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Findlay, J.

Normalized to: Findlay, J.

25 article(s) in total. 636 co-authors, from 1 to 10 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 8,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.05828  [pdf] - 2047932
Observing Strategy for the Legacy Surveys
Comments: 10 pages, 3 tables and 5 figures
Submitted: 2020-02-13
The Legacy Surveys, a combination of three ground-based imaging surveys, have mapped 16,000 deg$^2$ in three optical bands ($g$, $r$, and $z$) to a depth 1--$2$~mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our work addresses one of the major challenges of wide-field imaging surveys conducted at ground-based observatories: the varying depth that results from varying observing conditions at Earth-bound sites. To mitigate these effects, two of the Legacy Surveys (the Dark Energy Camera Legacy Survey, or DECaLS; and the Mayall $z$-band Legacy Survey, or MzLS) employed a unique strategy to dynamically adjust the exposure times as rapidly as possible in response to the changing observing conditions. We present the tiling and observing strategies used by these surveys. We demonstrate that the tiling and dynamic observing strategies jointly result in a more uniform-depth survey that has higher efficiency for a given total observing time compared with the traditional approach of using fixed exposure times.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.07099  [pdf] - 2041248
The Third Data Release of the Beijing-Arizona Sky Survey
Comments: published in ApJS
Submitted: 2019-08-19, last modified: 2020-02-02
The Beijing-Arizona Sky Survey (BASS) is a wide and deep imaging survey to cover a 5400 deg$^2$ area in the Northern Galactic Cap with the 2.3m Bok telescope using two filters ($g$ and $r$ bands). The Mosaic $z$-band Legacy Survey (MzLS) covers the same area in $z$ band with the 4m Mayall telescope. These two surveys will be used for spectroscopic targeting of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). The BASS survey observations were completed in 2019 March. This paper describes the third data release (DR3) of BASS, which contains the photometric data from all BASS and MzLS observations between 2015 January and 2019 March. The median astrometric precision relative to {\it Gaia} positions is about 17 mas and the median photometric offset relative to the PanSTARRS1 photometry is within 5 mmag. The median $5\sigma$ AB magnitude depths for point sources are 24.2, 23.6, and 23.0 mag for $g$, $r$, and $z$ bands, respectively. The photometric depth within the survey area is highly homogeneous, with the difference between the 20\% and 80\% depth less than 0.3 mag. The DR3 data, including raw data, calibrated single-epoch images, single-epoch photometric catalogs, stacked images, and co-added photometric catalogs, are publicly accessible at \url{http://batc.bao.ac.cn/BASS/doku.php?id=datarelease:home}.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.08657  [pdf] - 1867946
Overview of the DESI Legacy Imaging Surveys
Dey, Arjun; Schlegel, David J.; Lang, Dustin; Blum, Robert; Burleigh, Kaylan; Fan, Xiaohui; Findlay, Joseph R.; Finkbeiner, Doug; Herrera, David; Juneau, Stephanie; Landriau, Martin; Levi, Michael; McGreer, Ian; Meisner, Aaron; Myers, Adam D.; Moustakas, John; Nugent, Peter; Patej, Anna; Schlafly, Edward F.; Walker, Alistair R.; Valdes, Francisco; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Zou, Christophe Yeche Hu; Zhou, Xu; Abareshi, Behzad; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abolfathi, Bela; Aguilera, C.; Alam, Shadab; Allen, Lori; Alvarez, A.; Annis, James; Ansarinejad, Behzad; Aubert, Marie; Beechert, Jacqueline; Bell, Eric F.; BenZvi, Segev Y.; Beutler, Florian; Bielby, Richard M.; Bolton, Adam S.; Buckley-Geer, Cesar Briceno Elizabeth J.; Butler, Karen; Calamida, Annalisa; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Carter, Paul; Casas, Ricard; Castander, Francisco J.; Choi, Yumi; Comparat, Johan; Cukanovaite, Elena; Delubac, Timothee; DeVries, Kaitlin; Dey, Sharmila; Dhungana, Govinda; Dickinson, Mark; Ding, Zhejie; Donaldson, John B.; Duan, Yutong; Duckworth, Christopher J.; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Etourneau, Thomas; Fagrelius, Parker A.; Farihi, Jay; Fitzpatrick, Mike; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Fulmer, Leah; Gansicke, Boris T.; Gaztanaga, Enrique; George, Koshy; Gerdes, David W.; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Gorgoni, Claudio; Green, Gregory; Guy, Julien; Harmer, Diane; Hernandez, M.; Honscheid, Klaus; Lijuan; Huang; James, David; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Jiang, Linhua; Joyce, Richard; Karcher, Armin; Karkar, Sonia; Kehoe, Robert; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kueter-Young, Andrea; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lauer, Tod; Guillou, Laurent Le; Van Suu, Auguste Le; Lee, Jae Hyeon; Lesser, Michael; Levasseur, Laurence Perreault; Li, Ting S.; Mann, Justin L.; Marshall, Bob; Martinez-Vazquez, C. E.; Martini, Paul; Bourboux, Helion du Mas des; McManus, Sean; Meier, Tobias Gabriel; Menard, Brice; Metcalfe, Nigel; Munoz-Gutierrez, Andrea; Najita, Joan; Napier, Kevin; Narayan, Gautham; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nie, Jundan; Nord, Brian; Norman, Dara J.; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Paat, Anthony; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Peng, Xiyan; Poppett, Claire L.; Poremba, Megan R.; Prakash, Abhishek; Rabinowitz, David; Raichoor, Anand; Rezaie, Mehdi; Robertson, A. N.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rudnick, Gregory; Safonova, Sasha; Saha, Abhijit; Sanchez, F. Javier; Savary, Elodie; Schweiker, Heidi; Scott, Adam; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shan, Huanyuan; Silva, David R.; Slepian, Zachary; Soto, Christian; Sprayberry, David; Staten, Ryan; Stillman, Coley M.; Stupak, Robert J.; Summers, David L.; Tie, Suk Sien; Tirado, H.; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Vivas, A. Katherina; Wechsler, Risa H.; Williams, Doug; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Yapici, Tolga; Zaritsky, Dennis; Zenteno, A.; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhou, Rongpu; Zhou, Zhimin
Comments: 47 pages, 18 figures; accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2018-04-23, last modified: 2019-02-19
The DESI Legacy Imaging Surveys are a combination of three public projects (the Dark Energy Camera Legacy Survey, the Beijing-Arizona Sky Survey, and the Mayall z-band Legacy Survey) that will jointly image approximately 14,000 deg^2 of the extragalactic sky visible from the northern hemisphere in three optical bands (g, r, and z) using telescopes at the Kitt Peak National Observatory and the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The combined survey footprint is split into two contiguous areas by the Galactic plane. The optical imaging is conducted using a unique strategy of dynamically adjusting the exposure times and pointing selection during observing that results in a survey of nearly uniform depth. In addition to calibrated images, the project is delivering a catalog, constructed by using a probabilistic inference-based approach to estimate source shapes and brightnesses. The catalog includes photometry from the grz optical bands and from four mid-infrared bands (at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micorons) observed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite during its full operational lifetime. The project plans two public data releases each year. All the software used to generate the catalogs is also released with the data. This paper provides an overview of the Legacy Surveys project.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.11926  [pdf] - 1979514
Exploring Reionization-Era Quasars III: Discovery of 16 Quasars at $6.4\lesssim z \lesssim 6.9$ with DESI Legacy Imaging Surveys and UKIRT Hemisphere Survey and Quasar Luminosity Function at $z\sim6.7$
Comments: Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2018-10-28
This is the third paper in a series aims at finding reionzation-era quasars with the combination of DESI Legacy imaging Surveys (DELS) and near-infrared imaging surveys, such as the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS), as well as the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explore ($WISE$) mid-infrared survey. In this paper, we describe the updated quasar candidate selection procedure, report the discovery of 16 quasars at $6.4\lesssim z \lesssim6.9$ from area of $\sim$13,020 deg$^2$, and present the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at $z\sim6.7$. The measured QLF follows $\Phi(L_{1450})\propto L_{1450}^{-2.35}$ in the magnitude range $27.6<M_{1450}<-25.5$. We determine the quasar comoving spatial density at $\langle z \rangle$=6.7 and $M_{1450}<-26.0$ to be $\rm 0.39\pm0.11 Gpc^{-3}$ and find that the exponential density evolution parameter to be $k=-0.78\pm0.18$ from $z\sim6$ to $z\sim6.7$, corresponding to a rapid decline by a factor of $\sim 6$ per unit redshift towards earlier epoch, a rate significantly faster than that at $z\sim 3- 5$. The cosmic time between $z\sim6$ and $z\sim6.7$ is only 121 Myrs. The quasar density declined by a factor of more than three within such short time requires that SMBHs must grow rapidly or they are less radiatively efficient at higher redshifts. We measured quasar comoving emissivity at $z\sim6.7$ which indicate that high redshift quasars are highly unlikely to make a significant contribution to hydrogen reionization. The broad absorption line (BAL) quasar fraction at $z\gtrsim6.5$ is measured to be $\gtrsim$22%. In addition, we also report the discovery of additional five quasars at $z\sim6$ in the appendix.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.09165  [pdf] - 1739855
The Second Data Release of the Beijing-Arizona Sky Survey
Comments: 23 pages, published in AJ
Submitted: 2017-12-25, last modified: 2018-08-13
This paper presents the second data release (DR2) of the Beijing-Arizona Sky Survey (BASS). BASS is an imaging survey of about 5400 deg$^2$ in $g$ and $r$ bands using the 2.3 m Bok telescope. DR2 includes the observations as of July 2017 obtained by BASS and Mayall $z$-band Legacy Survey (MzLS). This is our first time to include the MzLS data covering the same area as BASS. BASS and MzLS have respectively completed about 72% and 76% of their observations. The two surveys will be served for the spectroscopic targeting of the upcoming Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. Both BASS and MzLS data are reduced by the same pipeline. We have updated the basic data reduction and photometric methods in DR2. In particular, source detections are performed on stacked images, and photometric measurements are co-added from single-epoch images based on these sources. The median 5$\sigma$ depths with corrections of the Galactic extinction are 24.05, 23.61, and 23.10 mag for $g$, $r$, and $z$ bands, respectively. The DR2 data products include stacked images, co-added catalogs, and single-epoch images and catalogs. The BASS website (http://batc.bao.ac.cn/BASS/) provides detailed information and links to download the data.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.08624  [pdf] - 1698165
Quasars probing quasars X: The quasar pair spectral database
Comments: 20 pages, 7 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2018-04-23
The rare close projection of two quasars on the sky provides the opportunity to study the host galaxy environment of a foreground quasar in absorption against the continuum emission of a background quasar. For over a decade the "Quasars probing quasars" series has utilized this technique to further the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution in the presence of a quasar at z>2, resolving scales as small as a galactic disc and from bound gas in the circumgalactic medium to the diffuse environs of intergalactic space. Presented here, is the public release of the quasar pair spectral database utilized in these studies. In addition to projected pairs at z>2, the database also includes quasar pair members at z<2, gravitational lens candidates and quasars closely separated in redshift that are useful for small-scale clustering studies. In total the database catalogs 5627 distinct objects, with 4083 lying within 5' of at least one other source. A spectral library contains 3582 optical and near-infrared spectra for 3028 of the cataloged sources. As well as reporting on 54 newly discovered quasar pairs, we outline the key contributions made by this series over the last ten years, summarize the imaging and spectroscopic data used for target selection, discuss the target selection methodologies, describe the database content and explore some avenues for future work. Full documentation for the spectral database, including download instructions, are supplied at the following URL http://specdb.readthedocs.io/en/latest/
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.01424  [pdf] - 1659743
Two more, bright, z > 6 quasars from VST ATLAS and WISE
Comments: 11 pages, 8 figures, 4 tables, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-03-04
Recently, Carnall et al. discovered two bright high redshift quasars using the combination of the VST ATLAS and WISE surveys. The technique involved using the 3-D colour plane i-z:z-W1:W1-W2 with the WISE W1 (3.4 micron) and W2 (4.5 micron) bands taking the place of the usual NIR J band to help decrease stellar dwarf contamination. Here we report on our continued search for 5.7<z<6.4 quasars over an ~2x larger area of ~3577 sq. deg. of the Southern Hemisphere. We have found two further z>6 quasars, VST-ATLAS J158.6938-14.4211 at z=6.07 and J332.8017-32.1036 at z=6.32 with magnitudes of z_AB=19.4 and 19.7 mag respectively. J158.6938-14.4211 was confirmed by Keck LRIS observations and J332.8017-32.1036 was confirmed by ESO NTT EFOSC-2 observations. Here we present VLT X-shooter Visible and NIR spectra for the four ATLAS quasars. We have further independently rediscovered two z>5.7 quasars previously found by the VIKING/KiDS and PanSTARRS surveys. This means that in ATLAS we have now discovered a total of six quasars in our target 5.7<z<6.4 redshift range. Making approximate corrections for incompleteness, we find that our quasar space density agrees with the SDSS results of Jiang et al. at M_1450A~-27mag. Preliminary virial mass estimates based on the CIV and MIII emission lines give black hole masses in the range M_BH~1-6x10e9 M_solar for the four ATLAS quasars.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.05238  [pdf] - 1598093
Molecular gas in three z~7 quasar host galaxies
Comments: 12 pages, 6 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2017-07-17
We present ALMA band 3 observations of the CO(6-5), CO(7-6), and [CI] 369micron emission lines in three of the highest redshift quasar host galaxies at 6.6<z<6.9. These measurements constitute the highest-redshift CO detections to date. The target quasars have previously been detected in [CII] 158micron emission and the underlying far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum. We detect (spatially unresolved, at a resolution of >2", or >14kpc) CO emission in all three quasar hosts. In two sources, we detect the continuum emission around 400micron (rest-frame), and in one source we detect [CI] at low significance. We derive molecular gas reservoirs of (1-3)x10^10 M_sun in the quasar hosts, i.e. approximately only 10 times the mass of their central supermassive black holes. The extrapolated [CII]-to-CO(1-0) luminosity ratio is 2500-4200, consistent with measurements in galaxies at lower redshift. The detection of the [CI] line in one quasar host galaxy and the limit on the [CI] emission in the other two hosts enables a first characterization of the physical properties of the interstellar medium in z~7 quasar hosts. In the sources, the derived global CO/[CII]/[CI] line ratios are consistent with expectations from photodissociation regions (PDR), but not X-ray dominated regions (XDR). This suggest that quantities derived from the molecular gas and dust emission are related to ongoing star-formation activity in the quasar hosts, providing further evidence that the quasar hosts studied here harbor intense starbursts in addition to their active nucleus.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.07490  [pdf] - 1564142
First Discoveries of z>6 Quasars with the DECam Legacy Survey and UKIRT Hemisphere Survey
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2017-03-21
We present the first discoveries from a survey of $z\gtrsim6$ quasars using imaging data from the DECam Legacy Survey (DECaLS) in the optical, the UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) and a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS) in the near-IR, and ALLWISE in the mid-IR. DECaLS will image 9000 deg$^2$ of sky down to $z_{\rm AB}\sim23.0$, and UKIDSS and UHS, which will map the northern sky at $0<DEC<+60^{\circ}$, reaching $J_{\rm VEGA}\sim19.6$ (5-$\sigma$). The combination of these datasets allows us to discover quasars at redshift $z\gtrsim7$ and to conduct a complete census of the faint quasar population at $z\gtrsim6$. In this paper, we report on the selection method of our search, and on the initial discoveries of two new, faint $z\gtrsim6$ quasars and one new $z=6.63$ quasar in our pilot spectroscopic observations. The two new $z\sim6$ quasars are at $z=6.07$ and $z=6.17$ with absolute magnitudes at rest-frame wavelength 1450 \AA\ being $M_{1450}=-25.83$ and $M_{1450}=-25.76$, respectively. These discoveries suggest that we can find quasars close to or fainter than the break magnitude of the Quasar Luminosity Function (QLF) at $z\gtrsim6$. The new $z=6.63$ quasar has an absolute magnitude of $M_{1450}=-25.95$. This demonstrates the potential of using the combined DECaLS and UKIDSS/UHS datasets to find $z\gtrsim7$ quasars. Extrapolating from previous QLF measurements, we predict that these combined datasets will yield $\sim200$ $z\sim6$ quasars to $z_{\rm AB} < 21.5$, $\sim1{,}000$ $z\sim6$ quasars to $z_{\rm AB}<23$, and $\sim 30$ quasars at $z>6.5$ to $J_{\rm VEGA}<19.5$.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.00037  [pdf] - 1532358
The DESI Experiment Part II: Instrument Design
DESI Collaboration; Aghamousa, Amir; Aguilar, Jessica; Ahlen, Steve; Alam, Shadab; Allen, Lori E.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Annis, James; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Ballester, Otger; Baltay, Charles; Beaufore, Lucas; Bebek, Chris; Beers, Timothy C.; Bell, Eric F.; Bernal, José Luis; Besuner, Robert; Beutler, Florian; Blake, Chris; Bleuler, Hannes; Blomqvist, Michael; Blum, Robert; Bolton, Adam S.; Briceno, Cesar; Brooks, David; Brownstein, Joel R.; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolas G.; Cahn, Robert N.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Carton, Pierre-Henri; Casas, Ricard; Castander, Francisco J.; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Claybaugh, Todd M.; Close, Madeline; Coker, Carl T.; Cole, Shaun; Comparat, Johan; Cooper, Andrew P.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Crocce, Martin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel; Cunningham, Daniel P.; Davis, Tamara M.; Dawson, Kyle S.; de la Macorra, Axel; De Vicente, Juan; Delubac, Timothée; Derwent, Mark; Dey, Arjun; Dhungana, Govinda; Ding, Zhejie; Doel, Peter; Duan, Yutong T.; Ealet, Anne; Edelstein, Jerry; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elliott, Ann; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Evatt, Matthew; Fagrelius, Parker; Fan, Xiaohui; Fanning, Kevin; Farahi, Arya; Farihi, Jay; Favole, Ginevra; Feng, Yu; Fernandez, Enrique; Findlay, Joseph R.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Fitzpatrick, Michael J.; Flaugher, Brenna; Flender, Samuel; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Fosalba, Pablo; Frenk, Carlos S.; Fumagalli, Michele; Gaensicke, Boris T.; Gallo, Giuseppe; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Fusillo, Nicola Pietro Gentile; Gerard, Terry; Gershkovich, Irena; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Gillet, Denis; Gonzalez-de-Rivera, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Gott, Shelby; Graur, Or; Gutierrez, Gaston; Guy, Julien; Habib, Salman; Heetderks, Henry; Heetderks, Ian; Heitmann, Katrin; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Herrera, David A.; Ho, Shirley; Holland, Stephen; Honscheid, Klaus; Huff, Eric; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Huterer, Dragan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Laguna, Joseph Maria Illa; Ishikawa, Yuzo; Jacobs, Dianna; Jeffrey, Niall; Jelinsky, Patrick; Jennings, Elise; Jiang, Linhua; Jimenez, Jorge; Johnson, Jennifer; Joyce, Richard; Jullo, Eric; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kama, Sami; Karcher, Armin; Karkar, Sonia; Kehoe, Robert; Kennamer, Noble; Kent, Stephen; Kilbinger, Martin; Kim, Alex G.; Kirkby, David; Kisner, Theodore; Kitanidis, Ellie; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koposov, Sergey; Kovacs, Eve; Koyama, Kazuya; Kremin, Anthony; Kron, Richard; Kronig, Luzius; Kueter-Young, Andrea; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lafever, Robin; Lahav, Ofer; Lambert, Andrew; Lampton, Michael; Landriau, Martin; Lang, Dustin; Lauer, Tod R.; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Guillou, Laurent Le; Van Suu, Auguste Le; Lee, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Su-Jeong; Leitner, Daniela; Lesser, Michael; Levi, Michael E.; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Li, Baojiu; Liang, Ming; Lin, Huan; Linder, Eric; Loebman, Sarah R.; Lukić, Zarija; Ma, Jun; MacCrann, Niall; Magneville, Christophe; Makarem, Laleh; Manera, Marc; Manser, Christopher J.; Marshall, Robert; Martini, Paul; Massey, Richard; Matheson, Thomas; McCauley, Jeremy; McDonald, Patrick; McGreer, Ian D.; Meisner, Aaron; Metcalfe, Nigel; Miller, Timothy N.; Miquel, Ramon; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam; Naik, Milind; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nicola, Andrina; da Costa, Luiz Nicolati; Nie, Jundan; Niz, Gustavo; Norberg, Peder; Nord, Brian; Norman, Dara; Nugent, Peter; O'Brien, Thomas; Oh, Minji; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Padilla, Cristobal; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palmese, Antonella; Pappalardo, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patej, Anna; Peacock, John A.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Peng, Xiyan; Percival, Will J.; Perruchot, Sandrine; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pogge, Richard; Pollack, Jennifer E.; Poppett, Claire; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Probst, Ronald G.; Rabinowitz, David; Raichoor, Anand; Ree, Chang Hee; Refregier, Alexandre; Regal, Xavier; Reid, Beth; Reil, Kevin; Rezaie, Mehdi; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie; Ronayette, Samuel; Roodman, Aaron; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rozo, Eduardo; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina; Rykoff, Eli S.; Sabiu, Cristiano; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez, Eusebio; Sanchez, Javier; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Michael; Schubnell, Michael; Secroun, Aurélia; Seljak, Uros; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serrano, Santiago; Shafieloo, Arman; Shan, Huanyuan; Sharples, Ray; Sholl, Michael J.; Shourt, William V.; Silber, Joseph H.; Silva, David R.; Sirk, Martin M.; Slosar, Anze; Smith, Alex; Smoot, George F.; Som, Debopam; Song, Yong-Seon; Sprayberry, David; Staten, Ryan; Stefanik, Andy; Tarle, Gregory; Tie, Suk Sien; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Valdes, Francisco; Valenzuela, Octavio; Valluri, Monica; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Verde, Licia; Walker, Alistair R.; Wang, Jiali; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wechsler, Risa H.; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Yang, Qian; Yeche, Christophe; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhimin; Zhu, Yaling; Zou, Hu; Zu, Ying
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-10-31, last modified: 2016-12-13
DESI (Dark Energy Spectropic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. The DESI instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking up to 5,000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 360 nm to 980 nm. The fibers feed ten three-arm spectrographs with resolution $R= \lambda/\Delta\lambda$ between 2000 and 5500, depending on wavelength. The DESI instrument will be used to conduct a five-year survey designed to cover 14,000 deg$^2$. This powerful instrument will be installed at prime focus on the 4-m Mayall telescope in Kitt Peak, Arizona, along with a new optical corrector, which will provide a three-degree diameter field of view. The DESI collaboration will also deliver a spectroscopic pipeline and data management system to reduce and archive all data for eventual public use.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.00036  [pdf] - 1532357
The DESI Experiment Part I: Science,Targeting, and Survey Design
DESI Collaboration; Aghamousa, Amir; Aguilar, Jessica; Ahlen, Steve; Alam, Shadab; Allen, Lori E.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Annis, James; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Ballester, Otger; Baltay, Charles; Beaufore, Lucas; Bebek, Chris; Beers, Timothy C.; Bell, Eric F.; Bernal, José Luis; Besuner, Robert; Beutler, Florian; Blake, Chris; Bleuler, Hannes; Blomqvist, Michael; Blum, Robert; Bolton, Adam S.; Briceno, Cesar; Brooks, David; Brownstein, Joel R.; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolas G.; Cahn, Robert N.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Carton, Pierre-Henri; Casas, Ricard; Castander, Francisco J.; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Claybaugh, Todd M.; Close, Madeline; Coker, Carl T.; Cole, Shaun; Comparat, Johan; Cooper, Andrew P.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Crocce, Martin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel; Cunningham, Daniel P.; Davis, Tamara M.; Dawson, Kyle S.; de la Macorra, Axel; De Vicente, Juan; Delubac, Timothée; Derwent, Mark; Dey, Arjun; Dhungana, Govinda; Ding, Zhejie; Doel, Peter; Duan, Yutong T.; Ealet, Anne; Edelstein, Jerry; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elliott, Ann; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Evatt, Matthew; Fagrelius, Parker; Fan, Xiaohui; Fanning, Kevin; Farahi, Arya; Farihi, Jay; Favole, Ginevra; Feng, Yu; Fernandez, Enrique; Findlay, Joseph R.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Fitzpatrick, Michael J.; Flaugher, Brenna; Flender, Samuel; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Fosalba, Pablo; Frenk, Carlos S.; Fumagalli, Michele; Gaensicke, Boris T.; Gallo, Giuseppe; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Fusillo, Nicola Pietro Gentile; Gerard, Terry; Gershkovich, Irena; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Gillet, Denis; Gonzalez-de-Rivera, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Gott, Shelby; Graur, Or; Gutierrez, Gaston; Guy, Julien; Habib, Salman; Heetderks, Henry; Heetderks, Ian; Heitmann, Katrin; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Herrera, David A.; Ho, Shirley; Holland, Stephen; Honscheid, Klaus; Huff, Eric; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Huterer, Dragan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Laguna, Joseph Maria Illa; Ishikawa, Yuzo; Jacobs, Dianna; Jeffrey, Niall; Jelinsky, Patrick; Jennings, Elise; Jiang, Linhua; Jimenez, Jorge; Johnson, Jennifer; Joyce, Richard; Jullo, Eric; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kama, Sami; Karcher, Armin; Karkar, Sonia; Kehoe, Robert; Kennamer, Noble; Kent, Stephen; Kilbinger, Martin; Kim, Alex G.; Kirkby, David; Kisner, Theodore; Kitanidis, Ellie; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koposov, Sergey; Kovacs, Eve; Koyama, Kazuya; Kremin, Anthony; Kron, Richard; Kronig, Luzius; Kueter-Young, Andrea; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lafever, Robin; Lahav, Ofer; Lambert, Andrew; Lampton, Michael; Landriau, Martin; Lang, Dustin; Lauer, Tod R.; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Guillou, Laurent Le; Van Suu, Auguste Le; Lee, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Su-Jeong; Leitner, Daniela; Lesser, Michael; Levi, Michael E.; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Li, Baojiu; Liang, Ming; Lin, Huan; Linder, Eric; Loebman, Sarah R.; Lukić, Zarija; Ma, Jun; MacCrann, Niall; Magneville, Christophe; Makarem, Laleh; Manera, Marc; Manser, Christopher J.; Marshall, Robert; Martini, Paul; Massey, Richard; Matheson, Thomas; McCauley, Jeremy; McDonald, Patrick; McGreer, Ian D.; Meisner, Aaron; Metcalfe, Nigel; Miller, Timothy N.; Miquel, Ramon; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam; Naik, Milind; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nicola, Andrina; da Costa, Luiz Nicolati; Nie, Jundan; Niz, Gustavo; Norberg, Peder; Nord, Brian; Norman, Dara; Nugent, Peter; O'Brien, Thomas; Oh, Minji; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Padilla, Cristobal; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palmese, Antonella; Pappalardo, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patej, Anna; Peacock, John A.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Peng, Xiyan; Percival, Will J.; Perruchot, Sandrine; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pogge, Richard; Pollack, Jennifer E.; Poppett, Claire; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Probst, Ronald G.; Rabinowitz, David; Raichoor, Anand; Ree, Chang Hee; Refregier, Alexandre; Regal, Xavier; Reid, Beth; Reil, Kevin; Rezaie, Mehdi; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie; Ronayette, Samuel; Roodman, Aaron; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rozo, Eduardo; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina; Rykoff, Eli S.; Sabiu, Cristiano; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez, Eusebio; Sanchez, Javier; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Michael; Schubnell, Michael; Secroun, Aurélia; Seljak, Uros; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serrano, Santiago; Shafieloo, Arman; Shan, Huanyuan; Sharples, Ray; Sholl, Michael J.; Shourt, William V.; Silber, Joseph H.; Silva, David R.; Sirk, Martin M.; Slosar, Anze; Smith, Alex; Smoot, George F.; Som, Debopam; Song, Yong-Seon; Sprayberry, David; Staten, Ryan; Stefanik, Andy; Tarle, Gregory; Tie, Suk Sien; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Valdes, Francisco; Valenzuela, Octavio; Valluri, Monica; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Verde, Licia; Walker, Alistair R.; Wang, Jiali; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wechsler, Risa H.; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Yang, Qian; Yeche, Christophe; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhimin; Zhu, Yaling; Zou, Hu; Zu, Ying
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-10-31, last modified: 2016-12-13
DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. To trace the underlying dark matter distribution, spectroscopic targets will be selected in four classes from imaging data. We will measure luminous red galaxies up to $z=1.0$. To probe the Universe out to even higher redshift, DESI will target bright [O II] emission line galaxies up to $z=1.7$. Quasars will be targeted both as direct tracers of the underlying dark matter distribution and, at higher redshifts ($ 2.1 < z < 3.5$), for the Ly-$\alpha$ forest absorption features in their spectra, which will be used to trace the distribution of neutral hydrogen. When moonlight prevents efficient observations of the faint targets of the baseline survey, DESI will conduct a magnitude-limited Bright Galaxy Survey comprising approximately 10 million galaxies with a median $z\approx 0.2$. In total, more than 30 million galaxy and quasar redshifts will be obtained to measure the BAO feature and determine the matter power spectrum, including redshift space distortions.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.02446  [pdf] - 1494670
A Wide-Field Camera and Fully Remote Operations at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory
Comments: 28 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2016-04-08
Upgrades at the 2.3 meter Wyoming Infrared Observatory telescope have provided the capability for fully-remote operations by a single operator from the University of Wyoming campus. A line-of-sight 300 Megabit/s 11 GHz radio link provides high-speed internet for data transfer and remote operations that include several real-time video feeds. Uninterruptable power is ensured by a 10 kVA battery supply for critical systems and a 55 kW autostart diesel generator capable of running the entire observatory for up to a week. Construction of a new four-element prime-focus corrector with fused-silica elements allows imaging over a 40' field-of-view with a new 4096x4096 UV-sensitive prime-focus camera and filter wheel. A new telescope control system facilitates the remote operations model and provides 20'' rms pointing over the usable sky. Taken together, these improvements pave the way for a new generation of sky surveys supporting space-based missions and flexible-cadence observations advancing emerging astrophysical priorities such as planet detection, quasar variability, and long-term time-domain campaigns.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.04849  [pdf] - 1375602
The 2QDES Pilot : The luminosity and redshift dependence of quasar clustering
Comments: 20 pages, 15 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-03-15
We present a new redshift survey, the 2dF Quasar Dark Energy Survey pilot (2QDESp), which consists of ${\approx}10000$ quasars from ${\approx}150$ deg$^2$ of the southern sky, based on VST-ATLAS imaging and 2dF/AAOmega spectroscopy. Combining our optical photometry with the WISE (W1,W2) bands we can select essentially contamination free quasar samples with $0.8{<}z{<}2.5$ and $g{<}20.5$. At fainter magnitudes, optical UVX selection is still required to reach our $g{\approx}22.5$ limit. Using both these techniques we observed quasar redshifts at sky densities up to $90$ deg$^{-2}$. By comparing 2QDESp with other surveys (SDSS, 2QZ and 2SLAQ) we find that quasar clustering is approximately luminosity independent, with results for all four surveys consistent with a correlation scale of $r_{0}{=}6.1{\pm}0.1 \: h^{-1}$Mpc, despite their decade range in luminosity. We find a significant redshift dependence of clustering, particularly when BOSS data with $r_{0}{=}7.3{\pm}0.1 \: h^{-1}$Mpc are included at $z{\approx}2.4$. All quasars remain consistent with having a single host halo mass of ${\approx}2{\pm}1{\times}10^{12} \: h^{-1}M_\odot$. This result implies that either quasars do not radiate at a fixed fraction of the Eddington luminosity or AGN black hole and dark matter halo masses are weakly correlated. No significant evidence is found to support fainter, X-ray selected quasars at low redshift having larger halo masses as predicted by the `hot halo' mode AGN model of Fanidakis et al. 2013. Finally, although the combined quasar sample reaches an effective volume as large as that of the original SDSS LRG sample, we do not detect the BAO feature in these data.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.07432  [pdf] - 1339049
Bright [CII] and dust emission in three z>6.6 quasar host galaxies observed by ALMA
Comments: 16 pages, 12 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-11-23
We present ALMA detections of the [CII] 158 micron emission line and the underlying far-infrared continuum of three quasars at 6.6<z<6.9 selected from the VIKING survey. The [CII] line fluxes range between 1.6-3.4 Jy km/s ([CII] luminosities ~(1.9-3.9)x10^9 L_sun). We measure continuum flux densities of 0.56-3.29 mJy around 158 micron (rest-frame), with implied far-infrared luminosities between (0.6-7.5)x10^12 L_sun and dust masses M_d=(0.7-24)x10^8 M_sun. In one quasar we derive a dust temperature of 30^+12_-9 K from the continuum slope, below the canonical value of 47 K. Assuming that the [CII] and continuum emission are powered by star formation, we find star-formation rates from 100-1600 M_sun/yr based on local scaling relations. The L_[CII]/L_FIR ratios in the quasar hosts span a wide range from (0.3-4.6)x10^-3, including one quasar with a ratio that is consistent with local star-forming galaxies. We find that the strength of the L_[CII] and 158 micron continuum emission in z>~6 quasar hosts correlate with the quasar's bolometric luminosity. In one quasar, the [CII] line is significantly redshifted by ~1700 km/s with respect to the MgII broad emission line. Comparing to values in the literature, we find that, on average, the MgII is blueshifted by 480 km/s (with a standard deviation of 630 km/s) with respect to the host galaxy redshift, i.e. one of our quasars is an extreme outlier. Through modeling we can rule out a flat rotation curve for our brightest [CII] emitter. Finally, we find that the ratio of black hole mass to host galaxy (dynamical) mass is higher by a factor 3-4 (with significant scatter) than local relations.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.00726  [pdf] - 1272262
First discoveries of z~6 quasars with the Kilo Degree Survey and VISTA Kilo-Degree Infrared Galaxy survey
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures. Published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: MNRAS 453, 2259-2266 (2015)
Submitted: 2015-07-02, last modified: 2015-09-07
We present the results of our first year of quasar search in the on-going ESO public Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and VISTA Kilo-Degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) surveys. These surveys are among the deeper wide-field surveys that can be used to uncovered large numbers of z~6 quasars. This allows us to probe a more common population of z~6 quasars that is fainter than the well-studied quasars from the main Sloan Digital Sky Survey. From this first set of combined survey catalogues covering ~250 deg^2 we selected point sources down to Z_AB=22 that had a very red i-Z (i-Z>2.2) colour. After follow-up imaging and spectroscopy, we discovered four new quasars in the redshift range 5.8<z<6.0. The absolute magnitudes at a rest-frame wavelength of 1450 A are between -26.6 < M_1450 < -24.4, confirming that we can find quasars fainter than M^*, which at z=6 has been estimated to be between M^*=-25.1 and M^*=-27.6. The discovery of 4 quasars in 250 deg^2 of survey data is consistent with predictions based on the z~6 quasar luminosity function. We discuss various ways to push the candidate selection to fainter magnitudes and we expect to find about 30 new quasars down to an absolute magnitude of M_1450=-24. Studying this homogeneously selected faint quasar population will be important to gain insight into the onset of the co-evolution of the black holes and their stellar hosts.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.07748  [pdf] - 1126235
Two bright z > 6 quasars from VST ATLAS and a new method of optical plus mid-infra-red colour selection
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures, submitted to MNRAS letters
Submitted: 2015-02-26, last modified: 2015-06-08
We present the discovery of two z > 6 quasars, selected as i band dropouts in the VST ATLAS survey. Our first quasar has redshift, z = 6.31 \pm 0.03, z band magnitude, z_AB = 19.63 \pm 0.08 and rest frame 1450A absolute magnitude, M_1450 = -27.8 \pm 0.2, making it the joint second most luminous quasar known at z > 6. The second quasar has z = 6.02 \pm 0.03, z_AB = 19.54 \pm 0.08 and M_1450 = -27.0 \pm 0.1. We also recover a z = 5.86 quasar discovered by Venemans et al. (2015, in prep.). To select our quasars we use a new 3D colour space, combining the ATLAS optical colours with mid-infra-red data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We use i_AB - z_AB colour to exclude main sequence stars, galaxies and lower redshift quasars, W1 - W2 to exclude L dwarfs and z_AB - W2 to exclude T dwarfs. A restrictive set of colour cuts returns only our three high redshift quasars and no contaminants, albeit with a sample completeness of ~50%. We discuss how our 3D colour space can be used to reject the majority of contaminants from samples of bright 5.7 < z < 6.3 quasars, replacing follow-up near-infra-red photometry, whilst retaining high completeness.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.05432  [pdf] - 937792
The VLT Survey Telescope ATLAS
Comments: 13 pages, 23 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-02-18
The VLT Survey Telescope (VST) ATLAS is an optical ugriz survey aiming to cover ~4700deg^2 of the Southern sky to similar depths as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From reduced images and object catalogues provided by the Cambridge Astronomical Surveys Unit we first find that the median seeing ranges from 0.8 arcsec FWHM in i to 1.0 arcsec in u, significantly better than the 1.2-1.5 arcsec seeing for SDSS. The 5 sigma magnitude limit for stellar sources is r_AB=22.7 and in all bands these limits are at least as faint as SDSS. SDSS and ATLAS are more equivalent for galaxy photometry except in the z band where ATLAS has significantly higher throughput. We have improved the original ESO magnitude zeropoints by comparing m<16 star magnitudes with APASS in gri, also extrapolating into u and z, resulting in zeropoints accurate to ~+-0.02 mag. We finally compare star and galaxy number counts in a 250deg^2 area with SDSS and other count data and find good agreement. ATLAS data products can be retrieved from the ESO Science Archive, while support for survey science analyses is provided by the OmegaCAM Science Archive (OSA), operated by the Wide-Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.3801  [pdf] - 1215664
Combining Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data with Near Infrared Data from the ESO VISTA Hemisphere Survey
Comments: 18 pages, 11 figures, Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-07-14, last modified: 2014-10-27
We present the combination of optical data from the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with near infrared data from the ESO VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS). The deep optical detections from DES are used to extract fluxes and associated errors from the shallower VHS data. Joint 7-band ($grizYJK$) photometric catalogues are produced in a single 3 sq-deg DECam field centred at 02h26m$-$04d36m where the availability of ancillary multi-wavelength photometry and spectroscopy allows us to test the data quality. Dual photometry increases the number of DES galaxies with measured VHS fluxes by a factor of $\sim$4.5 relative to a simple catalogue level matching and results in a $\sim$1.5 mag increase in the 80\% completeness limit of the NIR data. Almost 70\% of DES sources have useful NIR flux measurements in this initial catalogue. Photometric redshifts are estimated for a subset of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts and initial results, although currently limited by small number statistics, indicate that the VHS data can help reduce the photometric redshift scatter at both $z<0.5$ and $z>1$. We present example DES+VHS colour selection criteria for high redshift Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) at $z\sim0.7$ as well as luminous quasars. Using spectroscopic observations in this field we show that the additional VHS fluxes enable a cleaner selection of both populations with $<$10\% contamination from galactic stars in the case of spectroscopically confirmed quasars and $<0.5\%$ contamination from galactic stars in the case of spectroscopically confirmed LRGs. The combined DES+VHS dataset, which will eventually cover almost 5000 sq-deg, will therefore enable a range of new science and be ideally suited for target selection for future wide-field spectroscopic surveys.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.3666  [pdf] - 1180740
Discovery of three z>6.5 quasars in the VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) survey
Comments: 14 pages, 9 figures. Published in ApJ
Submitted: 2013-11-14, last modified: 2013-12-18
Studying quasars at the highest redshifts can constrain models of galaxy and black hole formation, and it also probes the intergalactic medium in the early universe. Optical surveys have to date discovered more than 60 quasars up to z~6.4, a limit set by the use of the z-band and CCD detectors. Only one z>6.4 quasar has been discovered, namely the z=7.08 quasar ULAS J1120+0641, using near-infrared imaging. Here we report the discovery of three new z>6.4 quasars in 332 square degrees of the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) survey, thus extending the number from 1 to 4. The newly discovered quasars have redshifts of z=6.60, 6.75, and 6.89. The absolute magnitudes are between -26.0 and -25.5, 0.6-1.1 mag fainter than ULAS J1120+0641. Near-infrared spectroscopy revealed the MgII emission line in all three objects. The quasars are powered by black holes with masses of ~(1-2)x10^9 M_sun. In our probed redshift range of 6.44<z<7.44 we can set a lower limit on the space density of supermassive black holes of \rho(M_BH>10^9 M_sun) > 1.1x10^(-9) Mpc^(-3). The discovery of three quasars in our survey area is consistent with the z=6 quasar luminosity function when extrapolated to z~7. We do not find evidence for a steeper decline in the space density of quasars with increasing redshift from z=6 to z=7.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.3891  [pdf] - 1116715
Herschel-ATLAS: VISTA VIKING near-IR counterparts in the Phase 1 GAMA 9h data
Comments: 20 pages, 20 figures, 3 tables, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-02-17, last modified: 2012-05-30
We identify near-infrared Ks band counterparts to Herschel-ATLAS sub-mm sources, using a preliminary object catalogue from the VISTA VIKING survey. The sub-mm sources are selected from the H-ATLAS Phase 1 catalogue of the GAMA 9h field, which includes all objects detected at 250, 350 or 500 um with the SPIRE instrument. We apply and discuss a likelihood ratio (LR) method for VIKING candidates within a search radius of 10" of the 22,000 SPIRE sources with a 5 sigma detection at 250 um. We find that 11,294(51%) of the SPIRE sources have a best VIKING counterpart with a reliability $R\ge 0.8$, and the false identification rate of these is estimated to be 4.2%. We expect to miss ~5% of true VIKING counterparts. There is evidence from Z-J and J-Ks colours that the reliable counterparts to SPIRE galaxies are marginally redder than the field population. We obtain photometric redshifts for ~68% of all (non-stellar) VIKING candidates with a median redshift of 0.405. Comparing to the results of the optical identifications supplied with the Phase I catalogue, we find that the use of medium-deep near-infrared data improves the identification rate of reliable counterparts from 36% to 51%.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.3314  [pdf] - 1091640
Selection constraints on high redshift quasar searches in the VISTA kilo-degree infrared galaxy survey
Comments: 16 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2011-11-14
The European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) is a 4-m class survey telescope for wide-field near-infrared imaging. VISTA is currently running a suite of six public surveys, which will shortly deliver their first Europe wide public data releases to ESO. The VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy Survey (VIKING) forms a natural intermediate between current wide shallow, and deeper more concentrated surveys, by targeting two patches totalling 1500 sq.deg in the northern and southern hemispheres with measured 5-sigma limiting depths of Z ~ 22.4, Y ~ 21.4, J ~ 20.9, H ~ 19.9 and Ks ~19.3 (Vega). This architecture forms an ideal working parameter space for the discovery of a significant sample of 6.5 <= z <= 7.5 quasars. In the first data release priority has been placed on small areas encompassing a number of fields well sampled at many wavelengths, thereby optimising science gains and synergy whilst ensuring a timely release of the first products. For rare object searches e.g. high-z quasars, this policy is not ideal since photometric selection strategies generally evolve considerably with the acquisition of data. Without a reasonably representative data set sampling many directions on the sky it is not clear how a rare object search can be conducted in a highly complete and efficient manner. In this paper, we alleviate this problem by supplementing initial data with a realistic model of the spatial, luminosity and colour distributions of sources known to heavily contaminate photometric quasar selection spaces, namely dwarf stars of spectral type M, L and T. We use this model along with a subset of available data to investigate contamination of quasar selection space by cool stars and galaxies and lay down a set of benchmark selection constraints that limit contamination to reasonable levels whilst maintaining high completeness...
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.1444  [pdf] - 1025033
Analysis of large-scale anisotropy of ultra-high energy cosmic rays in HiRes data
Comments: 9 pages, 5 Postscript figures
Submitted: 2010-02-07
Stereo data collected by the HiRes experiment over a six year period are examined for large-scale anisotropy related to the inhomogeneous distribution of matter in the nearby Universe. We consider the generic case of small cosmic-ray deflections and a large number of sources tracing the matter distribution. In this matter tracer model the expected cosmic ray flux depends essentially on a single free parameter, the typical deflection angle theta. We find that the HiRes data with threshold energies of 40 EeV and 57 EeV are incompatible with the matter tracer model at a 95% confidence level unless theta is larger than 10 degrees and are compatible with an isotropic flux. The data set above 10 EeV is compatible with both the matter tracer model and an isotropic flux.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.4500  [pdf] - 23759
Measurement of the Flux of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays by the Stereo Technique
Comments: 20 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2009-04-28
The High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment has measured the flux of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays using the stereoscopic air fluorescence technique. The HiRes experiment consists of two detectors that observe cosmic ray showers via the fluorescence light they emit. HiRes data can be analyzed in monocular mode, where each detector is treated separately, or in stereoscopic mode where they are considered together. Using the monocular mode the HiRes collaboration measured the cosmic ray spectrum and made the first observation of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff. In this paper we present the cosmic ray spectrum measured by the stereoscopic technique. Good agreement is found with the monocular spectrum in all details.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.0382  [pdf] - 11438
Search for Correlations between HiRes Stereo Events and Active Galactic Nuclei
Comments: 13 pages, 1 table, 5 figures
Submitted: 2008-04-02, last modified: 2008-08-15
We have searched for correlations between the pointing directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays observed by the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) visible from its northern hemisphere location. No correlations, other than random correlations, have been found. We report our results using search parameters prescribed by the Pierre Auger collaboration. Using these parameters, the Auger collaboration concludes that a positive correlation exists for sources visible to their southern hemisphere location. We also describe results using two methods for determining the chance probability of correlations: one in which a hypothesis is formed from scanning one half of the data and tested on the second half, and another which involves a scan over the entire data set. The most significant correlation found occurred with a chance probability of 24%.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.0554  [pdf] - 10663
An upper limit on the electron-neutrino flux from the HiRes detector
Comments: 13 pages, 3 figures. submitted to Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2008-03-04, last modified: 2008-06-03
Air-fluorescence detectors such as the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) detector are very sensitive to upward-going, Earth-skimming ultrahigh energy electron-neutrino-induced showers. This is due to the relatively large interaction cross sections of these high-energy neutrinos and to the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect. The LPM effect causes a significant decrease in the cross sections for bremsstrahlung and pair production, allowing charged-current electron-neutrino-induced showers occurring deep in the Earth's crust to be detectable as they exit the Earth into the atmosphere. A search for upward-going neutrino-induced showers in the HiRes-II monocular dataset has yielded a null result. From an LPM calculation of the energy spectrum of charged particles as a function of primary energy and depth for electron-induced showers in rock, we calculate the shape of the resulting profile of these showers in air. We describe a full detector Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detector response to upward-going electron-neutrino-induced cascades and present an upper limit on the flux of electron-neutrinos.