is responsible for $\simeq 15-25\%$ of the observed variation in $W_{\lambda}$(Ly$\alpha$) across our sample, with the remaining contribution ($\simeq 75-85\%$) being due to a decrease in the HI/dust covering fractions in low $Z_{\star}$ galaxies.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.13800  [pdf] - 2072807
X-ray emission from He II 1640 emitting galaxies in VANDELS
Comments: 10 pages, 4 figures, submitted to MNRAS. Comments welcome!
Submitted: 2020-03-30
We present X-ray measurements for 18 star-forming galaxies showing He II $\lambda 1640$ emission at $z\sim2.2-5$ in the Chandra Deep Field South, to test whether they show any X-ray excess compared to galaxies with no He II emission. Using aperture photometry on the 7 Ms Chandra image, we find that even though He II emitting galaxies in our sample (especially those with FWHM(He II) < 1000 km~s$^{-1}$) have marginally higher X-ray emission than galaxies with no He II, the difference is not statistically significant. The X-ray luminosity per star formation rate ($L_X$/SFR) for He II emitters and non-emitters are comparable, which rules out any enhanced contribution from young X-ray sources. The $L_X$/SFR at $z\sim3$ for both He II emitters and non-emitters is consistent with observations at lower redshifts, and in line with the redshift evolution predicted by models. We also find that our $L_X$/SFR measurements are consistent with the metallicity dependence predicted and observed in the literature. Therefore, we conclude that there is no significant difference between the X-ray emission from galaxies with and without He II emission, which rules out enhanced contribution from XRBs or weak or obscured AGN in galaxies with strong He II at $z\sim3$. Given the other similarities in the physical properties of both He II emitters and non-emitters reported earlier, alternative sources of He II ionising photon production, such as localised low-metallicity stellar populations, Pop-III stars, etc. may need to be explored.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.09999  [pdf] - 2076742
The properties of He II 1640 emitters at z ~ 2.5-5 from the VANDELS survey
Comments: 21 pages, 11 figures (including appendix), Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-11-22, last modified: 2020-03-23
Strong He II emission is produced by low-metallicity stellar populations. Here, we aim to identify and study a sample of He II $\lambda 1640$-emitting galaxies at redshifts of $z \sim 2.5-5$ in the deep VANDELS spectroscopic survey.. We identified a total of 33 Bright He II emitters (S/N > 2.5) and 17 Faint emitters (S/N < 2.5) in the VANDELS survey and used the available deep multi-wavelength data to study their physical properties. After identifying seven potential AGNs in our sample and discarding them from further analysis, we divided the sample of \emph{Bright} emitters into 20 \emph{Narrow} (FWHM < 1000 km s$^{-1}$) and 6 \emph{Broad} (FWHM > 1000 km s$^{-1}$) He II emitters. We created stacks of Faint, Narrow, and Broad emitters and measured other rest-frame UV lines such as O III] and C III] in both individual galaxies and stacks. We then compared the UV line ratios with the output of stellar population-synthesis models to study the ionising properties of He II emitters. We do not see a significant difference between the stellar masses, star-formation rates, and rest-frame UV magnitudes of galaxies with He II and no He II emission. The stellar population models reproduce the observed UV line ratios from metals in a consistent manner, however they under-predict the total number of \heii ionising photons, confirming earlier studies and suggesting that additional mechanisms capable of producing He II are needed, such as X-ray binaries or stripped stars. The models favour subsolar metallicities ($\sim0.1Z_\odot$) and young stellar ages ($10^6 - 10^7$ years) for the He II emitters. However, the metallicity measured for He II emitters is comparable to that of non-He II emitters at similar redshifts. We argue that galaxies with He II emission may have undergone a recent star-formation event, or may be powered by additional sources of He II ionisation.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.09722  [pdf] - 2076855
The lowest of the low: discovery of SN 2019gsc and the nature of faint Iax supernovae
Comments: 12 pages, 5 figures, accepted to ApJL, minor changes to submitted version
Submitted: 2020-01-27, last modified: 2020-02-18
We present the discovery and optical follow-up of the faintest supernova-like transient known. The event (SN 2019gsc) was discovered in a star-forming host at 53\,Mpc by ATLAS. A detailed multi-colour light curve was gathered with Pan-STARRS1 and follow-up spectroscopy was obtained with the NOT and Gemini-North. The spectra near maximum light show narrow features at low velocities of 3000 to 4000 km s$^{-1}$, similar to the extremely low luminosity SNe 2010ae and 2008ha, and the light curve displays a similar fast decline (\dmr $0.91 \pm 0.10$ mag). SNe 2010ae and 2008ha have been classified as type Iax supernovae, and together the three either make up a distinct physical class of their own or are at the extreme low luminosity end of this diverse supernova population. The bolometric light curve is consistent with a low kinetic energy of explosion ($E_{\rm k} \sim 10^{49}$ erg s$^{-1}$), a modest ejected mass ($M_{\rm ej} \sim 0.2$ \msol) and radioactive powering by $^{56}$Ni ($M_{\rm Ni} \sim 2 \times 10^{-3}$ \msol). The spectra are quite well reproduced with radiative transfer models (TARDIS) and a composition dominated by carbon, oxygen, magnesium, silicon and sulphur. Remarkably, all three of these extreme Iax events are in similar low-metallicity star-forming environments. The combination of the observational constraints for all three may be best explained by deflagrations of near $M_{\rm Ch}$ hybrid carbon-oxygen-neon white dwarfs which have short evolutionary pathways to formation.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.09058  [pdf] - 2061690
Into the Ly{\alpha} jungle: exploring the circumgalactic medium of galaxies at z ~ 4-5 with MUSE
Comments: 19 pages (+2 pages appendices), 19 figures (+4 in appendices). Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-01-24
We present a study of the galaxy environment of 9 strong HI+CIV absorption line systems ($16.2<{\rm log}(N({\rm HI}))<21.2$) spanning a wide range in metallicity at $z\sim4-5$, using MUSE integral field and X-Shooter spectroscopic data collected in a $z\approx 5.26$ quasar field. We identify galaxies within a 250 kpc and $\pm1000$ km s$^{-1}$ window for 6 out of the 9 absorption systems, with 2 of the absorption line systems showing multiple associated galaxies within the MUSE field of view. The space density of Ly$\alpha$ emitting galaxies (LAEs) around the HI and CIV systems is $\approx10-20$ times the average sky density of LAEs given the flux limit of our survey, showing a clear correlation between the absorption and galaxy populations. Further, we find that the strongest CIV systems in our sample are those that are most closely aligned with galaxies in velocity space, i.e. within velocities of $\pm500$ km s$^{-1}$. The two most metal poor systems lie in the most dense galaxy environments, implying we are potentially tracing gas that is infalling for the first time into star-forming groups at high redshift. Finally, we detect an extended Ly$\alpha$ nebula around the $z\approx 5.26$ quasar, which extends up to $\approx50$ kpc at the surface brightness limit of $3.8 \times 10^{-18}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ arcsec$^{-2}$. After scaling for surface brightness dimming, we find that this nebula is centrally brighter, having a steeper radial profile than the average for nebulae studied at $z\sim3$ and is consistent with the mild redshift evolution seen from $z\approx 2$.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.10649  [pdf] - 2050321
Gaia-assisted discovery of a detached low-ionisation BAL quasar with very large ejection velocities
Comments: 6 pages, 5 figures. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-12-23, last modified: 2019-12-29
We report on the discovery of a peculiar Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasar identified in our Gaia-assisted survey of red quasars. The systemic redshift of this quasar was difficult to establish due to the absence of conspicuous emission lines. Based on deep and broad BAL troughs (at least SiIV, CIV, and AlIII), a redshift of z=2.41 was established under the assumption that the systemic redshift can be inferred from the red edge of the BAL troughs. However, we observe a weak and spatially-extended emission line at 4450 AA most likely due to Lyman-alpha emission, which implies a systemic redshift of z=2.66 if correctly identified. There is also evidence for the onset of Lyman-alpha forest absorption bluewards of 4450 AA and evidence for H-alpha emission in the K-band consistent with a systemic redshift of z=2.66. If this redshift is correct, the quasar is an extreme example of a detached low-ionisation BAL quasar. The BAL lines must originate from material moving with very large velocities ranging from 22000 to 40000 km/s. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a systemic-redshift measurement based on extended Lyman-$\alpha$ emission for a BAL quasar, a method that should also be useful in cases of sufficiently distant BL Lac quasars without systemic-redshift information.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.00556  [pdf] - 2031943
HST Imaging of the Ionizing Radiation from a Star-forming Galaxy at z = 3.794
Comments: 24 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-08-01, last modified: 2019-12-07
We report on the HST detection of the Lyman-continuum (LyC) radiation emitted by a galaxy at redshift z=3.794, dubbed Ion1 (Vanzella et al. 2012). The LyC from Ion1 is detected at rest-frame wavelength 820$\sim$890 \AA with HST WFC3/UVIS in the F410M band ($m_{410}=27.60\pm0.36$ magnitude (AB), peak SNR = 4.17 in a circular aperture with radius r = 0.12'') and at 700$\sim$830 \AA with the VLT/VIMOS in the U-band ($m_U = 27.84\pm0.19$ magnitude (AB), peak SNR = 6.7 with a r = 0.6'' aperture). A 20-hr VLT/VIMOS spectrum shows low- and high-ionization interstellar metal absorption lines, the P-Cygni profile of CIV and Ly$\alpha$ in absorption. The latter spectral feature differs from what observed in known LyC emitters, which show strong Ly$\alpha$ emission. An HST far-UV color map reveals that the LyC emission escapes from a region of the galaxy that is bluer than the rest, presumably because of lower dust obscuration. The F410M image shows that the centroid of the LyC emission is offset from the centroid of the non-ionizing UV emission by 0.12''$\pm$0.03'', corresponding to 0.85$\pm$0.21 kpc (physical), and that its morphology is likely moderately resolved. These morphological characteristics favor a scenario where the LyC photons produced by massive stars escape from low HI column-density "cavities" in the ISM, possibly carved by stellar winds and/or supernova. We also collect the VIMOS U-band images of a sample of 107 Lyman-break galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts at $3.40<z<3.95$, i.e. sampling the LyC, and stack them with inverse-variance weights. No LyC emission is detected in the stacked image, resulting in a 32.5 magnitude (AB) flux limit (1$\sigma$) and an upper limit of absolute LyC escape fraction $f_{esc}^{abs} < 0.63\%$. LyC emitters like Ion1 are very likely at the bright-end of the LyC luminosity function.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.12532  [pdf] - 2050276
The Intergalactic medium transmission towards z>4 galaxies with VANDELS and the impact of dust attenuation
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-11-28
Aims. Our aim is to estimate the intergalactic medium transmission towards UV-selected star-forming galaxies at redshift 4 and above and study the effect of the dust attenuation on these measurements. Methods. The ultra-violet spectrum of high redshift galaxies is a combination of their intrinsic emission and the effect of the Inter-Galactic medium (IGM) absorption along their line of sight. Using data coming from the unprecedented deep spectroscopy from the VANDELS ESO public survey carried out with the VIMOS instrument we compute both the dust extinction and the mean transmission of the IGM as well as its scatter from a set of 281 galaxies at z>3.87. Because of a degeneracy between the dust content of the galaxy and the IGM, we first estimate the stellar dust extinction parameter E(B-V) and study the result as a function of the dust prescription. Using these measurements as constraint for the spectral fit we estimate the IGM transmission Tr(Lyalpha). Both photometric and spectroscopic SED fitting are done using the SPectroscopy And photometRy fiTting tool for Astronomical aNalysis (SPARTAN) that is able to fit the spectral continuum of the galaxies as well as photometric data. Results. Using the classical Calzetti's attenuation law we find that E(B-V) goes from 0.11 at z=3.99 to 0.08 at z=5.15. These results are in very good agreement with previous measurements from the literature. We estimate the IGM transmission and find that the transmission is decreasing with increasing redshift from Tr(Lyalpha)=0.53 at z=3.99 to 0.28 at z=5.15. We also find a large standard deviation around the average transmission that is more than 0.1 at every redshift. Our results are in very good agreement with both previous measurements from AGN studies and with theoretical models.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.09719  [pdf] - 2002512
Low frequency view of GRB 190114C reveals time varying shock micro-physics
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS, 15 pages, 11 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2019-11-21
We present radio and optical afterglow observations of the TeV-bright long Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 190114C, which was detected by the MAGIC telescope at a redshift of z=0.425. Our observations with ALMA, ATCA, and uGMRT were obtained by our low frequency observing campaign and range from ~1 to ~140 days after the burst and the optical observations were done with the 0.7-m GROWTH-India telescope up to ~25 days after the burst. Long term radio/mm observations reveal the complex nature of the afterglow, which does not conform to the predictions of the standard afterglow model. We find that the microphysical parameters of the external forward shock, representing the share of shock-created energy in the non-thermal electron population and magnetic field, are evolving with time. The kinetic energy in the blast-wave is almost an order of magnitude higher than that measured in the prompt emission.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.07876  [pdf] - 2030618
GRB 190114C in the nuclear region of an interacting galaxy -- A detailed host analysis using ALMA, HST and VLT
Comments: A&A, in press, 11 pages
Submitted: 2019-11-18
GRB 190114C is the first GRB for which the detection of very-high energy emission up to the TeV range has been reported. It is still unclear whether environmental properties might have contributed to the production of these very high-energy photons, or if it is solely related to the released GRB emission. The relatively low redshift of the GRB (z=0.425) allows us to study the host galaxy of this event in detail, and to potentially identify idiosyncrasies that could point to progenitor characteristics or environmental properties responsible for such a unique event. We use ultraviolet, optical, infrared and submillimetre imaging and spectroscopy obtained with HST, VLT and ALMA to obtain an extensive dataset on which the analysis of the host galaxy is based. The host system is composed of a close pair of interacting galaxies (Delta v = 50 km s^-1), both of which are well-detected by ALMA in CO(3-2). The GRB occurred within the nuclear region (~170 pc from the centre) of the less massive but more star-forming galaxy of the pair. The host is more massive (log(M/M_odot)=9.3) than average GRB hosts at that redshift and the location of the GRB is rather unique. The enhanced star-formation rate was probably triggered by tidal interactions between the two galaxies. Our ALMA observations indicate that both host galaxy and companion have a high molecular gas fraction, as has been observed before in interacting galaxy pairs. The location of the GRB within the core of an interacting galaxy with an extinguished line-of-sight is indicative of a denser environment than typically observed for GRBs and could have been crucial for the generation of the very-high-energy photons that were observed.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.14160  [pdf] - 1989155
GRB171010A / SN2017htp: a GRB-SN at z=0.33
Comments: Accepted for publication by MNRAS, 10 pages, 8 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2019-10-30
The number of supernovae known to be connected with long-duration gamma-ray bursts is increasing and the link between these events is no longer exclusively found at low redshift ($z \lesssim 0.3$) but is well established also at larger distances. We present a new case of such a liaison at $z = 0.33$ between GRB\,171010A and SN\,2017htp. It is the second closest GRB with an associated supernova of only three events detected by Fermi-LAT. The supernova is one of the few higher redshift cases where spectroscopic observations were possible and shows spectral similarities with the well-studied SN\,1998bw, having produced a similar Ni mass ($M_{\rm Ni}=0.33\pm0.02 ~\rm{M_{\odot}}$) with slightly lower ejected mass ($M_{\rm ej}=4.1\pm0.7~\rm{M_{\odot}}$) and kinetic energy ($E_{\rm K} = 8.1\pm2.5 \times 10^{51} ~\rm{erg}$). The host-galaxy is bigger in size than typical GRB host galaxies, but the analysis of the region hosting the GRB revealed spectral properties typically observed in GRB hosts and showed that the progenitor of this event was located in a very bright HII region of its face-on host galaxy, at a projected distance of $\sim$ 10 kpc from its galactic centre. The star-formation rate (SFR$_{GRB} \sim$ 0.2 M$_{\odot}$~yr$^{-1}$) and metallicity (12 + log(O/H) $\sim 8.15 \pm 0.10$) of the GRB star-forming region are consistent with those of the host galaxies of previously studied GRB-SN systems.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.10510  [pdf] - 1985401
Identification of strontium in the merger of two neutron stars
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-10-23
Half of all the elements in the universe heavier than iron were created by rapid neutron capture. The theory for this astrophysical `$r$-process' was worked out six decades ago and requires an enormous neutron flux to make the bulk of these elements. Where this happens is still debated. A key piece of missing evidence is the identification of freshly-synthesised $r$-process elements in an astrophysical site. Current models and circumstantial evidence point to neutron star mergers as a probable $r$-process site, with the optical/infrared `kilonova' emerging in the days after the merger a likely place to detect the spectral signatures of newly-created neutron-capture elements. The kilonova, AT2017gfo, emerging from the gravitational-wave--discovered neutron star merger, GW170817, was the first kilonova where detailed spectra were recorded. When these spectra were first reported it was argued that they were broadly consonant with an outflow of radioactive heavy elements, however, there was no robust identification of any element. Here we report the identification of the neutron-capture element strontium in a re-analysis of these spectra. The detection of a neutron-capture element associated with the collision of two extreme-density stars establishes the origin of $r$-process elements in neutron star mergers, and demonstrates that neutron stars contain neutron-rich matter.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.07289  [pdf] - 2026029
Small-scale clustering of nano-dust grains in supersonic turbulence
Comments: 10 pages, 10 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-10-16
We investigate the clustering and dynamics of nano-sized particles (nano-dust) in high-resolution ($1024^3$) simulations of compressible isothermal hydrodynamic turbulence. It is well-established that large grains will decouple from a turbulent gas flow, while small grains will tend to trace the motion of the gas. We demonstrate that nano-sized grains may cluster in a turbulent flow (fractal small-scale clustering), which increases the local grain density by at least a factor of a few. In combination with the fact that nano-dust grains may be abundant in general, and the increased interaction rate due to turbulent motions, aggregation involving nano dust may have a rather high probability. Small-scale clustering will also affect extinction properties. As an example we present an extinction model based on silicates, graphite and metallic iron, assuming strong clustering of grain sizes in the nanometre range, could explain the extreme and rapidly varying ultraviolet extinction in the host of GRB 140506A.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.04502  [pdf] - 2053201
Serendipitous discovery of a physical binary quasar at z=1.76
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-10-10
Binary quasars are extremely rare objects, used to investigate clustering on very small scales at different redshifts. The cases where the two quasar components are gravitationally bound, known as physical binary quasars, can also exhibit enhanced astrophysical activity and therefore are of particular scientific interest. Here we present the serendipitous discovery of a physical pair of quasars with an angular separation of $\Delta\theta = (8.76 \pm 0.11)$ arcsec. The redshifts of the two quasars are consistent within the errors and measured as $z = (1.76\pm 0.01)$. Under the motivated assumption that the pair does not arise from a single gravitationally lensed quasar, the resulting projected physical separation was estimated as $(76 \pm 1)$ kpc. For both targets we detected Si VI, C VI, C III], and Mg II emission lines. However, the two quasars show significantly different optical colours, one being among the most reddened quasars at $z > 1.5$ and the other with colours consistent with typical quasar colours at the same redshift. Therefore it is ruled out that the sources are a lensed system. This is our second serendipitous discovery of a pair of two quasars with different colours, having a separation $\lesssim 10$ arcsec, which extends the very limited catalogue of known quasar pairs. We ultimately argue that the number of binary quasars may have been significantly underestimated in previous photometric surveys, due to the bias arising from paired quasars with very different colours.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.10713  [pdf] - 1971198
The Brightest $z\gtrsim8$ Galaxies over the COSMOS UltraVISTA Field
Comments: This version reflects the accepted manuscript
Submitted: 2019-02-27, last modified: 2019-09-13
We present 16 new ultrabright $H_{AB}\lesssim25$ galaxy candidates at z~8 identified over the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. The new search takes advantage of the deepest-available ground-based optical and near-infrared observations, including the DR3 release of UltraVISTA and full-depth Spitzer/IRAC observations from the SMUVS and SPLASH programs. Candidates are selected using Lyman-break criteria, combined with strict optical non-detection and SED-fitting criteria, minimizing contamination by low-redshift galaxies and low-mass stars. HST/WFC3 coverage from the DASH program reveals that one source evident in our ground-based near-IR data has significant substructure and may actually correspond to 3 separate z~8 objects, resulting in a sample of 18 galaxies, 10 of which seem to be fairly robust (with a >97% probability of being at z>7). The UV-continuum slope $\beta$ for the bright z~8 sample is $\beta=-2.2\pm0.6$, bluer but still consistent with that of similarly bright galaxies at z~6 ($\beta=-1.55\pm0.17$) and z~7 ($\beta=-1.75\pm0.18$). Their typical stellar masses are 10$^{9.1^{+0.5}_{-0.4}}M_{\odot}$, with the SFRs of $32^{+44}_{-32}M_{\odot}$/year, specific SFR of $4^{+8}_{-4}$ Gyr$^{-1}$, stellar ages of $\sim22^{+69}_{-22}$\,Myr, and low dust content A$_V=0.15^{+0.30}_{-0.15}$ mag. Using this sample we constrain the bright end of the z~8 UV luminosity function (LF). When combined with recent empty field LF estimates at z~8-9, the resulting z~8 LF can be equally well represented by either a Schechter or a double power-law (DPL) form. Assuming a Schechter parameterization, the best-fit characteristic magnitude is $M^*= -20.95^{+0.30}_{-0.35}$ mag with a very steep faint end slope $\alpha=-2.15^{+0.20}_{-0.19}$. These new candidates include amongst the brightest yet found at these redshifts, 0.5-1.0 mag brighter than found over CANDELS, providing excellent targets for follow-up studies.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.05363  [pdf] - 1966960
Exploring galaxy dark matter halos across redshifts with strong quasar absorbers
Comments: 10 pages, submitted for publication in MNRAS. [v1] includes 2.nd set of answers to the referee
Submitted: 2019-08-14
Quasar lines of sight intersect intervening galaxy discs or circum-galactic environments at random impact parameters and potential well depths. Absorption line velocity widths ($\Delta v_{90}$) are known to scale with host galaxy stellar masses, and inversely with the projected separation from the quasar line of sight. Its dependence on stellar mass can be eliminated by normalising with the emission-line widths of the host galaxies, $\sigma_{em}$, so that absorbers with a range of $\Delta v_{90}$ values can be compared directly. Using a sample of DLA systems at 0.2 < z < 3.2 with spectroscopically confirmed host galaxies, we find that the velocity ratio $\Delta v_{90}/\sigma_{em}$ decreases with projected distances from the hosts. We compare the data with expectations of line-of-sight velocity dispersions derived for different dark matter halo mass distributions, and find that models with steeper radial dark matter profiles provide a better fit to the observations, although the scatter remains large. Gas outflows from the galaxies may cause an increased scatter, or scale radii of dark matter halo models may not be representative for the galaxies. We demonstrate by computing virial velocities, that metal-rich DLAs that belong to massive galaxy halos (M$_{halo} \approx 10^{12}$ M$_{\odot}$) mostly remain gravitationally bound to the halos.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.02309  [pdf] - 1962334
New constraints on the physical conditions in H$_2$-bearing GRB-host damped Lyman-$\alpha$ absorbers
Comments: 15 pages, 15 figures + Appendix. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-08-06
We report the detections of molecular hydrogen (H$_2$), vibrationally-excited H$_2$ (H$^*_2$), and neutral atomic carbon (CI), in two new afterglow spectra of GRBs\,181020A ($z=2.938$) and 190114A ($z=3.376$), observed with X-shooter at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Both host-galaxy absorption systems are characterized by strong damped Lyman-$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) and substantial amounts of molecular hydrogen with $\log N$(HI, H$_2$) = $22.20\pm 0.05,~20.40\pm 0.04$ (GRB\,181020A) and $\log N$(HI, H$_2$) = $22.15\pm 0.05,~19.44\pm 0.04$ (GRB\,190114A). The DLA metallicites, depletion levels and dust extinctions are [Zn/H] = $-1.57\pm 0.06$, [Zn/Fe] = $0.67\pm 0.03$, and $A_V = 0.27\pm 0.02$\,mag (GRB\,181020A) and [Zn/H] = $-1.23\pm 0.07$, [Zn/Fe] = $1.06\pm 0.08$, and $A_V = 0.36\pm 0.02$\,mag (GRB\,190114A). We then examine the molecular gas content of all known H$_2$-bearing GRB-DLAs and explore the physical conditions and characteristics of these systems. We confirm that H$_2$ is detected in all CI- and H$^*_2$-bearing GRB absorption systems, but that these rarer features are not necessarily detected in all GRB H$_2$ absorbers. We find that a large molecular fraction of $f_{\rm H_2} \gtrsim 10^{-3}$ is required for CI to be detected. The defining characteristic for H$^*_2$ to be present is less clear, though a large H$_2$ column density is an essential factor. We then derive the H$_2$ excitation temperatures of the molecular gas and find that they are relatively low with $T_{\rm ex} \approx 100 - 300$\,K, however, there could be evidence of warmer components populating the high-$J$ H$_2$ levels in GRBs\,181020A and 190114A. Finally, we demonstrate that the otherwise successful X-shooter GRB afterglow campaign is hampered by a significant dust bias excluding the most dust-obscured H$_2$ absorbers from identification [Abridged].
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.02159  [pdf] - 1966751
Short GRB 160821B: a reverse shock, a refreshed shock, and a well-sampled kilonova
Comments: 17 pages, 6 figures, Version accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2019-05-06, last modified: 2019-08-05
We report our identification of the optical afterglow and host galaxy of the short-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 160821B. The spectroscopic redshift of the host is $z=0.162$, making it one of the lowest redshift sGRBs identified by Swift. Our intensive follow-up campaign using a range of ground-based facilities as well as HST, XMM and Swift, shows evidence for a late-time excess of optical and near-infrared emission in addition to a complex afterglow. The afterglow light-curve at X-ray frequencies reveals a narrow jet, $\theta_j\sim1.9^{+0.10}_{-0.03}$ deg, that is refreshed at $>1$ day post-burst by a slower outflow with significantly more energy than the initial outflow that produced the main GRB. Observations of the 5 GHz radio afterglow shows a reverse shock into a mildly magnetised shell. The optical and near-infrared excess is fainter than AT2017gfo associated with GW170817, and is well explained by a kilonova with dynamic ejecta mass $M_{\rm dyn}=(1.0\pm0.6)\times10^{-3}$ M$_{\odot}$ and a secular (postmerger) ejecta mass with $M_{\rm pm}=(1.0\pm0.6)\times10^{-2}$ M$_\odot$, consistent with a binary neutron star merger resulting in a short-lived massive neutron star. This optical and near-infrared dataset provides the best-sampled kilonova light-curve without a gravitational wave trigger to date.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.12535  [pdf] - 1924376
Voyage 2050 White Paper: All-Sky Visible and Near Infrared Space Astrometry
Comments: arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1609.07325
Submitted: 2019-07-26
A new all-sky visible and Near-InfraRed (NIR) space astrometry mission with a wavelength cutoff in the K-band is not just focused on a single or small number of key science cases. Instead, it is extremely broad, answering key science questions in nearly every branch of astronomy while also providing a dense and accurate visible-NIR reference frame needed for future astronomy facilities. For almost 2 billion common stars the combination of Gaia and a new all-sky NIR astrometry mission would provide much improved proper motions, answering key science questions -- from the solar system and stellar systems, including exoplanet systems, to compact galaxies, quasars, neutron stars, binaries and dark matter substructures. The addition of NIR will result in up to 8 billion newly measured stars in some of the most obscured parts of our Galaxy, and crucially reveal the very heart of the Galactic bulge region. In this white paper we argue that rather than improving on the accuracy, a greater overall science return can be achieved by going deeper than Gaia and by expanding the wavelength range to the NIR.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.10144  [pdf] - 1912755
On the nature of the unusual transient AT 2018cow from HI observations of its host galaxy
Comments: Accepted to A&A. 9 pages, 4 figures, 2 tables. Main changes: 1) inclusion of the HI data from August 2018; 2) the atomic gas ring discovered by Roychowdhury et al. (2019) is visible, but we present a different interpretation of its origin (internal mechanisms); 3) the faint low-S/N companions were spurious
Submitted: 2019-02-26, last modified: 2019-06-12
Unusual stellar explosions represent an opportunity to learn about both stellar and galaxy evolution. Mapping the atomic gas in host galaxies of such transients can lead to an understanding of the conditions triggering them. We provide resolved atomic gas observations of the host galaxy, CGCG137-068, of the unusual, poorly-understood transient AT2018cow searching for clues to understand its nature. We test whether it is consistent with a recent inflow of atomic gas from the intergalactic medium, as suggested for host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and some supernovae (SNe). We observed the HI hyperfine structure line of the AT2018cow host with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. There is no unusual atomic gas concentration near the position of AT2018cow. The gas distribution is much more regular than those of GRB/SN hosts. The AT2018cow host has an atomic gas mass lower by 0.24 dex than predicted from its star formation rate (SFR) and is at the lower edge of the galaxy main sequence. In the continuum we detected the emission of AT2018cow and of a star-forming region in the north-eastern part of the bar (away from AT2018cow). This region hosts a third of the galaxy's SFR. The absence of atomic gas concentration close to AT2018cow, along with a normal SFR and regular HI velocity field, sets CGCG137-068 apart from GRB/SN hosts studied in HI. The environment of AT2018cow therefore suggests that its progenitor may not have been a massive star. Our findings are consistent with an origin of the transient that does not require a connection between its progenitor and gas concentration or inflow: an exploding low-mass star, a tidal disruption event, a merger of white dwarfs, or a merger between a neutron star and a giant star. We interpret the recently reported atomic gas ring in CGCG137-068 as a result of internal processes connected with gravitational resonances caused by the bar.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.09467  [pdf] - 1912870
Constraining Lyman-alpha spatial offsets at $3<z<5.5$ from VANDELS slit spectroscopy
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-05-23
We constrain the distribution of spatially offset Lyman-alpha emission (Ly$\alpha$) relative to rest-frame ultraviolet emission in $\sim300$ high redshift ($3<z<5.5$) Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) exhibiting Ly$\alpha$ emission from VANDELS, a VLT/VIMOS slit-spectroscopic survey of the CANDELS Ultra Deep Survey and Chandra Deep Field South fields (${\simeq0.2}~\mathrm{deg}^2$ total). Because slit spectroscopy compresses two-dimensional spatial information into one spatial dimension, we use Bayesian inference to recover the underlying Ly$\alpha$ spatial offset distribution. We model the distribution using a 2D circular Gaussian, defined by a single parameter $\sigma_{r,\mathrm{Ly}\alpha}$, the standard deviation expressed in polar coordinates. Over the entire redshift range of our sample ($3<z<5.5$), we find $\sigma_{r,\mathrm{Ly}\alpha}=1.70^{+0.09}_{-0.08}$ kpc ($68\%$ conf.), corresponding to $\sim0.25$ arcsec at $\langle z\rangle=4.5$. We also find that $\sigma_{r,\mathrm{Ly}\alpha}$ decreases significantly with redshift. Because Ly$\alpha$ spatial offsets can cause slit-losses, the decrease in $\sigma_{r,\mathrm{Ly}\alpha}$ with redshift can partially explain the increase in the fraction of Ly$\alpha$ emitters observed in the literature over this same interval, although uncertainties are still too large to reach a strong conclusion. If $\sigma_{r,\mathrm{Ly}\alpha}$ continues to decrease into the reionization epoch, then the decrease in Ly$\alpha$ transmission from galaxies observed during this epoch might require an even higher neutral hydrogen fraction than what is currently inferred. Conversely, if spatial offsets increase with the increasing opacity of the IGM, slit losses may explain some of the drop in Ly$\alpha$ transmission observed at $z>6$. Spatially resolved observations of Ly$\alpha$ and UV continuum at $6<z<8$ are needed to settle the issue.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.11081  [pdf] - 1890409
The VANDELS survey: the stellar metallicities of star-forming galaxies at 2.5 < z < 5.0
Comments: 21 pages (+ appendix), 13 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2019-03-26, last modified: 2019-05-22
We present the results of a study utilising ultra-deep, rest-frame UV, spectroscopy to quantify the relationship between stellar mass and stellar metallicity for 681 star-forming galaxies at $2.5<z<5.0$ ($\langle z \rangle = 3.5 \pm 0.6$) drawn from the VANDELS survey. Via a comparison with high-resolution stellar population models, we determine stellar metallicities for a set of composite spectra formed from subsamples selected by mass and redshift. Across the stellar mass range $8.5 < \mathrm{log}(\langle M_{\ast} \rangle/\rm{M}_{\odot}) < 10.2$ we find a strong correlation between stellar metallicity and stellar mass, with stellar metallicity monotonically increasing from $Z_{\ast}/\mathrm{Z}_{\odot} < 0.09$ at $\langle M_{\ast} \rangle = 3.2 \times 10^{8} \rm{M}_{\odot}$ to $Z_{\ast}/Z_{\odot} = 0.27$ at $\langle M_{\ast} \rangle = 1.7 \times 10^{10} \rm{M}_{\odot}$. In contrast, at a given stellar mass, we find no evidence for significant metallicity evolution across the redshift range of our sample. However, comparing our results to the $z=0$ stellar mass-metallicity relation, we find that the $\langle z \rangle = 3.5$ relation is consistent with being shifted to lower metallicities by $\simeq 0.6$ dex. Contrasting our derived stellar metallicities with estimates of gas-phase metallicities at similar redshifts, we find evidence for enhanced $\rm{O}/\rm{Fe}$ ratios of the order (O/Fe) $\gtrsim 1.8$ $\times$ (O/Fe)$_{\odot}$. Finally, by comparing our results to simulation predictions, we find that the $\langle z \rangle = 3.5$ stellar mass-metallicity relation is consistent with current predictions for how outflow strength scales with galaxy mass. This conclusion is supported by an analysis of analytic models, and suggests that the mass loading parameter ($\eta=\dot{M}_{\mathrm{outflow}}/M_{\ast}$) scales as $\eta \propto M_{\ast}^{\beta}$ with $\beta \simeq -0.4$.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.04301  [pdf] - 1877394
On the dust properties of high redshift molecular clouds and the connection to the 2175 {\AA} extinction bump
Comments: 10 pages, 5 Figs. + Appendix. Accepted in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-04-08, last modified: 2019-05-03
We present a study of the extinction and depletion-derived dust properties of gamma-ray burst (GRB) absorbers at $1<z<3$ showing the presence of neutral carbon (\ion{C}{I}). By modelling their parametric extinction laws, we discover a broad range of dust models characterizing the GRB \ion{C}{I} absorption systems. In addition to the already well-established correlation between the amount of \ion{C}{I} and visual extinction, $A_V$, we also observe a correlation with the total-to-selective reddening, $R_V$. All three quantities are also found to be connected to the presence and strength of the 2175\,{\AA} dust extinction feature. While the amount of \ion{C}{I} is found to be correlated with the SED-derived dust properties, we do not find any evidence for a connection with the depletion-derived dust content as measured from [Zn/Fe] and $N$(Fe)$_{\rm dust}$. To reconcile this, we discuss a scenario where the observed extinction is dominated by the composition of dust particles confined in the molecular gas-phase of the ISM. We argue that since the depletion level trace non-carbonaceous dust in the ISM, the observed extinction in GRB \ion{C}{I} absorbers is primarily produced by carbon-rich dust in the molecular cloud and is therefore only observable in the extinction curves and not in the depletion patterns. This also indicates that the 2175\,{\AA} dust extinction feature is caused by dust and molecules in the cold and molecular gas-phase. This scenario provides a possible resolution to the discrepancy between the depletion- and SED-derived amounts of dust in high-$z$ absorbers.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.08836  [pdf] - 1869907
All-Sky Near Infrared Space Astrometry
Comments: 7 pages
Submitted: 2019-04-18
Gaia is currently revolutionizing modern astronomy. However, much of the Galactic plane, center and the spiral arm regions are obscured by interstellar extinction, rendering them inaccessible because Gaia is an optical instrument. An all-sky near infrared (NIR) space observatory operating in the optical NIR, separated in time from the original Gaia would provide microarcsecond NIR astrometry and millimag photometry to penetrate obscured regions unraveling the internal dynamics of the Galaxy.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.07254  [pdf] - 1898012
Linking gas and galaxies at high redshift: MUSE surveys the environments of six damped Lyman alpha galaxies at z~3
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS. 23 pages, 15 figures plus appendices
Submitted: 2019-04-15
We present results from a survey of galaxies in the fields of six z>3 Damped Lyman alpha systems (DLAs) using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We report a high detection rate of up to ~80% of galaxies within 1000 km/s from DLAs and with impact parameters between 25 and 280 kpc. In particular, we discovered 5 high-confidence Lyman alpha emitters associated with three DLAs, plus up to 9 additional detections across five of the six fields. The majority of the detections are at relatively large impact parameters (>50 kpc) with two detections being plausible host galaxies. Among our detections, we report four galaxies associated with the most metal-poor DLA in our sample (Z/Z_sun = -2.33), which trace an overdense structure resembling a filament. By comparing our detections with predictions from the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) cosmological simulations and a semi-analytic model designed to reproduce the observed bias of DLAs at z>2, we conclude that our observations are consistent with a scenario in which a significant fraction of DLAs trace the neutral regions within halos with a characteristic mass of 10^11-10^12 M_sun, in agreement with the inference made from the large-scale clustering of DLAs. We finally show how larger surveys targeting ~25 absorbers have the potential of constraining the characteristic masses of halos hosting high-redshift DLAs with sufficient accuracy to discriminate between different models.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.06966  [pdf] - 1875464
The effect of dust bias on the census of neutral gas and metals in the high-redshift Universe due to SDSS-II quasar colour selection
Comments: accepted for publication in MNRAS, 19 pages (6 of which in appendix)
Submitted: 2019-04-15
We present a systematic study of the impact of a dust bias on samples of damped Lyman-$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs). This bias arises as an effect of the magnitude and colour criteria utilized in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar target selection up until data release 7 (DR7). The bias has previously been quantified assuming only a contribution from the dust obscuration. In this work, we apply the full set of magnitude and colour criteria used up until SDSS DR7 in order to quantify the full impact of dust biasing against dusty and metal-rich DLAs. We apply the quasar target selection algorithm on a modelled population of intrinsic colours, and by exploring the parameter space consisting of redshift, ($z_{\rm QSO}$ and $z_{\rm abs}$), optical extinction, and HI column density, we demonstrate how the selection probability depends on these variables. We quantify the dust bias on the following properties derived for DLAs at z=3: the incidence rate, the mass density of neutral hydrogen and metals, the average metallicity. We find that all quantities are significantly affected. When considering all uncertainties, the mass density of neutral hydrogen is underestimated by 10 to 50%, and the mass density in metals is underestimated by 30 to 200%. Lastly, we find that the bias depends on redshift. At redshift z=2.2, the mass density of neutral hydrogen and metals might be underestimated by up to a factor of 2 and 5, respectively. Characterizing such a bias is crucial in order to accurately interpret and model the properties and metallicity evolution of absorption-selected galaxies.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.01686  [pdf] - 1886577
Gaia-assisted selection of a quasar reddened by dust in an extremely-strong Damped Lyman-{\alpha} Absorber at z=2.226
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures, 2 tables. Submitted to A&A Letters, revised version after referee reports
Submitted: 2019-04-02
Damped Lyman-{\alpha} Absorbers (DLAs) as a class of QSO absorption-line systems are currently our most important source of detailed information on the cosmic chemical evolution of galaxies. However, the degree to which this information is biased by dust remains to be understood. One strategy is to specifically search for QSOs reddened by metal-rich and dusty foreground absorbers. In this Letter we present the discovery of a z=2.60 QSO strongly reddened by dust in an intervening extremely-strong DLA at z=2.226. This QSO was identified through a novel selection combining the astrometric measurements from ESA's Gaia satellite with extent optical and near/mid-infrared photometry. We infer a total neutral atomic-hydrogen column density of log N(HI)=21.95{\pm}0.15 and a lower limit on the gas-phase metallicity of [Zn/H]>-0.96. This DLA is also remarkable in exhibiting shielded neutral gas witnessed in CI and tentative detections of CO molecular bands. The Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of the QSO is well-accounted for by a normal QSO-SED reddened by dust from a DLA with a 10%-of-Solar metallicity, dust extinction of A_V=0.82{\pm}0.02mag, and LMC-like extinction curve including the characteristic 2175{\AA} extinction feature. Such QSO absorption-line systems have shown to be very rare in previous surveys, which have mostly revealed sight-lines with low extinction. The present case therefore suggests that previous samples have under-represented the fraction of dusty absorbers. Building a complete sample of such systems is needed to assess the significance of this effect.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.10455  [pdf] - 1859984
The Stellar-to-Halo Mass Ratios of Passive and Star-Forming Galaxies at z~2-3 from the SMUVS survey
Comments: 17 pages, 9 Figures, 1 Table. Accepted for publication in ApJ. Minor changes to previous version
Submitted: 2019-01-29, last modified: 2019-03-19
In this work, we use measurements of galaxy stellar mass and two-point angular correlation functions to constrain the stellar-to-halo mass ratios (SHMRs) of passive and \np\ galaxies at $z\sim2-3$, as identified in the \emph{Spitzer} Matching Survey of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep Stripes (SMUVS). We adopt a sophisticated halo modeling approach to statistically divide our two populations into central and satellite galaxies. For central galaxies, we find that the normalization of the SHMR is greater for our passive population. Through the modeling of $\Lambda$ cold dark matter halo mass accretion histories, we show that this can only arise if the conversion of baryons into stars was more efficient at higher redshifts and additionally that passive galaxies can be plausibly explained as residing in halos with the highest formation redshifts (i.e., those with the lowest accretion rates) at a given halo mass. At a fixed stellar mass, satellite galaxies occupy host halos with a greater mass than central galaxies, and we find further that the fraction of passive galaxies that are satellites is higher than for the combined population. This, and our derived satellite quenching timescales, combined with earlier estimates from the literature, support dynamical/environmental mechanisms as the dominant process for satellite quenching at $z\lesssim3$.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.06791  [pdf] - 1875178
Highly Luminous Supernovae associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts I.: GRB 111209A/SN 2011kl in the Context of Stripped-Envelope and Superluminous Supernovae
Comments: A&A, in press; v4: updated, text compressed, references removed upon request of the referee; 21 pages: 17 pages article, 2 pages tables
Submitted: 2016-06-21, last modified: 2019-03-08
GRB 111209A, one of the longest Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) ever observed, is linked to SN 2011kl, the most luminous GRB-Supernova (SN) detected so far, which shows evidence for being powered by a magnetar central engine. We place SN 2011kl into the context of large samples of SNe, addressing in more detail the question of whether it could be radioactively powered, and whether it represents an extreme version of a GRB-SN or an underluminous Superluminous SN (SLSN). We model SN 2011kl using SN 1998bw as a template and derive a bolometric light curve including near-infrared data. We compare the properties of SN 2011kl to literature results on stripped-envelope and superluminous supernovae. Comparison in the k,s context, i.e., comparing it to SN 1998bw templates in terms of luminosity and light-curve stretch, clearly shows SN 2011kl is the most luminous GRB-SN to date, and it is spectrally very dissimilar to other events, being significantly bluer/hotter. Although SN 2011kl does not reach the classical luminosity threshold of SLSNe and evolves faster than any of them, it resembles SLSNe more than the classical GRB-associated broad-lined Type Ic SNe in several aspects. GRB 111209A was a very energetic event, both at early (prompt emission) and at very late (SN) times. We have shown in a further publication that with the exception of the extreme duration, the GRB and afterglow parameters are in agreement with the known distributions for these parameters. SN 2011kl, on the other hand, is exceptional both in luminosity and spectral characteristics, indicating that GRB 111209A was likely not powered by a standard-model collapsar central engine, further supporting our earlier conclusions. Instead, it reveals the possibility of a direct link between GRBs and SLSNe.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.00485  [pdf] - 1851729
The host galaxy of GRB 980425 / SN1998bw: a collisional ring galaxy
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. For the definitive version visit 'https://academic.oup.com/mnras'
Submitted: 2019-03-01
We report Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) , Very Large Telescope (VLT) and Spitzer Space Telescope observations of ESO 184$-$G82, the host galaxy of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw, that yield evidence of a companion dwarf galaxy at a projected distance of 13 kpc. The companion, hereafter GALJ193510-524947, is a gas-rich, star-forming galaxy with a star formation rate of $\rm0.004\,M_{\odot}\, yr^{-1}$, a gas mass of $10^{7.1\pm0.1} M_{\odot}$, and a stellar mass of $10^{7.0\pm0.3} M_{\odot}$. The interaction between ESO 184$-$G82 and GALJ193510-524947 is evident from the extended gaseous structure between the two galaxies in the GMRT HI 21 cm map. We find a ring of high column density HI gas, passing through the actively star forming regions of ESO 184$-$G82 and the GRB location. This ring lends support to the picture in which ESO 184$-$G82 is interacting with GALJ193510-524947. The massive stars in GALJ193510-524947 have similar ages to those in star-forming regions in ESO 184$-$G82, also suggesting that the interaction may have triggered star formation in both galaxies. The gas and star formation properties of ESO 184$-$G82 favour a head-on collision with GALJ193510-524947 rather than a classical tidal interaction. We perform state-of-the art simulations of dwarf--dwarf mergers and confirm that the observed properties of ESO 184$-$G82 can be reproduced by collision with a small companion galaxy. This is a very clear case of interaction in a gamma ray burst host galaxy, and of interaction-driven star formation giving rise to a gamma ray burst in a dense environment.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.10777  [pdf] - 1949323
The nature of damped HI absorbers probed by cosmological simulations: satellite accretion and outflows
Comments: 12 pages, 5 figures, submitted to MNRAS 29/01/2019
Submitted: 2019-01-30
We use state-of-the-art cosmological zoom simulations to explore the distribution of neutral gas in and around galaxies that gives rise to high column density \ion{H}{i} \mbox{Ly-$\alpha$} absorption (formally, sub-DLAs and DLAs) in the spectra of background quasars. Previous cosmological hydrodynamic simulations under-predict the mean projected separations $(b)$ of these absorbers relative to the host, and invoke selection effects to bridge the gap with observations. On the other hand, single lines of sight (LOS) in absorption cannot uniquely constrain the galactic origin. Our simulations match all observational data, with DLA and sub-DLA LOS existing over the entire probed parameter space ($-4\lesssim $[M/H]$\lesssim 0.5$, $b<50$ kpc) at all redshifts ($z\sim 0.4 - 3.0$). We demonstrate how the existence of DLA LOS at $b\gtrsim 20-30$ kpc from a massive host galaxy require high numerical resolution, and that these LOS are associated with dwarf satellites in the main halo, stripped metal-rich gas and outflows. Separating the galaxy into interstellar ("\ion{H}{i} disc") and circumgalactic ("halo") components, we find that both components significantly contribute to damped \ion{H}{i} absorption LOS. Above the sub-DLA (DLA) limits, the disc and halo contribute with $\sim 60 (80)$ and $\sim 40 (20)$ per cent, respectively. Our simulations confirm analytical model-predictions of the DLA-distribution at $z\lesssim 1$. At high redshift ($z\sim 2-3$) sub-DLA and DLAs occupy similar spatial scales, but on average separate by a factor of two by $z\sim 0.5$. On whether sub-DLA and DLA LOS sample different stellar-mass galaxies, such a correlation can be driven by a differential covering-fraction of sub-DLA to DLA LOS with stellar mass. This preferentially selects sub-DLA LOS in more massive galaxies in the low-$z$ universe.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.05500  [pdf] - 1838347
Signatures of a jet cocoon in early spectra of a supernova associated with a $\gamma$-ray burst
Comments: 30 pages, 11 figures, 4 tables. Original author manuscript version of a Letter published in Nature journal. Full article available at https://goo.gl/7y9ZeM
Submitted: 2019-01-16
Long gamma-ray bursts mark the death of massive stars, as revealed by their association with energetic broad-lined stripped-envelope supernovae. The scarcity of nearby events and the brightness of the GRB afterglow, dominating the first days of emission, have so far prevented the study of the very early stages of the GRB-SN evolution. Here we present detailed, multi-epoch spectroscopic observations of SN 2017iuk, associated with GRB 171205A which display features at extremely high expansion velocities of $\sim$ 100,000 km s$^{-1}$ within the first day after the burst. These high-velocity components are characterized by chemical abundances different from those observed in the ejecta of SN 2017iuk at later times. Using spectral synthesis models developed for the SN 2017iuk, we explain these early features as originating not from the supernova ejecta, but from a hot cocoon generated by the energy injection of a mildly-relativistic GRB jet expanding into the medium surrounding the progenitor star. This cocoon becomes rapidly transparent and is outshone by the supernova emission which starts dominating three days after the burst. These results proves that the jet plays an important role not only in powering the GRB event but also its associated supernova.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.12483  [pdf] - 1818790
Broad absorption line disappearance/emergence in multiple ions in a weak emission-line quasar
Comments: Published in 2019 ApJL, 870, 2
Submitted: 2018-11-29, last modified: 2019-01-16
We report the discovery of disappearance of Mg ii, Al iii, C iv, and Si iv broad absorption lines (BALs) at the same velocity, accompanied by a new Civ BAL emerging at a higher velocity, in the quasar J0827+4252 at z = 2.038. This is the first report of BAL disappearance (i) over Mg ii, Al iii, C iv, and Si iv ions and (ii) in a weak emission-line quasar (WLQ). The discovery is based on four spectra from the SDSS and one follow-up spectrum from HET/LRS2. The simultaneous Civ BAL disappearance and emergence at different velocities, together with no variations in the CRTS light curve, indicate that ionization changes in the absorbing material are unlikely to cause the observed BAL variability. Our analyses reveal that transverse motion is the most likely dominant driver of the BAL disappearance/emergence. Given the presence of mildly relativistic BAL outflows and an apparently large C iv emission-line blueshift that is likely associated with strong bulk outflows in this WLQ, J0827+4252 provides a notable opportunity to study extreme quasar winds and their potential in expelling material from inner to large-scale regions.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.07401  [pdf] - 1800133
Son of X--Shooter: a multi--band instrument for a multi--band universe
Comments: 23 pages, 10 Figures, accepted to be published in Frontier Research in Astrophysics 2018 Conference proceedings in Proceeding of Science. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1807.08828
Submitted: 2018-12-17
Son Of X-Shooter (SOXS) will be a new instrument designed to be mounted at the Nasmyth--A focus of the ESO 3.5 m New Technology Telescope in La Silla site (Chile). SOXS is composed of two high-efficiency spectrographs with a resolution slit product 4500, working in the visible (350 -- 850 nm) and NIR (800 -- 2000 nm) range respectively, and a light imager in the visible (the acquisition camera usable also for scientific purposes). The science case is very broad, it ranges from moving minor bodies in the solar system, to bursting young stellar objects, cataclysmic variables and X-ray binary transients in our Galaxy, supernovae and tidal disruption events in the local Universe, up to gamma-ray bursts in the very distant and young Universe, basically encompassing all distance scales and astronomy branches. At the moment, the instrument passed the Preliminary Design Review by ESO (July 2017) and the Final Design (with FDR in July 2018).
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.04639  [pdf] - 1830557
The Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint. III. The South Galactic Cap Sample and the Quasar Luminosity Function at Cosmic Noon
Comments: 30 pages, 11 figures, ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2018-12-11
We have designed the Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS) to provide a highly complete census of unobscured UV-bright quasars during the cosmic noon, $z=2.8-5.0$. Here we report the discovery of 70 new quasars in the ELQS South Galactic Cap (ELQS-S) quasar sample, doubling the number of known extremely luminous quasars in $4,237.3\,\rm{deg}^2$ of the SDSS footprint. These observations conclude the ELQS and we present the properties of the full ELQS quasar catalog, containing 407 quasars over $11,838.5\,\rm{deg}^2$. Our novel ELQS quasar selection strategy resulted in unprecedented completeness at the bright end and allowed us to discover 109 new quasars in total. This marks an increase of $\sim36\%$ (109/298) to the known population at these redshifts and magnitudes, while we further are able to retain a selection efficiency of $\sim80\%$. On the basis of 166 quasars from the full ELQS quasar catalog, who adhere to the uniform criteria of the 2MASS point source catalog, we measure the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) and extend it one magnitude brighter than previous studies. Assuming a single power law with exponential density evolution for the functional form of the QLF, we retrieve the best fit parameters from a maximum likelihood analysis. We find a steep bright-end slope of $\beta\approx-4.1$ and we can constrain the bright-end slope to $\beta\leq-3.4$ with $99\%$ confidence. The density is well modeled by the exponential redshift evolution, resulting in a moderate decrease with redshift ($\gamma\approx-0.4$).
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.07934  [pdf] - 1838251
The intergalactic magnetic field probed by a giant radio galaxy
Comments: 12 pages, 6 figures, 3 tables. This paper is part of the LOFAR surveys data release 1 and has been accepted for publication in a special edition of A&A that will appear in Feb 2019, volume 622. The catalogues and images from the data release will be publicly available on lofar-surveys.org upon publication of the journal
Submitted: 2018-11-19
Cosmological simulations predict that an intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) pervades the large scale structure (LSS) of the Universe. Measuring the IGMF is important to determine its origin (i.e. primordial or otherwise). Using data from the LOFAR Two Metre Sky Survey (LoTSS), we present the Faraday rotation measure (RM) and depolarisation properties of the giant radio galaxy J1235+5317, at a redshift of $z = 0.34$ and 3.38 Mpc in size. We find a mean RM difference between the lobes of $2.5\pm0.1$ rad/m$^2$ , in addition to small scale RM variations of ~0.1 rad/m$^2$ . From a catalogue of LSS filaments based on optical spectroscopic observations in the local universe, we find an excess of filaments intersecting the line of sight to only one of the lobes. Associating the entire RM difference to these LSS filaments leads to a gas density-weighted IGMF strength of ~0.3 {\mu}G. However, direct comparison with cosmological simulations of the RM contribution from LSS filaments gives a low probability (~5%) for an RM contribution as large as 2.5 rad/m$^2$ , for the case of IGMF strengths of 10 to 50 nG. It is likely that variations in the RM from the Milky Way (on 11' scales) contribute significantly to the mean RM difference, and a denser RM grid is required to better constrain this contribution. In general, this work demonstrates the potential of the LOFAR telescope to probe the weak signature of the IGMF. Future studies, with thousands of sources with high accuracy RMs from LoTSS, will enable more stringent constraints on the nature of the IGMF.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.11064  [pdf] - 1806143
Cold gas in the early Universe. Survey for neutral atomic-carbon in GRB host galaxies at 1 < z < 6 from optical afterglow spectroscopy
Comments: Accepted in A&A. 14 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-25
We present a survey for neutral atomic-carbon (CI) along gamma-ray burst (GRB) sightlines, which probes the shielded neutral gas-phase in the interstellar medium (ISM) of GRB host galaxies at high redshift. We compile a sample of 29 medium- to high-resolution GRB optical afterglow spectra spanning a redshift range through most of cosmic time from $1 < z < 6$. We find that seven ($\approx 25\%$) of the GRBs entering our statistical sample have CI detected in absorption. It is evident that there is a strong excess of cold gas in GRB hosts compared to absorbers in quasar sightlines. We investigate the dust properties of the GRB CI absorbers and find that the amount of neutral carbon is positively correlated with the visual extinction, $A_V$, and the strength of the 2175 \AA\ dust extinction feature, $A_{\mathrm{bump}}$. GRBs with CI detected in absorption are all observed above a certain threshold of $\log N$(HI)$/\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$ + [X/H] > 20.7 and a dust-phase iron column density of $\log N$(Fe)$_{\mathrm{dust}}/\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$ > 16.2. In contrast to the SED-derived dust properties, the strength of the CI absorption does not correlate with the depletion-derived dust properties. This indicates that the GRB CI absorbers trace dusty systems where the dust composition is dominated by carbon-rich dust grains. The observed higher metal and dust column densities of the GRB CI absorbers compared to H$_2$- and CI-bearing quasar absorbers is mainly a consequence of how the two absorber populations are selected, but is also required in the presence of intense UV radiation fields in actively star-forming galaxies.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.06403  [pdf] - 1853567
Evidence for diffuse molecular gas and dust in the hearts of gamma-ray burst host galaxies
Comments: 45 pages, 39 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-15
Here we built up a sample of 22 GRBs at redshifts $z > 2$ observed with X-shooter to determine the abundances of hydrogen, metals, dust, and molecular species. This allows us to study the metallicity and dust depletion effects in the neutral ISM at high redshift and to answer the question whether (and why) there might be a lack of H$_2$ in GRB-DLAs. We fit absorption lines and measure the column densities of different metal species as well as atomic and molecular hydrogen. The derived relative abundances are used to fit dust depletion sequences and determine the dust-to-metals ratio and the host-galaxy intrinsic visual extinction. There is no lack of H$_2$-bearing GRB-DLAs. We detect absorption lines from H$_2$ in 6 out of 22 GRB afterglow spectra, with molecular fractions ranging between $f\simeq 5\cdot10^{-5}$ and $f\simeq 0.04$, and claim tentative detections in three other cases. The GRB-DLAs in the present sample have on average low metallicities ($\mathrm{[X/H]}\approx -1.3$), comparable to the rare population of QSO-ESDLAs (log N(HI) $> 21.5$). H$_2$-bearing GRB-DLAs are found to be associated with significant dust extinction, $A_V > 0.1$ mag, and have dust-to-metals ratios DTM$ > 0.4$. All of these systems exhibit column densities of log N(HI) $> 21.7$. The overall fraction of H$_2$ detections is $\ge 27$% (41% including tentative detections), which is three times larger than in the general population of QSO-DLAs. For $2<z<4$, and for log N(HI) $> 21.7$, the H$_2$ detection fraction is 60-80% in GRB-DLAs as well as in extremely strong QSO-DLAs. This is likely a consequence of the fact that both GRB- and QSO-DLAs with high N(HI) probe sight-lines with small impact parameters that indicate that the absorbing gas is associated with the inner regions of the absorbing galaxy, where the gas pressure is higher and the conversion of HI to H$_2$ takes place.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.05380  [pdf] - 1771730
Mass function and dynamical study of the open clusters Berkeley 24 and Czernik 27
Comments: 16 pages including 8 tables. 22 figures. Accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-10-12
We present a $UBVI$ photometric study of the open clusters Berkeley 24 (Be 24) and Czernik 27 (Cz 27). The radii of the clusters are determined as 2\farcm7 and 2\farcm3 for Be 24 and Cz 27, respectively. We use the Gaia Data Release 2 (GDR2) catalogue to estimate the mean proper motions for the clusters. We found the mean proper motion of Be 24 as $0.35\pm0.06$ mas yr$^{-1}$ and $1.20\pm0.08$ mas yr$^{-1}$ in right ascension and declination for Be 24 and $-0.52\pm0.05$ mas yr$^{-1}$ and $-1.30\pm0.05$ mas yr$^{-1}$ for Cz 27. We used probable cluster members selected from proper motion data for the estimation of fundamental parameters. We infer reddenings $E(B-V)$ = $0.45\pm0.05$ mag and $0.15\pm0.05$ mag for the two clusters. Analysis of extinction curves towards the two clusters show that both have normal interstellar extinction laws in the optical as well as in the near-IR band. From the ultraviolet excess measurement, we derive metallicities of [Fe/H]= $-0.025\pm0.01$ dex and $-0.042\pm0.01$ dex for the clusters Be 24 and Cz 27, respectively. The distances, as determined from main sequence fitting, are $4.4\pm0.5$ kpc and $5.6\pm0.2$ kpc. The comparison of observed CMDs with $Z=0.01$ isochrones, leads to an age of $2.0\pm0.2$ Gyr and $0.6\pm0.1$ Gyr for Be 24 and Cz 27, respectively. In addition to this, we have also studied the mass function and dynamical state of these two clusters for the first time using probable cluster members. The mass function is derived after including the corrections for data incompleteness and field star contamination. Our analysis shows that both clusters are now dynamically relaxed
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.02669  [pdf] - 1753218
The optical afterglow of the short gamma-ray burst associated with GW170817
Comments: Includes MCMC fitting
Submitted: 2018-01-08, last modified: 2018-09-19
The binary neutron star merger GW170817 was the first multi-messenger event observed in both gravitational and electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic signal began approximately 2 seconds post-merger with a weak, short burst of gamma-rays, which was followed over the next hours and days by the ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared emission from a radioactively- powered kilonova. Later, non-thermal rising X-ray and radio emission was observed. The low luminosity of the gamma-rays and the rising non-thermal flux from the source at late times could indicate that we are outside the opening angle of the beamed relativistic jet. Alternatively, the emission could be arising from a cocoon of material formed from the interaction between a jet and the merger ejecta. Here we present late-time optical detections and deep near-infrared limits on the emission from GW170817 at 110 days post-merger. Our new observations are at odds with expectations of late-time emission from kilonova models, being too bright and blue. Instead, the emission arises from the interaction between the relativistic ejecta of GW170817 and the interstellar medium. We show that this emission matches the expectations of a Gaussian structured relativistic jet, which would have launched a high luminosity short GRB to an aligned observer. However, other jet structure or cocoon models can also match current data - the future evolution of the afterglow will directly distinguish the origin of the emission.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01522  [pdf] - 1745539
MITS: the Multi-Imaging Transient Spectrograph for SOXS
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-09-05
The Son Of X-Shooter (SOXS) is a medium resolution spectrograph R~4500 proposed for the ESO 3.6 m NTT. We present the optical design of the UV-VIS arm of SOXS which employs high efficiency ion-etched gratings used in first order (m=1) as the main dispersers. The spectral band is split into four channels which are directed to individual gratings, and imaged simultaneously by a single three-element catadioptric camera. The expected throughput of our design is >60% including contingency. The SOXS collaboration expects first light in early 2021. This paper is one of several papers presented in these proceedings describing the full SOXS instrument.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01526  [pdf] - 1745540
The Acquisition Camera System for SOXS at NTT
Comments: 9 pages, 7 figures, SPIE conference
Submitted: 2018-09-05
SOXS (Son of X-Shooter) will be the new medium resolution (R$\sim$4500 for a 1 arcsec slit), high-efficiency, wide band spectrograph for the ESO-NTT telescope on La Silla. It will be able to cover simultaneously optical and NIR bands (350-2000nm) using two different arms and a pre-slit Common Path feeding system. SOXS will provide an unique facility to follow up any kind of transient event with the best possible response time in addition to high efficiency and availability. Furthermore, a Calibration Unit and an Acquisition Camera System with all the necessary relay optics will be connected to the Common Path sub-system. The Acquisition Camera, working in optical regime, will be primarily focused on target acquisition and secondary guiding, but will also provide an imaging mode for scientific photometry. In this work we give an overview of the Acquisition Camera System for SOXS with all the different functionalities. The optical and mechanical design of the system are also presented together with the preliminary performances in terms of optical quality, throughput, magnitude limits and photometric properties.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01528  [pdf] - 1745541
SOXS Control Electronics Design
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, to be publised in SPIE Proceedings 10707-90
Submitted: 2018-09-05
SOXS (Son Of X-Shooter) is a unique spectroscopic facility that will operate at the ESO New Technology Telescope (NTT) in La Silla from 2020 onward. The spectrograph will be able to cover simultaneously the UV-VIS and NIR bands exploiting two different arms and a Common Path feeding system. We present the design of the SOXS instrument control electronics. The electronics controls all the movements, alarms, cabinet temperatures, and electric interlocks of the instrument. We describe the main design concept. We decided to follow the ESO electronic design guidelines to minimize project time and risks and to simplify system maintenance. The design envisages Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) industrial components (e.g. Beckhoff PLC and EtherCAT fieldbus modules) to obtain a modular design and to increase the overall reliability and maintainability. Preassembled industrial motorized stages are adopted allowing for high precision assembly standards and a high reliability. The electronics is kept off-board whenever possible to reduce thermal issues and instrument weight and to increase the accessibility for maintenance purpose. The instrument project went through the Preliminary Design Review in 2017 and is currently in Final Design Phase (with FDR in July 2018). This paper outlines the status of the work and is part of a series of contributions describing the SOXS design and properties after the instrument Preliminary Design Review.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01565  [pdf] - 1745545
Architecture of the SOXS instrument control software
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2018-09-05
SOXS (Son Of X-Shooter) is a new spectrograph for the ESO NTT telescope, currently in the final design phase. The main instrument goal is to allow the characterization of transient sources based on alerts. It will cover from near-infrared to visible bands with a spectral resolution of $R \sim 4500$ using two separate, wavelength-optimized spectrographs. A visible camera, primarily intended for target acquisition and secondary guiding, will also provide a scientific "light" imaging mode. In this paper we present the current status of the design of the SOXS instrument control software, which is in charge of controlling all instrument functions and detectors, coordinating the execution of exposures, and implementing all observation, calibration and maintenance procedures. Given the extensive experience of the SOXS consortium in the development of instruments for the VLT, we decided to base the design of the Control System on the same standards, both for hardware and software control. We illustrate the control network, the instrument functions and detectors to be controlled, the overall design of SOXS Instrument Software (INS) and its main components. Then, we provide details about the control software for the most SOXS-specific features: control of the COTS-based imaging camera, the flexures compensation system and secondary guiding.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01570  [pdf] - 1745546
The VIS detector system of SOXS
Comments: 9 pages, 13 figures, to be published in SPIE Proceedings 10702
Submitted: 2018-09-05
SOXS will be a unique spectroscopic facility for the ESO NTT telescope able to cover the optical and NIR bands thanks to two different arms: the UV-VIS (350-850 nm), and the NIR (800-1800 nm). In this article, we describe the design of the visible camera cryostat and the architecture of the acquisition system. The UV-VIS detector system is based on a e2v CCD 44-82, a custom detector head coupled with the ESO continuous ow cryostats (CFC) cooling system and the NGC CCD controller developed by ESO. This paper outlines the status of the system and describes the design of the different parts that made up the UV-VIS arm and is accompanied by a series of contributions describing the SOXS design solutions.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01589  [pdf] - 1745548
The mechanical design of SOXS for the NTT
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-09-05
SOXS (Son of X-shooter) is a wide band, medium resolution spectrograph for the ESO NTT with a first light expected in 2021. The instrument will be composed by five semi-independent subsystems: a pre-slit Common Path, an Acquisition Camera, a Calibration Box, the NIR spectrograph, and the UV-VIS spectrograph. In this paper, we present the mechanical design of the subsystems, the kinematic mounts developed to simplify the final integration procedure and the maintenance. The concept of the CP and NIR optomechanical mounts developed for a simple pre-alignment procedure and for the thermal compensation of reflective and refractive elements will be shown.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01511  [pdf] - 1745536
The NIR Spectrograph for the new SOXS instrument at the NTT
Comments: SPIE Conference, Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation
Submitted: 2018-09-05
We present the NIR spectrograph of the Son Of XShooter (SOXS) instrument for the ESO-NTT telescope at La Silla (Chile). SOXS is a R~4,500 mean resolution spectrograph, with a simultaneously coverage from about 0.35 to 2.00 {\mu}m. It will be mounted at the Nasmyth focus of the NTT. The two UV-VIS-NIR wavelength ranges will be covered by two separated arms. The NIR spectrograph is a fully cryogenic echelle-dispersed spectrograph, working in the range 0.80-2.00 {\mu}m, equipped with an Hawaii H2RG IR array from Teledyne, working at 40 K. The spectrograph will be cooled down to about 150 K, to lower the thermal background, and equipped with a thermal filter to block any thermal radiation above 2.0 {\mu}m. In this poster we will show the main characteristics of the instrument along with the expected performances at the telescope.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01521  [pdf] - 1745538
Optical design of the SOXS spectrograph for ESO NTT
Comments: 9 pages, 9 figures, published in SPIE Proceedings 10702
Submitted: 2018-09-05
An overview of the optical design for the SOXS spectrograph is presented. SOXS (Son Of X-Shooter) is the new wideband, medium resolution (R>4500) spectrograph for the ESO 3.58m NTT telescope expected to start observations in 2021 at La Silla. The spectroscopic capabilities of SOXS are assured by two different arms. The UV-VIS (350-850 nm) arm is based on a novel concept that adopts the use of 4 ion-etched high efficiency transmission gratings. The NIR (800- 2000 nm) arm adopts the '4C' design (Collimator Correction of Camera Chromatism) successfully applied in X-Shooter. Other optical sub-systems are the imaging Acquisition Camera, the Calibration Unit and a pre-slit Common Path. We describe the optical design of the five sub-systems and report their performance in terms of spectral format, throughput and optical quality. This work is part of a series of contributions describing the SOXS design and properties as it is about to face the Final Design Review.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01519  [pdf] - 1745537
The assembly integration and test activities for the new SOXS instrument at NTT
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2018-09-05
Son Of X-Shooter (SOXS) is the new instrument for the ESO 3.5 m New Technology Telescope (NTT) in La Silla site (Chile) devised for the spectroscopic follow-up of transient sources. SOXS is composed by two medium resolution spectrographs able to cover the 350-2000 nm interval. An Acquisition Camera will provide a light imaging capability in the visible band. We present the procedure foreseen for the Assembly, Integration and Test activities (AIT) of SOXS that will be carried out at sub-systems level at various consortium partner premises and at system level both in Europe and Chile.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01053  [pdf] - 1789495
Dissecting cold gas in a high-redshift galaxy using a lensed background quasar
Comments: 12 pages + 5 pages of appendix. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2018-09-04
We present a study of cold gas absorption from a damped Lyman-$\alpha$ absorber (DLA) at redshift $z_{\rm abs}=1.946$ towards two lensed images of the quasar J144254.78+405535.5 at redshift $z_{\rm QSO} = 2.590$. The physical separation of the two lines of sight at the absorber redshift is $d_{\rm abs}=0.7$~kpc based on our lens model. We observe absorption lines from neutral carbon and H$_2$ along both lines of sight indicating that cold gas is present on scales larger than $d_{\rm abs}$. We measure column densities of HI to be $\log N(\rm H\,\i) = 20.27\pm0.02$ and $20.34\pm0.05$ and of H$_2$ to be $\log N(\rm H_2) = 19.7\pm0.1$ and $19.9\pm0.2$. The metallicity inferred from sulphur is consistent with Solar metallicity for both sightlines: $[{\rm S/H}]_A = 0.0\pm0.1$ and $[{\rm S/H}]_B = -0.1\pm0.1$. Based on the excitation of low rotational levels of H$_2$, we constrain the temperature of the cold gas phase to be $T=109\pm20$ and $T=89\pm25$ K for the two lines of sight. From the relative excitation of fine-structure levels of CI, we constrain the hydrogen volumetric densities in the range of $40-110$ cm$^{-3}$. Based on the ratio of observed column density and volumetric density, we infer the average individual `cloud' size along the line of sight to be $l\approx0.1$ pc. Using the transverse line-of-sight separation of 0.7 kpc together with the individual cloud size, we are able to put an upper limit to the volume filling factor of cold gas of $f_{\rm vol} < 0.2$ %. Nonetheless, the projected covering fraction of cold gas must be large (close to unity) over scales of a few kpc in order to explain the presence of cold gas in both lines of sight. Compared to the typical extent of DLAs (~10-30 kpc), this is consistent with the relative incidence rate of CI absorbers and DLAs.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.09228  [pdf] - 1748012
Infrared molecular hydrogen lines in GRB host galaxies
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2018-08-28
Molecular species, most frequently H_2, are present in a small, but growing, number of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra at redshifts z~2-3, detected through their rest-frame UV absorption lines. In rare cases, lines of vibrationally excited states of H_2 can be detected in the same spectra. The connection between afterglow line-of-sight absorption properties of molecular (and atomic) gas, and the observed behaviour in emission of similar sources at low redshift, is an important test of the suitability of GRB afterglows as general probes of conditions in star formation regions at high redshift. Recently, emission lines of carbon monoxide have been detected in a small sample of GRB host galaxies, at sub-mm wavelengths, but no searches for H_2 in emission have been reported yet. In this paper we perform an exploratory search for rest-frame K band rotation-vibrational transitions of H_2 in emission, observable only in the lowest redshift GRB hosts (z<0.22). Searching the data of four host galaxies, we detect a single significant rotation-vibrational H_2 line candidate, in the host of GRB 031203. Re-analysis of Spitzer mid-infrared spectra of the same GRB host gives a single low significance rotational line candidate. The (limits on) line flux ratios are consistent with those of blue compact dwarf galaxies in the literature. New instrumentation, in particular on the JWST and the ELT, can facilitate a major increase in our understanding of the H_2 properties of nearby GRB hosts, and the relation to H_2 absorption in GRBs at higher redshift.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.04281  [pdf] - 1799862
The luminous host galaxy, faint supernova and rapid afterglow rebrightening of GRB 100418A
Comments: 23 pages, 14 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2018-07-11, last modified: 2018-08-23
Long gamma-ray bursts give us the chance to study both their extreme physics and the star-forming galaxies in which they form. GRB 100418A, at a z = 0.6239, had a bright optical and radio afterglow, and a luminous star-forming host galaxy. This allowed us to study the radiation of the explosion as well as the interstellar medium of the host both in absorption and emission. We collected photometric data from radio to X-ray wavelengths to study the evolution of the afterglow and the contribution of a possible supernova and three X-shooter spectra obtained during the first 60 hr. The light curve shows a very fast optical rebrightening, with an amplitude of 3 magnitudes, starting 2.4 hr after the GRB onset. This cannot be explained by a standard external shock model and requires other contributions, such as late central-engine activity. Two weeks after the burst we detect an excess in the light curve consistent with a SN with peak absolute magnitude M_V = -18.5 mag, among the faintest GRB-SNe detected to date. The host galaxy shows two components in emission, with velocities differing by 130 km s^-1, but otherwise having similar properties. While some absorption and emission components coincide, the absorbing gas spans much higher velocities, indicating the presence of gas beyond the star-forming regions. The host has a star-formation rate of 12.2 M_sol yr^-1, a metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.55 and a mass of 1.6x10^9 M_sol. GRB 100418A is a member of a class of afterglow light curves which show a steep rebrightening in the optical during the first day, which cannot be explained by traditional models. Its very faint associated SN shows that GRB-SNe can have a larger dispersion in luminosities than previously seen. Furthermore, we have obtained a complete view of the host of GRB 100418A owing to its spectrum, which contains a remarkable number of both emission and absorption lines.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.07393  [pdf] - 1795728
X-shooter and ALMA spectroscopy of GRB 161023A - A study of metals and molecules in the line of sight towards a luminous GRB
Comments: 28 pages, 19 pages main text, 9 pages appendix; accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2018-06-19, last modified: 2018-08-23
Long gamma-ray bursts are produced during the dramatic deaths of massive stars with very short lifetimes, meaning that they explode close to the birth place of their progenitors. During a short period they become the most luminous objects observable in the Universe, being perfect beacons to study high-redshift star-forming regions. To use the afterglow of GRB 161023A at a redshift $z=2.710$ as a background source to study the environment of the explosion and the intervening systems along its line-of-sight. r the first time, we complement UV/Optical/NIR spectroscopy with millimetre spectroscopy using ALMA, which allows us to probe the molecular content of the host galaxy. The X-shooter spectrum shows a plethora of absorption features including fine-structure and metastable transitions of Fe, Ni, Si, C and O. We present photometry ranging from 43 s to over 500 days after the burst. We infer a host-galaxy metallicity of [Zn/H] $=-1.11\pm0.07$, which corrected for dust depletion results in [X/H] $=-0.94\pm0.08$. We do not detect molecular features in the ALMA data, but we derive limits on the molecular content of $log(N_{CO}/cm^{-2})<15.7$ and $log(N_{HCO+}/cm^{-2})<13.2$, which are consistent with those that we obtain from the optical spectra, $log(N_{H_2}/cm^{-2})<15.2$ and $log(N_{CO}/cm^{-2})<14.5$. Within the host galaxy we detect three velocity systems through UV/Optical/NIR absorption spectroscopy, all with levels that were excited by the GRB afterglow. We determine the distance from these systems to the GRB to be in the range between 0.7 and 1.0 kpc. The sight-line to GRB 161023A shows 9 independent intervening systems, most of them with multiple components. (Abridged)
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.03905  [pdf] - 1751729
The Spitzer Matching Survey of the UltraVISTA Ultra-deep Stripes (SMUVS): the Evolution of Dusty and Non-Dusty Galaxies with Stellar Mass at z=2-6
Comments: Final version accepted for publication at the ApJ. Several test results and corresponding figures added. No conclusions changed. 27 pages, 20 figures
Submitted: 2017-12-11, last modified: 2018-08-12
The Spitzer Matching Survey of the UltraVISTA Ultra-deep Stripes (SMUVS) has obtained the largest ultra-deep Spitzer maps to date in a single field of the sky. We considered the sample of about 66,000 SMUVS sources at $z=2-6$ to investigate the evolution of dusty and non-dusty galaxies with stellar mass through the analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). We further divide our non-dusty galaxy sample with rest-frame optical colours to isolate red quiescent (`passive') galaxies. At each redshift, we identify a characteristic stellar mass in the GSMF above which dusty galaxies dominate, or are at least as important as non-dusty galaxies. Below that stellar mass, non-dusty galaxies comprise about 80% of all sources, at all redshifts except at $z=4-5$. The percentage of dusty galaxies at $z=4-5$ is unusually high: 30-40% for $M_{*}=10^9 - 10^{10.5} \, \rm M_\odot$ and $>80\%$ at $M_*>10^{11} \, \rm M_\odot$, which indicates that dust obscuration is of major importance in this cosmic period. The overall percentage of massive ($\log_{10} (M_*/M_\odot)>10.6$) galaxies that are quiescent increases with decreasing redshift, reaching $>30\%$ at $z\sim2$. Instead, the quiescent percentage among intermediate-mass galaxies (with $\log_{10} (M_*/M_\odot)=9.7-10.6$) stays roughly constant at a $\sim 10\%$ level. Our results indicate that massive and intermediate-mass galaxies clearly have different evolutionary paths in the young Universe, and are consistent with the scenario of galaxy downsizing.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.02710  [pdf] - 1830433
Four GRB-Supernovae at Redshifts between 0.4 and 0.8
Comments: submitted to Astron. Astroph., revised version
Submitted: 2018-08-08
Twenty years ago, GRB 980425/SN 1998bw revealed that long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are physically associated with broad-lined type Ic supernovae. Since then more than 1000 long GRBs have been localized to high angular precision, but only in about 50 cases the underlying supernova (SN) component was identified. Using the multi-channel imager GROND (Gamma-Ray Burst Optical Near-Infrared Detector) at ESO/La Silla, during the last ten years we have devoted a substantial amount of observing time to reveal and to study SN components in long-GRB afterglows. Here we report on four more GRB-SNe (associated with GRBs 071112C, 111228A, 120714B, and 130831A) which were discovered and/or followed-up with GROND and whose redshifts lie between z=0.4 and 0.8. We study their afterglow light curves, follow the associated SN bumps over several weeks, and characterize their host galaxies. Using SN 1998bw as a template, the derived SN explosion parameters are fully consistent with the corresponding properties of the so-far known GRB-SN ensemble, with no evidence for an evolution of their properties as a function of redshift. In two cases (GRB 120714B/SN 2012eb at z=0.398 and GRB 130831A/SN 2013fu at z=0.479) additional Very Large Telescope (VLT) spectroscopy of the associated SNe revealed a photospheric expansion velocity at maximum light of about 40 000 and 20 000 km/s, respectively. For GRB 120714B, which was an intermediate-luminosity burst, we find additional evidence for a blackbody component in the light of the optical transient at early times, similar to what has been detected in some GRB-SNe at lower redshifts.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.02660  [pdf] - 1739864
Spitzer Matching survey of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep Stripes (SMUVS): Full-mission IRAC Mosaics and Catalogs
Comments: Accepted for publication by ApJS. The main text has been expanded and some figures have been updated in response to the referee's comments. Except for additions to error flag descriptors, the catalogs and the conclusions are unchanged from previous versions
Submitted: 2018-01-08, last modified: 2018-07-24
This paper describes new deep 3.6 and 4.5 micron imaging of three UltraVISTA near-infrared survey stripes within the COSMOS field. The observations were carried out with Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) for the Spitzer Matching Survey of the Ultra-VISTA Deep Stripes (SMUVS). In this work we present our data reduction techniques, and document the resulting mosaics, coverage maps, and catalogs in both IRAC passbands for the three easternmost UltraVISTA survey stripes, covering a combined area of about 0.66 square degrees, of which 0.45 square degrees have at least 20 hr integration time. SMUVS reaches point-source sensitivities of about 25.0 AB mag at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns with a significance of 4-sigma accounting for both survey sensitivity and source confusion. To this limit the SMUVS catalogs contain a total of about 350,000 sources, each of which is detected significantly in at least one IRAC band. Because of its uniform and high sensitivity, relatively large area coverage, and the wide array of ancillary data available in COSMOS, the SMUVS survey will be useful for a large number of cosmological investigations. We will make all images and catalogues described herein publicly available via the Spitzer Science Center.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.08828  [pdf] - 1762126
SOXS: a wide band spectrograph to follow up transients
Comments: 12 pages, 14 figures, to be published in SPIE Proceedings 10702
Submitted: 2018-07-23
SOXS (Son Of X-Shooter) will be a spectrograph for the ESO NTT telescope capable to cover the optical and NIR bands, based on the heritage of the X-Shooter at the ESO-VLT. SOXS will be built and run by an international consortium, carrying out rapid and longer term Target of Opportunity requests on a variety of astronomical objects. SOXS will observe all kind of transient and variable sources from different surveys. These will be a mixture of fast alerts (e.g. gamma-ray bursts, gravitational waves, neutrino events), mid-term alerts (e.g. supernovae, X-ray transients), fixed time events (e.g. close-by passage of minor bodies). While the focus is on transients and variables, still there is a wide range of other astrophysical targets and science topics that will benefit from SOXS. The design foresees a spectrograph with a Resolution-Slit product ~ 4500, capable of simultaneously observing over the entire band the complete spectral range from the U- to the H-band. The limiting magnitude of R~20 (1 hr at S/N~10) is suited to study transients identified from on-going imaging surveys. Light imaging capabilities in the optical band (grizy) are also envisaged to allow for multi-band photometry of the faintest transients. This paper outlines the status of the project, now in Final Design Phase.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.03597  [pdf] - 1720318
X-shooting GRBs at high redshift: probing dust production history
Comments: 13 pages, 5 figures, 2 tables, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2018-07-10
Evolved asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are important contributors to the elements that form dust in the interstellar medium of galaxies, in particular, carbon and iron. However, they require at least a Gyr to start producing these elements, therefore, a change in dust quantity or properties may appear at high redshifts. In this work, we use extinction of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows as a tool to look for variations in dust properties at z>3. We use a spectroscopically selected sample of GRB afterglows observed with the VLT/X-shooter instrument to determine extinction curves out to high redshifts. We present ten new z>3 X-shooter GRBs of which six are dusty. Combining these with individual extinction curves of three previously known z>3 GRBs, we find an average extinction curve consistent with the SMC-Bar. A comparison with spectroscopically selected GRBs at all redshifts indicates a drop in visual extinction (A_V) at z>3.5 with no moderate or high extinction bursts. We check for observational bias using template spectra and find that GRBs up to z~8 are detectable with X-shooter up to A_V~0.3 mag. Although other biases are noted, a uniformly low dust content above z>3.5 indicates a real drop, suggesting a transition in dust properties and/or available dust building blocks. The remarkable increase in dust content at z<3.5 could arise due to carbon and possibly iron production by the first carbon-rich AGB and Type Ia SNe, respectively. Alternatively, z>3.5 dust drop could be the result of low stellar masses of GRB host galaxies.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.01755  [pdf] - 1771593
Stellar masses, metallicity gradients and suppressed star formation revealed in a new sample of absorption selected galaxies
Comments: 20 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in A&A 03/07/2018
Submitted: 2018-07-04
Context. Absorbing galaxies are selected via the detection of characteristic absorption lines which their gas-rich media imprint in the spectra of distant light-beacons. The proximity of the typically faint foreground absorbing galaxies to bright background sources makes it challenging to robustly identify these in emission, and hence to characterise their relation to the general galaxy population. Aims. We search for emission to confirm and characterise ten galaxies hosting damped, metal-rich quasar absorbers at redshift z < 1. Methods. We identify the absorbing galaxies by matching spectroscopic absorption -and emission redshifts and from projected separations. Combining emission-line diagnostics with existing absorption spectroscopy and photometry of quasar-fields hosting metal-rich, damped absorbers, we compare our new detections with reference samples and place them on scaling relations. Results. We spectroscopically confirm seven galaxies harbouring damped absorbers (a 70% success-rate). Our results conform to the emerging picture that neutral gas on scales of tens of kpc in galaxies is what causes the characteristic Hi absorption. Our key results are: (I) Absorbing galaxies with $\log _{10} [M_\star ~(M_\odot)] \gtrsim 10$ have star formation rates that are lower than predicted for the main sequence of star formation. (II) The distribution of impact parameter with Hi column density and with absorption-metallicity for absorbing galaxies at $z\sim 2-3$ extends to $z\sim 0.7$ and to lower Hi column densities. (III) A robust mean metallicity gradient of $\langle \Gamma \rangle = 0.022 \pm 0.001~[dex~kpc^{-1}]$. (IV) By correcting absorption metallicities for $\langle \Gamma \rangle$ and imposing a truncation-radius at $12~\mathrm{kpc}$, absorbing galaxies fall on top of predicted mass-metallicity relations, with a statistically significant decrease in scatter.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.07827  [pdf] - 1779566
Molecular gas and star formation in an absorption-selected galaxy: Hitting the bull's eye at z = 2.46
Comments: accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2018-06-20, last modified: 2018-06-21
We present the detection analysis of a diffuse molecular cloud at z$_{abs}$=2.4636 towards the quasar SDSS J1513+0352(z$_{em}\,\simeq$ 2.68) observed with the X-shooter spectrograph(VLT). We measure very high column densities of atomic and molecular hydrogen, with log N(HI,H$_2$)$\simeq$21.8,21.3. This is the highest H$_2$ column density ever measured in an intervening damped Lyman-alpha system but we do not detect CO, implying log N(CO)/N(H$_2$) < -7.8, which could be due to a low metallicity of the cloud. From the metal absorption lines, we derive the metallicity to be Z $\simeq$ 0.15 Z$_{\odot}$ and determine the amount of dust by measuring the induced extinction of the background quasar light, A$_V$ $\simeq$ 0.4. We also detect Ly-$\alpha$ emission at the same redshift, with a centroid located at a most probable impact parameter of only $\rho\,\simeq$ 1.4 kpc. We argue that the line of sight is therefore likely passing through the ISM of a galaxy as opposed to the CGM. The relation between the surface density of gas and that of star formation seems to follow the global empirical relation derived in the nearby Universe although our constraints on the star formation rate and on the galaxy extent remain too loose to be conclusive. We study the transition from atomic to molecular hydrogen using a theoretical description based on the microphysics of molecular hydrogen. We use the derived chemical properties of the cloud and physical conditions (T$_k\,\simeq$90 K and n$\simeq$250 cm$^{-3}$ derived through the excitation of H$_2$ rotational levels and neutral carbon fine structure transitions to constrain the fundamental parameters that govern this transition. By comparing the theoretical and observed HI column densities, we are able to bring an independent constraint on the incident UV flux, which we find to be in agreement with that estimated from the observed star formation rate.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.07392  [pdf] - 1912678
Chasing Lyman alpha-emitting galaxies at z = 8.8
Comments: Submitted to A&A, comments are welcome
Submitted: 2018-06-19
With a total integration time of 168 hours and a narrowband (NB) filter tuned to Lyman alpha at z = 8.8, the UltraVISTA survey has set out to find some of the most distant galaxies, on the verge of the Epoch of Reionization. Previous calculations of the expected number of detected Lya-emitting galaxies (LAEs) at this redshift did not explicitly take into account the radiative transfer (RT) of Lya. In this work we combine a theoretical model for the halo mass function with numerical results from high-res cosmological hydrosimulations with LyC+Lya RT, assessing the visibility of LAEs residing in these halos. Uncertainties such as cosmic variance and the anisotropic escape of Lya are taken into account, and it is predicted that once the survey has finished, the probabilities of detecting none, one, or more than one are ~90%, ~10%, and ~1%; a significantly smaller success rate compared to earlier predictions, due to the combined effect of a highly neutral IGM scattering Lya to such large distances from the galaxy that they fall outside the observational aperture, and to the actual depth of the survey being less than predicted. Because the IGM affects NB and broadband (BB) magnitudes differently, we argue for a relaxed color selection criterion of NB - BB ~ +0.85. But since the flux is continuum-dominated, even if a galaxy is detectable in the NB its probability of being selected as a NB excess object is <~35%. Various properties of galaxies at this redshift are predicted, e.g. UV and Lya LFs, M*-Mh relation, spectral shape, optimal aperture, and the anisotropic escape of Lya through both a dusty ISM and a partly neutral IGM. Finally, we describe and publish a fast numerical code for adding numbers with asymmetric uncertainties ("x_{-sigma_1}^{+sigma_2}") proving to be significantly better than the standard, but wrong, way of adding upper and lower uncertainties in quadrature separately.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.00293  [pdf] - 1705341
The 2175 \AA\ extinction feature in the optical afterglow spectrum of GRB 180325A at z=2.25
Comments: 10 pages, 3 figures, 3 tables, Table 1 is in the journal electronic version, accepted for ApJL
Submitted: 2018-06-01, last modified: 2018-06-18
The UV extinction feature at 2175 \AA\ is ubiquitously observed in the Galaxy but is rarely detected at high redshifts. Here we report the spectroscopic detection of the 2175 \AA\ bump on the sightline to the \gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow GRB 180325A at z=2.2486, the only unambiguous detection over the past ten years of GRB follow-up, at four different epochs with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and the Very Large Telescope (VLT)/X-shooter. Additional photometric observations of the afterglow are obtained with the Gamma-Ray burst Optical and Near-Infrared Detector (GROND). We construct the near-infrared to X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) at four spectroscopic epochs. The SEDs are well-described by a single power-law and an extinction law with R_V~4.4, A_V~1.5, and the 2175 \AA\ extinction feature. The bump strength and extinction curve are shallower than the average Galactic extinction curve. We determine a metallicity of [Zn/H]>-0.98 from the VLT/X-shooter spectrum. We detect strong neutral carbon associated with the GRB with an equivalent width of Wr(\lambda 1656) = 0.85+/-0.05. We also detect optical emission lines from the host galaxy. Based on the H\alpha emission line flux, the derived dust-corrected star-formation rate is ~46+/-4 M_sun/yr and the predicted stellar mass is log M*/M_sun~9.3+/-0.4, suggesting the host galaxy is amongst the main-sequence star-forming galaxies.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.01715  [pdf] - 1705346
ALMA observations of a metal-rich damped Ly{\alpha} absorber at z = 2.5832: evidence for strong galactic winds in a galaxy group
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-06-05
We report on the results of a search for CO(3-2) emission from the galaxy counterpart of a high-metallicity Damped Ly-alpha Absorber (DLA) at z=2.5832 towards the quasar Q0918+1636. We do not detect CO emission from the previously identified DLA galaxy counterpart. The limit we infer on M_gas / M_star is in the low end of the range found for DLA galaxies, but is still consistent with what is found for other star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. Instead we detect CO(3-2) emission from another intensely star-forming galaxy at an impact parameter of 117 kpc from the line-of-sight to the quasar and 131 km s^-1 redshifted relative to the velocity centroid of the DLA in the quasar spectrum. In the velocity profile of the low- and high-ionisation absorption lines of the DLA there is an absorption component consistent with the redshift of this CO-emitting galaxy. It is plausible that this component is physically associated with a strong outflow in the plane of the sky from the CO-emitting galaxy. If true, this would be further evidence, in addition to what is already known from studies of Lyman-break galaxies, that galactic outflows can be traced beyond 100 kpc from star-forming galaxies. The case of this z=2.583 structure is an illustration of this in a group environment.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.01296  [pdf] - 1698271
Highly-ionized metals as probes of the circumburst gas in the natal regions of gamma-ray bursts
Comments: 13 pages, 8 figures + Appendix. Accepted in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-06-04
We present here a survey of high-ionization absorption lines in the afterglow spectra of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) obtained with the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph. Our main goal is to investigate the circumburst medium in the natal regions of GRBs. Our primary focus is on the NV 1238,1242 line transitions, but we also discuss other high-ionization lines such as OVI, CIV and SiIV. We find no correlation between the column density of NV and the neutral gas properties such as metallicity, HI column density and dust depletion, however the relative velocity of NV, typically a blueshift with respect to the neutral gas, is found to be correlated with the column density of HI. This may be explained if the NV gas is part of an HII region hosting the GRB, where the region's expansion is confined by dense, neutral gas in the GRB's host galaxy. We find tentative evidence (at 2-sigma significance) that the X-ray derived column density, N_H,X, may be correlated with the column density of NV, which would indicate that both measurements are sensitive to the column density of the gas located in the vicinity of the GRB. We investigate the scenario where NV (and also OVI) is produced by recombination after the corresponding atoms have been stripped entirely of their electrons by the initial prompt emission, in contrast to previous models where highly-ionized gas is produced by photoionization from the GRB afterglow.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.06928  [pdf] - 1747803
The second closest gamma-ray burst: sub-luminous GRB 111005A with no supernova in a super-solar metallicity environment
Comments: Accepted by A&A. 17 pages, 16 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2016-10-21, last modified: 2018-05-28
We report the detection of the radio afterglow of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 111005A at 5-345 GHz, including the very long baseline interferometry observations with the positional error of 0.2 mas. The afterglow position is coincident with the disk of a galaxy ESO 580-49 at z= 0.01326 (~1" from its center), which makes GRB 111005A the second closest GRB known to date, after GRB 980425. The radio afterglow of GRB 111005A was an order of magnitude less luminous than those of local low-luminosity GRBs, and obviously than those of cosmological GRBs. The radio flux was approximately constant and then experienced an unusually rapid decay a month after the GRB explosion. Similarly to only two other GRBs, we did not find the associated supernovae (SN), despite deep near- and mid-infrared observations 1-9 days after the GRB explosion, reaching ~20 times fainter than other SNe associated with GRBs. Moreover, we measured twice solar metallicity for the GRB location. The low gamma-ray and radio luminosities, rapid decay, lack of a SN, and super-solar metallicity suggest that GRB 111005A represents a different rare class of GRBs than typical core-collapse events. We modelled the spectral energy distribution of the GRB 111005A host finding that it is a dwarf, moderately star-forming galaxy, similar to the host of GRB 980425. The existence of two local GRBs in such galaxies is still consistent with the hypothesis that the GRB rate is proportional to the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) density, but suggests that the GRB rate is biased towards low SFRs. Using the far-infrared detection of ESO 580-49, we conclude that the hosts of both GRBs 111005A and 980425 exhibit lower dust content than what would be expected from their stellar masses and optical colours.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.07318  [pdf] - 1806016
The fraction of ionizing radiation from massive stars that escapes to the intergalactic medium
Comments: 31 pages
Submitted: 2018-05-18
The part played by stars in the ionization of the intergalactic medium remains an open question. A key issue is the proportion of the stellar ionizing radiation that escapes the galaxies in which it is produced. Spectroscopy of gamma-ray burst afterglows can be used to determine the neutral hydrogen column-density in their host galaxies and hence the opacity to extreme ultra-violet radiation along the lines-of-sight to the bursts. Thus, making the reasonable assumption that long-duration GRB locations are representative of the sites of massive stars that dominate EUV production, one can calculate an average escape fraction of ionizing radiation in a way that is independent of galaxy size, luminosity or underlying spectrum. Here we present a sample of NH measures for 138 GRBs in the range 1.6<z<6.7 and use it to establish an average escape fraction at the Lyman limit of <fesc>~0.005, with a 98% confidence upper limit of ~0.015. This analysis suggests that stars provide a small contribution to the ionizing radiation budget of the IGM at z<5, where the bulk of the bursts lie. At higher redshifts, z>5, firm conclusions are limited by the small size of the GRB sample, but any decline in average HI column-density seems to be modest. We also find no indication of a significant correlation of NH with galaxy UV luminosity or host stellar mass, for the subset of events for which these are available. We discuss in some detail a number of selection effects and potential biases. Drawing on a range of evidence we argue that such effects, while not negligible, are unlikely to produce systematic errors of more than a factor ~2, and so would not affect the primary conclusions. Given that many GRB hosts are low metallicity, high specific star-formation rate, dwarf galaxies, these results present a particular problem for the hypothesis that such galaxies dominated the reionization of the universe.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.07016  [pdf] - 1689831
VLT/X-shooter GRBs: Individual extinction curves of star-forming regions
Comments: 4 Figures, 2 Tables, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2018-05-17
The extinction profiles in Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) afterglow spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are usually described by the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)-type extinction curve. In different empirical extinction laws, the total-to-selective extinction, RV, is an important quantity because of its relation to dust grain sizes and compositions. We here analyse a sample of 17 GRBs (0.34<z<7.84) where the ultraviolet to near-infrared spectroscopic observations are available through the VLT/X-shooter instrument, giving us an opportunity to fit individual extinction curves of GRBs for the first time. Our sample is compiled on the basis that multi-band photometry is available around the X-shooter observations. The X-shooter data are combined with the Swift X-ray data and a single or broken power-law together with a parametric extinction law is used to model the individual SEDs. We find 10 cases with significant dust, where the derived extinction, AV, ranges from 0.1-1.0mag. In four of those, the inferred extinction curves are consistent with the SMC curve. The GRB individual extinction curves have a flat RV distribution with an optimal weighted combined value of RV = 2.61+/-0.08 (for seven broad coverage cases). The 'average GRB extinction curve' is similar to, but slightly steeper than the typical SMC, and consistent with the SMC Bar extinction curve at ~95% confidence level. The resultant steeper extinction curves imply populations of small grains, where large dust grains may be destroyed due to GRB activity. Another possibility could be that young age and/or lower metallicities of GRBs environments are responsible for the steeper curves.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.07414  [pdf] - 1709385
The VANDELS ESO public spectroscopic survey
Comments: 19 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-03-20, last modified: 2018-05-14
VANDELS is a uniquely-deep spectroscopic survey of high-redshift galaxies with the VIMOS spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). The survey has obtained ultra-deep optical (0.48 < lambda < 1.0 micron) spectroscopy of ~2100 galaxies within the redshift interval 1.0 < z < 7.0, over a total area of ~0.2 sq. degrees centred on the CANDELS UDS and CDFS fields. Based on accurate photometric redshift pre-selection, 85% of the galaxies targeted by VANDELS were selected to be at z>=3. Exploiting the red sensitivity of the refurbished VIMOS spectrograph, the fundamental aim of the survey is to provide the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra necessary to measure key physical properties such as stellar population ages, masses, metallicities and outflow velocities from detailed absorption-line studies. Using integration times calculated to produce an approximately constant signal-to-noise ratio (20 < t_int < 80 hours), the VANDELS survey targeted: a) bright star-forming galaxies at 2.4 < z < 5.5, b) massive quiescent galaxies at 1.0 < z < 2.5, c) fainter star-forming galaxies at 3.0 < z < 7.0 and d) X-ray/Spitzer-selected active galactic nuclei and Herschel-detected galaxies. By targeting two extragalactic survey fields with superb multi-wavelength imaging data, VANDELS will produce a unique legacy data set for exploring the physics underpinning high-redshift galaxy evolution. In this paper we provide an overview of the VANDELS survey designed to support the science exploitation of the first ESO public data release, focusing on the scientific motivation, survey design and target selection.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.03394  [pdf] - 1721105
Unidentified quasars among stationary objects from Gaia DR2
Comments: Submitted to A&A, comments welcome
Submitted: 2018-05-09
We here apply a novel technique selecting quasar candidates purely as sources with zero proper motions in the Gaia data release 2 (DR2). We demonstrate that this approach is highly efficient toward high Galactic latitudes with < 25% contamination from stellar sources. Such a selection technique offers a very pure sample completeness, since all cosmological point sources are selected regardless of their intrinsic spectral properties within the limiting magnitude of Gaia. We carry out a pilot-study by defining a sample compiled by including all Gaia-DR2 sources within one degree of the North Galactic Pole (NGP) selected to have proper motions consistent with zero within 2-sigma uncertainty. By cross-matching the sample to the optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the mid-infrared AllWISE photometric catalogues we investigate the colours of each of our sources. Together with already spectroscopically confirmed quasars we are therefore able to determine the efficiency of our selection. The majority of the zero proper motion sources have optical to mid-infrared colours consistent with known quasars. The remaining population may be contaminating stellar sources, but some may also be quasars with colours similar to stars. Spectroscopic follow-up of the zero proper motion sources is needed to unveil such a hitherto hidden quasar population. This approach has the potential to allow substantial progress on many important questions concerning quasars such as determining the fraction of dust-obscured quasars, the fraction of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, and the metallicity distribution of damped Lyman-$\alpha$ absorbers. The technique could also potentially reveal new types of quasars or even new classes of cosmological point sources.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.00601  [pdf] - 1759244
The Optical/NIR afterglow of GRB 111209A: Complex yet not Unprecedented
Comments: A&A, in press, expanded discussion on energetics, and updated otherwise. 32 pages, 17 pages main paper, 2 pages Appendix, 11 pages data tables. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1606.06791
Submitted: 2017-06-02, last modified: 2018-05-04
Afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are simple in the most basic model, but can show many complex features. The ultra-long duration GRB 111209A, one of the longest GRBs ever detected, also has the best-monitored afterglow in this rare class of GRBs. We want to address the question whether GRB 111209A was a special event beyond its extreme duration alone, and whether it is a classical GRB or another kind of high-energy transient. The afterglow may yield significant clues. We present afterglow photometry obtained in seven bands with the GROND imager as well as in further seven bands with the UVOT telescope on-board the Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory. The light curve is analysed by multi-band modelling and joint fitting with power-laws and broken power-laws, and we use the contemporaneous GROND data to study the evolution of the spectral energy distribution. We compare the optical afterglow to a large ensemble we have analysed in earlier works, and especially to that of another ultra-long event, GRB 130925A. We furthermore undertake a photometric study of the host galaxy. We find a strong, chromatic rebrightening event at approx 0.8 days after the GRB, during which the spectral slope becomes redder. After this, the light curve decays achromatically, with evidence for a break at about 9 days after the trigger. The afterglow luminosity is found to not be exceptional. We find that a double-jet model is able to explain the chromatic rebrightening. The afterglow features have been detected in other events and are not unique. The duration aside, the GRB prompt emission and afterglow parameters of GRB 111209A are in agreement with the known distributions for these parameters. While the central engine of this event may differ from that of classical GRBs, there are multiple lines of evidence pointing to GRB 111209A resulting from the core-collapse of a massive star with a stripped envelope.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.04638  [pdf] - 1697940
The THESEUS space mission concept: science case, design and expected performances
Amati, L.; O'Brien, P.; Goetz, D.; Bozzo, E.; Tenzer, C.; Frontera, F.; Ghirlanda, G.; Labanti, C.; Osborne, J. P.; Stratta, G.; Tanvir, N.; Willingale, R.; Attina, P.; Campana, R.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Contini, C.; Fuschino, F.; Gomboc, A.; Hudec, R.; Orleanski, P.; Renotte, E.; Rodic, T.; Bagoly, Z.; Blain, A.; Callanan, P.; Covino, S.; Ferrara, A.; Floch, E. Le; Marisaldi, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Rosati, P.; Vacchi, A.; D'Avanzo, P.; Giommi, P.; Gomboc, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Piro, L.; Reglero, V.; Rossi, A.; Santangelo, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S.; Vinciguerra, S.; Briggs, M.; Campolongo, E.; Ciolfi, R.; Connaughton, V.; Cordier, B.; Morelli, B.; Orlandini, M.; Adami, C.; Argan, A.; Atteia, J. -L.; Auricchio, N.; Balazs, L.; Baldazzi, G.; Basa, S.; Basak, R.; Bellutti, P.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bertuccio, G.; Braga, J.; Branchesi, M.; Brandt, S.; Brocato, E.; Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Bulgarelli, A.; Burderi, L.; Camp, J.; Capozziello, S.; Caruana, J.; Casella, P.; Cenko, B.; Chardonnet, P.; Ciardi, B.; Colafrancesco, S.; Dainotti, M. G.; D'Elia, V.; De Martino, D.; De Pasquale, M.; Del Monte, E.; Della Valle, M.; Drago, A.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Finelli, F.; Fiorini, M.; Fynbo, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gendre, B.; Ghisellini, G.; Grado, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Hafizi, M.; Hanlon, L.; Hjorth, J.; Izzo, L.; Kiss, L.; Kumar, P.; Kuvvetli, I.; Lavagna, M.; Li, T.; Longo, F.; Lyutikov, M.; Maio, U.; Maiorano, E.; Malcovati, P.; Malesani, D.; Margutti, R.; Martin-Carrillo, A.; Masetti, N.; McBreen, S.; Mignani, R.; Morgante, G.; Mundell, C.; Nargaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Paltani, S.; Panessa, F.; Pareschi, G.; Pe'er, A.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pian, E.; Piedipalumbo, E.; Piran, T.; Rauw, G.; Razzano, M.; Read, A.; Rezzolla, L.; Romano, P.; Ruffini, R.; Savaglio, S.; Sguera, V.; Schady, P.; Skidmore, W.; Song, L.; Stanway, E.; Starling, R.; Topinka, M.; Troja, E.; van Putten, M.; Vanzella, E.; Vercellone, S.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Yonetoku, D.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, B. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S. -N.; Antonelli, A.; Bianco, F.; Boci, S.; Boer, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Boulade, O.; Butler, C.; Campana, S.; Capitanio, F.; Celotti, A.; Chen, Y.; Colpi, M.; Comastri, A.; Cuby, J. -G.; Dadina, M.; De Luca, A.; Dong, Y. -W.; Ettori, S.; Gandhi, P.; Geza, E.; Greiner, J.; Guiriec, S.; Harms, J.; Hernanz, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Hutchinson, I.; Israel, G.; Jonker, P.; Kaneko, Y.; Kawai, N.; Wiersema, K.; Korpela, S.; Lebrun, V.; Lu, F.; MacFadyen, A.; Malaguti, G.; Maraschi, L.; Melandri, A.; Modjaz, M.; Morris, D.; Omodei, N.; Paizis, A.; Pata, P.; Petrosian, V.; Rachevski, A.; Rhoads, J.; Ryde, F.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; Shigehiro, N.; Sims, M.; Soomin, J.; Szecsi, D.; Urata, Y.; Uslenghi, M.; Valenziano, L.; Vianello, G.; Vojtech, S.; Watson, D.; Zicha, J.
Comments: Accepted for publication in Advances in Space Research. Partly based on the proposal submitted on October 2016 in response to the ESA Call for next M5 mission, with expanded and updated science sections
Submitted: 2017-10-12, last modified: 2018-03-27
THESEUS is a space mission concept aimed at exploiting Gamma-Ray Bursts for investigating the early Universe and at providing a substantial advancement of multi-messenger and time-domain astrophysics. These goals will be achieved through a unique combination of instruments allowing GRB and X-ray transient detection over a broad field of view (more than 1sr) with 0.5-1 arcmin localization, an energy band extending from several MeV down to 0.3 keV and high sensitivity to transient sources in the soft X-ray domain, as well as on-board prompt (few minutes) follow-up with a 0.7 m class IR telescope with both imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. THESEUS will be perfectly suited for addressing the main open issues in cosmology such as, e.g., star formation rate and metallicity evolution of the inter-stellar and intra-galactic medium up to redshift $\sim$10, signatures of Pop III stars, sources and physics of re-ionization, and the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In addition, it will provide unprecedented capability to monitor the X-ray variable sky, thus detecting, localizing, and identifying the electromagnetic counterparts to sources of gravitational radiation, which may be routinely detected in the late '20s / early '30s by next generation facilities like aLIGO/ aVirgo, eLISA, KAGRA, and Einstein Telescope. THESEUS will also provide powerful synergies with the next generation of multi-wavelength observatories (e.g., LSST, ELT, SKA, CTA, ATHENA).
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.09805  [pdf] - 1721054
A quasar hiding behind two dusty absorbers. Quantifying the selection bias of metal-rich, damped Lyman-alpha absorption systems
Comments: 14 pages, 8 figures. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2018-03-26
The cosmic chemical enrichment as measured from damped Ly$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) will be underestimated if dusty and metal-rich absorbers have evaded identification. Here we report the discovery and present the spectroscopic observations of a quasar, KV-RQ\,1500-0031, at $z=2.520$ reddened by a likely dusty DLA at $z=2.428$ and a strong MgII absorber at $z=1.603$. This quasar was identified as part of the KiDS-VIKING Red Quasar (KV-RQ) survey, specifically aimed at targeting dusty absorbers which may cause the background quasars to escape the optical selection of e.g. the SDSS quasar survey. For the DLA we find an HI column density of $\log N$(HI) = $21.2\pm 0.1$ and a metallicity of [X/H] = $-0.90\pm 0.20$ derived from an empirical relation based on the equivalent width of SiII$\lambda$1526. We observe a total visual extinction of $A_V=0.16$ mag induced by both absorbers. We compile a sample of 17 additional dusty ($A_V > 0.1$ mag) DLAs toward quasars (QSO-DLAs) from the literature for which we characterize the properties of HI column density, metallicity and dust. From this sample we also estimate a correction factor to the overall DLA metallicity budget. We demonstrate that the dusty QSO-DLAs have high metal column densities ($\log N$(HI) + [X/H]) and are more similar to gamma-ray burst (GRB)-selected DLAs (GRB-DLAs) than regular QSO-DLAs. We evaluate the effect of dust reddening in DLAs as well as illustrate how the induced color excess of the underlying quasars can be significant (up to $\sim 1$ mag in various optical bands), even for low to moderate extinction values ($A_V \lesssim 0.6$ mag). Finally we discuss the direct and indirect implications of a significant dust bias in both QSO- and GRB-DLA samples. [Abridged]
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.07563  [pdf] - 1663401
Massive, Absorption-selected Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures; accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal Letters. Minor changes to match the version in press in ApJL
Submitted: 2018-03-20, last modified: 2018-03-22
The nature of absorption-selected galaxies and their connection to the general galaxy population have been open issues for more than three decades, with little information available on their gas properties. Here we show, using detections of carbon monoxide (CO) emission with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), that five of seven high-metallicity, absorption-selected galaxies at intermediate redshifts, $z \approx 0.5-0.8$, have large molecular gas masses, $M_{\rm Mol} \approx (0.6 - 8.2) \times 10^{10} \: {\rm M}_\odot$ and high molecular gas fractions ($f_{\rm Mol} \equiv \: M_{\rm Mol}/(M_\ast + M_{\rm Mol}) \approx 0.29-0.87)$. Their modest star formation rates (SFRs), $\approx (0.3-9.5) \: {\rm M}_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, then imply long gas depletion timescales, $\approx (3 - 120)$ Gyr. The high-metallicity absorption-selected galaxies at $z \approx 0.5-0.8$ appear distinct from populations of star-forming galaxies at both $z \approx 1.3-2.5$, during the peak of star formation activity in the Universe, and lower redshifts, $z \lesssim 0.05$. Their relatively low SFRs, despite the large molecular gas reservoirs, may indicate a transition in the nature of star formation at intermediate redshifts, $z \approx 0.7$.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.07373  [pdf] - 1747874
The VANDELS ESO public spectroscopic survey: observations and first data release
Comments: Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2018-03-20
This paper describes the observations and the first data release (DR1) of the ESO public spectroscopic survey "VANDELS, a deep VIMOS survey of the CANDELS CDFS and UDS fields". VANDELS' main targets are star-forming galaxies at 2.4<z<5.5 and massive passive galaxies at 1<z<2.5. By adopting a strategy of ultra-long exposure times, from 20 to 80 hours per source, VANDELS is designed to be the deepest ever spectroscopic survey of the high-redshift Universe. Exploiting the red sensitivity of the VIMOS spectrograph, the survey has obtained ultra-deep spectra covering the wavelength 4800-10000 A with sufficient signal-to-noise to investigate the astrophysics of high-redshift galaxy evolution via detailed absorption line studies. The VANDELS-DR1 is the release of all spectra obtained during the first season of observations and includes data for galaxies for which the total (or half of the total) scheduled integration time was completed. The release contains 879 individual objects with a measured redshift and includes fully wavelength and flux-calibrated 1D spectra, the associated error spectra, sky spectra and wavelength-calibrated 2D spectra. We also provide a catalog with the essential galaxy parameters, including spectroscopic redshifts and redshift quality flags. In this paper we present the survey layout and observations, the data reduction and redshift measurement procedure and the general properties of the VANDELS-DR1 sample. We also discuss the spectroscopic redshift distribution, the accuracy of the photometric redshifts and we provide some examples of data products. All VANDELS-DR1 data are publicly available and can be retrieved from the ESO archive. Two further data releases are foreseen in the next 2 years with a final release scheduled for June 2020 which will include improved re-reduction of the entire spectroscopic data set. (abridged)
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.05914  [pdf] - 1661286
Molecular Emission from a Galaxy Associated with a z~2.2 Damped Lyman-alpha Absorber
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in ApJL
Submitted: 2018-03-15
Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array, we have detected CO(3-2) line and far-infrared continuum emission from a galaxy associated with a high-metallicity ([M/H] = -0.27) damped Ly-alpha absorber (DLA) at z =2.19289. The galaxy is located 3.5" away from the quasar sightline, corresponding to a large impact parameter of 30 kpc at the DLA redshift. We use archival Very Large Telescope-SINFONI data to detect Halpha emission from the associated galaxy, and find that the object is dusty, with a dust-corrected star formation rate of 110 +60 -30 Msun/yr. The galaxy's molecular mass is large, Mmol = (1.4 +- 0.2) x 10^11 x (\alpha_CO/4.3) x (0.57/r_31) Msun, supporting the hypothesis that high-metallicity DLAs arise predominantly near massive galaxies. The excellent agreement in redshift between the CO(3-2) line emission and low-ion metal absorption (~40 km/s) disfavors scenarios whereby the gas probed by the DLA shows bulk motion around the galaxy. We use Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope HI 21cm absorption spectroscopy to find that the HI along the DLA sightline must be warm, with a stringent lower limit on the spin temperature of T_s > 1895 x (f/0.93) K. The detection of CI absorption in the DLA, however, also indicates the presence of cold neutral gas. To reconcile these results requires that the cold components in the DLA contribute little to the HI column density, yet contain roughly 50% of the metals of the absorber, underlining the complex multi-phase nature of the gas surrounding high-z galaxies.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.07727  [pdf] - 1846762
The X-shooter GRB afterglow legacy sample (XS-GRB)
Comments: 41 pages, 10 Figures, 4 Tables. Submitted to A&A. Paper and code also available at https://github.com/jselsing/XSGRB-sample-paper
Submitted: 2018-02-21
In this work we present spectra of all $\gamma$-ray burst (GRB) afterglows that have been promptly observed with the X-shooter spectrograph until 31-03-2017. In total, we obtained spectroscopic observations of 103 individual GRBs observed within 48 hours of the GRB trigger. Redshifts have been measured for 97 per cent of these, covering a redshift range from 0.059 to 7.84. Based on a set of observational selection criteria that minimize biases with regards to intrinsic properties of the GRBs, the follow-up effort has been focused on producing a homogeneous sample of 93 afterglow spectra for GRBs discovered by the Swift satellite. We here provide a public release of all the reduced spectra, including continuum estimates and telluric absorption corrections. For completeness, we also provide reductions for the 18 late-time observations of the underlying host galaxies. We provide an assessment of the degree of completeness with respect to the parent GRB population, in terms of the X-ray properties of the bursts in the sample and find that the sample presented here is representative of the full Swift sample. We constrain the fraction of dark bursts to be < 28 per cent and we confirm previous results that higher optical darkness is correlated with increased X-ray absorption. For the 42 bursts for which it is possible, we provide a measurement of the neutral hydrogen column density, increasing the total number of published HI column density measurements by $\sim$ 33 per cent. This dataset provides a unique resource to study the ISM across cosmic time, from the local progenitor surroundings to the intervening universe.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.01292  [pdf] - 1648726
The VANDELS survey: Dust attenuation in star-forming galaxies at $\mathbf{z=3-4}$
Comments: 16 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-12-04, last modified: 2018-02-14
We present the results of a new study of dust attenuation at redshifts $3 < z < 4$ based on a sample of $236$ star-forming galaxies from the VANDELS spectroscopic survey. Motivated by results from the First Billion Years (FiBY) simulation project, we argue that the intrinsic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of star-forming galaxies at these redshifts have a self-similar shape across the mass range $8.2 \leq$ log$(M_{\star}/M_{\odot}) \leq 10.6$ probed by our sample. Using FiBY data, we construct a set of intrinsic SED templates which incorporate both detailed star formation and chemical abundance histories, and a variety of stellar population synthesis (SPS) model assumptions. With this set of intrinsic SEDs, we present a novel approach for directly recovering the shape and normalization of the dust attenuation curve. We find, across all of the intrinsic templates considered, that the average attenuation curve for star-forming galaxies at $z\simeq3.5$ is similar in shape to the commonly-adopted Calzetti starburst law, with an average total-to-selective attenuation ratio of $R_{V}=4.18\pm0.29$. We show that the optical attenuation ($A_V$) versus stellar mass ($M_{\star}$) relation predicted using our method is consistent with recent ALMA observations of galaxies at $2<z<3$ in the \emph{Hubble} \emph{Ultra} \emph{Deep} \emph{Field} (HUDF), as well as empirical $A_V - M_{\star}$ relations predicted by a Calzetti-like law. Our results, combined with other literature data, suggest that the $A_V - M_{\star}$ relation does not evolve over the redshift range $0<z<5$, at least for galaxies with log$(M_{\star}/M_{\odot}) \gtrsim 9.5$. Finally, we present tentative evidence which suggests that the attenuation curve may become steeper at log$(M_{\star}/M_{\odot}) \lesssim 9.0$.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.00482  [pdf] - 1652460
MALS-NOT: Identifying Radio-Bright Quasars for the MeerKAT Absorption Line Survey
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJS. Supplementary figure sets available in the source files
Submitted: 2018-01-30
We present a preparatory spectroscopic survey to identify radio-bright, high-redshift quasars for the MeerKAT Absorption Line Survey (MALS). The candidates have been selected on the basis of a single flux density limit at 1.4 GHz (>200 mJy) together with mid-infrared color criteria from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Through spectroscopic observations using the Nordic Optical Telescope, we identify 72 quasars out of 99 candidates targeted. We measure the spectroscopic redshifts based on characteristic, broad emission lines present in the spectra. Of these 72 quasars, 64 and 48 objects are at sufficiently high redshift (z>0.6 and z>1.4) to be used for the L-band and UHF-band spectroscopic follow-up with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) precursor in South Africa: the MeerKAT.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.03844  [pdf] - 1634234
The Galaxy-Halo Connection for $1.5\lesssim z\lesssim5$ as revealed by the \emph{Spitzer} Matching survey of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep Stripes
Comments: 22 pages (14 pages in main body + appendices). 17 Figures. 3 Tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2017-12-11, last modified: 2018-01-11
The \emph{Spitzer} Matching Survey of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep Stripes (SMUVS) provides unparalleled depth at $3.6$ and $4.5$~$\mu$m over $\sim0.66$~deg$^2$ of the COSMOS field, allowing precise photometric determinations of redshift and stellar mass. From this unique dataset we can connect galaxy samples, selected by stellar mass, to their host dark matter halos for $1.5<z<5.0$, filling in a large hitherto unexplored region of the parameter space. To interpret the observed galaxy clustering we utilize a phenomenological halo model, combined with a novel method to account for uncertainties arising from the use of photometric redshifts. We find that the satellite fraction decreases with increasing redshift and that the clustering amplitude (e.g., comoving correlation length / large-scale bias) displays monotonic trends with redshift and stellar mass. Applying $\Lambda$CDM halo mass accretion histories and cumulative abundance arguments for the evolution of stellar mass content we propose pathways for the coevolution of dark matter and stellar mass assembly. Additionally, we are able to estimate that the halo mass at which the ratio of stellar to halo mass is maximized is $10^{12.5_{-0.08}^{+0.10}}$~M$_{\odot}$ at $z\sim2.5$. This peak halo mass is here inferred for the first time from stellar mass-selected clustering measurements at $z\gtrsim2$, and implies mild evolution of this quantity for $z\lesssim3$, consistent with constraints from abundance-matching techniques.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.02706  [pdf] - 1608597
The luminous, massive and solar metallicity galaxy hosting the Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 160804A at z = 0.737
Comments: 12 pages, 8 figures; Accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-11-07
We here present the spectroscopic follow-up observations with VLT/X-shooter of the Swift long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 160804A at z = 0.737. Typically, GRBs are found in low-mass, metal-poor galaxies which constitute the sub-luminous population of star-forming galaxies. For the host galaxy of the GRB presented here we derive a stellar mass of $\log(M_*/M_{\odot}) = 9.80\pm 0.07$, a roughly solar metallicity (12+log(O/H) = $8.74\pm 0.12$) based on emission line diagnostics, and an infrared luminosity of $M_{3.6/(1+z)} = -21.94$ mag, but find it to be dust-poor ($E(B-V) < 0.05$ mag). This establishes the galaxy hosting GRB 160804A as one of the most luminous, massive and metal-rich GRB hosts at z < 1.5. Furthermore, the gas-phase metallicity is found to be representative of the physical conditions of the gas close to the explosion site of the burst. The high metallicity of the host galaxy is also observed in absorption, where we detect several strong FeII transitions as well as MgII and MgI. While host galaxy absorption features are common in GRB afterglow spectra, we detect absorption from strong metal lines directly in the host continuum (at a time when the afterglow was contributing to < 15%). Finally, we discuss the possibility that the geometry and state of the absorbing and emitting gas is indicative of a galactic scale outflow expelled at the final stage of two merging galaxies.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.05847  [pdf] - 1598226
ALMA and GMRT constraints on the off-axis gamma-ray burst 170817A from the binary neutron star merger GW170817
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letter. 12 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2017-10-16, last modified: 2017-11-02
Binary neutron-star mergers (BNSMs) are among the most readily detectable gravitational-wave (GW) sources with LIGO. They are also thought to produce short $\gamma$-ray bursts (SGRBs), and kilonovae that are powered by r-process nuclei. Detecting these phenomena simultaneously would provide an unprecedented view of the physics during and after the merger of two compact objects. Such a Rosetta Stone event was detected by LIGO/Virgo on 17 August 2017 at a distance of $\sim 44$ Mpc. We monitored the position of the BNSM with ALMA at 338.5 GHz and GMRT at 1.4 GHz, from 1.4 to 44 days after the merger. Our observations rule out any afterglow more luminous than $3\times 10^{26}~{\rm erg\,s}^{-1}\,{\rm Hz}^{-1}$ in these bands, probing $>$2--4 dex fainter than previous SGRB limits. We match these limits, in conjunction with public data announcing the appearance of X-ray and radio emission in the weeks after the GW event, to templates of off-axis afterglows. Our broadband modeling suggests that GW170817 was accompanied by a SGRB and that the GRB jet, powered by $E_{\rm AG,\,iso}\sim10^{50}$~erg, had a half-opening angle of $\sim20^\circ$, and was misaligned by $\sim41^\circ$ from our line of sight. The data are also consistent with a more collimated jet: $E_{\rm AG,\,iso}\sim10^{51}$~erg, $\theta_{1/2,\,\rm jet}\sim5^\circ$, $\theta_{\rm obs}\sim17^\circ$. This is the most conclusive detection of an off-axis GRB afterglow and the first associated with a BNSM-GW event to date. Assuming a uniform top-hat jet, we use the viewing angle estimates to infer the initial bulk Lorentz factor and true energy release of the burst.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.00407  [pdf] - 1590598
ALMA + VLT observations of a Damped Lyman-{\alpha} absorbing galaxy: Massive, wide CO emission, gas-rich but with very low SFR
Comments: Accepted (on All Hallows' Eve 2017) for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-11-01
We are undertaking an ALMA survey of molecular gas in galaxies selected for their strong HI absorption, so-called DLA/sub-DLA galaxies. Here we report CO(2-1) detection from a DLA galaxy at z = 0.716. We also present optical and near-infrared spectra of the galaxy revealing [OII], H{\alpha} and [NII] emission lines shifted by ~170 km/s relative to the DLA, and providing an oxygen abundance 3.2 times solar, similar to the absorption metallicity. We report low unobscured SFR ~1 Msun/yr given the large reservoir of molecular gas, and also modest obscured SFR=4.5(+4.4,-2.6) Msun/yr based on far-IR and sub-mm data. We determine mass components of the galaxy: log[M*/Msun] = 10.80(+0.07,-0.14), log[M mol-gas/Msun] = 10.37 +/-0.04, and log[M dust/Msun] = 8.45(+0.10,-0.30). Surprisingly, this HI absorption-selected galaxy has no equivalent objects in CO surveys of flux-selected samples. The galaxy falls off current scaling relations for the SFR to molecular gas mass and CO Tully-Fisher relation. Detailed comparison of kinematical components of the absorbing, ionized and molecular gas, combined with their spatial distribution, suggests that part of the CO gas is both kinematically and spatially de-coupled from the main galaxy. It is thus possible that a major star burst in the past could explain the wide CO profile as well as the low SFR. Support for this also comes from the SED favouring an instantaneous burst of age ~0.5 Gyr. Our survey will establish whether flux-selected surveys of molecular gas are missing a key stage in the evolution of galaxies and their conversion of gas to stars.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.04613  [pdf] - 1608383
HST imaging of the brightest z~8-9 galaxies from UltraVISTA: the extreme bright end of the UV luminosity function
Comments: Resubmitting after addressing the referee's comments. Appendix B includes the additional 3 sources from Labbe+2017, used for the LF estimate
Submitted: 2017-06-14, last modified: 2017-10-16
We report on the discovery of three especially bright candidate $z_{phot} \gtrsim 8$ galaxies. Five sources were targeted for follow-up with HST/WFC3, selected from a larger sample of 16 bright ($24.8 \lesssim H\lesssim25.5$~mag) candidate $z\gtrsim 8$ LBGs identified over the 1.6 degrees$^2$ of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. These were identified as Y and J dropouts by leveraging the deep (Y-to-$K_{S} \sim 25.3-24.8$~mag, $5\sigma$) NIR data from the UltraVISTA DR3 release, deep ground based optical imaging from the CFHTLS and Subaru Suprime Cam programs and Spitzer/IRAC mosaics combining observations from the SMUVS and SPLASH programs. Through the refined spectral energy distributions, which now also include new HyperSuprime Cam g, r, i, z and Y band data, we confirm that 3/5 galaxies have robust $z_{phot}\sim8.0-8.7$, consistent with the initial selection. The remaining 2/5 galaxies have a nominal $z_{phot}\sim2$. However, if we use the HST data alone, these objects have increased probability of being at $z\sim9$. Furthermore, we measure mean UV continuum slopes $\beta=-1.91\pm0.26$ for the three $z\sim8-9$ galaxies, marginally bluer than similarly luminous $z\sim4-6$ in CANDELS but consistent with previous measurements of similarly luminous galaxies at $z\sim7$. The circularized effective radius for our brightest source is $0.9\pm0.2$ kpc, similar to previous measurements for a bright $z\sim11$ galaxy and bright $z\sim7$ galaxies. Finally, enlarging our sample to include the six brightest $z\sim8$ LBGs identified over UltraVISTA (i.e., including three other sources from Labbe et al. 2017, in prep.) we estimate for the first time the volume density of galaxies at the extreme bright ($M_{UV}\sim-22$~mag) end of the $z\sim8$ UV LF. Despite this exceptional result, the still large statistical uncertainties do not allow us to discriminate between a Schechter and a double power-law form.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.05444  [pdf] - 1589762
The environment of the binary neutron star merger GW170817
Comments: ApJL in press, 13 pages
Submitted: 2017-10-16
We present Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra imaging, combined with Very Large Telescope MUSE integral field spectroscopy of the counterpart and host galaxy of the first binary neutron star merger detected via gravitational wave emission by LIGO & Virgo, GW170817. The host galaxy, NGC 4993, is an S0 galaxy at z=0.009783. There is evidence for large, face-on spiral shells in continuum imaging, and edge-on spiral features visible in nebular emission lines. This suggests that NGC 4993 has undergone a relatively recent (<1 Gyr) ``dry'' merger. This merger may provide the fuel for a weak active nucleus seen in Chandra imaging. At the location of the counterpart, HST imaging implies there is no globular or young stellar cluster, with a limit of a few thousand solar masses for any young system. The population in the vicinity is predominantly old with <1% of any light arising from a population with ages <500 Myr. Both the host galaxy properties and those of the transient location are consistent with the distributions seen for short-duration gamma-ray bursts, although the source position lies well within the effective radius (r_e ~ 3 kpc), providing an r_e-normalized offset that is closer than ~90% of short GRBs. For the long delay time implied by the stellar population, this suggests that the kick velocity was significantly less than the galaxy escape velocity. We do not see any narrow host galaxy interstellar medium features within the counterpart spectrum, implying low extinction, and that the binary may lie in front of the bulk of the host galaxy.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.05455  [pdf] - 1589771
The Emergence of a Lanthanide-Rich Kilonova Following the Merger of Two Neutron Stars
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-10-16
We report the discovery and monitoring of the near-infrared counterpart (AT2017gfo) of a binary neutron-star merger event detected as a gravitational wave source by Advanced LIGO/Virgo (GW170817) and as a short gamma-ray burst by Fermi/GBM and Integral/SPI-ACS (GRB170817A). The evolution of the transient light is consistent with predictions for the behaviour of a "kilonova/macronova", powered by the radioactive decay of massive neutron-rich nuclides created via r-process nucleosynthesis in the neutron-star ejecta. In particular, evidence for this scenario is found from broad features seen in Hubble Space Telescope infrared spectroscopy, similar to those predicted for lanthanide dominated ejecta, and the much slower evolution in the near-infrared Ks-band compared to the optical. This indicates that the late-time light is dominated by high-opacity lanthanide-rich ejecta, suggesting nucleosynthesis to the 3rd r-process peak (atomic masses A~195). This discovery confirms that neutron-star mergers produce kilo-/macronovae and that they are at least a major - if not the dominant - site of rapid neutron capture nucleosynthesis in the universe.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.05835  [pdf] - 1589824
A gravitational-wave standard siren measurement of the Hubble constant
Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. 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R.; Constancio, M.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Datrier, L. E. H.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Álvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Goncharov, B.; González, G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hreibi, A.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y. -M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Liu, X.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Hernandez, I. Magaña; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magaña; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muñiz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steer, D.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; Brand, J. F. J. van den; Broeck, C. Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y. -H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zimmerman, A. B.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Foley, R. J.; Coulter, D. A.; Drout, M. R.; Kasen, D.; Kilpatrick, C. D.; Madore, B. F.; Murguia-Berthier, A.; Pan, Y. -C.; Piro, A. L.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Rest, A.; Rojas-Bravo, C.; Shappee, B. J.; Siebert, M. R.; Simon, J. D.; Ulloa, N.; Annis, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Brout, D.; Scolnic, D.; Diehl, H. T.; Frieman, J.; Berger, E.; Alexander, K. D.; Allam, S.; Balbinot, E.; Blanchard, P.; Butler, R. E.; Chornock, R.; Cook, E. R.; Cowperthwaite, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Durret, F.; Eftekhari, T.; Finley, D. A.; Fong, W.; Fryer, C. L.; García-Bellido, J.; Gill, M. S . S.; Gruendl, R. A.; Hanna, C.; Hartley, W.; Herner, K.; Huterer, D.; Kasen, D.; Kessler, R.; Li, T. S.; Lin, H.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Lourenço, A. C. C.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Matheson, T.; Medina, G. E.; Metzger, B. D.; Muñoz, R. R.; Muir, J.; Nicholl, M.; Nugent, P.; Palmese, A.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Quataert, E.; Sako, M.; Sauseda, M.; Schlegel, D. J.; Secco, L. F.; Smith, N.; Sobreira, F.; Stebbins, A.; Villar, V. A.; Vivas, A. K.; Wester, W.; Williams, P. K. G.; Yanny, B.; Zenteno, A.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Estrada, J.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Kent, S.; Krause, E.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Zhang, Y.; Haislip, J. B.; Kouprianov, V. V.; Reichart, D. E.; Tartaglia, L.; Sand, D. J.; Valenti, S.; Yang, S.; Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Howell, D. Andrew; McCully, Curtis; Poznanski, Dovi; Vasylyev, Sergiy; Tanvir, N. R.; Levan, A. J.; Hjorth, J.; Cano, Z.; Copperwheat, C.; de Ugarte-Postigo, A.; Evans, P. A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; González-Fernández, C.; Greiner, J.; Irwin, M.; Lyman, J.; Mandel, I.; McMahon, R.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Perley, D. A.; Pian, E.; Palazzi, E.; Rol, E.; Rosetti, S.; Rosswog, S.; Rowlinson, A.; Schulze, S.; Steeghs, D. T. H.; Thöne, C. C.; Ulaczyk, K.; Watson, D.; Wiersema, K.; Lipunov, V. M.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Kornilov, V. G.; Tyurina, N .; Balanutsa, P.; Vlasenko, D.; Gorbunov, I.; Podesta, R.; Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O.; Yurkov, V.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.
Comments: 26 pages, 5 figures, Nature in press. For more information see https://dcc.ligo.org/LIGO-P1700296/public
Submitted: 2017-10-16
The detection of GW170817 in both gravitational waves and electromagnetic waves heralds the age of gravitational-wave multi-messenger astronomy. On 17 August 2017 the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors observed GW170817, a strong signal from the merger of a binary neutron-star system. Less than 2 seconds after the merger, a gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A) was detected within a region of the sky consistent with the LIGO-Virgo-derived location of the gravitational-wave source. This sky region was subsequently observed by optical astronomy facilities, resulting in the identification of an optical transient signal within $\sim 10$ arcsec of the galaxy NGC 4993. These multi-messenger observations allow us to use GW170817 as a standard siren, the gravitational-wave analog of an astronomical standard candle, to measure the Hubble constant. This quantity, which represents the local expansion rate of the Universe, sets the overall scale of the Universe and is of fundamental importance to cosmology. Our measurement combines the distance to the source inferred purely from the gravitational-wave signal with the recession velocity inferred from measurements of the redshift using electromagnetic data. This approach does not require any form of cosmic "distance ladder;" the gravitational wave analysis can be used to estimate the luminosity distance out to cosmological scales directly, without the use of intermediate astronomical distance measurements. We determine the Hubble constant to be $70.0^{+12.0}_{-8.0} \, \mathrm{km} \, \mathrm{s}^{-1} \, \mathrm{Mpc}^{-1}$ (maximum a posteriori and 68% credible interval). This is consistent with existing measurements, while being completely independent of them. Additional standard-siren measurements from future gravitational-wave sources will provide precision constraints of this important cosmological parameter.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.05849  [pdf] - 1589837
The unpolarized macronova associated with the gravitational wave event GW170817
Comments: 18 pages, 1 figure, 2 tables, Nature Astronomy, in press
Submitted: 2017-10-16
The merger of two dense stellar remnants including at least one neutron star (NS) is predicted to produce gravitational waves (GWs) and short duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs). In the process, neutron-rich material is ejected from the system and heavy elements are synthesized by r-process nucleosynthesis. The radioactive decay of these heavy elements produces additional transient radiation termed "kilonova" or "macronova". We report the detection of linear optical polarization P = (0.50 +/- 0.07)% at 1.46 days after detection of the GWs from GW170817, a double neutron star merger associated with an optical macronova counterpart and a short GRB. The optical emission from a macronova is expected to be characterized by a blue, rapidly decaying, component and a red, more slowly evolving, component due to material rich of heavy elements, the lanthanides. The polarization measurement was made when the macronova was still in its blue phase, during which there is an important contribution from a lanthanide-free outflow. The low degree of polarization is consistent with intrinsically unpolarized emission scattered by Galactic dust, suggesting a symmetric geometry of the emitting region and low inclination of the merger system. Stringent upper limits to the polarization degree from 2.45 - 9.48 days post-burst are consistent with the lanthanides-rich macronova interpretation.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.05858  [pdf] - 1589846
Spectroscopic identification of r-process nucleosynthesis in a double neutron star merger
Comments: version accepted for publication in Nature. Some minor changes are expected with respect to the journal version
Submitted: 2017-10-16
The merger of two neutron stars is predicted to give rise to three major detectable phenomena: a short burst of gamma-rays, a gravitational wave signal, and a transient optical/near-infrared source powered by the synthesis of large amounts of very heavy elements via rapid neutron capture (the r-process). Such transients, named "macronovae" or "kilonovae", are believed to be centres of production of rare elements such as gold and platinum. The most compelling evidence so far for a kilonova was a very faint near-infrared rebrightening in the afterglow of a short gamma-ray burst at z = 0.356, although findings indicating bluer events have been reported. Here we report the spectral identification and describe the physical properties of a bright kilonova associated with the gravitational wave source GW 170817 and gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A associated with a galaxy at a distance of 40 Mpc from Earth. Using a series of spectra from ground-based observatories covering the wavelength range from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared, we find that the kilonova is characterized by rapidly expanding ejecta with spectral features similar to those predicted by current models. The ejecta is optically thick early on, with a velocity of about 0.2 times light speed, and reaches a radius of about 50 astronomical units in only 1.5 days. As the ejecta expands, broad absorption-like lines appear on the spectral continuum indicating atomic species produced by nucleosynthesis that occurs in the post-merger fast-moving dynamical ejecta and in two slower (0.05 times light speed) wind regions. Comparison with spectral models suggests that the merger ejected 0.03-0.05 solar masses of material, including high-opacity lanthanides.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.01306  [pdf] - 1589228
Near Infrared Variability of obscured and unobscured X-ray selected AGN in the COSMOS field
Comments: 21 pages, 17 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2017-10-03
We present our statistical study of near infrared (NIR) variability of X-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the COSMOS field, using UltraVISTA data. This is the largest sample of AGN light curves in YJHKs bands, making possible to have a global description of the nature of AGN for a large range of redshifts, and for different levels of obscuration. To characterize the variability properties of the sources we computed the Structure Function. Our results show that there is an anti-correlation between the Structure Function $A$ parameter (variability amplitude) and the wavelength of emission, and a weak anti-correlation between $A$ and the bolometric luminosity. We find that Broad Line (BL) AGN have a considerably larger fraction of variable sources than Narrow Line (NL) AGN, and that they have different distributions of the $A$ parameter. We find evidence that suggests that most of the low luminosity variable NL sources correspond to BL AGN, where the host galaxy could be damping the variability signal. For high luminosity variable NL, we propose that they can be examples of "True type II" AGN or BL AGN with limited spectral coverage which results in missing the Broad Line emission. We also find that the fraction of variable sources classified as unobscured in the X-ray is smaller than the fraction of variable sources unobscured in the optical range. We present evidence that this is related to the differences in the origin of the obscuration in the optical and X-ray regimes.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.06574  [pdf] - 1593627
Mass and metallicity scaling relations of high redshift star-forming galaxies selected by GRBs
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-09-19
We present a comprehensive study of the relations between gas kinematics, metallicity, and stellar mass in a sample of 82 GRB-selected galaxies using absorption and emission methods. We find the velocity widths of both emission and absorption profiles to be a proxy of stellar mass. We also investigate the velocity-metallicity correlation and its evolution with redshift and find the correlation derived from emission lines to have a significantly smaller scatter compared to that found using absorption lines. Using 33 GRB hosts with measured stellar mass and metallicitiy, we study the mass-metallicity relation for GRB host galaxies in a stellar mass range of $10^{8.2} M_{\odot}$ to $10^{11.1} M_{\odot}$ and a redshift range of $ z\sim 0.3-3.4$. The GRB-selected galaxies appear to track the mass-metallicity relation of star forming galaxies but with an offset of 0.15 towards lower metallicities. This offset is comparable with the average error-bar on the metallicity measurements of the GRB sample and also the scatter on the MZ relation of the general population. It is hard to decide whether this relatively small offset is due to systematic effects or the intrinsic nature of GRB hosts. We also investigate the possibility of using absorption-line metallicity measurements of GRB hosts to study the mass-metallicity relation at high redshifts. Our analysis shows that the metallicity measurements from absorption methods can significantly differ from emission metallicities and assuming identical measurements from the two methods may result in erroneous conclusions.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.01084  [pdf] - 1602615
Solving the conundrum of intervening strong MgII absorbers towards GRBs and quasars
Comments: 10 pages, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-09-04
Previous studies have shown that the incidence rate of intervening strong MgII absorbers towards GRBs were a factor of 2 - 4 higher than towards quasars. Exploring the similar sized and uniformly selected legacy data sets XQ-100 and XSGRB, each consisting of 100 quasar and 81 GRB afterglow spectra obtained with a single instrument (VLT/X-shooter), we demonstrate that there is no disagreement in the number density of strong MgII absorbers with rest-frame equivalent widths $W_r^{2796} >$ 1 {\AA} towards GRBs and quasars in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 5. With large and similar sample sizes, and path length coverages of $\Delta$z = 57.8 and 254.4 for GRBs and quasars, respectively, the incidences of intervening absorbers are consistent within 1 sigma uncertainty levels at all redshifts. For absorbers at z < 2.3 the incidence towards GRBs is a factor of 1.5$\pm$0.4 higher than the expected number of strong MgII absorbers in SDSS quasar spectra, while for quasar absorbers observed with X-shooter we find an excess factor of 1.4$\pm$0.2 relative to SDSS quasars. Conversely, the incidence rates agree at all redshifts with reported high spectral resolution quasar data, and no excess is found. The only remaining discrepancy in incidences is between SDSS MgII catalogues and high spectral resolution studies. The rest-frame equivalent width distribution also agrees to within 1 sigma uncertainty levels between the GRB and quasar samples. Intervening strong MgII absorbers towards GRBs are therefore neither unusually frequent, nor unusually strong.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.05509  [pdf] - 1582652
The MUSE view of the host galaxy of GRB 100316D
Comments: 19 pages, 17 figures, 6 tables. Updated version after referee comments. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-04-18, last modified: 2017-08-29
The low distance, $z=0.0591$, of GRB 100316D and its association with SN 2010bh represent two important motivations for studying this host galaxy and the GRB's immediate environment with the Integral-Field Spectrographs like VLT/MUSE. Its large field-of-view allows us to create 2D maps of gas metallicity, ionization level, and the star-formation rate distribution maps, as well as to investigate the presence of possible host companions. The host is a late-type dwarf irregular galaxy with multiple star-forming regions and an extended central region with signatures of on-going shock interactions. The GRB site is characterized by the lowest metallicity, the highest star-formation rate and the youngest ($\sim$ 20-30 Myr) stellar population in the galaxy, which suggest a GRB progenitor stellar population with masses up to 20 -- 40 $M_{\odot}$. We note that the GRB site has an offset of $\sim$660pc from the most luminous SF region in the host. The observed SF activity in this galaxy may have been triggered by a relatively recent gravitational encounter between the host and a small undetected ($L_{H\alpha} \leq 10^{36}$ erg/s) companion.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.07371  [pdf] - 1587439
The MeerKAT Absorption Line Survey (MALS)
Comments: 16 pages, 3 figures Accepted for publication, Proceedings of Science, Workshop on "MeerKAT Science: On the Pathway to the SKA", held in Stellenbosch 25-27 May, 2016
Submitted: 2017-08-24
Deep galaxy surveys have revealed that the global star formation rate (SFR) density in the Universe peaks at 1 < z < 2 and sharply declines towards z = 0. But a clear picture of the underlying processes, in particular the evolution of cold atomic (~100 K) and molecular gas phases, that drive such a strong evolution is yet to emerge. MALS is designed to use MeerKAT's L- and UHF-band receivers to carry out the most sensitive (N(HI)>10$^{19}$ cm$^{-2}$) dust-unbiased search of intervening HI 21-cm and OH 18-cm absorption lines at 0 < z < 2. This will provide reliable measurements of the evolution of cold atomic and molecular gas cross-sections of galaxies, and unravel the processes driving the steep evolution in the SFR density. The large sample of HI and OH absorbers obtained from the survey will (i) lead to tightest constraints on the fundamental constants of physics, and (ii) be ideally suited to probe the evolution of magnetic fields in disks of galaxies via Zeeman Splitting or Rotation Measure synthesis. The survey will also provide an unbiased census of HI and OH absorbers, i.e. cold gas associated with powerful AGNs (>10$^{24}$ W Hz$^{-1}$) at 0 < z < 2, and will simultaneously deliver a blind HI and OH emission line survey, and radio continuum survey. Here, we describe the MALS survey design, observing plan and the science issues to be addressed under various science themes.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.06179  [pdf] - 1583529
Star formation in galaxies at z~4-5 from the SMUVS survey: a clear starburst/main-sequence bimodality for Halpha emitters on the SFR-M* plane
Comments: 18 pages, 11 figures, 1 table. Re-submitted to the ApJ, after addressing referee report. Main changes with respect to v1: a new section and a new appendix have been added to investigate further the origin and robustness of the sSFR bimodality. No conclusion changed
Submitted: 2017-05-17, last modified: 2017-08-18
We study a large galaxy sample from the Spitzer Matching Survey of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep Stripes (SMUVS) to search for sources with enhanced 3.6 micron fluxes indicative of strong Halpha emission at z=3.9-4.9. We find that the percentage of "Halpha excess" sources reaches 37-40% for galaxies with stellar masses log10(M*/Msun) ~ 9-10, and decreases to <20% at log10(M*/Msun) ~ 10.7. At higher stellar masses, however, the trend reverses, although this is likely due to AGN contamination. We derive star formation rates (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR) from the inferred Halpha equivalent widths (EW) of our "Halpha excess" galaxies. We show, for the first time, that the "Halpha excess" galaxies clearly have a bimodal distribution on the SFR-M* plane: they lie on the main sequence of star formation (with log10(sSFR/yr^{-1})<-8.05) or in a starburst cloud (with log10(sSFR/yr^{-1}) >-7.60). The latter contains ~15% of all the objects in our sample and accounts for >50% of the cosmic SFR density at z=3.9-4.9, for which we derive a robust lower limit of 0.066 Msun yr^{-1} Mpc^{-3}. Finally, we identify an unusual >50sigma overdensity of z=3.9-4.9 galaxies within a 0.20 x 0.20 sq. arcmin region. We conclude that the SMUVS unique combination of area and depth at mid-IR wavelengths provides an unprecedented level of statistics and dynamic range which are fundamental to reveal new aspects of galaxy evolution in the young Universe.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.07003  [pdf] - 1586236
Witnessing galaxy assembly in an extended z~3 structure
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures. MNRAS in press. Comments are welcome
Submitted: 2017-07-21
We present new observations acquired with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer instrument on the Very Large Telescope in a quasar field that hosts a high column-density damped Ly{\alpha} absorber (DLA) at z~3.25. We detect Ly{\alpha} emission from a nebula at the redshift of the DLA with line luminosity (27+/-1)x1e41 erg/s, which extends over 37+/-1 kpc above a surface brightness limit of 6x1e-19 erg/s/cm2/arcsec2 at a projected distance of 30.5+/-0.5 kpc from the quasar sightline. Two clumps lie inside this nebula, both with Ly{\alpha} rest-frame equivalent width > 50 A and with relative line-of-sight velocities aligned with two main absorption components seen in the DLA spectrum. In addition, we identify a compact galaxy at a projected distance of 19.1+/-0.5 kpc from the quasar sightline. The galaxy spectrum is noisy but consistent with that of a star-forming galaxy at the DLA redshift. We argue that the Ly{\alpha} nebula is ionized by radiation from star formation inside the two clumps, or by radiation from the compact galaxy. In either case, these data imply the presence of a structure with size >>50 kpc inside which galaxies are assembling, a picture consistent with galaxy formation in groups and filaments as predicted by cosmological simulations such as the EAGLE simulations.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.01452  [pdf] - 1732526
The host galaxy of the short GRB111117A at $z = 2.211$: impact on the short GRB redshift distribution and progenitor channels
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, 2 tables. Submitted for publication in A&A. All data, code and calculations related to the paper along with the paper itself are available at https://github.com/jselsing/GRB111117A
Submitted: 2017-07-03
It is notoriously difficult to localize short $\gamma$-ray bursts (sGRBs) and their hosts to measure their redshifts. These measurements, however, are critical to constrain the nature of sGRB progenitors, their redshift distribution and the $r$-process element enrichment history of the universe. Here, we present spectroscopy of the host galaxy of GRB111117A and measure its redshift to be $z = 2.211$. This makes GRB111117A the most distant high-confidence short duration GRB detected to date. Our spectroscopic redshift supersedes a lower, previously estimated photometric redshift value for this burst. We use the spectroscopic redshift, as well as new imaging data to constrain the nature of the host galaxy and the physical parameters of the GRB. The rest-frame X-ray derived hydrogen column density, for example, is the highest compared to a complete sample of sGRBs and seems to follow the evolution with redshift as traced by the hosts of long GRBs (lGRBs). The host lies in the brighter end of the expected sGRB host brightness distribution at $z = 2.211$, and is actively forming stars. Using the host as a benchmark for redshift determination, we find that between 43 and 71 per cent of all sGRB redshifts should be missed due to host faintness for hosts at $z\sim2$. The high redshift of GRB111117A is evidence against a lognormal delay-time model for sGRBs through the predicted redshift distribution of sGRBs, which is very sensitive to high-$z$ sGRBs. From the age of the universe at the time of GRB explosion, an initial neutron star (NS) separation of $a_0 < 3.2~R_\odot$ is required in the case where the progenitor system is a circular pair of inspiralling NSs. This constraint excludes some of the longest sGRB formation channels for this burst.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.07016  [pdf] - 1584995
The high A_V Quasar Survey: A z=2.027 metal-rich damped Lyman-alpha absorber towards a red quasar at z=3.21
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures. Accepted for publication in A&A. A few typos have been corrected
Submitted: 2017-06-21, last modified: 2017-06-23
To fully exploit the potential of quasars as probes of cosmic chemical evolution and the internal gas dynamics of galaxies it is important to understand the selection effects behind the quasar samples and in particular if the selection criteria exclude foreground galaxies with certain properties (most importantly a high dust content). Here we present spectroscopic follow-up from the 10.4-m GTC telescope of a dust-reddened quasar, eHAQ0111+0641, from the extended High A_V Quasar (HAQ) survey. We find that the z=3.21 quasar has a foreground Damped Lyman-alpha Absorber (DLA) at z=2.027 along the line of sight. The DLA has very strong metal lines due to a moderately high metallicity (with an inferred lower limit of 25% of the solar metallicity), but a very large gas column density along the line-of-sight in its host galaxy. This discovery is further evidence that there is a dust bias affecting the census of metals, caused by the combined effect of dust obscuration and reddening, in existing samples of z>2 DLAs. The case of eHAQ0111+0641 illustrates that dust bias is not only caused by dust obscuration, but also dust reddening.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.08075  [pdf] - 1582871
Consensus report on 25 years of searches for damped Ly$\alpha$ galaxies in emission: Confirming their metallicity-luminosity relation at $z \gtrsim 2$
Comments: 25 pages (7 of which in appendix), accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-04-26
Starting from a summary of detection statistics of our recent X-shooter campaign, we review the major surveys, both space and ground based, for emission counterparts of high-redshift damped Ly$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) carried out since the first detection 25 years ago. We show that the detection rates of all surveys are precisely reproduced by a simple model in which the metallicity and luminosity of the galaxy associated to the DLA follow a relation of the form, ${\rm M_{UV}} = -5 \times \left(\,[{\rm M/H}] + 0.3\, \right) - 20.8$, and the DLA cross-section follows a relation of the form $\sigma_{DLA} \propto L^{0.8}$. Specifically, our spectroscopic campaign consists of 11 DLAs preselected based on their equivalent width of SiII $\lambda1526$ to have a metallicity higher than [Si/H] > -1. The targets have been observed with the X-shooter spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope to search for emission lines around the quasars. We observe a high detection rate of 64% (7/11), significantly higher than the typical $\sim$10% for random, HI-selected DLA samples. We use the aforementioned model, to simulate the results of our survey together with a range of previous surveys: spectral stacking, direct imaging (using the `double DLA' technique), long-slit spectroscopy, and integral field spectroscopy. Based on our model results, we are able to reconcile all results. Some tension is observed between model and data when looking at predictions of Ly$\alpha$ emission for individual targets. However, the object to object variations are most likely a result of the significant scatter in the underlying scaling relations as well as uncertainties in the amount of dust which affects the emission.
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.05401  [pdf] - 1582635
GRB 161219B / SN 2016jca: A low-redshift gamma-ray burst supernova powered by radioactive heating
Comments: 23 pages, 17 figures, 5 tables. Submitted to A&A. Comments welcomed
Submitted: 2017-04-18, last modified: 2017-04-20
Since the first discovery of a broad-lined type Ic supernova (SN) with a long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) in 1998, fewer than fifty gamma-ray burst supernovae (GRB-SNe) have been discovered. The intermediate-luminosity Swift GRB 161219B and its associated supernova SN 2016jca, which occurred at a redshift of z=0.1475, represents only the seventh GRB-SN to have been discovered within 1 Gpc, and hence provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the observational and physical properties of these very elusive and rare type of SN. As such, we present optical to near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of GRB 161219B and SN 2016jca, spanning the first three months since its discovery. GRB 161219B exploded in the disk of an edge-on spiral galaxy at a projected distance of 3.4 kpc from the galactic centre. GRB 161219B itself is an outlier of the Amati relation, while SN 2016jca had a rest-frame, peak absolute V-band magnitude of M_V = -19.0, which it reached after 12.5 rest-frame days. We find that the bolometric properties of SN 2016jca are inconsistent with being powered solely by a magnetar central engine, as proposed by other authors, and demonstrate that it was likely powered exclusively by energy deposited by the radioactive decay of nickel and cobalt into their daughter products, which were nucleosynthesized when its progenitor underwent core collapse. We find that 0.22 solar masses of nickel is required to reproduce the peak luminosity of SN 2016jca, and we constrain an ejecta mass of 5.8 solar masses and a kinetic energy of ~5 x 10^52 erg. Finally, we report on a chromatic, pre-maximum bump in the g-band light curve, and discuss its possible origin. [Abridged]
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.09052  [pdf] - 1762875
The properties of GRB 120923A at a spectroscopic redshift of z=7.8
Comments: 20 pages
Submitted: 2017-03-27
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful probes of early stars and galaxies, during and potentially even before the era of reionization. Although the number of GRBs identified at z>6 remains small, they provide a unique window on typical star-forming galaxies at that time, and thus are complementary to deep field observations. We report the identification of the optical drop-out afterglow of Swift GRB 120923A in near-infrared Gemini-North imaging, and derive a redshift of z=7.84_{-0.12}^{+0.06} from VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy. At this redshift the peak 15-150 keV luminosity of the burst was 3.2x10^52 erg/s, and in fact the burst was close to the Swift/BAT detection threshold. The X-ray and near-infrared afterglow were also faint, and in this sense it was a rather typical long-duration GRB in terms of rest-frame luminosity. We present ground- and space-based follow-up observations spanning from X-ray to radio, and find that a standard external shock model with a constant-density circumburst environment with density, n~4x10^-2 cm^-3 gives a good fit to the data. The near-infrared light curve exhibits a sharp break at t~3.4 days in the observer frame, which if interpreted as being due to a jet corresponds to an opening angle of ~5 degrees. The beaming corrected gamma-ray energy is then E_gamma~2x10^50 erg, while the beaming-corrected kinetic energy is lower, E_K~10^49 erg, suggesting that GRB 120923A was a comparatively low kinetic energy event. We discuss the implications of this event for our understanding of the high-redshift population of GRBs and their identification.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.07109  [pdf] - 1574692
Steep extinction towards GRB 140506A reconciled from host galaxy observations: Evidence that steep reddening laws are local
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures and 4 tables. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics. Abstract have been truncated
Submitted: 2017-03-21, last modified: 2017-03-22
We present the spectroscopic and photometric late-time follow-up of the host galaxy of the long-duration Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 140506A at z = 0.889. The optical and near-infrared afterglow of this GRB had a peculiar spectral energy distribution (SED) with a strong flux-drop at 8000 {\AA} (4000 {\AA} rest-frame) suggesting an unusually steep extinction curve. By analyzing the contribution and physical properties of the host galaxy, we here aim at providing additional information on the properties and origin of this steep, non-standard extinction. We find that the strong flux-drop in the GRB afterglow spectrum at < 8000 {\AA} and rise at < 4000 {\AA} is well explained by the combination of a steep extinction curve along the GRB line of sight and contamination by the host galaxy light so that the scenario with an extreme 2175 {\AA} extinction bump can be excluded. We localise the GRB to be at a projected distance of approximately 4 kpc from the centre of the host galaxy. Based on emission-line diagnostics of the four detected nebular lines, Halpha, Hbeta, [O II] and [O III], we find the host to be a modestly star forming (SFR = 1.34 +/- 0.04 Msun yr^-1) and relatively metal poor (Z = 0.35^{+0.15}_{-0.11} Zsun) galaxy with a large dust content, characterized by a measured visual attenuation of A_V = 1.74 +/- 0.41 mag, thus unexceptional in all its physical properties. We model the extinction curve of the host-corrected afterglow and show that the standard dust properties causing the reddening seen in the Local Group are inadequate in describing the steep drop. We conclude that the steep extinction curve seen in the afterglow towards the GRB is of exotic origin, is sightline-dependent only and thus solely a consequence of the circumburst environment.
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.00288  [pdf] - 1540534
Evolution of the dust-to-metals ratio in high-redshift galaxies probed by GRB-DLAs
Comments: Published in Astronomy & Astrophysics. 24 pages, 34 figures
Submitted: 2016-07-01, last modified: 2017-03-02
Context. Several issues regarding the nature of dust at high redshift remain unresolved: its composition, its production and growth mechanisms, and its effect on background sources. Aims. We provide a more accurate relation between dust depletion levels and dust-to-metals ratio (DTM), and to use the DTM to investigate the origin and evolution of dust in the high-redshift Universe via Gamma-ray burst damped Lyman-alpha absorbers (GRB-DLAs). Methods. We use absorption-line measured metal column densities for a total of 19 GRB-DLAs, including five new GRB afterglow spectra from VLT/X-shooter. We use the latest linear models to calculate the dust depletion strength factor in each DLA. Using these values we calculate total dust and metal column densities to determine a DTM. We explore the evolution of DTM with metallicity, and compare it to previous trends in DTM measured with different methods. Results. We find significant dust depletion in 16 of our 19 GRB-DLAs, yet 18 of the 19 have a DTM significantly lower than the Milky Way. We find that DTM is positively correlated with metallicity, which supports a dominant ISM grain-growth mode of dust formation. We find a substantial discrepancy between the dust content measured from depletion and that derived from the total V-band extinction, $A_V$ , measured by fitting the afterglow SED. We advise against using a measurement from one method to estimate that from the other until the discrepancy can be resolved.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.06126  [pdf] - 1550507
The mass, colour, and structural evolution of today's massive galaxies since z~5
Comments: 19 pages, 14 figures, accepted for publication
Submitted: 2017-02-20
In this paper, we use stacking analysis to trace the mass-growth, colour evolution, and structural evolution of present-day massive galaxies ($\log(M_{*}/M_{\odot})=11.5$) out to $z=5$. We utilize the exceptional depth and area of the latest UltraVISTA data release, combined with the depth and unparalleled seeing of CANDELS to gather a large, mass-selected sample of galaxies in the NIR (rest-frame optical to UV). Progenitors of present-day massive galaxies are identified via an evolving cumulative number density selection, which accounts for the effects of merging to correct for the systematic biases introduced using a fixed cumulative number density selection, and find progenitors grow in stellar mass by $\approx1.5~\mathrm{dex}$ since $z=5$. Using stacking, we analyze the structural parameters of the progenitors and find that most of the stellar mass content in the central regions was in place by $z\sim2$, and while galaxies continue to assemble mass at all radii, the outskirts experience the largest fractional increase in stellar mass. However, we find evidence of significant stellar mass build up at $r<3~\mathrm{kpc}$ beyond $z>4$ probing an era of significant mass assembly in the interiors of present day massive galaxies. We also compare mass assembly from progenitors in this study to the EAGLE simulation and find qualitatively similar assembly with $z$ at $r<3~\mathrm{kpc}$. We identify $z\sim1.5$ as a distinct epoch in the evolution of massive galaxies where progenitors transitioned from growing in mass and size primarily through in-situ star formation in disks to a period of efficient growth in $r_{e}$ consistent with the minor merger scenario.
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.05925  [pdf] - 1581223
The host galaxies and explosion sites of long-duration gamma ray bursts: Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared imaging
Comments: 26 pages, accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-01-20
We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/F160W SNAPSHOT sur- vey of the host galaxies of 39 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) at z < 3. We have non-detections of hosts at the locations of 4 bursts. Sufficient accuracy to as- trometrically align optical afterglow images and determine the location of the LGRB within its host was possible for 31/35 detected hosts. In agreement with other work, we find the luminosity distribution of LGRB hosts is significantly fainter than that of a star formation rate-weighted field galaxy sample over the same redshift range, indicating LGRBs are not unbiasedly tracing the star formation rate. Morphologi- cally, the sample of LGRB hosts are dominated by spiral-like or irregular galaxies. We find evidence for evolution of the population of LGRB hosts towards lower-luminosity, higher concentrated hosts at lower redshifts. Their half-light radii are consistent with other LGRB host samples where measurements were made on rest-frame UV obser- vations. In agreement with recent work, we find their 80 per cent enclosed flux radii distribution to be more extended than previously thought, making them intermedi- ate between core-collapse supernova (CCSN) and super-luminous supernova (SLSN) hosts. The galactocentric projected-offset distribution confirms LGRBs as centrally concentrated, much more so than CCSNe and similar to SLSNe. LGRBs are strongly biased towards the brighter regions in their host light distributions, regardless of their offset. We find a correlation between the luminosity of the LGRB explosion site and the intrinsic column density, N_H , towards the burst.
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.00091  [pdf] - 1532365
The ESO UVES Advanced Data Products Quasar Sample-V. Identifying the Galaxy Counterpart to the sub-Damped Ly-alpha System towards Q2239-2949
Comments: 9 pages, 7 figures, 2 tables, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2016-10-31
Gas flows in and out of galaxies are one of the key unknowns in todays' galaxy evolution studies. Because gas flows carry mass, energy and metals, they are believed to be closely connected to the star formation history of galaxies. Most of these processes take place in the circum-galactic medium (CGM) which remains challenging to observe in emission. A powerful tool to study the CGM gas is offered by combining observations of the gas traced by absorption lines in quasar spectra with detection of the stellar component of the same absorbing-galaxy. To this end, we have targeted the zabs=1.825 sub-Damped Ly-alpha absorber (sub-DLA) towards the zem=2.102 quasar 2dF J 223941.8-294955 (hereafter Q2239-2949) with the ESO VLT/X-Shooter spectrograph. Our aim is to investigate the relation between its properties in emission and in absorption. The derived metallicity of the sub-DLA with log N(HI) = 19.84+/-0.14 cm-2 is [M/H] >-0.75. Using the Voigt profile optical depth method, we measure Delta_v90(FeII)=64 kms-1. The sub-DLA galaxy counterpart is located at an impact parameter of 2."4+/-0."2 (20.8+/-1.7 kpc at z = 1.825). We have detected Ly-alpha and marginal [OII] emissions. The mean measured flux of the Ly-alpha line is F(Ly-alpha) ~ 5.7x10^-18 erg s-1 cm-2 A-1, corresponding to a dust uncorrected SFR of ~ 0.13 M(solar) yr-1.
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.07744  [pdf] - 1580461
The galaxy counterpart of the high-metallicity and 16 kpc impact parameter DLA towards Q0918+1636 - a challenge to galaxy formation models?
Comments: 22 pages, 24 figures, MNRAS in press
Submitted: 2016-10-25
The quasar Q0918+1636 (z=3.07) has an intervening high-metallicity Damped Lyman-alpha Absorber (DLA) along the line of sight, at a redshift of z=2.58. The DLA is located at a large impact parameter of 16.2 kpc, and has an almost solar metallicity. It is shown, that a novel type of cosmological galaxy formation models, invoking a new SNII feedback prescription, the Haardt & Madau (2012) UVB field and explicit treatment of UVB self-shielding, can reproduce the observed characteristics of the DLA. UV radiation from young stellar populations in the galaxy, in particular in the photon energy range 10.36-13.61 eV (relating to Sulfur II abundance), are also considered in the analysis. It is found that a) for L~L* galaxies (at z=2.58), about 10% of the sight-lines through the galaxies at impact parameter 16.2 kpc will display a Sulfur II column density N(SII)$>$ 10$^{15.82}$ cm$^{-2}$ (the observed value for the DLA), and b) considering only cases where a near-solar metallicity will be detected at 16.2 kpc impact parameter, the probability distribution of galaxy SFR peaks near the value observed for the DLA galaxy counterpart of ~27 Msun/yr. It is argued, that the bulk of the alpha-elements, like Sulfur, traced by the high metal column density, b=16.2 kpc absorption lines, were produced by evolving young stars in the inner galaxy, and later transported outward by galactic winds.
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.01844  [pdf] - 1580348
GRB 110715A: The peculiar multiwavelength evolution of the first afterglow detected by ALMA
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-10-06, last modified: 2016-10-11
We present the extensive follow-up campaign on the afterglow of GRB 110715A at 17 different wavelengths, from X-ray to radio bands, starting 81 seconds after the burst and extending up to 74 days later. We performed for the first time a GRB afterglow observation with the ALMA observatory. We find that the afterglow of GRB 110715A is very bright at optical and radio wavelengths. We use optical and near infrared spectroscopy to provide further information about the progenitor's environment and its host galaxy. The spectrum shows weak absorption features at a redshift z = 0.8225, which reveal a host galaxy environment with low ionization, column density and dynamical activity. Late deep imaging shows a very faint galaxy, consistent with the spectroscopic results. The broadband afterglow emission is modelled with synchrotron radiation using a numerical algorithm and we determine the best fit parameters using Bayesian inference in order to constrain the physical parameters of the jet and the medium in which the relativistic shock propagates. We fitted our data with a variety of models, including different density profiles and energy injections. Although the general behaviour can be roughly described by these models, none of them are able to fully explain all data points simultaneously. GRB 110715A shows the complexity of reproducing extensive multi-wavelength broadband afterglow observations, and the need of good sampling in wavelength and time and more complex models to accurately constrain the physics of GRB afterglows.
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.00497  [pdf] - 1531440
EELT-HIRES the high-resolution spectrograph for the E-ELT
Comments: 12 pages, in Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy VI, 2016, Proc. SPIE 9908, 23
Submitted: 2016-09-02
The first generation of E-ELT instruments will include an optical-infrared High Resolution Spectrograph, conventionally indicated as EELT-HIRES, which will be capable of providing unique breakthroughs in the fields of exoplanets, star and planet formation, physics and evolution of stars and galaxies, cosmology and fundamental physics. A 2-year long phase A study for EELT-HIRES has just started and will be performed by a consortium composed of institutes and organisations from Brazil, Chile, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom. In this paper we describe the science goals and the preliminary technical concept for EELT-HIRES which will be developed during the phase A, as well as its planned development and consortium organisation during the study.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.08404  [pdf] - 1580180
The extended High A(V) Quasar Survey: Searching for dusty absorbers toward mid-infrared selected quasars
Comments: 45 pages containing a large set of 100 figures and 2 long tables. Accepted for publication in ApJS
Submitted: 2016-08-30
We present the results of a new spectroscopic survey for dusty intervening absorption systems, particularly damped Ly$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs), towards reddened quasars. The candidate quasars are selected from mid-infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer combined with optical and near-infrared photometry. Out of 1073 candidates, we secure low-resolution spectra for 108 using the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma, Spain. Based on the spectra, we are able to classify 100 of the 108 targets as quasars. A large fraction (50 %) is observed to have broad absorption lines (BALs). Moreover, we find 6 quasars with strange breaks in their spectra, which are not consistent with regular dust reddening. Using template fitting we infer the amount of reddening along each line of sight ranging from A(V)$\approx$0.1 mag to 1.2 mag (assuming an SMC extinction curve). In four cases, the reddening is consistent with dust exhibiting the 2175{\AA} feature caused by an intervening absorber, and for two of these, a MgII absorption system is observed at the best-fit absorption redshift. In the rest of the cases, the reddening is most likely intrinsic to the quasar. We observe no evidence for dusty DLAs in this survey. However, the large fraction of BAL quasars hampers the detection of absorption systems. Out of the 50 non-BAL quasars only 28 have sufficiently high redshift to detect Ly$\alpha$ in absorption.
[116]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.09149  [pdf] - 1507545
K2-31b, a grazing transiting hot Jupiter on an 1.26-day orbit around a bright G7V star
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-10-30, last modified: 2016-08-30
We report the discovery of K2-31b, the first confirmed transiting hot Jupiter detected by the K2 space mission. We combined K2 photometry with FastCam lucky imaging and FIES and HARPS high-resolution spectroscopy to confirm the planetary nature of the transiting object and derived the system parameters. K2-31b is a 1.8-Jupiter-mass planet on an 1.26-day-orbit around a G7\,V star ($M_\star=0.91$~\Msun, $R_\star=0.78$~\Rsun). The planetary radius is poorly constrained (0.7$<$$R_\mathrm{p}$$<$1.4~\Rjup), owing to the grazing transit and the low sampling rate of the K2 photometry.
[117]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.00701  [pdf] - 1501931
Determining the fraction of reddened quasars in COSMOS with multiple selection techniques from X-ray to radio wavelengths
Comments: 22 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in A&A. The ArXiv abstract has been shortened for it to be printable
Submitted: 2016-05-02, last modified: 2016-08-25
The sub-population of quasars reddened by intrinsic or intervening clouds of dust are known to be underrepresented in optical quasar surveys. By defining a complete parent sample of the brightest and spatially unresolved quasars in the COSMOS field, we quantify to which extent this sub-population is fundamental to our understanding of the true population of quasars. By using the available multiwavelength data of various surveys in the COSMOS field, we built a parent sample of 33 quasars brighter than $J=20$ mag, identified by reliable X-ray to radio wavelength selection techniques. Spectroscopic follow-up with the NOT/ALFOSC was carried out for four candidate quasars that had not been targeted previously to obtain a 100\% redshift completeness of the sample. The population of high $A_V$ quasars (HAQs), a specific sub-population of quasars selected from optical/near-infrared photometry, is found to contribute $21\%^{+9}_{-5}$ of the parent sample. The full population of bright spatially unresolved quasars represented by our parent sample consists of $39\%^{+9}_{-8}$ reddened quasars defined by having $A_V>0.1$, and $21\%^{+9}_{-5}$ of the sample having $E(B-V)>0.1$ assuming the extinction curve of the Small Magellanic Cloud. We show that the HAQ selection works well for selecting reddened quasars, but some are missed because their optical spectra are too blue to pass the $g-r$ color cut in the HAQ selection. This is either due to a low degree of dust reddening or anomalous spectra. We find that the fraction of quasars with contributing light from the host galaxy is most dominant at $z \lesssim 1$. At higher redshifts the population of spatially unresolved quasars selected by our parent sample is found to be representative of the full population at $J<20$ mag. This work quantifies the bias against reddened quasars in studies that are based solely on optical surveys.
[118]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.08492  [pdf] - 1441500
Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914
Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. C.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. 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Comments: For Supplement, see https://arxiv.org/abs/1604.07864
Submitted: 2016-02-26, last modified: 2016-07-21
A gravitational-wave (GW) transient was identified in data recorded by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors on 2015 September 14. The event, initially designated G184098 and later given the name GW150914, is described in detail elsewhere. By prior arrangement, preliminary estimates of the time, significance, and sky location of the event were shared with 63 teams of observers covering radio, optical, near-infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths with ground- and space-based facilities. In this Letter we describe the low-latency analysis of the GW data and present the sky localization of the first observed compact binary merger. We summarize the follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-ray Coordinates Network circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the GW sky localization coverage, the timeline and depth of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger, there is little expectation of a detectable electromagnetic (EM) signature. Nevertheless, this first broadband campaign to search for a counterpart of an Advanced LIGO source represents a milestone and highlights the broad capabilities of the transient astronomy community and the observing strategies that have been developed to pursue neutron star binary merger events. Detailed investigations of the EM data and results of the EM follow-up campaign are being disseminated in papers by the individual teams.
[119]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.07864  [pdf] - 1441527
Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914
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S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; Brand, J. F. J. van den; Broeck, C. Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Allison, J.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Chatterjee, S.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, Ian; Hotan, A.; Indermuehle, B.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Murphy, T.; Popping, A.; Reynolds, J.; Sault, R. J.; Voronkov, M. A.; Whiting, M. T.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Cunniffe, R.; Jelínek, M.; Tello, J. C.; Oates, S. R.; Hu, Y. -D.; Kubánek, P.; Guziy, S.; Castellón, A.; García-Cerezo, A.; Muñoz, V. F.; del Pulgar, C. Pérez; Castillo-Carrión, S.; Cerón, J. M. Castro; Hudec, R.; Caballero-García, M. D.; Páta, P.; Vitek, S.; Adame, J. A.; Konig, S.; Rendón, F.; Sanguino, T. de J. Mateo; Fernández-Muñoz, R.; Yock, P. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Allen, W. H.; Querel, R.; Jeong, S.; Park, I. H.; Bai, J.; Cui, Ch.; Fan, Y.; Wang, Ch.; Hiriart, D.; Lee, W. H.; Claret, A.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Pandey, S. B.; Mediavilla, T.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Berger, E.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W. -F.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D. B.; Frieman, J.; Fryer, C. L.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Herner, K.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Johnson, M. D.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A. G.; Kind, M. C.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Martini, P.; Matheson, T.; Melchior, P.; Metzger, B. D.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Quataert, E.; Roe, N.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A. C.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, N.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.; Connaughton, V.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Zhang, B. -B.; Hui, C. M.; Jenke, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Giles, M. M.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kippen, R. M.; McBreen, S.; Mailyan, B.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Roberts, O.; Sparke, L.; Stanbro, M.; Toelge, K.; Veres, P.; Yu, H. -F.; Blackburn, L.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Domínguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Salvetti, D.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venters, T. M.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zhu, S.; Zimmer, S.; Brocato, E.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; Grado, A.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L. A.; Capaccioli, M.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Giuffrida, G.; Iannicola, G.; Limatola, L.; Lisi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Pulone, L.; Rossi, A.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Tomasella, L.; Yang, S.; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; Courvoisier, T. J. -L.; Ferrigno, C.; Hanlon, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Laurent, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Roques, J. P.; Savchenko, V.; Ubertini, P.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Singer, L. P.; Cao, Y.; Duggan, G.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bhalerao, V.; Miller, A. A.; Barlow, T.; Bellm, E.; Manulis, I.; Rana, J.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Surace, J.; Rebbapragada, U.; Cook, D.; Van Sistine, A.; Sesar, B.; Perley, D.; Ferreti, R.; Prince, T.; Kendrick, R.; Horesh, A.; Hurley, K.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Aptekar, R. L.; Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Smith, D. M.; Cline, T.; Krimm, H.; Abe, F.; Doi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kawabata, K. S.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ohta, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yoshida, M.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Ellman, N.; Rostami, S.; Bersier, D. F.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mazzali, P.; Mundell, C. G.; Piascik, A. S.; Pollacco, Don; Steele, I. A.; Ulaczyk, K.; Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Rowlinson, A.; Stappers, B. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Poleshuk, V.; Tlatov, A.; Yurkov, V.; Kawai, N.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Nakahira, S.; Mihara, T.; Tomida, H.; Ueno, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.; Croft, S.; Feng, L.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Morales, M. F.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Williams, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Chambers, K. C.; Smith, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Young, D. R.; Wright, D. E.; Schultz, A.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E. A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; E., F. Olivares; Campbell, H.; Kotak, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Anderson, J. P.; Botticella, M. T.; Chen, T. -W.; Valle, M. D.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Guillou, L. Le; Lyman, J. D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Razza, A.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Ćwiek, A.; Ćwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Opiela, R.; Zaremba, M.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Onken, C. A.; Scalzo, R. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Wolf, C.; Yuan, F.; Evans, P. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Giommi, P.; Marshall, F. E.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Palmer, D.; Perri, M.; Siegel, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Klotz, A.; Turpin, D.; Laugier, R.; Beroiz, M.; Peñuela, T.; Macri, L. M.; Oelkers, R. J.; Lambas, D. G.; Vrech, R.; Cabral, J.; Colazo, C.; Dominguez, M.; Sanchez, B.; Gurovich, S.; Lares, M.; Marshall, J. L.; DePoy, D. L.; Padilla, N.; Pereyra, N. A.; Benacquista, M.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A. J.; Steeghs, D.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Watson, D.; Irwin, M.; Fernandez, C. G.; McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Schulze, S.; Postigo, A. de U.; Thoene, C. C.; Cano, Z.; Rosswog, S.
Comments: For the main Letter, see arXiv:1602.08492
Submitted: 2016-04-26, last modified: 2016-07-21
This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.
[120]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.07808  [pdf] - 1437565
Detection of three Gamma-Ray Burst host galaxies at $z\sim6$
Comments: Published in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-12-24, last modified: 2016-07-13
Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) allow us to pinpoint and study star-forming galaxies in the early universe, thanks to their orders of magnitude brighter peak luminosities compared to other astrophysical sources, and their association with deaths of massive stars. We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 detections of three Swift GRB host galaxies lying at redshifts $z = 5.913$ (GRB 130606A), $z = 6.295$ (GRB 050904), and $z = 6.327$ (GRB 140515A) in the F140W (wide-$JH$ band, $\lambda_{\rm{obs}}\sim1.4\,\mu m$) filter. The hosts have magnitudes (corrected for Galactic extinction) of $m_{\rm{\lambda_{obs},AB}}= 26.34^{+0.14}_{-0.16}, 27.56^{+0.18}_{-0.22},$ and $28.30^{+0.25}_{-0.33}$ respectively. In all three cases the probability of chance coincidence of lower redshift galaxies is $\lesssim2\,\%$, indicating that the detected galaxies are most likely the GRB hosts. These are the first detections of high redshift ($z > 5$) GRB host galaxies in emission. The galaxies have luminosities in the range $0.1-0.6\,L^{*}_{z=6}$ (with $M_{1600}^{*}=-20.95\pm0.12$), and half-light radii in the range $0.6-0.9\,\rm{kpc}$. Both their half-light radii and luminosities are consistent with existing samples of Lyman-break galaxies at $z\sim6$. Spectroscopic analysis of the GRB afterglows indicate low metallicities ($[\rm{M/H}]\lesssim-1$) and low dust extinction ($A_{\rm{V}}\lesssim0.1$) along the line of sight. Using stellar population synthesis models, we explore the implications of each galaxy's luminosity for its possible star formation history, and consider the potential for emission-line metallicity determination with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope.
[121]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.03729  [pdf] - 1531021
The new SOXS instrument for the ESO NTT
Comments: 10 pages, submitted to SPIE Astronomical Telescopes & Instrumentation 2016, paper 9908-152
Submitted: 2016-07-13
SOXS (Son Of X-Shooter) will be a unique spectroscopic facility for the ESO-NTT 3.5-m telescope in La Silla (Chile), able to cover the optical/NIR band (350-1750 nm). The design foresees a high-efficiency spectrograph with a resolution-slit product of ~4,500, capable of simultaneously observing the complete spectral range 350 - 1750 nm with a good sensitivity, with light imaging capabilities in the visible band. This paper outlines the status of the project.
[122]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.01361  [pdf] - 1428251
Serendipitous discovery of a projected pair of QSOs separated by 4.5 arcsec on the sky
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures. Accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2016-04-05, last modified: 2016-06-23
We present the serendipitous discovery of a projected pair of quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) with an angular separation of $\Delta\theta =4.50$ arcsec. The redshifts of the two QSOs are widely different: one, our programme target, is a QSO with a spectrum consistent with being a narrow line Seyfert 1 AGN at $z=2.05$. For this target we detect Lyman-$\alpha$, \ion{C}{4}, and \ion{C}{3]}. The other QSO, which by chance was included on the spectroscopic slit, is a Type 1 QSO at a redshift of $z=1.68$, for which we detect \ion{C}{4}, \ion{C}{3]} and \ion{Mg}{2}. We compare this system to previously detected projected QSO pairs and find that only about a dozen previously known pairs have smaller angular separation.
[123]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.05720  [pdf] - 1397041
First Connection between Cold Gas in Emission and Absorption: CO Emission from a Galaxy-Quasar Pair
Comments: 6 pages, 5 figures, published in ApJL
Submitted: 2016-04-19
We present the first detection of molecular emission from a galaxy selected to be near a projected background quasar using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The ALMA detection of CO(1$-$0) emission from the $z=0.101$ galaxy toward quasar PKS 0439-433 is coincident with its stellar disk and yields a molecular gas mass of $M_{\rm mol} \approx 4.2 \times 10^9 M_\odot$ (for a Galactic CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor), larger than the upper limit on its atomic gas mass. We resolve the CO velocity field, obtaining a rotational velocity of $134 \pm 11$ km s$^{-1}$, and a resultant dynamical mass of $\geq 4 \times 10^{10} M_\odot$. Despite its high metallicity and large molecular mass, the $z=0.101$ galaxy has a low star formation rate, implying a large gas consumption timescale, larger than that typical of late-type galaxies. Most of the molecular gas is hence likely to be in a diffuse extended phase, rather than in dense molecular clouds. By combining the results of emission and absorption studies, we find that the strongest molecular absorption component toward the quasar cannot arise from the molecular disk, but is likely to arise from diffuse gas in the galaxy's circumgalactic medium. Our results emphasize the potential of combining molecular and stellar emission line studies with optical absorption line studies to achieve a more complete picture of the gas within and surrounding high-redshift galaxies.
[124]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.02214  [pdf] - 1579882
A New Constraint on the Ly$\alpha$ Fraction of UV Very Bright Galaxies at Redshift 7
Comments: 20 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-04-07, last modified: 2016-04-13
We study the extent to which very bright (-23.0 < MUV < -21.75) Lyman-break selected galaxies at redshifts z~7 display detectable Lya emission. To explore this issue, we have obtained follow-up optical spectroscopy of 9 z~7 galaxies from a parent sample of 24 z~7 galaxy candidates selected from the 1.65 sq.deg COSMOS-UltraVISTA and SXDS-UDS survey fields using the latest near-infrared public survey data, and new ultra-deep Subaru z'-band imaging (which we also present and describe in this paper). Our spectroscopy has yielded only one possible detection of Lya at z=7.168 with a rest-frame equivalent width EW_0 = 3.7 (+1.7/-1.1) Angstrom. The relative weakness of this line, combined with our failure to detect Lya emission from the other spectroscopic targets allows us to place a new upper limit on the prevalence of strong Lya emission at these redshifts. For conservative calculation and to facilitate comparison with previous studies at lower redshifts, we derive a 1-sigma upper limit on the fraction of UV bright galaxies at z~7 that display EW_0 > 50 Angstrom, which we estimate to be < 0.23. This result may indicate a weak trend where the fraction of strong Lya emitters ceases to rise, and possibly falls between z~6 and z~7. Our results also leave open the possibility that strong Lya may still be more prevalent in the brightest galaxies in the reionization era than their fainter counterparts. A larger spectroscopic sample of galaxies is required to derive a more reliable constraint on the neutral hydrogen fraction at z~7 based on the Lya fraction in the bright galaxies.
[125]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.02350  [pdf] - 1579885
The COSMOS2015 Catalog: Exploring the 1<z<6 Universe with half a million galaxies
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-04-08
We present the COSMOS2015 catalog which contains precise photometric redshifts and stellar masses for more than half a million objects over the 2deg$^{2}$ COSMOS field. Including new $YJHK_{\rm s}$ images from the UltraVISTA-DR2 survey, $Y$-band from Subaru/Hyper-Suprime-Cam and infrared data from the Spitzer Large Area Survey with the Hyper-Suprime-Cam Spitzer legacy program, this near-infrared-selected catalog is highly optimized for the study of galaxy evolution and environments in the early Universe. To maximise catalog completeness for bluer objects and at higher redshifts, objects have been detected on a $\chi^{2}$ sum of the $YJHK_{\rm s}$ and $z^{++}$ images. The catalog contains $\sim 6\times 10^5$ objects in the 1.5 deg$^{2}$ UltraVISTA-DR2 region, and $\sim 1.5\times 10^5$ objects are detected in the "ultra-deep stripes" (0.62 deg$^{2}$) at $K_{\rm s}\leq 24.7$ (3$\sigma$, 3", AB magnitude). Through a comparison with the zCOSMOS-bright spectroscopic redshifts, we measure a photometric redshift precision of $\sigma_{\Delta z/(1+z_s)}$ = 0.007 and a catastrophic failure fraction of $\eta=0.5$%. At $3<z<6$, using the unique database of spectroscopic redshifts in COSMOS, we find $\sigma_{\Delta z/(1+z_s)}$ = 0.021 and $\eta=13.2\% $. The deepest regions reach a 90\% completeness limit of 10$^{10}M_\odot$ to $z=4$. Detailed comparisons of the color distributions, number counts, and clustering show excellent agreement with the literature in the same mass ranges. COSMOS2015 represents a unique, publicly available, valuable resource with which to investigate the evolution of galaxies within their environment back to the earliest stages of the history of the Universe. The COSMOS2015 catalog is distributed via anonymous ftp (ftp://ftp.iap.fr/pub/from_users/hjmcc/COSMOS2015/) and through the usual astronomical archive systems (CDS, ESO Phase 3, IRSA).
[126]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.06304  [pdf] - 1407105
A Method to improve line flux and redshift measurements with narrowband filters
Comments: 25 pages, 24 figures; accepted for publication in A&A; arXiv abstract is shortened w.r.t. paper abstract
Submitted: 2016-02-19
High redshift star-forming galaxies are discovered routinely through a flux excess in narrowband filters (NB) caused by an emission line. In most cases, the width of such filters is broad compared to typical line widths, and the throughput of the filters varies substantially within the bandpass. This leads to substantial uncertainties in redshifts and fluxes that are derived from the observations with one specific NB. In this work we demonstrate that the uncertainty in measured line parameters can be sharply reduced by using repeated observations of the same target field with filters that have slightly different transmittance curves. Such data are routinely collected with some large field imaging cameras that use multiple detectors and a separate filter for each of the detectors. An example is the NB118 data from ESO's VISTA InfraRed CAMera (VIRCAM). We carefully developed and characterized this method to determine more accurate redshift and line flux estimates from the ratio of apparent fluxes measured from observations in different narrowband filters and several matching broadband filters. Then, we tested the obtainable quality of parameter estimation both on simulated and actual observations for the example of Ha in the VIRCAM NB118 filters combined with broadband data in Y, J, H. We find that by using this method, the errors in the measured lines fluxes can be reduced up to almost an order of magnitude and that an accuracy in wavelength of better than 1nm can be achieved with the ~13nm wide NB118 filters.
[127]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.00770  [pdf] - 1523090
Long-Duration Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies in Emission and Absorption
Comments: Invited review accepted to SSR. Part of a special edition on gamma-ray bursts accompanying the ISSI-Beijing workshop, "Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Tool to Explore the Young Universe"
Submitted: 2016-02-01
The galaxy population hosting long-duration GRBs provides a means to constrain the progenitor and an opportunity to use these violent explosions to characterize the nature of the high-redshift universe. Studies of GRB host galaxies in emission reveal a population of star-forming galaxies with great diversity, spanning a wide range of masses, metallicities, and redshifts. However, as a population GRB hosts are significantly less massive and poorer in metals than the hosts of other core-collapse transients, suggesting that GRB production is only efficient at metallicities significantly below Solar. GRBs may also prefer compact galaxies, and dense and/or central regions of galaxies, more than other types of core-collapse explosion. Meanwhile, studies of hosts in absorption against the luminous GRB optical afterglow provide a unique means of unveiling properties of the ISM in even the faintest and most distant galaxies; these observations are helping to constrain the chemical evolution of galaxies and the properties of interstellar dust out to very high redshifts. New ground- and space-based instrumentation, and the accumulation of larger and more carefully-selected samples, are continually enhancing our view of the GRB host population.
[128]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.02479  [pdf] - 1344169
The Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey - II. Rest-Frame NIR Luminosity Distribution and Evidence for a Near-Solar Metallicity Threshold
Comments: Published in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-04-09, last modified: 2016-01-20
We present rest-frame NIR luminosities and stellar masses for a large and uniformly-selected population of GRB host galaxies using deep Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of 119 targets from the Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey spanning 0.03 < z < 6.3, and determine the effects of galaxy evolution and chemical enrichment on the mass distribution of the GRB host population across cosmic history. We find strong evolution in the host luminosity distribution between z~0.5 (median absolute NIR AB magnitude ~ -18.5, corresponding to M* ~ 3x10^8 M_sun and z~1.5), but negligible variation between z~1.5 and z~5 (median magnitude ~ -21.2, corresponding to M* ~ 5x10^9 M_sun). Dust-obscured GRBs dominate the massive host population but are only rarely seen associated with low-mass hosts, indicating that massive star-forming galaxies are universally and (to some extent) homogeneously dusty at high-redshift while low-mass star-forming galaxies retain little dust in their ISM. Comparing our luminosity distributions to field surveys and measurements of the high-z mass-metallicity relation, our results have good consistency with a model in which the GRB rate per unit star-formation is constant in galaxies with gas-phase metallicity below approximately the Solar value but heavily suppressed in more metal-rich environments. This model also naturally explains the previously-reported "excess" in the GRB rate beyond z>2; metals stifle GRB production in most galaxies at z<1.5 but have only minor impact at higher redshifts. The metallicity threshold we infer is much higher than predicted by single-star models and favors a binary progenitor. Our observations also constrain the fraction of cosmic star-formation in low-mass galaxies undetectable to Spitzer to be a small minority at most redshifts (~10% at z~2, ~25% at z~3, and ~50% at z=3.5-6.0).
[129]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.02482  [pdf] - 1344170
The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey - I. Sample Selection and Redshift Distribution
Comments: Published in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-04-09, last modified: 2016-01-20
We introduce the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey ("SHOALS"), a multi-observatory high-redshift galaxy survey targeting the largest unbiased sample of long-duration gamma-ray burst hosts yet assembled (119 in total). We describe the motivations of the survey and the development of our selection criteria, including an assessment of the impact of various observability metrics on the success rate of afterglow-based redshift measurement. We briefly outline our host-galaxy observational program, consisting of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging of every field supplemented by similarly-deep, multi-color optical/NIR photometry, plus spectroscopy of events without pre-existing redshifts. Our optimized selection cuts combined with host-galaxy follow-up have so far enabled redshift measurements for 110 targets (92%) and placed upper limits on all but one of the remainder. About 20% of GRBs in the sample are heavily dust-obscured, and at most 2% originate from z>5.5. Using this sample we estimate the redshift-dependent GRB rate density, showing it to peak at z~2.5 and fall by about an order of magnitude towards low (z=0) redshift, while declining more gradually towards high (z~7) redshift. This behavior is consistent with a progenitor whose formation efficiency varies modestly over cosmic history. Our survey will permit the most detailed examination to date of the connection between the GRB host population and general star-forming galaxies, directly measure evolution in the host population over cosmic time and discern its causes, and provide new constraints on the fraction of cosmic star-formation occurring in undetectable galaxies at all redshifts.
[130]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.01708  [pdf] - 1324879
Extinction curve template for intrinsically reddened quasars
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2015-10-06, last modified: 2015-12-08
We analyze the near-infrared to UV data of 16 quasars with redshifts ranging from 0.71 $<$ $z$ $<$ 2.13 to investigate dust extinction properties. The sample presented in this work is obtained from the High $A_V$ Quasar (HAQ) survey. The quasar candidates were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and follow-up spectroscopy was carried out at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and the New Technology Telescope (NTT). To study dust extinction curves intrinsic to the quasars, from the HAQ survey we selected 16 cases where the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) law could not provide a good solution to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We derived the extinction curves using Fitzpatrick & Massa 1986 (FM) law by comparing the observed SEDs to the combined quasar template from Vanden Berk et al. 2001 and Glikman et al. 2006. The derived extinction, $A_V$, ranges from 0.2-1.0 mag. All the individual extinction curves of our quasars are steeper ($R_V=2.2$-2.7) than that of the SMC, with a weighted mean value of $R_V=2.4$. We derive an `average quasar extinction curve' for our sample by fitting SEDs simultaneously by using the weighted mean values of the FM law parameters and a varying $R_V$. The entire sample is well fit with a single best-fit value of $R_V=2.2\pm0.2$. The `average quasar extinction curve' deviates from the steepest Milky Way and SMC extinction curves at a confidence level $\gtrsim95\%$. Such steep extinction curves suggest a significant population of silicates to produce small dust grains. Moreover, another possibility could be that the large dust grains may have been destroyed by the activity of the nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN), resulting in steep extinction curves.
[131]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.07807  [pdf] - 1579741
The optical identifcation of events with poorly defined locations: The case of the Fermi GBM GRB140801A
Comments: in press MNRAS, 2015
Submitted: 2015-10-27
We report the early discovery of the optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 140801A in the 137 deg$^2$ 3-$\sigma$ error-box of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). MASTER is the only observatory that automatically react to all Fermi alerts. GRB 140801A is one of the few GRBs whose optical counterpart was discovered solely from its GBM localization. The optical afterglow of GRB 140801A was found by MASTER Global Robotic Net 53 sec after receiving the alert, making it the fastest optical detection of a GRB from a GBM error-box. Spectroscopy obtained with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6-m BTA of SAO RAS reveals a redshift of $z=1.32$. We performed optical and near-infrared photometry of GRB 140801A using different telescopes with apertures ranging from 0.4-m to 10.4-m. GRB 140801A is a typical burst in many ways. The rest-frame bolometric isotropic energy release and peak energy of the burst is $E_\mathrm{iso} = 5.54_{-0.24}^{+0.26} \times 10^{52}$ erg and $E_\mathrm{p, rest}\simeq280$ keV, respectively, which is consistent with the Amati relation. The absence of a jet break in the optical light curve provides a lower limit on the half-opening angle of the jet $\theta=6.1$ deg. The observed $E_\mathrm{peak}$ is consistent with the limit derived from the Ghirlanda relation. The joint Fermi GBM and Konus-Wind analysis shows that GRB 140801A could belong to the class of intermediate duration. The rapid detection of the optical counterpart of GRB 140801A is especially important regarding the upcoming experiments with large coordinate error-box areas.
[132]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.08058  [pdf] - 1331063
An X-shooter composite of bright 1 < z < 2 quasars from UV to infrared
Comments: 14 pages, 8 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2015-10-27
Quasi-stellar object (QSO) spectral templates are important both to QSO physics and for investigations that use QSOs as probes of intervening gas and dust. However, combinations of various QSO samples obtained at different times and with different instruments so as to expand a composite and to cover a wider rest frame wavelength region may create systematic effects, and the contribution from QSO hosts may contaminate the composite. We have constructed a composite spectrum from luminous blue QSOs at 1 < z < 2.1 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The observations with X-shooter simultaneously cover ultraviolet (UV) to near- infrared (NIR) light, which ensures that the composite spectrum covers the full rest-frame range from Ly$\beta$ to 11350 $\AA$ without any significant host contamination. Assuming a power-law continuum for the composite we find a spectral slope of $\alpha_\lambda$ = 1.70+/-0.01, which is steeper than previously found in the literature. We attribute the differences to our broader spectral wavelength coverage, which allows us to effectively avoid fitting any regions that are affected either by strong QSO emissions lines (e.g., Balmer lines and complex [Fe II] blends) or by intrinsic host galaxy emission. Finally, we demonstrate the application of the QSO composite spectrum for evaluating the reddening in other QSOs.
[133]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.04695  [pdf] - 1579728
A quasar reddened by a sub-parsec sized, metal-rich and dusty cloud in a damped Lyman-alpha absorber at z=2.13
Comments: 14 pages, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-10-15
We present a detailed analysis of a red quasar at z=2.32 with an intervening damped Lyman-alpha absorber (DLA) at z=2.13. Using high quality data from the X-shooter spectrograph at ESO Very Large Telescope we find that the absorber has a metallicity consistent with Solar. We observe strong C I and H$_2$ absorption indicating a cold, dense absorbing medium. Partial coverage effects are observed in the C I lines, from which we infer a covering fraction of $27 \pm 6$ % and a physical diameter of the cloud of 0.1 pc. From the covering fraction and size, we estimate the size of the background quasar's broad line region. We search for emission from the DLA counterpart in optical and near-infrared imaging. No emission is observed in the optical data. However, we see tentative evidence for a counterpart in the H and K' band images. The DLA shows high depletion (as probed by [Fe/Zn]=-1.22) indicating that significant amounts of dust must be present in the DLA. By fitting the spectrum with various dust reddened quasar templates we find a best-fitting amount of dust in the DLA of $A(V)_{\rm DLA}=0.28 \pm 0.01|_{\rm stat} \pm 0.07|_{\rm sys}$. We conclude that dust in the DLA is causing the colours of this intrinsically very luminous background quasar to appear much redder than average quasars, thereby not fulfilling the criteria for quasar identification in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Such chemically enriched and dusty absorbers are thus underrepresented in current samples of DLAs.
[134]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.06743  [pdf] - 1282690
GRB hosts through cosmic time - VLT/X-Shooter emission-line spectroscopy of 96 GRB-selected galaxies at 0.1 < z < 3.6
Comments: 33 pages, 21 figures, published in A&A 581, A125 (2015)
Submitted: 2015-05-25, last modified: 2015-09-24
[Abridged] We present data and initial results from VLT/X-Shooter emission-line spectroscopy of 96 GRB-selected galaxies at 0.1<z<3.6, the largest sample of GRB host spectroscopy available to date. Most of our GRBs were detected by Swift and 76% are at 0.5<z<2.5 with a median z~1.6. Based on Balmer and/or forbidden lines of oxygen, nitrogen, and neon, we measure systemic redshifts, star formation rates (SFRs), visual attenuations, oxygen abundances (12+log(O/H)), and emission-line widths. We find a strong change of the typical physical properties of GRB hosts with redshift. The median SFR, for example, increases from ~0.6 M_sun/yr at z~0.6 up to ~15 M_sun/yr at z~2. A higher ratio of [OIII]/[OII] at higher redshifts leads to an increasing distance of GRB-selected galaxies to the locus of local galaxies in the BPT diagram. Oxygen abundances of the galaxies are distributed between 12+log(O/H)=7.9 and 12+log(O/H)=9.0 with a median of 12+log(O/H)~8.5. The fraction of GRB-selected galaxies with super-solar metallicities is around 20% at z<1 in the adopted metallicity scale. This is significantly less than the fraction of star formation in similar galaxies, illustrating that GRBs are scarce in high-metallicity environments. At z~3, sensitivity limits us to probing only the most luminous GRB hosts for which we derive metallicities of Z ~< 0.5 Z_sun. Together with a high incidence of galaxies with similar metallicity in our sample at z~1.5, this indicates that the metallicity dependence observed at low redshift will not be dominant at z~3.
[135]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.03279  [pdf] - 1275061
A very luminous magnetar-powered supernova associated with an ultra-long gamma-ray burst
Comments: Table 1 only in printed version
Submitted: 2015-09-10
A new class of ultra-long duration (>10,000 s) gamma-ray bursts has recently been suggested. They may originate in the explosion of stars with much larger radii than normal long gamma-ray bursts or in the tidal disruptions of a star. No clear supernova had yet been associated with an ultra-long gamma-ray burst. Here we report that a supernova (2011kl) was associated with the ultra-long duration burst 111209A, at z=0.677. This supernova is more than 3 times more luminous than type Ic supernovae associated with long gamma-ray bursts, and its spectrum is distinctly different. The continuum slope resembles those of super-luminous supernovae, but extends farther down into the rest-frame ultra-violet implying a low metal content. The light curve evolves much more rapidly than super-luminous supernovae. The combination of high luminosity and low metal-line opacity cannot be reconciled with typical type Ic supernovae, but can be reproduced by a model where extra energy is injected by a strongly magnetized neutron star (a magnetar), which has also been proposed as the explanation for super-luminous supernovae.
[136]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.05721  [pdf] - 1579644
Spitzer bright, UltraVISTA faint sources in COSMOS: the contribution to the overall population of massive galaxies at z=3-7
Comments: 18 pages, 15 figures, 4 tables. Updated to match version in press at the ApJ
Submitted: 2015-05-21, last modified: 2015-08-25
We have analysed a sample of 574 Spitzer 4.5 micron-selected galaxies with [4.5]<23 and Ks_auto>24 (AB) over the UltraVISTA ultra-deep COSMOS field. Our aim is to investigate whether these mid-IR bright, near-IR faint sources contribute significantly to the overall population of massive galaxies at redshifts z>=3. By performing a spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis using up to 30 photometric bands, we have determined that the redshift distribution of our sample peaks at redshifts z~2.5-3.0, and ~32% of the galaxies lie at z>=3. We have studied the contribution of these sources to the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) at high redshifts. We found that the [4.5]<23, Ks_auto>24 galaxies produce a negligible change to the GSMF previously determined for Ks_auto<24 sources at 3=<z<4, but their contribution is more important at 4=<z<5, accounting for >~50% of the galaxies with stellar masses Mst>~6 x 10^10 Msun. We also constrained the GSMF at the highest-mass end (Mst>~2 x 10^11 Msun) at z>=5. From their presence at 5=<z<6, and virtual absence at higher redshifts, we can pinpoint quite precisely the moment of appearance of the first most massive galaxies as taking place in the ~0.2 Gyr of elapsed time between z~6 and z~5. Alternatively, if very massive galaxies existed earlier in cosmic time, they should have been significantly dust-obscured to lie beyond the detection limits of current, large-area, deep near-IR surveys.
[137]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.04246  [pdf] - 1258772
The Optically Unbiased Gamma-Ray Burst Host (TOUGH) Survey. VII. The Host Galaxy Luminosity Function: Probing the Relationship Between GRBs and Star Formation to Redshift $\sim6$
Comments: ApJ, in press (including revisions according to the language editor), 14 pages, 10 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2015-03-13, last modified: 2015-07-16
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a route to characterizing star-forming galaxies and quantifying high-$z$ star formation that is distinct from the approach of traditional galaxy surveys: GRB selection is independent of dust and probes even the faintest galaxies that can evade detection in flux-limited surveys. However, the exact relation between the GRB rate and the star formation rate (SFR) throughout all redshifts is controversial. The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) survey includes observations of all GRB hosts (69) in an optically unbiased sample of Swift GRBs and we utilize these to constrain the evolution of the UV GRB-host-galaxy luminosity function (LF) between $z=0$ and $z=4.5$, and compare this with LFs derived from both Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) surveys and simulation modeling. At all redshifts we find the GRB hosts to be most consistent with a luminosity function derived from SFR weighted models incorporating GRB production via both metallicity-dependent and independent channels with a relatively high level of bias toward low metallicity hosts. In the range $1<z<3$ an SFR weighted LBG derived (i.e., non-metallicity biased) LF is also a reasonable fit to the data. Between $z\sim3$ and $z\sim6$, we observe an apparent lack of UV bright hosts in comparison with LBGs, though the significance of this shortfall is limited by nine hosts of unknown redshift.
[138]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.4804  [pdf] - 1265605
VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy of the afterglow of the Swift GRB 130606A: Chemical abundances and reionisation at $z\sim6$
Comments: 15 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2014-09-16, last modified: 2015-07-09
The reionisation of the Universe is thought to have ended around z~6, as inferred from spectroscopy of distant bright background sources, such as quasars (QSO) and gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Furthermore, spectroscopy of a GRB afterglow provides insight in its host galaxy, which is often too dim and distant to study otherwise. We present the high S/N VLT/X-shooter spectrum of GRB130606A at z=5.913. We aim to measure the degree of ionisation of the IGM between 5.02<z<5.84 and to study the chemical abundance pattern and dust content of its host galaxy. We measured the flux decrement due to absorption at Ly$\alpha$, $\beta$ and $\gamma$ wavelength regions. The hydrogen and metal absorption lines formed in the host galaxy were fitted with Voigt profiles to obtain column densities. Our measurements of the Ly$\alpha$-forest optical depth are consistent with previous measurements of QSOs, but have a much smaller uncertainty. The analysis of the red damping wing yields a neutral fraction $x_{HI}<0.05$ (3$\sigma$). We obtain column density measurements of several elements. The ionisation corrections due to the GRB is estimated to be negligible (<0.03 dex), but larger corrections may apply due to the pre-existing radiation field (up to 0.4 dex based on sub-DLA studies). Our measurements confirm that the Universe is already predominantly ionised over the redshift range probed in this work, but was slightly more neutral at z>5.6. GRBs are useful probes of the ionisation state of the IGM in the early Universe, but because of internal scatter we need a larger statistical sample to draw robust conclusions. The high [Si/Fe] in the host can be due to dust depletion, alpha-element enhancement, or a combination of both. The very high value of [Al/Fe]=2.40+/-0.78 might connected to the stellar population history. We estimate the host metallicity to be -1.7<[M/H]<-0.9 (2%-13% of solar). (trunc.)
[139]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.02101  [pdf] - 1280820
Diversity in extinction laws of Type Ia supernovae measured between $0.2$ and $2\,\mu\mathrm{m}$
Comments: 31 pages, 28 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-04-08, last modified: 2015-07-08
We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of six nearby Type~Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, three of which were also observed in the near-IR (NIR) with Wide-Field Camera~3. UV observations with the Swift satellite, as well as ground-based optical and near-infrared data provide complementary information. The combined data-set covers the wavelength range $0.2$--$2~\mu$m. By also including archival data of SN 2014J, we analyse a sample spanning observed colour excesses up to $E(B-V)=1.4~$mag. We study the wavelength dependent extinction of each individual SN and find a diversity of reddening laws when characterised by the total-to-selective extinction $R_V$. In particular, we note that for the two SNe with $E(B-V)\gtrsim1~$mag, for which the colour excess is dominated by dust extinction, we find $R_V=1.4\pm0.1$ and $R_V=2.8\pm0.1$. Adding UV photometry reduces the uncertainty of fitted $R_V$ by $\sim50\,$% allowing us to also measure $R_V$ of individual low-extinction objects which point to a similar diversity, currently not accounted for in the analyses when SNe~Ia are used for studying the expansion history of the universe.
[140]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.2976  [pdf] - 1258685
The galaxy luminosity function at z ~ 6 and evidence for rapid evolution in the bright end from z ~ 7 to 5
Comments: 27 pages, 13 figures, updated to match MNRAS accepted version
Submitted: 2014-11-11, last modified: 2015-06-25
We present the results of a search for bright (-22.7 < M_UV < -20.5) Lyman-break galaxies at z ~ 6 within a total of 1.65 square degrees of imaging in the UltraVISTA/COSMOS and UKIDSS UDS/SXDS fields. The deep near-infrared imaging available in the two independent fields, in addition to deep optical (including z'-band) data, enables the sample of z ~ 6 star-forming galaxies to be securely detected long-ward of the break (in contrast to several previous studies). We show that the expected contamination rate of our initial sample by cool galactic brown dwarfs is < 3 per cent and demonstrate that they can be effectively removed by fitting brown dwarf spectral templates to the photometry. At z ~ 6 the galaxy surface density in the UltraVISTA field exceeds that in the UDS by a factor of ~ 1.8, indicating strong cosmic variance even between degree-scale fields at z > 5. We calculate the bright end of the rest-frame Ultra-Violet (UV) luminosity function (LF) at z ~ 6. The galaxy number counts are a factor of ~1.7 lower than predicted by the recent LF determination by Bouwens et al.. In comparison to other smaller area studies, we find an evolution in the characteristic magnitude between z ~ 5 and z ~ 7 of dM* ~ 0.4 mag, and show that a double power-law or a Schechter function can equally well describe the LF at z = 6. Furthermore, the bright-end of the LF appears to steepen from z ~ 7 to z ~ 5, which could indicate the onset of mass quenching or the rise of dust obscuration, a conclusion supported by comparing the observed LFs to a range of theoretical model predictions.
[141]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.03522  [pdf] - 1441471
GRB 140606B / iPTF14bfu: Detection of shock-breakout emission from a cosmological gamma-ray burst?
Comments: Pre-print version: 14 Figs, 9 Tables, accepted at MNRAS. Comments and discussion are welcomed
Submitted: 2015-05-13, last modified: 2015-06-10
We present optical and near-infrared photometry of GRB~140606B ($z=0.384$), and optical photometry and spectroscopy of its associated supernova (SN). The results of our modelling indicate that the bolometric properties of the SN ($M_{\rm Ni} = 0.4\pm0.2$~M$_{\odot}$, $M_{\rm ej} = 5\pm2$~M$_{\odot}$, and $E_{\rm K} = 2\pm1 \times 10^{52}$ erg) are fully consistent with the statistical averages determined for other GRB-SNe. However, in terms of its $\gamma$-ray emission, GRB~140606B is an outlier of the Amati relation, and occupies the same region as low-luminosity ($ll$) and short GRBs. The $\gamma$-ray emission in $ll$GRBs is thought to arise in some or all events from a shock-breakout (SBO), rather than from a jet. The measured peak photon energy ($E_{\rm p}\approx800$ keV) is close to that expected for $\gamma$-rays created by a SBO ($\gtrsim1$ MeV). Moreover, based on its position in the $M_{V,\rm p}$--$L_{\rm iso,\gamma}$~plane and the $E_{\rm K}$--$\Gamma\beta$~plane, GRB~140606B has properties similar to both SBO-GRBs and jetted-GRBs. Additionally, we searched for correlations between the isotropic $\gamma$-ray emission and the bolometric properties of a sample of GRB-SNe, finding that no statistically significant correlation is present. The average kinetic energy of the sample is $\bar{E}_{\rm K} = 2.1\times10^{52}$ erg. All of the GRB-SNe in our sample, with the exception of SN 2006aj, are within this range, which has implications for the total energy budget available to power both the relativistic and non-relativistic components in a GRB-SN event.
[142]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.6315  [pdf] - 1449744
The warm, the excited, and the molecular gas: GRB 121024A shining through its star-forming galaxy
Comments: 20 pages, 11 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-09-22, last modified: 2015-05-10
We present the first reported case of the simultaneous metallicity determination of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy, from both afterglow absorption lines as well as strong emission-line diagnostics. Using spectroscopic and imaging observations of the afterglow and host of the long-duration Swift GRB121024A at z = 2.30, we give one of the most complete views of a GRB host/environment to date. We observe a strong damped Ly-alpha absorber (DLA) with a hydrogen column density of log N(HI) = 21.88 +/- 0.10, H2 absorption in the Lyman-Werner bands (molecular fraction of log(f)~ -1.4; fourth solid detection of molecular hydrogen in a GRB-DLA), the nebular emission lines H-alpha, H-beta, [O II], [O III] and [N II], as well as metal absorption lines. We find a GRB host galaxy that is highly star-forming (SFR ~ 40 solar masses/yr ), with a dust-corrected metallicity along the line of sight of [Zn/H]corr = -0.6 +/- 0.2 ([O/H] ~ -0.3 from emission lines), and a depletion factor [Zn/Fe] = 0.85 +/- 0.04. The molecular gas is separated by 400 km/s (and 1-3 kpc) from the gas that is photoexcited by the GRB. This implies a fairly massive host, in agreement with the derived stellar mass of log(M/M_solar ) = 9.9+/- 0.2. We dissect the host galaxy by characterising its molecular component, the excited gas, and the line-emitting star-forming regions. The extinction curve for the line of sight is found to be unusually flat (Rv ~15). We discuss the possibility of an anomalous grain size distributions. We furthermore discuss the different metallicity determinations from both absorption and emission lines, which gives consistent results for the line of sight to GRB 121024A.
[143]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.02874  [pdf] - 1212342
A study of purely astrometric selection of extragalactic point sources with Gaia
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures, sent in and accepted for publishing to A&A
Submitted: 2015-03-10, last modified: 2015-05-08
Selection of extragalactic point sources, e.g. QSOs, is often hampered by significant selection effects causing existing samples to have rather complex selection functions. We explore whether a purely astrometric selection of extragalactic point sources, e.g. QSOs, is feasible with the ongoing Gaia mission. Such a selection would be interesting as it would be unbiased in terms of colours of the targets and hence would allow selection also with colours in the stellar sequence. We have analyzed a total of 18 representative regions of the sky by using GUMS, the simulator prepared for ESAs Gaia mission, both in the range of $12\le G \le 20$ mag and $12\le G \le 18$ mag. For each region we determine the density of apparently stationary stellar sources, i.e. sources for which Gaia cannot measure a significant proper motion. The density is contrasted with the density of extragalactic point sources, e.g. QSOs, in order to establish in which celestial directions a pure astrometric selection is feasible. When targeting regions at galactic latitude $|b| \ge 30^\mathrm{o}$ the ratio of QSOs to apparently stationary stars is above 50\% and when observing towards the poles the fraction of QSOs goes up to about $\sim80$\%. We show that the proper motions from the proposed Gaia successor mission in about 20 years would dramatically improve these results at all latitudes. Detection of QSOs solely from zero proper motion, unbiased by any assumptions on spectra, might lead to the discovery of new types of QSOs or new classes of extragalactic point sources.
[144]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.01859  [pdf] - 1579636
Deep rest-frame far-UV spectroscopy of the giant Lyman-alpha emitter 'Himiko'
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-05-07
We present deep 10h VLT/XSHOOTER spectroscopy for an extraordinarily luminous and extended Lya emitter at z=6.595 referred to as Himiko and first discussed by Ouchi et al. (2009), with the purpose of constraining the mechanisms powering its strong emission. Complementary to the spectrum, we discuss NIR imaging data from the CANDELS survey. We find neither for HeII nor any metal line a significant excess, with 3 sigma upper limits of 6.8, 3.1, and 5.8x10^{-18} erg/s/cm^2 for CIV $\lambda$1549, HeII $\lambda$1640, CIII] $\lambda$1909, respectively, assuming apertures with 200 km/s widths and offset by -250 km/s w.r.t to the peak Lya redshift. These limits provide strong evidence that an AGN is not a major contribution to Himiko's Lya flux. Strong conclusions about the presence of PopIII star-formation or gravitational cooling radiation are not possible based on the obtained HeII upper limit. Our Lya spectrum confirms both spatial extent and flux (8.8+/-0.5x10^{-17} erg/s/cm^2) of previous measurements. In addition, we can unambiguously exclude any remaining chance of it being a lower redshift interloper by significantly detecting a continuum redwards of Lya, while being undetected bluewards.
[145]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.03005  [pdf] - 1579625
Emission line selected galaxies at $z=0.6-2$ in GOODS South: Stellar masses, SFRs, and large scale structure
Comments: 18 pages, 19 figures, version accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2015-04-12
We have obtained deep NIR narrow and broad (J and Y) band imaging data of the GOODS-South field. The narrow band filter is centered at 1060 nm corresponding to redshifts $z = 0.62, 1.15, 1.85$ for the strong emission lines H$\alpha$, $[$OIII$]$/H$\beta$ and $[$OII$]$, respectively. From those data we extract a well defined sample ($M(AB)=24.8$ in the narrow band) of objects with large emission line equivalent widths in the narrow band. Via SED fits to published broad band data we identify which of the three lines we have detected and assign redshifts accordingly. This results in a well defined, strong emission line selected sample of galaxies down to lower masses than can easily be obtained with only continuum flux limited selection techniques. We compare the (SED fitting-derived) main sequence of star-formation (MS) of our sample to previous works and find that it has a steeper slope than that of samples of more massive galaxies. We conclude that the MS steepens at lower (below $M_{\star} = 10^{9.4} M_{\odot}$) galaxy masses. We also show that the SFR at any redshift is higher in our sample. We attribute this to the targeted selection of galaxies with large emission line equivalent widths, and conclude that our sample presumably forms the upper boundary of the MS. We briefly investigate and outline how samples with accurate redshifts down to those low stellar masses open a new window to study the formation of large scale structure in the early universe. In particular we report on the detection of a young galaxy cluster at $z=1.85$ which features a central massive galaxy which is the candidate of an early stage cD galaxy, and we identify a likely filament mapped out by $[$OIII$]$ and $H\beta$ emitting galaxies at $z=1.15$.
[146]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3416  [pdf] - 1216310
Stellar mass functions of galaxies at 4<z<7 from an IRAC-selected sample in COSMOS/UltraVISTA: limits on the abundance of very massive galaxies
Comments: 23 pages, 18 figures. ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2014-08-14, last modified: 2015-03-30
We build a Spitzer IRAC complete catalog of objects, obtained by complementing the $K_\mathrm{s}$-band selected UltraVISTA catalog with objects detected in IRAC only. With the aim of identifying massive (i.e., $\log(M_*/M_\odot)>11$) galaxies at $4<z<7$, we consider the systematic effects on the measured photometric redshifts from the introduction of an old and dusty SED template and from the introduction of a bayesian prior taking into account the brightness of the objects, as well as the systematic effects from different star formation histories (SFHs) and from nebular emission lines in the recovery of stellar population parameters. We show that our results are most affected by the bayesian luminosity prior, while nebular emission lines and SFHs only introduce a small dispersion in the measurements. Specifically, the number of $4<z<7$ galaxies ranges from 52 to 382 depending on the adopted configuration. Using these results we investigate, for the first time, the evolution of the massive end of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) at $4<z<7$. Given the rarity of very massive galaxies in the early universe, major contributions to the total error budget come from cosmic variance and poisson noise. The SMF obtained without the introduction of the bayesian luminosity prior does not show any evolution from $z\sim6.5$ to $z\sim 3.5$, implying that massive galaxies could already be present when the Universe was $\sim0.9$~Gyr old. However, the introduction of the bayesian luminosity prior reduces the number of $z>4$ galaxies with best fit masses $\log(M_*/M_\odot)>11$ by 83%, implying a rapid growth of very massive galaxies in the first 1.5 Gyr of cosmic history. From the stellar-mass complete sample, we identify one candidate of a very massive ($\log(M_*/M_\odot)\sim11.5$), quiescent galaxy at $z\sim5.4$, with MIPS $24\mu$m detection suggesting the presence of a powerful obscured AGN.
[147]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.03623  [pdf] - 1450544
Spectrophotometric analysis of GRB afterglow extinction curves with X-shooter
Comments: 17 pages, 7 figures, 4 tables, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2015-03-12
In this work we use gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra observed with the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph to measure rest-frame extinction in GRB lines-of-sight by modeling the broadband near-infrared (NIR) to X-ray afterglow spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Our sample consists of nine Swift GRBs, eight of them belonging to the long-duration and one to the short-duration class. Dust is modeled using the average extinction curves of the Milky Way and the two Magellanic Clouds. We derive the rest-frame extinction of the entire sample, which fall in the range $0 \lesssim {\it A}_{\rm V} \lesssim 1.2$. Moreover, the SMC extinction curve is the preferred extinction curve template for the majority of our sample, a result which is in agreement with those commonly observed in GRB lines-of-sights. In one analysed case (GRB 120119A), the common extinction curve templates fail to reproduce the observed extinction. To illustrate the advantage of using the high-quality X-shooter afterglow SEDs over the photometric SEDs, we repeat the modeling using the broadband SEDs with the NIR-to-UV photometric measurements instead of the spectra. The main result is that the spectroscopic data, thanks to a combination of excellent resolution and coverage of the blue part of the SED, are more successful in constraining the extinction curves and therefore the dust properties in GRB hosts with respect to photometric measurements. In all cases but one the extinction curve of one template is preferred over the others. We show that the modeled values of the extinction and the spectral slope, obtained through spectroscopic and photometric SED analysis, can differ significantly for individual events. Finally we stress that, regardless of the resolution of the optical-to-NIR data, the SED modeling gives reliable results only when the fit is performed on a SED covering a broader spectral region.
[148]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.7783  [pdf] - 1222852
The High A(V) Quasar Survey: Reddened quasi-stellar objects selected from optical/near-infrared photometry - II
Comments: 64 pages, 18 figures, 16 pages of tables. Accepted to ApJS
Submitted: 2014-10-28, last modified: 2015-02-04
Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) whose spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are reddened by dust either in their host galaxies or in intervening absorber galaxies are to a large degree missed by optical color selection criteria like the one used by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To overcome this bias against red QSOs, we employ a combined optical and near-infrared color selection. In this paper, we present a spectroscopic follow-up campaign of a sample of red candidate QSOs which were selected from the SDSS and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The spectroscopic data and SDSS/UKIDSS photometry are supplemented by mid-infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. In our sample of 159 candidates, 154 (97%) are confirmed to be QSOs. We use a statistical algorithm to identify sightlines with plausible intervening absorption systems and identify nine such cases assuming dust in the absorber similar to Large Magellanic Cloud sightlines. We find absorption systems toward 30 QSOs, 2 of which are consistent with the best-fit absorber redshift from the statistical modeling. Furthermore, we observe a broad range in SED properties of the QSOs as probed by the rest-frame 2 {\mu}m flux. We find QSOs with a strong excess as well as QSOs with a large deficit at rest-frame 2 {\mu}m relative to a QSO template. Potential solutions to these discrepancies are discussed. Overall, our study demonstrates the high efficiency of the optical/near-infrared selection of red QSOs.
[149]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.05312  [pdf] - 1224118
Overturning the Case for Gravitational Powering in the Prototypical Cooling Lyman-alpha Nebula
Comments: Accepted to ApJ; 21 pages in emulateapj format; 12 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2015-01-21
The Nilsson et al. (2006) Lyman-alpha nebula has often been cited as the most plausible example of a Lyman-alpha nebula powered by gravitational cooling. In this paper, we bring together new data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory as well as comparisons to recent theoretical simulations in order to revisit the questions of the local environment and most likely power source for the Lyman-alpha nebula. In contrast to previous results, we find that this Lyman-alpha nebula is associated with 6 nearby galaxies and an obscured AGN that is offset by $\sim$4"$\approx$30 kpc from the Lyman-alpha peak. The local region is overdense relative to the field, by a factor of $\sim$10, and at low surface brightness levels the Lyman-alpha emission appears to encircle the position of the obscured AGN, highly suggestive of a physical association. At the same time, we confirm that there is no compact continuum source located within $\sim$2-3"$\approx$15-23 kpc of the Lyman-alpha peak. Since the latest cold accretion simulations predict that the brightest Lyman-alpha emission will be coincident with a central growing galaxy, we conclude that this is actually a strong argument against, rather than for, the idea that the nebula is gravitationally-powered. While we may be seeing gas within cosmic filaments, this gas is primarily being lit up, not by gravitational energy, but due to illumination from a nearby buried AGN.
[150]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3923  [pdf] - 1216352
Detailed Afterglow Modeling and Host Galaxy Properties of the Dark GRB 111215A
Comments: 11 pages, 4 figures, 4 tables; accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-08-18, last modified: 2014-11-14
Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 111215A was bright at X-ray and radio frequencies, but not detected in the optical or near-infrared (nIR) down to deep limits. We have observed the GRB afterglow with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at radio frequencies, with the William Herschel Telescope and Nordic Optical Telescope in the nIR/optical, and with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have combined our data with the Swift X-Ray Telescope monitoring, and radio and millimeter observations from the literature to perform broadband modeling, and determined the macro- and microphysical parameters of the GRB blast wave. By combining the broadband modeling results with our nIR upper limits we have put constraints on the extinction in the host galaxy. This is consistent with the optical extinction we have derived from the excess X-ray absorption, and higher than in other dark bursts for which similar modeling work has been performed. We also present deep imaging of the host galaxy with the Keck I telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST), which resulted in a well-constrained photometric redshift, giving credence to the tentative spectroscopic redshift we obtained with the Keck II telescope, and estimates for the stellar mass and star formation rate of the host. Finally, our high resolution HST images of the host galaxy show that the GRB afterglow position is offset from the brightest regions of the host galaxy, in contrast to studies of optically bright GRBs.
[151]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.3510  [pdf] - 1222554
On the mass-metallicity relation, velocity dispersion and gravitational well depth of GRB host galaxies
Comments: 11 pages, 6 figures, 6 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS Main Journal. For the definitive version visit http://mnras.oxfordjournals.org/
Submitted: 2014-10-13, last modified: 2014-10-15
We analyze a sample of 16 absorption systems intrinsic to long duration GRB host galaxies at $z \gtrsim 2$ for which the metallicities are known. We compare the relation between the metallicity and cold gas velocity width for this sample to that of the QSO-DLAs, and find complete agreement. We then compare the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity relation of our sample to that of QSO-DLAs and find that also GRB hosts favour a late onset of this evolution, around a redshift of $\approx 2.6$. We compute predicted stellar masses for the GRB host galaxies using the prescription determined from QSO-DLA samples and compare the measured stellar masses for the four hosts where stellar masses have been determined from SED fits. We find excellent agreement and conclude that, on basis of all available data and tests, long duration GRB-DLA hosts and intervening QSO-DLAs are consistent with being drawn from the same underlying population. GRB host galaxies and QSO-DLAs are found to have different impact parameter distributions and we briefly discuss how this may affect statistical samples. The impact parameter distribution has two effects. First any metallicity gradient will shift the measured metallicity away from the metallicity in the centre of the galaxy, second the path of the sightline through different parts of the potential well of the dark matter halo will cause different velocity fields to be sampled. We report evidence suggesting that this second effect may have been detected.
[152]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.0489  [pdf] - 875511
Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A
Comments: Published as Wiersema et al. 2014, Nature 509, 201-204. This is the version prior to final editing; please see official published version for the final version and higher quality images
Submitted: 2014-10-02
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet, when measured minutes after the burst, and the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after burst in GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and negligable circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blastwave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized optical light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.15 days after the burst. We show that the circular polarization is intrinsic to the afterglow and unlikely to be produced by dust scattering or plasma propagation effects. A possible explanation is to invoke anisotropic (rather than the commonly assumed isotropic) electron pitch angle distributions, and we suggest that new models are required to produce the complex microphysics of realistic shocks in relativistic jets.
[153]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.4975  [pdf] - 903745
The mysterious optical afterglow spectrum of GRB140506A at z=0.889
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures. Accepted for publications in A&A
Submitted: 2014-09-17, last modified: 2014-09-18
Context. Gamma-ray burst (GRBs) afterglows probe sightlines to star-forming regions in distant star-forming galaxies. Here we present a study of the peculiar afterglow spectrum of the z = 0.889 Swift GRB 140506A. Aims. Our aim is to understand the origin of the very unusual properties of the absorption along the line-of-sight. Methods. We analyse spectroscopic observations obtained with the X-shooter spectrograph mounted on the ESO/VLT at two epochs 8.8 h and 33 h after the burst as well as imaging from the GROND instrument. We also present imaging and spectroscopy of the host galaxy obtained with the Magellan telescope. Results. The underlying afterglow appears to be a typical afterglow of a long-duration GRB. However, the material along the line-of- sight has imprinted very unusual features on the spectrum. Firstly, there is a very broad and strong flux drop below 8000 AA (4000 AA in the rest frame), which seems to be variable between the two spectroscopic epochs. We can reproduce the flux-drops both as a giant 2175 AA extinction bump and as an effect of multiple scattering on dust grains in a dense environment. Secondly, we detect absorption lines from excited H i and He i. We also detect molecular absorption from CH+ . Conclusions. We interpret the unusual properties of these spectra as reflecting the presence of three distinct regions along the line-of-sight: the excited He i absorption originates from an H ii-region, whereas the Balmer absorption must originate from an associated photodissociation region. The strong metal line and molecular absorption and the dust extinction must originate from a third, cooler region along the line-of-sight. The presence of (at least) three separate regions is reflected in the fact that the different absorption components have different velocities relative to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy.
[154]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.6529  [pdf] - 1579520
Verifying the mass-metallicity relation in damped Lyman-alpha selected galaxies at 0.1<z<3.2
Comments: 15 pages, 6 figures. Major revision. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-04-25, last modified: 2014-08-22
A scaling relation has recently been suggested to combine the galaxy mass-metallicity (MZ) relation with metallicities of damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs) in quasar spectra. Based on this relation the stellar masses of the absorbing galaxies can be predicted. We test this prediction by measuring the stellar masses of 12 galaxies in confirmed DLA absorber - galaxy pairs in the redshift range 0.1<z<3.2. We find an excellent agreement between the predicted and measured stellar masses over three orders of magnitude, and we determine the average offset $\langle C_{[M/H]} \rangle$ = 0.44+/-0.10 between absorption and emission metallicities. We further test if $C_{[M/H]}$ could depend on the impact parameter and find a correlation at the 5.5sigma level. The impact parameter dependence of the metallicity corresponds to an average metallicity difference of -0.022+/-0.004 dex/kpc. By including this metallicity vs. impact parameter correlation in the prescription instead of $C_{[M/H]}$, the scatter reduces to 0.39 dex in log M*. We provide a prescription how to calculate the stellar mass (M*,DLA) of the galaxy when both the DLA metallicity and DLA galaxy impact parameter is known. We demonstrate that DLA galaxies follow the MZ relation for luminosity-selected galaxies at z=0.7 and z=2.2 when we include a correction for the correlation between impact parameter and metallicity.
[155]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.0003  [pdf] - 1203114
The Progenitors of Local Ultra-massive Galaxies Across Cosmic Time: from Dusty Star-bursting to Quiescent Stellar Populations
Comments: 20 pages, 15 figures (6 of which in appendix); accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2014-01-31, last modified: 2014-08-15
Using the UltraVISTA catalogs, we investigate the evolution in the 11.4~Gyr since $z=3$ of the progenitors of local ultra-massive galaxies ($\log{(M_{\rm star}/M_{\odot})}\approx11.8$; UMGs), providing a complete and consistent picture of how the most massive galaxies at $z=0$ have assembled. By selecting the progenitors with a semi-empirical approach using abundance matching, we infer a growth in stellar mass of 0.56$^{+0.35}_{-0.25}$ dex, 0.45$^{+0.16}_{-0.20}$~dex, and 0.27$^{+0.08}_{-0.12}$ dex from $z=3$, $z=2$, and $z=1$, respectively, to $z=0$. At $z<1$, the progenitors of UMGs constitute a homogeneous population of only quiescent galaxies with old stellar populations. At $z>1$, the contribution from star-forming galaxies progressively increases, with the progenitors at $2<z<3$ being dominated by massive ($M_{\rm star} \approx 2 \times 10^{11}$M$_{\odot}$), dusty ($A_{\rm V}\sim$1--2.2 mag), star-forming (SFR$\sim$100--400~M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$) galaxies with a large range in stellar ages. At $z=2.75$, $\sim$15\% of the progenitors are quiescent, with properties typical of post-starburst galaxies with little dust extinction and strong Balmer break, and showing a large scatter in color. Our findings indicate that at least half of the stellar content of local UMGs was assembled at $z>1$, whereas the remaining was assembled via merging from $z\sim 1$ to the present. Most of the quenching of the star-forming progenitors happened between $z=2.75$ and $z=1.25$, in good agreement with the typical formation redshift and scatter in age of $z=0$ UMGs as derived from their fossil records. The progenitors of local UMGs, including the star-forming ones, never lived on the blue cloud since $z=3$. We propose an alternative path for the formation of local UMGs that refines previously proposed pictures and that is fully consistent with our findings.
[156]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.5338  [pdf] - 1172862
Hubble Space Telescope observations of the afterglow, supernova and host galaxy associated with the extremely bright GRB 130427A
Comments: 8 pages, replaced with accepted version
Submitted: 2013-07-19, last modified: 2014-07-14
We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst ($E_{iso} >10^{54}$ erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light ~17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN~2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v$_{ph}$ ~15,000 km/s). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN~2010bh (v$_{ph}$ ~ 30,000 km/s), but SN 2010bh is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ~4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Msol/yr), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.
[157]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.3114  [pdf] - 862776
A Trio of GRB-SNe: GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez and GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu
Comments: Archive copy - 24 pages, 12 Figures, 3 Tables. Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2014-05-13
We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry for three gamma-ray burst supernovae (GRB-SNe): GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez and GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu. In the case of GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez, we also present optical spectroscopy at t-t0=16.1 d, which covers rest-frame 3000-6250 Angstroms. Based on Fe II (5169) and Si (II) (6355), our spectrum indicates an unusually low expansion velocity of 4000-6350 km/s, the lowest ever measured for a GRB-SN. Additionally, we determined the brightness and shape of each accompanying SN relative to a template supernova (SN 1998bw), which were used to estimate the amount of nickel produced via nucleosynthesis during each explosion. We find that our derived nickel masses are typical of other GRB-SNe, and greater than those of SNe Ibc that are not associated with GRBs. For GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu, we use our well-sampled R-band light curve (LC) to estimate the amount of ejecta mass and the kinetic energy of the SN, finding that these too are similar to other GRB-SNe. For GRB 130215A, we take advantage of contemporaneous optical/NIR observations to construct an optical/NIR bolometric LC of the afterglow. We fit the bolometric LC with the millisecond magnetar model of Zhang & Meszaros (2001), which considers dipole radiation as a source of energy injection to the forward shock powering the optical/NIR afterglow. Using this model we derive an initial spin period of P=12 ms and a magnetic field of B=1.1 x 10^15 G, which are commensurate with those found for proposed magnetar central engines of other long-duration GRBs.
[158]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.4457  [pdf] - 815294
Hubble Space Telescope and Ground-Based Observations of the Type Iax Supernovae SN 2005hk and SN 2008A
Comments: 20 pages, 15 figures
Submitted: 2013-09-17, last modified: 2014-04-25
We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from all other SN types. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in other SNe at late phases, spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with n_e >~ 10^9 cm^-3. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected "infrared catastrophe," a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photometry of SN 2008A does not match the predictions of an infrared catastrophe. Moreover, our HST observations rule out a "complete deflagration" that fully disrupts the white dwarf for these peculiar SNe, showing no evidence for unburned material at late times. Deflagration explosion models that leave behind a bound remnant can match some of the observed properties of SNe Iax, but no published model is consistent with all of our observations of SNe 2005hk and 2008A.
[159]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.0881  [pdf] - 1208785
The host of the SN-less GRB 060505 in high resolution
Comments: 15 pages, 16 figures, 6 tables; resubmitted to MNRAS after minor revisions
Submitted: 2014-04-03
The spiral host galaxy of GRB 060505 at z=0.089 was the site of a puzzling long duration burst without an accompanying supernova. Studies of the burst environment by Th\"one et al. (2008) suggested that this GRB came from the collapse of a massive star and that the GRB site was a region with properties different from the rest of the galaxy. We reobserved the galaxy in high spatial resolution using the VIMOS integral-field unit (IFU) at the VLT with a spaxel size of 0.67 arcsec. Furthermore, we use long slit high resolution data from HIRES/Keck at two different slit positions covering the GRB site, the center of the galaxy and an HII region next to the GRB region. We compare the properties of different HII regions in the galaxy with the GRB site and study the global and local kinematic properties of this galaxy. The resolved data show that the GRB site has the lowest metallicity in the galaxy with around 1/3 Z_solar, but its specific SFR (SSFR) of 7.4 M_solar/yr/L/L* and age (determined by the Halpha EW) are similar to other HII regions in the host. The galaxy shows a gradient in metallicity and SSFR from the bulge to the outskirts as it is common for spiral galaxies. This gives further support to the theory that GRBs prefer regions of higher star-formation and lower metallicity, which, in S-type galaxies, are more easily found in the spiral arms than in the centre. Kinematic measurements of the galaxy do not show evidence for large perturbations but a minor merger in the past cannot be excluded. This study confirms the collapsar origin of GRB060505 but reveals that the properties of the HII region surrounding the GRB were not unique to that galaxy. Spatially resolved observations are key to know the implications and interpretations of unresolved GRB hosts observations at higher redshifts.
[160]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.2940  [pdf] - 806779
The metallicity and dust content of a redshift 5 gamma-ray burst host galaxy
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2013-09-11, last modified: 2014-03-12
Observations of the afterglows of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow the study of star-forming galaxies across most of cosmic history. Here we present observations of GRB 111008A from which we can measure metallicity, chemical abundance patterns, dust-to-metals ratio and extinction of the GRB host galaxy at z=5.0. The host absorption system is a damped Lyman-alpha absorber (DLA) with a very large neutral hydrogen column density of log N(HI)/cm^(-2) = 22.30 +/- 0.06, and a metallicity of [S/H]= -1.70 +/- 0.10. It is the highest redshift GRB with such a precise metallicity measurement. The presence of fine-structure lines confirms the z=5.0 system as the GRB host galaxy, and makes this the highest redshift where Fe II fine-structure lines have been detected. The afterglow is mildly reddened with A_V = 0.11 +/- 0.04 mag, and the host galaxy has a dust-to-metals ratio which is consistent with being equal to or lower than typical values in the Local Group.
[161]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.5643  [pdf] - 1202378
The bright end of the galaxy luminosity function at z ~ 7: before the onset of mass quenching?
Comments: 36 pages, 13 figures, accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-12-19, last modified: 2014-03-05
We present the results of a new search for bright star-forming galaxies at z ~ 7 within the UltraVISTA DR2 and UKIDSS UDS DR10 data, which together provide 1.65 sq deg of near-infrared imaging with overlapping optical and Spitzer data. Using a full photo-z analysis to identify high-z galaxies and reject contaminants, we have selected a sample of 34 luminous (-22.7 < M_UV < -21.2) galaxies with 6.5 < z < 7.5. Crucially, the deeper imaging provided by UltraVISTA DR2 confirms all of the robust objects previously uncovered by Bowler et al. (2012), validating our selection technique. Our sample includes the most massive galaxies known at z ~ 7, with M_* ~ 10^{10} M_sun, and the majority are resolved, consistent with larger sizes (r_{1/2} ~ 1 - 1.5 kpc) than displayed by less massive galaxies. From our final sample, we determine the form of the bright end of the rest-frame UV galaxy luminosity function (LF) at z ~ 7, providing strong evidence that the bright end of the z = 7 LF does not decline as steeply as predicted by the Schechter function fitted to fainter data. We consider carefully, and exclude the possibility that this is due to either gravitational lensing, or significant contamination of our galaxy sample by AGN. Rather, our results favour a double power-law form for the galaxy LF at high z, or, more interestingly, a LF which simply follows the form of the dark-matter halo mass function at bright magnitudes. This suggests that the physical mechanism which inhibits star-formation activity in massive galaxies (i.e. AGN feedback or some other form of `mass quenching') has yet to impact on the observable galaxy LF at z ~ 7, a conclusion supported by the estimated masses of our brightest galaxies which have only just reached a mass comparable to the critical `quenching mass' of M_* = 10 ^{10.2} M_sun derived from studies of the mass function of star-forming galaxies at lower z.
[162]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.6697  [pdf] - 940702
A 10 deg$^2$ Lyman-$\alpha$ survey at z=8.8 with spectroscopic follow-up: strong constraints on the LF and implications for other surveys
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-02-26
Candidate galaxies at redshifts of $z \sim 10$ are now being found in extremely deep surveys, probing very small areas. As a consequence, candidates are very faint, making spectroscopic confirmation practically impossible. In order to overcome such limitations, we have undertaken the CF-HiZELS survey, which is a large area, medium depth near infrared narrow-band survey targeted at $z=8.8$ Lyman-$\alpha$ (Ly$\alpha$) emitters (LAEs) and covering 10 deg$^2$ in part of the SSA22 field with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We surveyed a comoving volume of $4.7\times 10^6$ Mpc$^3$ to a Ly$\alpha$ luminosity limit of $6.3\times10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$. We look for Ly$\alpha$ candidates by applying the following criteria: i) clear emission line source, ii) no optical detections ($ugriz$ from CFHTLS), iii) no visible detection in the optical stack ($ugriz > 27$), iv) visually checked reliable NB$_J$ and $J$ detections and v) $J-K \leq 0$. We compute photometric redshifts and remove a significant amount of dusty lower redshift line-emitters at $z \sim 1.4 $ or $2.2$. A total of 13 Ly$\alpha$ candidates were found, of which two are marked as strong candidates, but the majority have very weak constraints on their SEDs. Using follow-up observations with SINFONI/VLT we are able to exclude the most robust candidates as Ly$\alpha$ emitters. We put a strong constraint on the Ly$\alpha$ luminosity function at $z \sim 9$ and make realistic predictions for ongoing and future surveys. Our results show that surveys for the highest redshift LAEs are susceptible of multiple contaminations and that spectroscopic follow-up is absolutely necessary.
[163]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.4026  [pdf] - 806331
VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy of the GRB 120327A afterglow
Comments: 18 pages, 12 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2014-02-17
We present a study of the environment of the Swift long gamma-ray burst GRB 120327A at z ~2.8 through optical spectroscopy of its afterglow. We analyzed medium-resolution, multi-epoch spectroscopic observations (~7000 - 12000, corresponding to ~ 15 - 23 km/s, S/N = 15- 30 and wavelength range 3000-25000AA) of the optical afterglow of GRB 120327A, taken with X-shooter at the VLT 2.13 and 27.65 hr after the GRB trigger. The first epoch spectrum shows that the ISM in the GRB host galaxy at z = 2.8145 is extremely rich in absorption features, with three components contributing to the line profiles. The hydrogen column density associated with GRB 120327A has log NH / cm^(-2) = 22.01 +/- 0.09, and the metallicity of the host galaxy is in the range [X/H] = -1.3 to -1.1. In addit