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Fuhrmeister, B.

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27 article(s) in total. 288 co-authors, from 1 to 21 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 2,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.09372  [pdf] - 2117069
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. Variability of the He I line at 10830 \AA
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, accepted by A&A, full Table 2 only available electronically at CDS
Submitted: 2020-06-16
The He I infrared (IR) triplet at 10830 \AA is known as an activity indicator in solar-type stars and has become a primary diagnostic in exoplanetary transmission spectroscopy. He I lines are a tracer of the stellar extreme-ultraviolet irradiation from the transition region and corona. We study the variability of the He I IR triplet lines in a spectral time series of 319 M~dwarf stars that was obtained with the CARMENES high-resolution optical and near-infrared spectrograph at Calar Alto. We detect He I IR line variability in 18% of our sample stars, all of which show H$\alpha$ in emission. Therefore, we find detectable He I IR variability in 78% of the sub-sample of stars with H$\alpha$ emission. Detectable variability is strongly concentrated in the latest spectral sub-types, where the He I IR lines during quiescence are typically weak. The fraction of stars with detectable He I IR variation remains lower than 10% for stars earlier than M3.0 V, while it exceeds 30% for the later spectral sub-types. Flares are accompanied by particularly pronounced line variations, including strongly broadened lines with red and blue asymmetries. However, we also find evidence for enhanced He I IR absorption, which is potentially associated with increased high-energy irradiation levels at flare onset. Generally, He I IR and H$\alpha$ line variations tend to be correlated, with H$\alpha$ being the most sensitive indicator in terms of pseudo-equivalent width variation. This makes the He I IR triplet a favourable target for planetary transmission spectroscopy.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.06246  [pdf] - 2124850
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. The He I infrared triplet lines in PHOENIX models of M2-3 V stars
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A, 13 pages, 9 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2020-05-13
The He I infrared (IR) line at a vacuum wavelength of 10833 A is a diagnostic for the investigation of atmospheres of stars and planets orbiting them. For the first time, we study the behavior of the He I IR line in a set of chromospheric models for M-dwarf stars, whose much denser chromospheres may favor collisions for the level population over photoionization and recombination, which are believed to be dominant in solar-type stars. For this purpose, we use published PHOENIX models for stars of spectral types M2 V and M3 V and also compute new series of models with different levels of activity following an ansatz developed for the case of the Sun. We perform a detailed analysis of the behavior of the He I IR line within these models. We evaluate the line in relation to other chromospheric lines and also the influence of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation field. The analysis of the He I IR line strengths as a function of the respective EUV radiation field strengths suggests that the mechanism of photoionization and recombination is necessary to form the line for inactive models, while collisions start to play a role in our most active models. Moreover, the published model set, which is optimized in the ranges of the Na I D2, H$\alpha$, and the bluest Ca II IR triplet line, gives an adequate prediction of the He I IR line for most stars of the stellar sample. Because especially the most inactive stars with weak He I IR lines are fit worst by our models, it seems that our assumption of a 100% filling factor of a single inactive component no longer holds for these stars.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.00246  [pdf] - 2005557
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. The He I triplet at 10830 $\mathrm{\AA}\,$ across the M dwarf sequence
Comments: 18 pages, 15 figures, A&A accepted
Submitted: 2019-11-01
The He I infrared (IR) triplet at 10830 AA is an important activity indicator for the Sun and in solar-type stars, however, it has rarely been studied in relation to M dwarfs to date. In this study, we use the time-averaged spectra of 319 single stars with spectral types ranging from M0.0 V to M9.0 V obtained with the CARMENES high resolution optical and near-infrared spectrograph at Calar Alto to study the properties of the He I IR triplet lines. In quiescence, we find the triplet in absorption with a decrease of the measured pseudo equivalent width (pEW) towards later sub-types. For stars later than M5.0 V, the He I triplet becomes undetectable in our study. This dependence on effective temperature may be related to a change in chromospheric conditions along the M dwarf sequence. When an emission in the triplet is observed, we attribute it to flaring. The absence of emission during quiescence is consistent with line formation by photo-ionisation and recombination, while flare emission may be caused by collisions within dense material. The He I triplet tends to increase in depth according to increasing activity levels, ultimately becoming filled in; however, we do not find a correlation between the pEW(He IR) and X-ray properties. This behaviour may be attributed to the absence of very inactive stars ($L_{\rm X}/L_{\rm bol}$ < -5.5) in our sample or to the complex behaviour with regard to increasing depth and filling in.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.08053  [pdf] - 2026043
Predicting the Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation Environment of Exoplanets Around Low-Mass Stars: GJ 832, GJ 176, GJ 436
Comments: 21 pages, 12 figures, accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2019-10-17
Correct estimates of stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV; 100 - 1170 \AA) flux are important for studying the photochemistry and stability of exoplanet atmospheres, as EUV radiation ionizes hydrogen and contributes to the heating, expansion, and potential escape of a planet's upper atmosphere. Contamination from interstellar hydrogen makes observing EUV emission from M stars particularly difficult, and impossible past 100 pc, and necessitates other means to predict the flux in this wavelength regime. We present EUV -- infrared (100 \AA - 5.5 $\mu$m) synthetic spectra computed with the PHOENIX atmospheric code of three early M dwarf planet hosts: GJ 832 (M1.5 V), GJ 176 (M2.5 V), and GJ 436 (M3.5 V). These one-dimensional semiempirical nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium models include simple temperature prescriptions for the stellar chromosphere and transition region, from where ultraviolet (UV; 100 - 3008 \AA) fluxes originate. We guide our models with Hubble Space Telescope far- and near-UV spectra and discuss the ability to constrain these models using Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV photometry. Our models closely reproduce the observations and predict the unobservable EUV spectrum at a wavelength resolution of < 0.1 \AA. The temperature profiles that best reproduce the observations for all three stars are described by nearly the same set of parameters, suggesting that early M type stars may have similar thermal structures in their upper atmospheres. With an impending UV observation gap and the scarcity of observed EUV spectra for stars less luminous and more distant than the Sun, upper-atmosphere models such as these are important for providing realistic spectra across short wavelengths and for advancing our understanding of the effects of radiation on planets orbiting M stars.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.12174  [pdf] - 1979781
A giant exoplanet orbiting a very low-mass star challenges planet formation models
Morales, J. C.; Mustill, A. J.; Ribas, I.; Davies, M. B.; Reiners, A.; Bauer, F. F.; Kossakowski, D.; Herrero, E.; Rodríguez, E.; López-González, M. J.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Béjar, V. J. S.; González-Cuesta, L.; Luque, R.; Pallé, E.; Perger, M.; Baroch, D.; Johansen, A.; Klahr, H.; Mordasini, C.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Caballero, J. A.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Dreizler, S.; Lafarga, M.; Nagel, E.; Passegger, V. M.; Reffert, S.; Rosich, A.; Schweitzer, A.; Tal-Or, L.; Trifonov, T.; Zechmeister, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Guenther, E. W.; Hagen, H. -J.; Henning, T.; Jeffers, S. V.; Kaminski, A.; Kürster, M.; Montes, D.; Seifert, W.; Abellán, F. J.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, J.; Aceituno, F. J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Antona, R.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Azzaro, M.; Barrado, D.; Becerril-Jarque, S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Bergond, G.; Brinkmöller, M.; del Burgo, C.; Burn, R.; Calvo-Ortega, R.; Cano, J.; Cárdenas, M. C.; Guillén, C. Cardona; Carro, J.; Casal, E.; Casanova, V.; Casasayas-Barris, N.; Chaturvedi, P.; Cifuentes, C.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Czesla, S.; Díez-Alonso, E.; Dorda, R.; Emsenhuber, A.; Fernández, M.; Fernández-Martín, A.; Ferro, I. M.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Cava, I. Gallardo; Vargas, M. L. García; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Gesa, L.; González-Álvarez, E.; Hernández, J. I. González; González-Peinado, R.; Guàrdia, J.; Guijarro, A.; de Guindos, E.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Hermelo, I.; Arabi, R. Hernández; Otero, F. Hernández; Hintz, D.; Holgado, G.; Huber, A.; Huke, P.; Johnson, E. N.; de Juan, E.; Kehr, M.; Kemmer, J.; Kim, M.; Klüter, J.; Klutsch, A.; Labarga, F.; Labiche, N.; Lalitha, S.; Lampón, M.; Lara, L. M.; Launhardt, R.; Lázaro, F. J.; Lizon, J. -L.; Llamas, M.; Lodieu, N.; del Fresno, M. López; Salas, J. F. López; López-Santiago, J.; Madinabeitia, H. Magán; Mall, U.; Mancini, L.; Mandel, H.; Marfil, E.; Molina, J. A. Marín; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Fernández, P.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Martínez-Rodríguez, H.; Marvin, C. J.; Mirabet, E.; Moya, A.; Naranjo, V.; Nelson, R. P.; Nortmann, L.; Nowak, G.; Ofir, A.; Pascual, J.; Pavlov, A.; Pedraz, S.; Medialdea, D. Pérez; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Rabaza, O.; Ballesta, A. Ramón; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Rix, H. -W.; Rodler, F.; Trinidad, A. Rodríguez; Sabotta, S.; Sadegi, S.; Salz, M.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Carrasco, M. A. Sánchez; Sánchez-López, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarkis, P.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schlecker, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schöfer, P.; Solano, E.; Sota, A.; Stahl, O.; Stock, S.; Stuber, T.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tulloch, S. M.; Veredas, G.; Vico-Linares, J. I.; Vilardell, F.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Wolthoff, V.; Yan, F.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero
Comments: Manuscript author version. 41 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2019-09-26
Statistical analyses from exoplanet surveys around low-mass stars indicate that super-Earth and Neptune-mass planets are more frequent than gas giants around such stars, in agreement with core accretion theory of planet formation. Using precise radial velocities derived from visual and near-infrared spectra, we report the discovery of a giant planet with a minimum mass of 0.46 Jupiter masses in an eccentric 204-day orbit around the very low-mass star GJ 3512. Dynamical models show that the high eccentricity of the orbit is most likely explained from planet-planet interactions. The reported planetary system challenges current formation theories and puts stringent constraints on the accretion and migration rates of planet formation and evolution models, indicating that disc instability may be more efficient in forming planets than previously thought.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.07196  [pdf] - 1960956
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. Two temperate Earth-mass planet candidates around Teegarden's Star
Zechmeister, M.; Dreizler, S.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Bauer, F. F.; Béjar, V. J. S.; González-Cuesta, L.; Herrero, E.; Lalitha, S.; López-González, M. J.; Luque, R.; Morales, J. C.; Pallé, E.; Rodríguez, E.; López, C. Rodríguez; Tal-Or, L.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, F. J.; Aceituno, J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Jiménez, R. Antona; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Azzaro, M.; Baroch, D.; Barrado, D.; Becerril, S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Bergond, G.; Bluhm, P.; Brinkmöller, M.; del Burgo, C.; Ortega, R. Calvo; Cano, J.; Guillén, C. Cardona; Carro, J.; Vázquez, M. C. Cárdenas; Casal, E.; Casasayas-Barris, N.; Casanova, V.; Chaturvedi, P.; Cifuentes, C.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Czesla, S.; Díez-Alonso, E.; Dorda, R.; Fernández, M.; Fernández-Martín, A.; Ferro, I. M.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Fukui, A.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Cava, I. Gallardo; de la Fuente, J. Garcia; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Vargas, M. L. García; Gesa, L.; Rueda, J. Góngora; González-Álvarez, E.; Hernández, J. I. González; González-Peinado, R.; Grözinger, U.; Guàrdia, J.; Guijarro, A.; de Guindos, E.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Helmling, J.; Henning, T.; Hermelo, I.; Arabi, R. Hernández; Castaño, L. Hernández; Otero, F. Hernández; Hintz, D.; Huke, P.; Huber, A.; Jeffers, S. V.; Johnson, E. N.; de Juan, E.; Kaminski, A.; Kemmer, J.; Kim, M.; Klahr, H.; Klein, R.; Klüter, J.; Klutsch, A.; Kossakowski, D.; Kürster, M.; Labarga, F.; Lafarga, M.; Llamas, M.; Lampón, M.; Lara, L. M.; Launhardt, R.; Lázaro, F. J.; Lodieu, N.; del Fresno, M. López; López-Comazzi, A.; López-Puertas, M.; Salas, J. F. López; López-Santiago, J.; Madinabeitia, H. Magán; Mall, U.; Mancini, L.; Mandel, H.; Marfil, E.; Molina, J. A. Marín; Fernández, D. Maroto; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Fernández, P.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Marvin, C. J.; Mirabet, E.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.; Montes, D.; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Nagel, E.; Naranjo, V.; Narita, N.; Nortmann, L.; Nowak, G.; Ofir, A.; Oshagh, M.; Panduro, J.; Parviainen, H.; Pascual, J.; Passegger, V. M.; Pavlov, A.; Pedraz, S.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Medialdea, D. Pérez; Perger, M.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Rabaza, O.; Ballesta, A. Ramón; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reffert, S.; Reinhardt, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H. -W.; Rodler, F.; Trinidad, A. Rodríguez; Rosich, A.; Sadegi, S.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Carrasco, M. A. Sánchez; Sánchez-López, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarkis, P.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schöfer, P.; Schweitzer, A.; Seifert, W.; Shulyak, D.; Solano, E.; Sota, A.; Stahl, O.; Stock, S.; Strachan, J. B. P.; Stuber, T.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Tabernero, H. M.; Pinto, M. Tala; Trifonov, T.; Veredas, G.; Linares, J. I. Vico; Vilardell, F.; Wagner, K.; Wolthoff, V.; Xu, W.; Yan, F.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero
Comments: A&A 627, A49. 26 pages, 17 figures, 6 tables. Press release available at http://www.astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de/~zechmeister/teegarden/teegarden.html. v2: two authors and one reference added
Submitted: 2019-06-17, last modified: 2019-09-13
Context. Teegarden's Star is the brightest and one of the nearest ultra-cool dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood. For its late spectral type (M7.0V), the star shows relatively little activity and is a prime target for near-infrared radial velocity surveys such as CARMENES. Aims. As part of the CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs, we obtained more than 200 radial-velocity measurements of Teegarden's Star and analysed them for planetary signals. Methods. We find periodic variability in the radial velocities of Teegarden's Star. We also studied photometric measurements to rule out stellar brightness variations mimicking planetary signals. Results. We find evidence for two planet candidates, each with $1.1M_\oplus$ minimum mass, orbiting at periods of 4.91 and 11.4 d, respectively. No evidence for planetary transits could be found in archival and follow-up photometry. Small photometric variability is suggestive of slow rotation and old age. Conclusions. The two planets are among the lowest-mass planets discovered so far, and they are the first Earth-mass planets around an ultra-cool dwarf for which the masses have been determined using radial velocities.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.03992  [pdf] - 1851698
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. Chromospheric modeling of M2-3 V stars with PHOENIX
Comments: 16 pages + 6 pages appendix, 13 figures, 2 + 4 tables
Submitted: 2019-02-11
Chromospheric modeling of observed differences in stellar activity lines is imperative to fully understand the upper atmospheres of late-type stars. We present one-dimensional parametrized chromosphere models computed with the atmosphere code PHOENIX using an underlying photosphere of 3500 K. The aim of this work is to model chromospheric lines of a sample of 50 M2-3 dwarfs observed in the framework of the CARMENES, the Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exo-earths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs, exoplanet survey. The spectral comparison between observed data and models is performed in the chromospheric lines of Na I D2, H$\alpha$, and the bluest Ca II infrared triplet line to obtain best-fit models for each star in the sample. We find that for inactive stars a single model with a VAL C-like temperature structure is sufficient to describe simultaneously all three lines adequately. Active stars are rather modeled by a combination of an inactive and an active model, also giving the filling factors of inactive and active regions. Moreover, the fitting of linear combinations on variable stars yields relationships between filling factors and activity states, indicating that more active phases are coupled to a larger portion of active regions on the surface of the star.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.08861  [pdf] - 1842500
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. Activity indicators at visible and near-infrared wavelengths
Comments: 16 pages + 2 pages appendix, 11 figures, 3+1 tables, accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2019-01-25
The CARMENES survey is searching for Earth-like planets orbiting M dwarfs using the radial velocity method. Studying the stellar activity of the target stars is important to avoid false planet detections and to improve our understanding of the atmospheres of late-type stars. In this work we present measurements of activity indicators at visible and near-infrared wavelengths for 331 M dwarfs observed with CARMENES. Our aim is to identify the activity indicators that are most sensitive and easiest to measure, and the correlations among these indicators. We also wish to characterise their variability. Using a spectral subtraction technique, we measured pseudo-equivalent widths of the He I D3, H$\alpha$, He I $\lambda$10833 {\AA}, and Pa$\beta$ lines, the Na I D doublet, and the Ca II infrared triplet, which have a chromospheric component in active M dwarfs. In addition, we measured an index of the strength of two TiO and two VO bands, which are formed in the photosphere. We also searched for periodicities in these activity indicators for all sample stars using generalised Lomb-Scargle periodograms. We find that the most slowly rotating stars of each spectral subtype have the strongest H$\alpha$ absorption. H$\alpha$ is correlated most strongly with He I D3, whereas Na I D and the Ca II infrared triplet are also correlated with H$\alpha$. He I $\lambda$10833 {\AA} and Pa$\beta$ show no clear correlations with the other indicators. The TiO bands show an activity effect that does not appear in the VO bands. We find that the relative variations of H$\alpha$ and He I D3 are smaller for stars with higher activity levels, while this anti-correlation is weaker for Na I D and the Ca II infrared triplet, and is absent for He I $\lambda$10833 {\AA} and Pa$\beta$. Periodic variation with the rotation period most commonly appears in the TiO bands, H$\alpha$, and in the Ca II infrared triplet.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.05173  [pdf] - 1838344
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. Period search in H$\alpha$, Na I D, and Ca II IRT lines
Comments: 14 pages + 17 pages appendix, 9+16 figures, accepted to A&A
Submitted: 2019-01-16
We use spectra from CARMENES, the Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exo-earths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs, to search for periods in chromospheric indices in 16 M0 to M2 dwarfs. We measure spectral indices in the H$\alpha$, the Ca II infrared triplet (IRT), and the Na I D lines to study which of these indices are best-suited to find rotation periods in these stars. Moreover, we test a number of different period-search algorithms, namely the string length method, the phase dispersion minimisation, the generalized Lomb-Scargle periodogram, and the Gaussian process regression with quasi-periodic kernel. We find periods in four stars using H$\alpha$ and in five stars using the Ca II IRT, two of which have not been found before. Our results show that both H$\alpha$ and the Ca II IRT lines are well suited for period searches, with the Ca II IRT index performing slightly better than H$\alpha$. Unfortunately, the Na I D lines are strongly affected by telluric airglow, and we could not find any rotation period using this index. Further, different definitions of the line indices have no major impact on the results. Comparing the different search methods, the string length method and the phase dispersion minimisation perform worst, while Gaussian process models produce the smallest numbers of false positives and non-detections.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.02338  [pdf] - 1705219
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: Radial-velocity variations of active stars in visual-channel spectra
Comments: A&A accepted
Submitted: 2018-03-06
Previous simulations predicted the activity-induced radial-velocity (RV) variations of M dwarfs to range from $\sim1$ cm/s to $\sim1$ km/s, depending on various stellar and activity parameters. We investigate the observed relations between RVs, stellar activity, and stellar parameters of M dwarfs by analyzing CARMENES high-resolution visual-channel spectra ($0.5$$-$$1$$\mu$m), which were taken within the CARMENES RV planet survey during its first $20$ months of operation. During this time, $287$ of the CARMENES-sample stars were observed at least five times. From each spectrum we derived a relative RV and a measure of chromospheric H$\alpha$ emission. In addition, we estimated the chromatic index (CRX) of each spectrum, which is a measure of the RV wavelength dependence. Despite having a median number of only $11$ measurements per star, we show that the RV variations of the stars with RV scatter of $>10$ m/s and a projected rotation velocity $v \sin{i}>2$ km/s are caused mainly by activity. We name these stars `active RV-loud stars' and find their occurrence to increase with spectral type: from $\sim3\%$ for early-type M dwarfs (M$0.0$$-$$2.5$V) through $\sim30\%$ for mid-type M dwarfs (M$3.0$$-$$5.5$V) to $>50\%$ for late-type M dwarfs (M$6.0$$-$$9.0$V). Their RV-scatter amplitude is found to be correlated mainly with $v \sin{i}$. For about half of the stars, we also find a linear RV$-$CRX anticorrelation, which indicates that their activity-induced RV scatter is lower at longer wavelengths. For most of them we can exclude a linear correlation between RV and H$\alpha$ emission. Our results are in agreement with simulated activity-induced RV variations in M dwarfs. The RV variations of most active RV-loud M dwarfs are likely to be caused by dark spots on their surfaces, which move in and out of view as the stars rotate.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.06576  [pdf] - 1670513
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: High-resolution optical and near-infrared spectroscopy of 324 survey stars
Reiners, A.; Zechmeister, M.; Caballero, J. A.; Ribas, I.; Morales, J. C.; Jeffers, S. V.; Schöfer, P.; Tal-Or, L.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Kaminski, A.; Seifert, W.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Antona, R.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Azzaro, M.; Baroch, D.; Barrado, D.; Bauer, F. F.; Becerril, S.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Bergond, G.; Blümcke, M.; Brinkmöller, M.; del Burgo, C.; Cano, J.; Vázquez, M. C. Cárdenas; Casal, E.; Cifuentes, C.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Czesla, S.; Díez-Alonso, E.; Dreizler, S.; Feiz, C.; Fernández, M.; Ferro, I. M.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Vargas, M. L. García; Gesa, L.; Gómez, V.; Galera; Hernández, J. I. González; González-Peinado, R.; Grözinger, U.; Grohnert, S.; Guàrdia, J.; Guenther, E. W.; Guijarro, A.; de Guindos, E.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Hagen, H. -J.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Helmling, J.; Henning, Th.; Hermelo, I.; Arabí, R. Hernández; Castaño, L. Hernández; Hernando, F. Hernández; Herrero, E.; Huber, A.; Huke, P.; Johnson, E.; de Juan, E.; Kim, M.; Klein, R.; Klüter, J.; Klutsch, A.; Kürster, M.; Lafarga, M.; Lamert, A.; Lampón, M.; Lara, L. M.; Laun, W.; Lemke, U.; Lenzen, R.; Launhardt, R.; del Fresno, M. López; López-González, J.; López-Puertas, M.; Salas, J. F. López; López-Santiago, J.; Luque, R.; Madinabeitia, H. Magán; Mall, U.; Mancini, L.; Mandel, H.; Marfil, E.; Molina, J. A. Marín; Maroto, D.; Fernández; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Marvin, C. J.; Mathar, R. J.; Mirabet, E.; Montes, D.; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Moya, A.; Mundt, R.; Nagel, E.; Naranjo, V.; Nortmann, L.; Nowak, G.; Ofir, A.; Oreiro, R.; Pallé, E.; Panduro, J.; Pascual, J.; Passegger, V. M.; Pavlov, A.; Pedraz, S.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Medialdea, D. Pérez; Perger, M.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Pluto, M.; Rabaza, O.; Ramón, A.; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reffert, S.; Reinhart, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H. -W.; Rodler, F.; Rodríguez, E.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Trinidad, A. Rodríguez; Rohloff, R. -R.; Rosich, A.; Sadegi, S.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Carrasco, M. A. Sánchez; Sánchez-López, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarkis, P.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schiller, J.; Schweitzer, A.; Solano, E.; Stahl, O.; Strachan, J. B. P.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tala, M.; Trifonov, T.; Tulloch, S. M.; Ulbrich, R. G.; Veredas, G.; Linares, J. I. Vico; Vilardell, F.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Wolthoff, V.; Xu, W.; Yan, F.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero
Comments: accepted for publication in A&A, 13 pages plus 40 pages spectral atlas, first 10 atlas pages are reduced in quality to fit arXiv size limit; one CARMENES spectrum for each of the 324 stars is published in electronic format at http://carmenes.cab.inta-csic.es/
Submitted: 2017-11-17, last modified: 2018-02-09
The CARMENES radial velocity (RV) survey is observing 324 M dwarfs to search for any orbiting planets. In this paper, we present the survey sample by publishing one CARMENES spectrum for each M dwarf. These spectra cover the wavelength range 520--1710nm at a resolution of at least $R > 80,000$, and we measure its RV, H$\alpha$ emission, and projected rotation velocity. We present an atlas of high-resolution M-dwarf spectra and compare the spectra to atmospheric models. To quantify the RV precision that can be achieved in low-mass stars over the CARMENES wavelength range, we analyze our empirical information on the RV precision from more than 6500 observations. We compare our high-resolution M-dwarf spectra to atmospheric models where we determine the spectroscopic RV information content, $Q$, and signal-to-noise ratio. We find that for all M-type dwarfs, the highest RV precision can be reached in the wavelength range 700--900nm. Observations at longer wavelengths are equally precise only at the very latest spectral types (M8 and M9). We demonstrate that in this spectroscopic range, the large amount of absorption features compensates for the intrinsic faintness of an M7 star. To reach an RV precision of 1ms$^{-1}$ in very low mass M dwarfs at longer wavelengths likely requires the use of a 10m class telescope. For spectral types M6 and earlier, the combination of a red visual and a near-infrared spectrograph is ideal to search for low-mass planets and to distinguish between planets and stellar variability. At a 4m class telescope, an instrument like CARMENES has the potential to push the RV precision well below the typical jitter level of 3-4ms$^{-1}$.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.10372  [pdf] - 1716999
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: Wing asymmetries of H$\alpha$, Na I D, and He I lines
Comments: 28 pages, 67 figures, accepted to A&A
Submitted: 2018-01-31
Stellar activity is ubiquitously encountered in M dwarfs and often characterised by the H$\alpha$ line. In the most active M dwarfs, H$\alpha$ is found in emission, sometimes with a complex line profile. Previous studies have reported extended wings and asymmetries in the H$\alpha$ line during flares. We used a total of 473 high-resolution spectra of 28 active M dwarfs obtained by the CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exo-earths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs) spectrograph to study the occurrence of broadened and asymmetric H$\alpha$ line profiles and their association with flares, and examine possible physical explanations. We detected a total of 41 flares and 67 broad, potentially asymmetric, wings in H$\alpha$. The broadened H$\alpha$ lines display a variety of profiles with symmetric cases and both red and blue asymmetries. Although some of these line profiles are found during flares, the majority are at least not obviously associated with flaring. We propose a mechanism similar to coronal rain or chromospheric downward condensations as a cause for the observed red asymmetries; the symmetric cases may also be caused by Stark broadening. We suggest that blue asymmetries are associated with rising material, and our results are consistent with a prevalence of blue asymmetries during the flare onset. Besides the H$\alpha$ asymmetries, we find some cases of additional line asymmetries in \ion{He}{i} D$_{3}$, \ion{Na}{i}~D lines, and the \ion{He}{i} line at 10830\,\AA\, taken all simultaneously thanks to the large wavelength coverage of CARMENES. Our study shows that asymmetric H$\alpha$ lines are a rather common phenomenon in M~dwarfs and need to be studied in more detail to obtain a better understanding of the atmospheric dynamics in these objects.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.01595  [pdf] - 1630202
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. First visual-channel radial-velocity measurements and orbital parameter updates of seven M-dwarf planetary systems
Trifonov, T.; Kürster, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Tal-Or, L.; Caballero, J. A.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Reffert, S.; Dreizler, S.; Hatzes, A. P.; Kaminski, A.; Launhardt, R.; Henning, Th.; Montes, D.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Mundt, R.; Pavlov, A.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Seifert, W.; Morales, J. C.; Nowak, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Rodríguez-López, C.; del Burgo, C.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; López-Santiago, J.; Mathar, R. J.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Guenther, E. W.; Barrado, D.; Hernández, J. I. González; Mancini, L.; Stürmer, J.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Antona, R.; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Azzaro, M.; Baroch, D.; Bauer, F. F.; Becerril, S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Bergond, G.; Blümcke, M.; Brinkmöller, M.; Cano, J.; Vázquez, M. C. Cárdenas; Casal, E.; Cifuentes, C.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Czesla, S.; Díez-Alonso, E.; Feiz, C.; Fernández, M.; Ferro, I. M.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Vargas, M. L. García; Gesa, L.; Galera, V. Gómez; González-Peinado, R.; Grözinger, U.; Grohnert, S.; Guàrdia, J.; Guijarro, A.; de Guindos, E.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Hagen, H. -J.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Helmling, J.; Hermelo, I.; Arabí, R. Hernández; Castaño, L. Hernández; Hernando, F. Hernández; Herrero, E.; Huber, A.; Huke, P.; Johnson, E.; de Juan, E.; Kim, M.; Klein, R.; Klüter, J.; Klutsch, A.; Lafarga, M.; Lampón, M.; Lara, L. M.; Laun, W.; Lemke, U.; Lenzen, R.; del Fresno, M. López; López-González, J.; López-Puertas, M.; Salas, J. F. López; Luque, R.; Madinabeitia, H. Magán; Mall, U.; Mandel, H.; Marfil, E.; Molina, J. A. Marín; Fernández, D. Maroto; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Marvin, C. J.; Mirabet, E.; Moya, A.; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Nagel, E.; Naranjo, V.; Nortmann, L.; Ofir, A.; Oreiro, R.; Pallé, E.; Panduro, J.; Pascual, J.; Passegger, V. M.; Pedraz, S.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Medialdea, D. Pérez; Perger, M.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Pluto, M.; Rabaza, O.; Ramón, A.; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reinhardt, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H. -W.; Rodler, F.; Rodríguez, E.; Trinidad, A. Rodríguez; Rohloff, R. -R.; Rosich, A.; Sadegi, S.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Carrasco, M. A. Sánchez; Sánchez-López, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarkis, P.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schiller, J.; Schöfer, P.; Schweitzer, A.; Solano, E.; Stahl, O.; Strachan, J. B. P.; Suárez, J. C.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tala, M.; Tulloch, S. M.; Veredas, G.; Linares, J. I. Vico; Vilardell, F.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Wolthoff, V.; Xu, W.; Yan, F.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A, 24 pages, 16 figures, 14 tables
Submitted: 2017-10-04, last modified: 2018-01-29
Context: The main goal of the CARMENES survey is to find Earth-mass planets around nearby M-dwarf stars. Seven M-dwarfs included in the CARMENES sample had been observed before with HIRES and HARPS and either were reported to have one short period planetary companion (GJ15A, GJ176, GJ436, GJ536 and GJ1148) or are multiple planetary systems (GJ581 and GJ876). Aims: We aim to report new precise optical radial velocity measurements for these planet hosts and test the overall capabilities of CARMENES. Methods: We combined our CARMENES precise Doppler measurements with those available from HIRES and HARPS and derived new orbital parameters for the systems. Bona-fide single planet systems are fitted with a Keplerian model. The multiple planet systems were analyzed using a self-consistent dynamical model and their best fit orbits were tested for long-term stability. Results: We confirm or provide supportive arguments for planets around all the investigated stars except for GJ15A, for which we find that the post-discovery HIRES data and our CARMENES data do not show a signal at 11.4 days. Although we cannot confirm the super-Earth planet GJ15Ab, we show evidence for a possible long-period ($P_{\rm c}$ = 7025$_{-629}^{+972}$ d) Saturn-mass ($m_{\rm c} \sin i$ = 51.8$_{-5.8}^{+5.5}M_\oplus$) planet around GJ15A. In addition, based on our CARMENES and HIRES data we discover a second planet around GJ1148, for which we estimate a period $P_{\rm c}$ = 532.6$_{-2.5}^{+4.1}$ d, eccentricity $e_{\rm c}$ = 0.34$_{-0.06}^{+0.05}$ and minimum mass $m_{\rm c} \sin i$ = 68.1$_{-2.2}^{+4.9}M_\oplus$. Conclusions: The CARMENES optical radial velocities have similar precision and overall scatter when compared to the Doppler measurements conducted with HARPS and HIRES. We conclude that CARMENES is an instrument that is up to the challenge of discovering rocky planets around low-mass stars.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.05797  [pdf] - 1605300
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs - HD 147379b: A nearby Neptune in the temperate zone of an early-M dwarf
Reiners, A.; Ribas, I.; Zechmeister, M.; Caballero, J. A.; Trifonov, T.; Dreizler, S.; Morales, J. C.; Tal-Or, L.; Lafarga, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Kaminski, A.; Jeffers, S. V.; Aceituno, J.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Guàrdia, J.; Guenther, E. W.; Hagen, H. -J.; Montes, D.; Passegger, V. M.; Seifert, W.; Schweitzer, A.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Abril, M.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Antona, R.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Azzaro, M.; Baroch, D.; Barrado, D.; Bauer, F. F.; Becerril, S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Bergond, G.; Blümcke, M.; Brinkmöller, M.; del Burgo, C.; Cano, J.; Vázquez, M. C. Cárdenas; Casal, E.; Cifuentes, C.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Czesla, S.; Díez-Alonso, E.; Feiz, C.; Fernández, M.; Ferro, I. M.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Vargas, M. L. García; Gesa, L.; Galera, V. Gómez; Hernández, J. I. González; González-Peinado, R.; Grözinger, U.; Grohnert, S.; Guijarro, A.; de Guindos, E.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Helmling, J.; Henning, Th.; Hermelo, I.; Arabí, R. Hernández; Castaño, L. Hernández; Hernando, F. Hernández; Herrero, E.; Huber, A.; Huke, P.; Johnson, E. N.; de Juan, E.; Kim, M.; Klein, R.; Klüter, J.; Klutsch, A.; Kürster, M.; Labarga, F.; Lamert, A.; Lampón, M.; Lara, L. M.; Laun, W.; Lemke, U.; Lenzen, R.; Launhardt, R.; del Fresno, M. López; López-González, M. J.; López-Puertas, M.; Salas, J. F. López; López-Santiago, J.; Luque, R.; Madinabeitia, H. Magán; Mall, U.; Mancini, L.; Mandel, H.; Marfil, E.; Molina, J. A. Marín; Fernández, D. Maroto; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Marvin, C. J.; Mathar, R. J.; Mirabet, E.; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Moya, A.; Mundt, R.; Nagel, E.; Naranjo, V.; Nortmann, L.; Nowak, G.; Ofir, A.; Oreiro, R.; Pallé, E.; Panduro, J.; Pascual, J.; Pavlov, A.; Pedraz, S.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Medialdea, D. Pérez; Perger, M.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Pluto, M.; Rabaza, O.; Ramón, A.; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reffert, S.; Reinhart, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H. -W.; Rodler, F.; Rodríguez, E.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Trinidad, A. Rodríguez; Rohloff, R. -R.; Rosich, A.; Sadegi, S.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Carrasco, M. A. Sánchez; Sánchez-López, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarkis, P.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schiller, J.; Schöfer, P.; Solano, E.; Stahl, O.; Strachan, J. B. P.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tala, M.; Tulloch, S. M.; Ulbrich, R. -G.; Veredas, G.; Linares, J. I. Vico; Vilardell, F.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Wolthoff, V.; Xu, W.; Yan, F.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero
Comments: accepted for publication as A&A Letter
Submitted: 2017-12-15
We report on the first star discovered to host a planet detected by radial velocity (RV) observations obtained within the CARMENES survey for exoplanets around M dwarfs. HD 147379 ($V = 8.9$ mag, $M = 0.58 \pm 0.08$ M$_{\odot}$), a bright M0.0V star at a distance of 10.7 pc, is found to undergo periodic RV variations with a semi-amplitude of $K = 5.1\pm0.4$ m s$^{-1}$ and a period of $P = 86.54\pm0.06$ d. The RV signal is found in our CARMENES data, which were taken between 2016 and 2017, and is supported by HIRES/Keck observations that were obtained since 2000. The RV variations are interpreted as resulting from a planet of minimum mass $m_{\rm p}\sin{i} = 25 \pm 2$ M$_{\oplus}$, 1.5 times the mass of Neptune, with an orbital semi-major axis $a = 0.32$ au and low eccentricity ($e < 0.13$). HD 147379b is orbiting inside the temperate zone around the star, where water could exist in liquid form. The RV time-series and various spectroscopic indicators show additional hints of variations at an approximate period of 21.1d (and its first harmonic), which we attribute to the rotation period of the star.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.04895  [pdf] - 1587165
The Ca II infrared triplet's performance as an activity indicator compared to Ca II H and K
Comments: 16 pages, 15 figures. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2017-08-16
Aims. A large number of Calcium Infrared Triplet (IRT) spectra are expected from the GAIA- and CARMENES missions. Conversion of these spectra into known activity indicators will allow analysis of their temporal evolution to a better degree. We set out to find such a conversion formula and to determine its robustness. Methods. We have compared 2274 Ca II IRT spectra of active main-sequence F to K stars taken by the TIGRE telescope with those of inactive stars of the same spectral type. After normalizing and applying rotational broadening, we subtracted the comparison spectra to find the chromospheric excess flux caused by activity. We obtained the total excess flux, and compared it to established activity indices derived from the Ca II H & K lines, the spectra of which were obtained simultaneously to the infrared spectra. Results. The excess flux in the Ca II IRT is found to correlate well with $R_\mathrm{HK}'$ and $R_\mathrm{HK}^{+}$, as well as $S_\mathrm{MWO}$, if the $B-V$-dependency is taken into account. We find an empirical conversion formula to calculate the corresponding value of one activity indicator from the measurement of another, by comparing groups of datapoints of stars with similar B-V.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.0612  [pdf] - 862881
Kepler super-flare stars: what are they?
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A, 9 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2014-06-03
The Kepler mission has led to the serendipitous discovery of a significant number of `super flares' - white light flares with energies between 10^33 erg and 10^36 erg - on solar-type stars. It has been speculated that these could be `freak' events that might happen on the Sun, too. We have started a programme to study the nature of the stars on which these super flares have been observed. Here we present high-resolution spectroscopy of 11 of these stars and discuss our results. We find that several of these stars are very young, fast-rotating stars where high levels of stellar activity can be expected, but for some other stars we do not find a straightforward explanation for the occurrence of super flares.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.4933  [pdf] - 1179358
A multi-wavelength view of AB Dor's outer atmosphere - Simultaneous X-ray and optical spectroscopy at high cadence
Comments:
Submitted: 2013-09-19
We study the chromosphere and corona of the ultra-fast rotator AB Dor A at high temporal and spectral resolution using simultaneous observations with XMM-Newton in the X-rays, VLT/UVES in the optical, and the ATCA in the radio. Our optical spectra have a resolving power of ~50 000 with a time cadence of ~1 min. Our observations continuously cover more than one rotational period and include both quiescent periods and three flaring events of different strengths. From the X-ray observations we investigated the variations in coronal temperature, emission measure, densities, and abundance. We interpreted our data in terms of a loop model. From the optical data we characterise the flaring chromospheric material using numerous emission lines that appear in the course of the flares. A detailed analysis of the line shapes and line centres allowed us to infer physical characteristics of the flaring chromosphere and to coarsely localise the flare event on the star. We specifically used the optical high-cadence spectra to demonstrate that both, turbulent and Stark broadening are present during the first ten minutes of the first flare. Also, in the first few minutes of this flare, we find short-lived (one to several minutes) emission subcomponents in the H{\alpha} and Ca ii K lines, which we interpret as flare-connected shocks owing to their high intrinsic velocities. Combining the space-based data with the results of our optical spectroscopy, we derive flare-filling factors. Finally, comparing X-ray, optical broadband, and line emission, we find a correlation for two of the three flaring events, while there is no clear correlation for one event. Also, we do not find any correlation of the radio data to any other observed data.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.1130  [pdf] - 1083855
Multi-wavelength observations of Proxima Centauri
Comments: 19 pages, 22 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2011-09-06
We report simultaneous observations of the nearby flare star Proxima Centauri with VLT/UVES and XMM-Newton over three nights in March 2009. Our optical and X-ray observations cover the star's quiescent state, as well as its flaring activity and allow us to probe the stellar atmospheric conditions from the photosphere into the chromosphere, and then the corona during its different activity stages. Using the X-ray data, we investigate variations in coronal densities and abundances and infer loop properties for an intermediate-sized flare. The optical data are used to investigate the magnetic field and its possible variability, to construct an emission line list for the chromosphere, and use certain emission lines to construct physical models of Proxima Centauri's chromosphere. We report the discovery of a weak optical forbidden Fe xiii line at 3388 AA during the more active states of Proxima Centauri. For the intermediate flare, we find two secondary flare events that may originate in neighbouring loops, and discuss the line asymmetries observed during this flare in H i, He i, and Ca ii lines. The high time-resolution in the H alpha line highlights strong temporal variations in the observed line asymmetries, which re-appear during a secondary flare event. We also present theoretical modelling with the stellar atmosphere code PHOENIX to construct flaring chromospheric models.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1003.4128  [pdf] - 1025851
Multiwavelength observations of a giant flare on CN Leonis III. Temporal evolution of coronal properties
Comments: 13 pages, 7 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2010-03-22
Stellar flares affect all atmospheric layers from the photosphere over chromosphere and transition region up into the corona. Simultaneous observations in different spectral bands allow to obtain a comprehensive picture of the environmental conditions and the physical processes going on during different phases of the flare. We investigate the properties of the coronal plasma during a giant flare on the active M dwarf CN Leo observed simultaneously with the UVES spectrograph at the VLT and XMM-Newton.From the X-ray data, we analyze the temporal evolution of the coronal temperature and emission measure, and investigate variations in electron density and coronal abundances during the flare. Optical Fe XIII line emission traces the cooler quiescent corona. Although of rather short duration (exponential decay time < 5 minutes), the X-ray flux at flare peak exceeds the quiescent level by a factor of 100. The electron density averaged over the whole flare is greater than 5 * 10^11 cm^-3. The flare plasma shows an enhancement of iron by a factor of approx. 2 during the rise and peak phase of the flare. We derive a size of <9000 km for the flaring structure from the evolution of the the emitting plasma during flare rise, peak, and decay. The characteristics of the flare plasma suggest that the flare originates from a compact arcade instead of a single loop. The combined results from X-ray and optical data further confine the plasma properties and the geometry of the flaring structure in different atmospheric layers.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.1172  [pdf] - 1000910
The stellar content of the Hamburg/ESO survey. V. The metallicity distribution function of the Galactic halo
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2008-09-06, last modified: 2009-09-30
We determine the metallicity distribution function (MDF) of the Galactic halo by means of a sample of 1638 metal-poor stars selected from the Hamburg/ESO objective-prism survey (HES). The sample was corrected for minor biases introduced by the strategy for spectroscopic follow-up observations of the metal-poor candidates, namely "best and brightest stars first". [...] We determined the selection function of the HES, which must be taken into account for a proper comparison between the HES MDF with MDFs of other stellar populations or those predicted by models of Galactic chemical evolution. The latter show a reasonable agreement with the overall shape of the HES MDF for [Fe/H] > -3.6, but only a model of Salvadori et al. (2007) with a critical metallicity for low-mass star formation of Z_cr = 10^{-3.4} * Z_Sun reproduces the sharp drop at [Fe/H] ~-3.6 present in the HES MDF. [...] A comparison of the MDF of Galactic globular clusters and of dSph satellites to the Galaxy shows qualitative agreement with the halo MDF, derived from the HES, once the selection function of the latter is included. However, statistical tests show that the differences between these are still highly significant. [ABSTRACT ABRIDGED]
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.2025  [pdf] - 14469
Multiwavelength observations of a giant flare on CN Leonis I. The chromosphere as seen in the optical spectra
Comments: 15 pages, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2008-07-13
Flares on dM stars contain plasmas at very different temperatures and thus affect a wide wavelength range in the electromagnetic spectrum. While the coronal properties of flares are studied best in X-rays, the chromosphere of the star is observed best in the optical and ultraviolet ranges. Therefore, multiwavelength observations are essential to study flare properties throughout the atmosphere of a star. We analysed simultaneous observations with UVES/VLT and XMM-Newton of the active M5.5 dwarf CN Leo (Gl 406) exhibiting a major flare. The optical data cover the wavelength range from 3000 to 10000 Angstrom. From our optical data, we find an enormous wealth of chromospheric emission lines occurring throughout the spectrum. We identify a total of 1143 emission lines, out of which 154 are located in the red arm, increasing the number of observed emission lines in this red wavelength range by about a factor of 10. Here we present an emission line list and a spectral atlas. We also find line asymmetries for H I, He I, and Ca II lines. For the last, this is the first observation of asymmetries due to a stellar flare. During the flare onset, there is additional flux found in the blue wing, while in the decay phase, additional flux is found in the red wing. We interpret both features as caused by mass motions. In addition to the lines, the flare manifests itself in the enhancement of the continuum throughout the whole spectrum, inverting the normal slope for the net flare spectrum.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.3752  [pdf] - 9353
A coronal explosion on the flare star CN Leonis
Comments: 7 pages, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2008-01-24
We present simultaneous high-temporal and high-spectral resolution observations at optical and soft X-ray wavelengths of the nearby flare star CN Leo. During our observing campaign a major flare occurred, raising the star's instantaneous energy output by almost three orders of magnitude. The flare shows the often observed impulsive behavior, with a rapid rise and slow decay in the optical and a broad soft X-ray maximum about 200 seconds after the optical flare peak. However, in addition to this usually encountered flare phenomenology we find an extremely short (~2 sec) soft X-ray peak, which is very likely of thermal, rather than non-thermal nature and temporally coincides with the optical flare peak. While at hard X-ray energies non-thermal bursts are routinely observed on the Sun at flare onset, thermal soft X-ray bursts on time scales of seconds have never been observed in a solar nor stellar context. Time-dependent, one-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of this event requires an extremely short energy deposition time scale of a few seconds to reconcile theory with observations, thus suggesting that we are witnessing the results of a coronal explosion on CN Leo. Thus the flare on CN Leo provides the opportunity to observationally study the physics of the long-sought "micro-flares" thought to be responsible for coronal heating.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0505375  [pdf] - 73145
PHOENIX model chromospheres of mid- to late-type M dwarfs
Comments: 14 pages, 18 figures
Submitted: 2005-05-18
We present semi-empirical model chromospheres computed with the atmosphere code PHOENIX. The models are designed to fit the observed spectra of five mid- to late-type M dwarfs. Next to hydrogen lines from the Balmer series we used various metal lines, e. g. from Fe {\sc i}, for the comparison between data and models. Our computations show that an NLTE treatment of C, N, O impacts on the hydrogen line formation, while NLTE treatment of less abundant metals such as nickel influences the lines of the considered species itself. For our coolest models we investigated also the influence of dust on the chromospheres and found that dust increases the emission line flux. Moreover we present an (electronically published) emission line list for the spectral range of 3100 to 3900 and 4700 to 6800 \AA for a set of 21 M dwarfs and brown dwarfs. The line list includes the detection of the Na {\sc i} D lines in emission for a L3 dwarf.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0403617  [pdf] - 63808
Detection and high-resolution spectroscopy of a huge flare on the old M9 dwarf DENIS 104814.7-395606.1
Comments: 7 pages, 8 figures, accepted A&A
Submitted: 2004-03-26
We report a flare on the M9 dwarf DENIS 104814.7-395606.1, whose mass places it directly at the hydrogen burning limit. The event was observed in a spectral sequence during 1.3 hours. Line shifts to bluer wavelengths were detected in H alpha, H beta, and in the Na D lines, indicating mass motions. In addition we detect a flux enhancement on the blue side of the two Balmer lines in the last spectrum of our series. We interpret this as rising gas cloud with a projected velocity of about 100 km/s which may lead to mass ejection. The higher Balmer lines H gamma to H 8 are not seen due to our instrumental setup, but in the last spectrum there is strong evidence for H 9 being in emission.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0401102  [pdf] - 61972
Fe XIII coronal line emission in cool M dwarfs
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2004-01-08
We report on a search for the Fe xiii forbidden coronal line at 3388.1 \AA in a sample of 15 M-type dwarf stars covering the whole spectral class as well as different levels of activity. A clear detection was achieved for LHS 2076 during a major flare and for CN Leo, where the line had been discovered before. For some other stars the situation is not quite clear. For CN Leo we investigated the timing behaviour of the Fe xiii line and report a high level of variability on a timescale of hours which we ascribe to microflare heating.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0303106  [pdf] - 55345
A Systematic Study Of X-Ray Variability In The ROSAT All-Sky Survey
Comments: 34 pages, 19 figures, Latex2e. accepted for A&A under H4169
Submitted: 2003-03-05
We present a systematic search for variability among the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) X-ray sources. We generated lightcurves for about 30000 X-ray point sources detected sufficiently high above background. For our variability study different search algorithms were developed in order to recognize flares, periods and trends, respectively. The variable X-ray sources were optically identified with counterparts in the SIMBAD, the USNO-A2.0 and NED data bases, but a significant part of the X-ray sources remains without cataloged optical counterparts. Out of the 1207 sources classified as variable 767 (63.5 %) were identified with stars, 118 (9.8 %) are of extragalactic origin, 10 (0.8 %) are identified with other sources and 312 (25.8 %) could not uniquely be identified with entries in optical catalogs. We give a statistical analysis of the variable X-ray population and present some outstanding examples of X-ray variability detected in the ROSAT all-sky survey. Most prominent among these sources are white dwarfs, apparently single, yet nevertheless showing periodic variability. Many flares from hitherto unrecognised flare stars have been detected as well as long term variability in the BL Lac 1E1757.7+7034.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0204339  [pdf] - 48884
Metal Abundances and Kinematics of Bright Metal-Poor Giants Selected from the LSE Survey: Implications for the Metal-Weak Thick Disk
Comments: 41 pages, 9 tables, 6 figures, accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2002-04-19
We report medium-resolution (1-2 A) spectroscopy and broadband (UBV) photometry for a sample of 39 bright stars (the majority of which are likely to be giants) selected as metal-deficient candidates from an objective-prism survey concentrating on Galactic latitudes below |b| = 30 deg, the LSE survey of Drilling & Bergeron. Although the primary purpose of the LSE survey was to select OB stars (hence the concentration on low latitudes), the small number of bright metal-deficient giant candidates noted during this survey provide interesting information on the metal-weak thick disk (MWTD) population. The kinematics of the LSE giants indicate the presence of a rapidly rotating population, even at quite low metallicity. We consider the distribution of orbital eccentricity of the LSE giants as a function of [Fe/H], and conclude that the local fraction (i.e., within 1 kpc from the Sun) of metal-poor stars that might be associated with the MWTD is on the order of 30%-40% at abundances below [Fe/H] = -1.0. Contrary to recent analyses of previous (much larger) samples of non-kinematically selected metal-poor stars, we find that this relatively high fraction of local metal-poor stars associated with the MWTD may extend to metallicities below [Fe/H] = -1.6, much lower than had been considered before. We identify a subsample of 11 LSE stars that are very likely to be members of the MWTD, based on their derived kinematics; the lowest metallicity among these stars is [Fe/H] = -2.35. Implications of these results for the origin of the MWTD and for the formation of the Galaxy are considered. (abridged)