sort results by

Use logical operators AND, OR, NOT and round brackets to construct complex queries. Whitespace-separated words are treated as ANDed.

Show articles per page in mode

Feng, Chang

Normalized to: Feng, C.

111 article(s) in total. 1140 co-authors, from 1 to 78 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 9,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.02156  [pdf] - 2032804
Fractional Polarisation of Extragalactic Sources in the 500-square-degree SPTpol Survey
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-03, last modified: 2020-01-17
We study the polarisation properties of extragalactic sources at 95 and 150 GHz in the SPTpol 500 deg$^2$ survey. We estimate the polarised power by stacking maps at known source positions, and correct for noise bias by subtracting the mean polarised power at random positions in the maps. We show that the method is unbiased using a set of simulated maps with similar noise properties to the real SPTpol maps. We find a flux-weighted mean-squared polarisation fraction $\langle p^2 \rangle= [8.9\pm1.1] \times 10^{-4}$ at 95 GHz and $[6.9\pm1.1] \times 10^{-4}$ at 150~GHz for the full sample. This is consistent with the values obtained for a sub-sample of active galactic nuclei. For dusty sources, we find 95 per cent upper limits of $\langle p^2 \rangle_{\rm 95}<16.9 \times 10^{-3}$ and $\langle p^2 \rangle_{\rm 150}<2.6 \times 10^{-3}$. We find no evidence that the polarisation fraction depends on the source flux or observing frequency. The 1-$\sigma$ upper limit on measured mean squared polarisation fraction at 150 GHz implies that extragalactic foregrounds will be subdominant to the CMB E and B mode polarisation power spectra out to at least $\ell\lesssim5700$ ($\ell\lesssim4700$) and $\ell\lesssim5300$ ($\ell\lesssim3600$), respectively at 95 (150) GHz.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.12840  [pdf] - 2021393
Cross-Correlation of Far-Infrared Background Anisotropies and CMB Lensing form Herschel and Planck satellites
Comments: 12 pages, 10 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2019-12-30
The cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies and cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing are powerful measurements for exploring cosmological and astrophysical problems. In this work, we measure the auto-correlation power spectrum of the CIB anisotropies in the Herschel-SPIRE HerMES Large Mode Survey (HeLMS) field, which covers more than 280 square degrees of the sky, and the cross power spectrum between HeLMS CIB and the CMB lensing from Planck. We use the Herschel Level 1 timeline data to merge the CIB maps at 250, 350 and 500 um bands, and mask the areas where the flux is greater than 3-sigma (~50 mJy/beam) or no measured data. We obtain the final CIB power spectra at 100<ell<20,000 by considering several effects, such as beam function, mode coupling, transfer function, and so on. We also calculate the theoretical CIB auto- and cross-power spectra of CIB and CMB lensing by assuming that the CIB emissivity follows Gaussian distribution in redshift. The Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method is used to perform a joint fit of the CIB auto-power spectra and cross-power spectra of CIB and CMB lensing data. We find that our model can fit the power spectrum data very well, and obtain basically consistent results with higher accuracy comparing to previous studies.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.02668  [pdf] - 2042169
Fractional Dark Matter decay: cosmological imprints and observational constraints
Comments: 34 pages, 18 figures, 5 tables, accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2019-08-07, last modified: 2019-12-30
If a fraction $f_{\rm dcdm}$ of the Dark Matter decays into invisible and massless particles (so-called "dark radiation") with the decay rate (or inverse lifetime) $\Gamma_{\rm dcdm}$, such decay will leave distinctive imprints on cosmological observables. With a full consideration of the Boltzmann hierarchy, we calculate the decay-induced impacts not only on the CMB but also on the redshift distortion and the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, while providing detailed physical interpretations based on evaluating the evolution of gravitational potential. By using the current cosmological data with a combination of Planck 2015, Baryon Acoustic Oscillation and redshift distortion measurements which can improve the constraints, we update the $1\sigma$ bound on the fraction of decaying DM from $f_{\rm dcdm}\lesssim5.26\%$ to $f_{\rm dcdm}\lesssim2.73\%$ for the short-lived DM (assuming $\Gamma_{\rm dcdm}/H_0\gtrsim10^4$). However, no constraints are improved from RSD data ($f_{\rm dcdm}\lesssim0.94\%$) for the long-lived DM (i.e., $\Gamma_{\rm dcdm}/H_0\lesssim10^4$). We also find the fractional DM decay can only slightly reduce the $H_0$ and $\sigma_8$ tensions, which is consistent with other previous works. Furthermore, our calculations show that the kSZ effect in future would provide a further constraining power on the decaying DM.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.10980  [pdf] - 2003195
Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Lensing Power Spectrum from Two Years of POLARBEAR Data
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-11-25
We present a measurement of the gravitational lensing deflection power spectrum reconstructed with two seasons cosmic microwave background polarization data from the POLARBEAR experiment. Observations were taken at 150 GHz from 2012 to 2014 which survey three patches of sky totaling 30 square degrees. We test the consistency of the lensing spectrum with a Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmology and reject the no-lensing hypothesis at a confidence of 10.9 sigma including statistical and systematic uncertainties. We observe a value of A_L = 1.33 +/- 0.32 (statistical) +/- 0.02 (systematic) +/- 0.07 (foreground) using all polarization lensing estimators, which corresponds to a 24% accurate measurement of the lensing amplitude. Compared to the analysis of the first year data, we have improved the breadth of both the suite of null tests and the error terms included in the estimation of systematic contamination.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.07046  [pdf] - 2000185
Cross-correlation of POLARBEAR CMB Polarization Lensing with High-$z$ Sub-mm Herschel-ATLAS galaxies
Comments: 14 pages, 6 figures, updated to match published version on ApJ
Submitted: 2019-03-17, last modified: 2019-11-18
We report a 4.8$\sigma$ measurement of the cross-correlation signal between the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence reconstructed from measurements of the CMB polarization made by the POLARBEAR experiment and the infrared-selected galaxies of the Herschel-ATLAS survey. This is the first measurement of its kind. We infer a best-fit galaxy bias of $b = 5.76 \pm 1.25$, corresponding to a host halo mass of $\log_{10}(M_h/M_\odot) =13.5^{+0.2}_{-0.3}$ at an effective redshift of $z \sim 2$ from the cross-correlation power spectrum. Residual uncertainties in the redshift distribution of the sub-mm galaxies are subdominant with respect to the statistical precision. We perform a suite of systematic tests, finding that instrumental and astrophysical contaminations are small compared to the statistical error. This cross-correlation measurement only relies on CMB polarization information that, differently from CMB temperature maps, is less contaminated by galactic and extra-galactic foregrounds, providing a clearer view of the projected matter distribution. This result demonstrates the feasibility and robustness of this approach for future high-sensitivity CMB polarization experiments.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.02116  [pdf] - 1977965
Evidence for the Cross-correlation between Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Lensing from POLARBEAR and Cosmic Shear from Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam
Comments: 16 pages, 5 figures, Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-04-03, last modified: 2019-10-11
We present the first measurement of cross-correlation between the lensing potential, reconstructed from cosmic microwave background (CMB) {\it polarization} data, and the cosmic shear field from galaxy shapes. This measurement is made using data from the POLARBEAR CMB experiment and the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey. By analyzing an 11~deg$^2$ overlapping region, we reject the null hypothesis at 3.5$\sigma$\ and constrain the amplitude of the {\bf cross-spectrum} to $\widehat{A}_{\rm lens}=1.70\pm 0.48$, where $\widehat{A}_{\rm lens}$ is the amplitude normalized with respect to the Planck~2018{} prediction, based on the flat $\Lambda$ cold dark matter cosmology. The first measurement of this {\bf cross-spectrum} without relying on CMB temperature measurements is possible due to the deep POLARBEAR map with a noise level of ${\sim}$6\,$\mu$K-arcmin, as well as the deep HSC data with a high galaxy number density of $n_g=23\,{\rm arcmin^{-2}}$. We present a detailed study of the systematics budget to show that residual systematics in our results are negligibly small, which demonstrates the future potential of this cross-correlation technique.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.00802  [pdf] - 1977400
AEDGE: Atomic Experiment for Dark Matter and Gravity Exploration in Space
El-Neaj, Yousef Abou; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Amairi-Pyka, Sana; Araujo, Henrique; Balaz, Antun; Bassi, Angelo; Bathe-Peters, Lars; Battelier, Baptiste; Belic, Aleksandar; Bentine, Elliot; Bernabeu, Jose; Bertoldi, Andrea; Bingham, Robert; Blas, Diego; Bolpasi, Vasiliki; Bongs, Kai; Bose, Sougato; Bouyer, Philippe; Bowcock, Themis; Bowden, William; Buchmueller, Oliver; Burrage, Clare; Calmet, Xavier; Canuel, Benjamin; Caramete, Laurentiu-Ioan; Carroll, Andrew; Cella, Giancarlo; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Chattopadhyay, Swapan; Chen, Xuzong; Chiofalo, Maria Luisa; Coleman, Jonathon; Cotter, Joseph; Cui, Yanou; Derevianko, Andrei; De Roeck, Albert; Djordjevic, Goran; Dornan, Peter; Doser, Michael; Drougkakis, Ioannis; Dunningham, Jacob; Dutan, Ioana; Easo, Sajan; Elertas, Gedminas; Ellis, John; Sawy, Mai El; Fassi, Farida; Felea, Daniel; Feng, Chen-Hao; Flack, Robert; Foot, Chris; Fuentes, Ivette; Gaaloul, Naceur; Gauguet, Alexandre; Geiger, Remi; Gibson, Valerie; Giudice, Gian; Goldwin, Jon; Grachov, Oleg; Graham, Peter W.; Grasso, Dario; van der Grinten, Maurits; Gundogan, Mustafa; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Harte, Tiffany; Hees, Aurelien; Hobson, Richard; Holst, Bodil; Hogan, Jason; Kasevich, Mark; Kavanagh, Bradley J.; von Klitzing, Wolf; Kovachy, Tim; Krikler, Benjamin; Krutzik, Markus; Lewicki, Marek; Lien, Yu-Hung; Liu, Miaoyuan; Luciano, Giuseppe Gaetano; Magnon, Alain; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Malik, Sarah; McCabe, Christopher; Mitchell, Jeremiah; Pahl, Julia; Pal, Debapriya; Pandey, Saurabh; Papazoglou, Dimitris; Paternostro, Mauro; Penning, Bjoern; Peters, Achim; Prevedelli, Marco; Puthiya-Veettil, Vishnupriya; Quenby, John; Rasel, Ernst; Ravenhall, Sean; Sfar, Haifa Rejeb; Ringwood, Jack; Roura, Albert; Sabulsky, Dylan; Sameed, Muhammed; Sauer, Ben; Schaffer, Stefan Alaric; Schiller, Stephan; Schkolnik, Vladimir; Schlippert, Dennis; Schubert, Christian; Shayeghi, Armin; Shipsey, Ian; Signorini, Carla; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Singh, Yajpal; Sumner, Timothy; Tassis, Konstantinos; Tentindo, Silvia; Tino, Guglielmo Maria; Tinsley, Jonathan N.; Unwin, James; Valenzuela, Tristan; Vasilakis, Georgios; Vaskonen, Ville; Vogt, Christian; Webber-Date, Alex; Wenzlawski, Andre; Windpassinger, Patrick; Woltmann, Marian; Holynski, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zhan, Ming-Sheng; Zou, Xinhao; Zupan, Jure
Comments: V2 -- added support authors
Submitted: 2019-08-02, last modified: 2019-10-10
We propose in this White Paper a concept for a space experiment using cold atoms to search for ultra-light dark matter, and to detect gravitational waves in the frequency range between the most sensitive ranges of LISA and the terrestrial LIGO/Virgo/KAGRA/INDIGO experiments. This interdisciplinary experiment, called Atomic Experiment for Dark Matter and Gravity Exploration (AEDGE), will also complement other planned searches for dark matter, and exploit synergies with other gravitational wave detectors. We give examples of the extended range of sensitivity to ultra-light dark matter offered by AEDGE, and how its gravitational-wave measurements could explore the assembly of super-massive black holes, first-order phase transitions in the early universe and cosmic strings. AEDGE will be based upon technologies now being developed for terrestrial experiments using cold atoms, and will benefit from the space experience obtained with, e.g., LISA and cold atom experiments in microgravity. This paper is based on a submission (v1) in response to the Call for White Papers for the Voyage 2050 long-term plan in the ESA Science Programme. ESA limited the number of White Paper authors to 30. However, in this version (v2) we have welcomed as supporting authors participants in the Workshop on Atomic Experiments for Dark Matter and Gravity Exploration held at CERN: ({\tt https://indico.cern.ch/event/830432/}), as well as other interested scientists, and have incorporated additional material.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.02608  [pdf] - 1974580
A Measurement of the Degree Scale CMB B-mode Angular Power Spectrum with POLARBEAR
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-10-07
We present a measurement of the $B$-mode polarization power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using taken from July 2014 to December 2016 with the POLARBEAR experiment. The CMB power spectra are measured using observations at 150 GHz with an instantaneous array sensitivity of $\mathrm{NET}_\mathrm{array}=23\, \mu \mathrm{K} \sqrt{\mathrm{s}}$ on a 670 square degree patch of sky centered at (RA, Dec)=($+0^\mathrm{h}12^\mathrm{m}0^\mathrm{s},-59^\circ18^\prime$). A continuously rotating half-wave plate is used to modulate polarization and to suppress low-frequency noise. We achieve $32\,\mu\mathrm{K}$-$\mathrm{arcmin}$ effective polarization map noise with a knee in sensitivity of $\ell = 90$, where the inflationary gravitational wave signal is expected to peak. The measured $B$-mode power spectrum is consistent with a $\Lambda$CDM lensing and single dust component foreground model over a range of multipoles $50 \leq \ell \leq 600$. The data disfavor zero $C_\ell^{BB}$ at $2.2\sigma$ using this $\ell$ range of POLARBEAR data alone. We cross-correlate our data with Planck high frequency maps and find the low-$\ell$ $B$-mode power in the combined dataset to be consistent with thermal dust emission. We place an upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r < 0.90$ at 95% confidence level after marginalizing over foregrounds.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.12860  [pdf] - 1971488
Measurement of the cosmic-ray proton spectrum from 40 GeV to 100 TeV with the DAMPE satellite
An, Q.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Cai, M. S.; Chang, J.; Chen, D. Y.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, W.; Cui, M. Y.; Cui, T. S.; Dai, H. T.; D'Amone, A.; De Benedittis, A.; De Mitri, I.; Di Santo, M.; Ding, M.; Dong, T. K.; Dong, Y. F.; Dong, Z. X.; Donvito, G.; Droz, D.; Duan, J. L.; Duan, K. K.; D'Urso, D.; Fan, R. R.; Fan, Y. Z.; Fang, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Feng, L.; Fusco, P.; Gallo, V.; Gan, F. J.; Gao, M.; Gargano, F.; Gong, K.; Gong, Y. Z.; Guo, D. Y.; Guo, J. H.; Guo, X. L.; Han, S. X.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, X. Y.; Huang, Y. Y.; Ionica, M.; Jiang, W.; Jin, X.; Kong, J.; Lei, S. J.; Li, S.; Li, W. L.; Li, X.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. M.; Liao, N. H.; Liu, C. M.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, Y.; Loparco, F.; Luo, C. N.; Ma, M.; Ma, P. X.; Ma, S. Y.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Marsella, G.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mo, D.; Niu, X. Y.; Pan, X.; Peng, W. X.; Peng, X. Y.; Qiao, R.; Rao, J. N.; Salinas, M. M.; Shang, G. Z.; Shen, W. H.; Shen, Z. Q.; Shen, Z. T.; Song, J. X.; Su, H.; Su, M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Surdo, A.; Teng, X. J.; Tykhonov, A.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, L. G.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S.; Wang, X. H.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. P.; Wang, Y. Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, D. M.; Wei, J. J.; Wei, Y. F.; Wen, S. C.; Wu, D.; Wu, J.; Wu, L. B.; Wu, S. S.; Wu, X.; Xi, K.; Xia, Z. Q.; Xu, H. T.; Xu, Z. H.; Xu, Z. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, G. F.; Yang, H. B.; Yang, P.; Yang, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. L.; Yao, H. J.; Yu, Y. H.; Yuan, Q.; Yue, C.; Zang, J. J.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, P. F.; Zhang, S. X.; Zhang, W. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. L.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Zhao, X. F.; Zhou, C. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Zimmer, S.
Comments: 37 pages, 5 figures, published in Science Advances
Submitted: 2019-09-27, last modified: 2019-09-30
The precise measurement of the spectrum of protons, the most abundant component of the cosmic radiation, is necessary to understand the source and acceleration of cosmic rays in the Milky Way. This work reports the measurement of the cosmic ray proton fluxes with kinetic energies from 40 GeV to 100 TeV, with two and a half years of data recorded by the DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE). This is the first time an experiment directly measures the cosmic ray protons up to ~100 TeV with a high statistics. The measured spectrum confirms the spectral hardening found by previous experiments and reveals a softening at ~13.6 TeV, with the spectral index changing from ~2.60 to ~2.85. Our result suggests the existence of a new spectral feature of cosmic rays at energies lower than the so-called knee, and sheds new light on the origin of Galactic cosmic rays.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.13832  [pdf] - 1970581
Internal delensing of cosmic microwave background polarization B-modes with the POLARBEAR experiment
Comments: Comments welcome
Submitted: 2019-09-30
Using only cosmic microwave background polarization data from the POLARBEAR experiment, we measure B-mode polarization delensing on sub-degree scales at more than $5\sigma$ significance. We achieve a 14% B-mode power variance reduction, the highest to date for internal delensing, and improve this result to 22% by applying for the first time an iterative maximum a posteriori delensing method. Our analysis demonstrates the capability of internal delensing as a mean of improving constraints on inflationary models, paving the way for the optimal analysis of next-generation primordial B-mode experiments.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.08605  [pdf] - 1994098
A Detection of CMB-Cluster Lensing using Polarization Data from SPTpol
Raghunathan, S.; Patil, S.; Baxter, E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Crawford, T. M.; Holder, G. P.; McClintock, T.; Reichardt, C. L.; Varga, T. N.; Whitehorn, N.; Ade, P. A. R.; Allam, S.; Anderson, A. J.; Austermann, J. E.; Avila, S.; Avva, J. S.; Bacon, D.; Beall, J. A.; Bender, A. N.; Bianchini, F.; Bocquet, S.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Citron, R.; Costanzi, M.; Crites, A. T.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Doel, P.; Everett, S.; Evrard, A. E.; Feng, C.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gallicchio, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; George, E. M.; Giannantonio, T.; Gilbert, A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, G.; de Haan, T.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeltema, T.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Knox, L.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lee, A. T.; Li, D.; Lima, M.; Lowitz, A.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Montgomery, J.; Moran, C. Corbett; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Noble, G.; Novosad, V.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Rapetti, D.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Rozo, E.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sievers, C.; Smecher, G.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Veach, T.; De Vicente, J.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Wang, G.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yefremenko, V.; Zhang, Y.
Comments: 10 pages, 3 figures, 1 table; typos fixed; accepted for publication in PRL
Submitted: 2019-07-19, last modified: 2019-09-24
We report the first detection of gravitational lensing due to galaxy clusters using only the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The lensing signal is obtained using a new estimator that extracts the lensing dipole signature from stacked images formed by rotating the cluster-centered Stokes $Q/U$ map cutouts along the direction of the locally measured background CMB polarization gradient. Using data from the SPTpol 500 deg$^{2}$ survey at the locations of roughly 18,000 clusters with richness $\lambda \ge 10$ from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year-3 full galaxy cluster catalog, we detect lensing at $4.8\sigma$. The mean stacked mass of the selected sample is found to be $(1.43 \pm 0.4)\ \times 10^{14}\ {\rm M_{\odot}}$ which is in good agreement with optical weak lensing based estimates using DES data and CMB-lensing based estimates using SPTpol temperature data. This measurement is a key first step for cluster cosmology with future low-noise CMB surveys, like CMB-S4, for which CMB polarization will be the primary channel for cluster lensing measurements.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.12212  [pdf] - 1965367
Solar System Tests of a New Class of $f(z)$ Theory
Comments: 10 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2019-05-29, last modified: 2019-09-22
Recently, a new kind of $f(z)$ theory is proposed to provide a different perspective for the development of reliable alternative models of gravity in which the $f(R)$ Lagrangian terms are reformulated as a polynomial parameterizations $f(z)$. In the previous study, the parameters in the $f(z)$ models have been constrained by using cosmological data. In this paper, these models will be tested by the observations in the solar system. After solving the Ricci scalar as a function of the redshift, one could obtain $f(R)$ that could be used to calculate the standard Parameterized-Post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters. We find that some models are consistent with or favored by the tests, while other ones are not.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.01062  [pdf] - 1928247
CMB-S4 Decadal Survey APC White Paper
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Amin, Mustafa A.; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bock, James J.; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Project White Paper submitted to the 2020 Decadal Survey, 10 pages plus references. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1907.04473
Submitted: 2019-07-31
We provide an overview of the science case, instrument configuration and project plan for the next-generation ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4, for consideration by the 2020 Decadal Survey.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.12085  [pdf] - 1924335
Polarization of the Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2019-07-28
The cosmic infrared background (CIB) is slightly polarized. Polarization directions of individual galaxies could be aligned with tidal fields around galaxies, resulting in nonzero CIB polarization. We use a linear intrinsic alignment model to theoretically predict angular correlations of the CIB polarization fluctuations and find that electriclike and curl-like ($B$-mode) polarization modes are equally generated with power four orders of magnitude less than its intensity. The CIB $B$-mode signal is negligible and not a concerning foreground for the inflationary $B$-mode searches at nominal frequencies for cosmic microwave background measurements, but could be detected at submillimetre wavelengths by future space missions.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.06842  [pdf] - 1945858
GRID: a Student Project to Monitor the Transient Gamma-Ray Sky in the Multi-Messenger Astronomy Era
Wen, Jiaxing; Long, Xiangyun; Zheng, Xutao; An, Yu; Cai, Zhengyang; Cang, Jirong; Che, Yuepeng; Chen, Changyu; Chen, Liangjun; Chen, Qianjun; Chen, Ziyun; Cheng, Yingjie; Deng, Litao; Deng, Wei; Ding, Wenqing; Du, Hangci; Duan, Lian; Gan, Quan; Gao, Tai; Gao, Zhiying; Han, Wenbin; Han, Yiying; He, Xinbo; He, Xinhao; Hou, Long; Hu, Fan; Hu, Junling; Huang, Bo; Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Xuefeng; Jia, Shihai; Jiang, Yuchen; Jin, Yifei; Li, Ke; Li, Siyao; Li, Yurong; Liang, Jianwei; Liang, Yuanyuan; Lin, Wei; Liu, Chang; Liu, Gang; Liu, Mengyuan; Liu, Rui; Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Wanqiang; Lu, Di'an; Lu, Peiyibin; Lu, Zhiyong; Luo, Xiyu; Ma, Sizheng; Ma, Yuanhang; Mao, Xiaoqing; Mo, Yanshan; Nie, Qiyuan; Qu, Shuiyin; Shan, Xiaolong; Shi, Gengyuan; Song, Weiming; Sun, Zhigang; Tan, Xuelin; Tang, Songsong; Tao, Mingrui; Wang, Boqin; Wang, Yue; Wang, Zhiang; Wu, Qiaoya; Wu, Xuanyi; Xia, Yuehan; Xiao, Hengyuan; Xie, Wenjin; Xu, Dacheng; Xu, Rui; Xu, Weili; Yan, Longbiao; Yan, Shengyu; Yang, Dongxin; Yang, Hang; Yang, Haoguang; Yang, Yi-Si; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Lei; Yu, Huan; Yu, Yangyi; Zhang, Aiqiang; Zhang, Bingtao; Zhang, Lixuan; Zhang, Maoxing; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Tianliang; Zhang, Yuchong; Zhao, Qianru; Zhao, Ruining; Zheng, Shiyu; Zhou, Xiaolong; Zhu, Runyu; Zou, Yu; An, Peng; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Hongbing; Dai, Zigao; Fan, Yizhong; Feng, Changqing; Feng, Hua; Gao, He; Huang, Liang; Kang, Mingming; Li, Lixin; Li, Zhuo; Liang, Enwei; Lin, Lin; Lin, Qianqian; Liu, Congzhan; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Xuewen; Liu, Yinong; Lu, Xiang; Mao, Shude; Shen, Rongfeng; Shu, Jing; Su, Meng; Sun, Hui; Tam, Pak-Hin; Tang, Chi-Pui; Tian, Yang; Wang, Fayin; Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zhonghai; Wu, Jianfeng; Wu, Xuefeng; Xiong, Shaolin; Xu, Can; Yu, Jiandong; Yu, Wenfei; Yu, Yunwei; Zeng, Ming; Zeng, Zhi; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Bing; Zhao, Zongqing; Zhou, Rong; Zhu, Zonghong
Comments: accepted for publication in Experimental Astronomy
Submitted: 2019-07-16
The Gamma-Ray Integrated Detectors (GRID) is a space mission concept dedicated to monitoring the transient gamma-ray sky in the energy range from 10 keV to 2 MeV using scintillation detectors onboard CubeSats in low Earth orbits. The primary targets of GRID are the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the local universe. The scientific goal of GRID is, in synergy with ground-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, to accumulate a sample of GRBs associated with the merger of two compact stars and study jets and related physics of those objects. It also involves observing and studying other gamma-ray transients such as long GRBs, soft gamma-ray repeaters, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, and solar flares. With multiple CubeSats in various orbits, GRID is unaffected by the Earth occultation and serves as a full-time and all-sky monitor. Assuming a horizon of 200 Mpc for ground-based GW detectors, we expect to see a few associated GW-GRB events per year. With about 10 CubeSats in operation, GRID is capable of localizing a faint GRB like 170817A with a 90% error radius of about 10 degrees, through triangulation and flux modulation. GRID is proposed and developed by students, with considerable contribution from undergraduate students, and will remain operated as a student project in the future. The current GRID collaboration involves more than 20 institutes and keeps growing. On August 29th, the first GRID detector onboard a CubeSat was launched into a Sun-synchronous orbit and is currently under test.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.04473  [pdf] - 1914295
CMB-S4 Science Case, Reference Design, and Project Plan
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; McQuinn, Matthew; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: 287 pages, 82 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-09
We present the science case, reference design, and project plan for the Stage-4 ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.02173  [pdf] - 1910775
The on-orbit calibration of DArk Matter Particle Explorer
Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bernardini, P.; Cai, M. S.; Caragiulo, M.; Chang, J.; Chen, D. Y.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, W.; Cui, M. Y.; Cui, T. S.; Dai, H. T.; D'Amone, A.; De Benedittis, A.; De Mitri, I.; Ding, M.; Di Santo, M.; Dong, J. N.; Dong, T. K.; Dong, Y. F.; Dong, Z. X.; Droz, D.; Duan, K. K.; Duan, J. L.; D'Urso, D.; Fan, R. R.; Fan, Y. Z.; Fang, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Feng, L.; Fusco, P.; Gallo, V.; Gan, F. J.; Gao, M.; Gao, S. S.; Gargano, F.; Garrappa, S.; Gong, K.; Gong, Y. Z.; Guo, J. H.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, Y. Y.; Ionica, M.; Jiang, D.; Jiang, W.; Jin, X.; Kong, J.; Lei, S. J.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, W. L.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. M.; Liao, N. H.; Liu, C. M.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, Y.; Loparco, F.; Ma, M.; Ma, P. X.; Ma, S. Y.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Q.; Ma, X. Y.; Marsella, G.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mo, D.; Niu, X. Y.; Pan, X.; Peng, X. Y.; Peng, W. X.; Qiao, R.; Rao, J. N.; Salinas, M. M.; Shang, G. Z.; Shen, W. H.; Shen, Z. Q.; Shen, Z. T.; Song, J. X.; Su, H.; Su, M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Surdo, A.; Teng, X. J.; Tian, X. B.; Tykhonov, A.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, L. G.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S.; Wang, X. H.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. P.; Wang, Y. Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wen, S. C.; Wei, D. M.; Wei, J. J.; Wei, Y. F.; Wu, D.; Wu, J.; Wu, L. B.; Wu, S. S.; Wu, X.; Xi, K.; Xia, Z. Q.; Xin, Y. L.; Xu, H. T.; Xu, Z. H.; Xu, Z. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, G. F.; Yang, H. B.; Yang, P.; Yang, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. L.; Yao, H. J.; Yu, Y. H.; Yuan, Q.; Yue, C.; Zang, J. J.; Zhang, D. L.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P. F.; Zhang, S. X.; Zhang, W. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Y. L.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Zhao, X. F.; Zhou, C. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Zimmer, S.
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-07-03
The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), a satellite-based cosmic ray and gamma-ray detector, was launched on December 17, 2015, and began its on-orbit operation on December 24, 2015. In this work we document the on-orbit calibration procedures used by DAMPE and report the calibration results of the Plastic Scintillator strip Detector (PSD), the Silicon-Tungsten tracKer-converter (STK), the BGO imaging calorimeter (BGO), and the Neutron Detector (NUD). The results are obtained using Galactic cosmic rays, bright known GeV gamma-ray sources, and charge injection into the front-end electronics of each sub-detector. The determination of the boundary of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), the measurement of the live time, and the alignments of the detectors are also introduced. The calibration results demonstrate the stability of the detectors in almost two years of the on-orbit operation.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.05521  [pdf] - 1928119
First Detection of Photons with Energy Beyond 100 TeV from an Astrophysical Source
Comments: April 4, 2019; Submitted to the Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2019-06-13
We report on the highest energy photons from the Crab Nebula observed by the Tibet air shower array with the underground water-Cherenkov-type muon detector array. Based on the criterion of muon number measured in an air shower, we successfully suppress 99.92% of the cosmic-ray background events with energies $E>100$ TeV. As a result, we observed 24 photon-like events with $E>100$ TeV against 5.5 background events, which corresponds to 5.6$\sigma$ statistical significance. This is the first detection of photons with $E>100$ TeV from an astrophysical source.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.02084  [pdf] - 1878173
An excess of non-Gaussian fluctuations in the cosmic infrared background consistent with gravitational lensing
Comments: 13 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2019-05-06
The cosmic infrared background (CIB) is gravitationally lensed. A quadratic-estimator technique that is inherited from lensing analyses of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) can be applied to detect the CIB lensing effects. However, the CIB fluctuations are intrinsically strongly non-Gaussian, making CIB lensing reconstruction highly biased. We perform numerical simulations to estimate the intrinsic non-Gaussianity and establish a cross-correlation approach to precisely extract the CIB lensing signal from raw data. We apply this technique to CIB data from the Planck satellite and cross-correlate the resulting lensing estimate with the CIB data, galaxy number counts and the CMB lensing potential. We detect an excess that is consistent with a lensing contribution at $>4\sigma$.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.04201  [pdf] - 1838331
Search for gamma-ray emission from the Sun during solar minimum with the ARGO-YBJ experiment
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-01-14
The hadronic interaction of cosmic rays with solar atmosphere can produce high energy gamma rays. The gamma-ray luminosity is correlated both with the flux of primary cosmic rays and the intensity of the solar magnetic field. The gamma rays below 200 GeV have been observed by $Fermi$ without any evident energy cutoff. The bright gamma-ray flux above 100 GeV has been detected only during solar minimum. The only available data in TeV range come from the HAWC observations, however outside the solar minimum. The ARGO-YBJ dataset has been used to search for sub-TeV/TeV gamma rays from the Sun during the solar minimum from 2008 to 2010, the same time period covered by the Fermi data. A suitable model containing the Sun shadow, solar disk emission and inverse-Compton emission has been developed, and the chi-square minimization method was used to quantitatively estimate the disk gamma-ray signal. The result shows that no significant gamma-ray signal is detected and upper limits to the gamma-ray flux at 0.3$-$7 TeV are set at 95\% confidence level. In the low energy range these limits are consistent with the extrapolation of the Fermi-LAT measurements taken during solar minimum and are compatible with a softening of the gamma-ray spectrum below 1 TeV. They provide also an experimental upper bound to any solar disk emission at TeV energies. Models of dark matter annihilation via long-lived mediators predicting gamma-ray fluxes > $10^{-7}$ GeV $cm^{-2}$ $s^{-1}$ below 1 TeV are ruled out by the ARGO-YBJ limits.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.00734  [pdf] - 1809093
Calibration and Status of the 3D Imaging Calorimeter of DAMPE for Cosmic Ray Physics on Orbit
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-01-03
The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) developed in China was designed to search for evidence of dark matter particles by observing primary cosmic rays and gamma rays in the energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. Since its launch in December 2015, a large quantity of data has been recorded. With the data set acquired during more than a year of operation in space, a precise time-dependent calibration for the energy measured by the BGO ECAL has been developed. In this report, the instrumentation and development of the BGO Electromagnetic Calorimeter (BGO ECAL) are briefly described. The calibration on orbit, including that of the pedestal, attenuation length, minimum ionizing particle peak, and dynode ratio, is discussed, and additional details about the calibration methods and performance in space are presented.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.06556  [pdf] - 1818678
Measurements of tropospheric ice clouds with a ground-based CMB polarization experiment, POLARBEAR
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, 1 table, Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2018-09-18
The polarization of the atmosphere has been a long-standing concern for ground-based experiments targeting cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Ice crystals in upper tropospheric clouds scatter thermal radiation from the ground and produce a horizontally-polarized signal. We report the detailed analysis of the cloud signal using a ground-based CMB experiment, POLARBEAR, located at the Atacama desert in Chile and observing at 150 GHz. We observe horizontally-polarized temporal increases of low-frequency fluctuations ("polarized bursts," hereafter) of $\lesssim$0.1 K when clouds appear in a webcam monitoring the telescope and the sky. The hypothesis of no correlation between polarized bursts and clouds is rejected with $>$24$\sigma$ statistical significance using three years of data. We consider many other possibilities including instrumental and environmental effects, and find no other reasons other than clouds that can explain the data better. We also discuss the impact of the cloud polarization on future ground-based CMB polarization experiments.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.05964  [pdf] - 1871399
Multi-Component Decomposition of Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-17, last modified: 2018-09-18
The near-infrared background between 0.5 $\mu$m to 2 $\mu$m contains a wealth of information related to radiative processes in the universe. Infrared background anisotropies encode the redshift-weighted total emission over cosmic history, including any spatially diffuse and extended contributions. The anisotropy power spectrum is dominated by undetected galaxies at small angular scales and diffuse background of Galactic emission at large angular scales. In addition to these known sources, the infrared background also arises from intra-halo light (IHL) at $z < 3$ associated with tidally-stripped stars during galaxy mergers. Moreover, it contains information on the very first galaxies from the epoch of reionization (EoR). The EoR signal has a spectral energy distribution (SED) that goes to zero near optical wavelengths due to Lyman absorption, while other signals have spectra that vary smoothly with frequency. Due to differences in SEDs and spatial clustering, these components may be separated in a multi-wavelength-fluctuation experiment. To study the extent to which EoR fluctuations can be separated in the presence of IHL, extra-galactic and Galactic foregrounds, we develop a maximum likelihood technique that incorporates a full covariance matrix among all the frequencies at different angular scales. We apply this technique to simulated deep imaging data over a 2$\times$100 deg$^2$ sky area from 0.75 $\mu$m to 5 $\mu$m in 9 bands and find that such a "frequency tomography" can successfully reconstruct both the amplitude and spectral shape for representative EoR, IHL and the foreground signals.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.01592  [pdf] - 1897838
Searching for patchy reionization from cosmic microwave background with hybrid quadratic estimators
Comments: 6 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-05
We propose a hybrid quadratic estimator to measure cross correlations between gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and differential screening effects arising from fluctuations in the electron column density, such as could arise from patchy reionization. The hybrid quadratic estimators are validated by simulated data sets with both Planck and CMB-Stage 4 (CMB-S4) instrumental properties and found to be able to recover the cross-power spectra with almost no biases. We apply this technique to Planck 2015 temperature data and obtain cross-power spectra between gravitational lensing and differential screening effects. Planck data alone cannot detect the patchy-reionization-induced cross-power spectrum but future experiment like CMB-S4 will be able to robustly measure the expected signal and deliver new insights on reionization.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.2369  [pdf] - 1715860
A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background B-Mode Polarization Power Spectrum at Sub-Degree Scales with POLARBEAR
Comments: 22 pages, 12 figures. v3 is updated to reflect the erratum published in ApJ 2017 848:73, which changed the rejection of the hypothesis of no B-mode polarization power from gravitational lensing from 97.2% to 97.1%
Submitted: 2014-03-10, last modified: 2018-07-16
We report a measurement of the B-mode polarization power spectrum in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the POLARBEAR experiment in Chile. The faint B-mode polarization signature carries information about the Universe's entire history of gravitational structure formation, and the cosmic inflation that may have occurred in the very early Universe. Our measurement covers the angular multipole range 500 < l < 2100 and is based on observations of an effective sky area of 25 square degrees with 3.5 arcmin resolution at 150 GHz. On these angular scales, gravitational lensing of the CMB by intervening structure in the Universe is expected to be the dominant source of B-mode polarization. Including both systematic and statistical uncertainties, the hypothesis of no B-mode polarization power from gravitational lensing is rejected at 97.1% confidence. The band powers are consistent with the standard cosmological model. Fitting a single lensing amplitude parameter A_BB to the measured band powers, A_BB = 1.12 +/- 0.61 (stat) +0.04/-0.12 (sys) +/- 0.07 (multi), where A_BB = 1 is the fiducial WMAP-9 LCDM value. In this expression, "stat" refers to the statistical uncertainty, "sys" to the systematic uncertainty associated with possible biases from the instrument and astrophysical foregrounds, and "multi" to the calibration uncertainties that have a multiplicative effect on the measured amplitude A_BB.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.03387  [pdf] - 1701643
Influence of Earth-Directed Coronal Mass Ejections on the Sun's Shadow Observed by the Tibet-III Air Shower Array
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in the ApJ
Submitted: 2018-06-08
We examine the possible influence of Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (ECMEs) on the Sun's shadow in the 3~TeV cosmic-ray intensity observed by the Tibet-III air shower (AS) array. We confirm a clear solar-cycle variation of the intensity deficit in the Sun's shadow during ten years between 2000 and 2009. This solar-cycle variation is overall reproduced by our Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the Sun's shadow based on the potential field model of the solar magnetic field averaged over each solar rotation period. We find, however, that the magnitude of the observed intensity deficit in the Sun's shadow is significantly less than that predicted by MC simulations, particularly during the period around solar maximum when a significant number of ECMEs is recorded. The $\chi^2$ tests of the agreement between the observations and the MC simulations show that the difference is larger during the periods when the ECMEs occur, and the difference is reduced if the periods of ECMEs are excluded from the analysis. This suggests the first experimental evidence of the ECMEs affecting the Sun's shadow observed in the 3~TeV cosmic-ray intensity.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.08980  [pdf] - 1721132
Galactic Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy in the Northern hemisphere from the ARGO-YBJ Experiment during 2008-2012
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-05-23
This paper reports on the observation of the sidereal large-scale anisotropy of cosmic rays using data collected by the ARGO-YBJ experiment over 5 years (2008$-$2012). This analysis extends previous work limited to the period from 2008 January to 2009 December,near the minimum of solar activity between cycles 23 and 24.With the new data sample the period of solar cycle 24 from near minimum to maximum is investigated. A new method is used to improve the energy reconstruction, allowing us to cover a much wider energy range, from 4 to 520 TeV. Below 100 TeV, the anisotropy is dominated by two wide regions, the so-called "tail-in" and "loss-cone" features. At higher energies, a dramatic change of the morphology is confirmed. The yearly time dependence of the anisotropy is investigated. Finally, no noticeable variation of cosmic-ray anisotropy with solar activity is observed for a median energy of 7 TeV.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.07432  [pdf] - 1686756
Enhanced global signal of neutral hydrogen due to excess radiation at cosmic dawn
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2018-02-21
We revisit the global 21cm signal calculation incorporating a possible radio background at early times, and find that the global 21cm signal shows a much stronger absorption feature, which could enhance detection prospects for future 21 cm experiments. In light of recent reports of a possible low-frequency excess radio background, we propose that detailed 21 cm calculations should include a possible early radio background.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.01461  [pdf] - 1644759
Observation of the thunderstorm-related ground cosmic ray flux variations by ARGO-YBJ
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures. The paper has been accepted by PRD
Submitted: 2017-12-04, last modified: 2018-02-13
A correlation between the secondary cosmic ray flux and the near-earth electric field intensity, measured during thunderstorms, has been found by analyzing the data of the ARGO-YBJ experiment, a full coverage air shower array located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (4300 m a. s. l., Tibet, China). The counting rates of showers with different particle multiplicities, have been found to be strongly dependent upon the intensity and polarity of the electric field measured during the course of 15 thunderstorms. In negative electric fields (i.e. accelerating negative charges downwards), the counting rates increase with increasing electric field strength. In positive fields, the rates decrease with field intensity until a certain value of the field EFmin (whose value depends on the event multiplicity), above which the rates begin increasing. By using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that this peculiar behavior can be well described by the presence of an electric field in a layer of thickness of a few hundred meters in the atmosphere above the detector, which accelerates/decelerates the secondary shower particles of opposite charge, modifying the number of particles with energy exceeding the detector threshold. These results, for the first time, give a consistent explanation for the origin of the variation of the electron/positron flux observed for decades by high altitude cosmic ray detectors during thunderstorms.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.06799  [pdf] - 1640350
Relieving the Tension between Weak Lensing and Cosmic Microwave Background with Interacting Dark Matter and Dark Energy Models
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures, to be published in JCAP
Submitted: 2017-11-17, last modified: 2018-02-08
We constrain interacting dark matter and dark energy (IDMDE) models using a 450-degree-square cosmic shear data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and the angular power spectra from Planck's latest cosmic microwave background measurements. We revisit the discordance problem in the standard Lambda cold dark matter ($\Lambda$CDM) model between weak lensing and Planck datasets and extend the discussion by introducing interacting dark sectors. The IDMDE models are found to be able to alleviate the discordance between KiDS and Planck as previously inferred from the $\Lambda$CDM model, and moderately favored by a combination of the two datasets.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.06942  [pdf] - 1621586
Evaluation of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength Using the Cosmic-Ray Shadow of the Sun
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2018-01-21
We analyze the Sun's shadow observed with the Tibet-III air shower array and find that the shadow's center deviates northward (southward) from the optical solar disc center in the "Away" ("Toward") IMF sector. By comparing with numerical simulations based on the solar magnetic field model, we find that the average IMF strength in the "Away" ("Toward") sector is $1.54 \pm 0.21_{\rm stat} \pm 0.20_{\rm syst}$ ($1.62 \pm 0.15_{\rm stat} \pm 0.22_{\rm syst}$) times larger than the model prediction. These demonstrate that the observed Sun's shadow is a useful tool for the quantitative evaluation of the average solar magnetic field.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.05396  [pdf] - 1701545
Detecting Electron Density Fluctuations from Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization using a Bispectrum Approach
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2018-01-16
Recent progress in high sensitivity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization experiments opens up a window on large scale structure (LSS), as CMB polarization fluctuations on small angular scales can arise from a combination of LSS and ionization fluctuations in the late universe. Gravitational lensing effects can be extracted from CMB datasets with quadratic estimators but reconstructions of electron density fluctuations (EDFs) with quadratic estimators are found to be significantly biased by the much larger lensing effects in the secondary CMB fluctuations. In this paper we establish a bispectrum formalism using tracers of LSS to extract the subdominant EDFs from CMB polarization data. We find that this bispectrum can effectively reconstruct angular band-powers of cross correlation between EDFs and LSS tracers. Next generation CMB polarization experiments in conjunction with galaxy surveys and cosmic infrared background experiments can detect signatures of EDFs with high significance.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.01723  [pdf] - 1705182
Artificial Neural Network for Constructing Type Ia Supernovae Spectrum Evolution Model
Comments: v2 refs added, two columns, 7pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2018-01-05, last modified: 2018-01-14
We construct and train an artificial neural network called the back-propagation neural network to describe the evolution of the type Ia supernova spectrum by using the data from the CfA Supernova Program. This network method has many attractive features, and one of them is that the constructed model is differentiable. Benefitting from this, we calculate the absorption velocity and its variation. The model we constructed can well describe not only the spectrum of SNe Ia with wavelength range from $3500\AA$ to $8000\AA$, but also the light-curve evolution with phase time from $-15$ to $50$ with different colors. Moreover, the number of parameters needed during the training process is much less than the usual methods.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.06661  [pdf] - 1605417
New prototype scintillator detector for the Tibet AS$\gamma$ Experiment
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures, published in JINST
Submitted: 2017-12-18
The hybrid Tibet AS array was successfully constructed in 2014. It has 4500 m$^{2}$ underground water Cherenkov pools used as the muon detector (MD) and 789 scintillator detectors covering 36900 m$^{2}$ as the surface array. At 100 TeV, cosmic-ray background events can be rejected by approximately 99.99\%, according to the full Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for $\gamma$-ray observations. In order to use the muon detector efficiently, we propose to extend the surface array area to 72900 m$^{2}$ by adding 120 scintillator detectors around the current array to increase the effective detection area. A new prototype scintillator detector is developed via optimizing the detector geometry and its optical surface, by selecting the reflective material and adopting dynode readout. This detector can meet our physics requirements with a positional non-uniformity of the output charge within 10\% (with reference to the center of the scintillator), time resolution FWHM of $\sim$2.2 ns, and dynamic range from 1 to 500 minimum ionization particles.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.10981  [pdf] - 1600918
Direct detection of a break in the teraelectronvolt cosmic-ray spectrum of electrons and positrons
Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bernardini, P.; Bertucci, B.; Cai, M. S.; Chang, J.; Chen, D. Y.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, W.; Cui, M. Y.; Cui, T. S.; D'Amone, A.; De Benedittis, A.; De Mitri, I.; Di Santo, M.; Dong, J. N.; Dong, T. K.; Dong, Y. F.; Dong, Z. X.; Donvito, G.; Droz, D.; Duan, K. K.; Duan, J. L.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Fan, R. R.; Fan, Y. Z.; Fang, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Feng, L.; Fusco, P.; Gallo, V.; Gan, F. J.; Gao, M.; Gao, S. S.; Gargano, F.; Garrappa, S.; Gong, K.; Gong, Y. Z.; Guo, D. Y.; Guo, J. H.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, Y. Y.; Ionica, M.; Jiang, D.; Jiang, W.; Jin, X.; Kong, J.; Lei, S. J.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, W. L.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. M.; Liao, N. H.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, Y.; Loparco, F.; Ma, M.; Ma, P. X.; Ma, S. Y.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Q.; Ma, X. Y.; Marsella, G.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mo, D.; Niu, X. Y.; Peng, X. Y.; Peng, W. X.; Qiao, R.; Rao, J. N.; Salinas, M. M.; Shang, G. Z.; Shen, W. H.; Shen, Z. Q.; Shen, Z. T.; Song, J. X.; Su, H.; Su, M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Surdo, A.; Teng, X. J.; Tian, X. B.; Tykhonov, A.; Vagelli, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, L. G.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S.; Wang, X. H.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. P.; Wang, Y. Z.; Wen, S. C.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, D. M.; Wei, J. J.; Wei, Y. F.; Wu, D.; Wu, J.; Wu, L. B.; Wu, S. S.; Wu, X.; Xi, K.; Xia, Z. Q.; Xin, Y. L.; Xu, H. T.; Xu, Z. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, G. F.; Yang, H. B.; Yang, P.; Yang, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. L.; Yao, H. J.; Yu, Y. H.; Yuan, Q.; Yue, C.; Zang, J. J.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, D. L.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P. F.; Zhang, S. X.; Zhang, W. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Y. L.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Zhao, X. F.; Zhou, C. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Zimmer, S.
Comments: 18 pages, 6 figures, Nature in press, doi:10.1038/nature24475
Submitted: 2017-11-29
High energy cosmic ray electrons plus positrons (CREs), which lose energy quickly during their propagation, provide an ideal probe of Galactic high-energy processes and may enable the observation of phenomena such as dark-matter particle annihilation or decay. The CRE spectrum has been directly measured up to $\sim 2$ TeV in previous balloon- or space-borne experiments, and indirectly up to $\sim 5$ TeV by ground-based Cherenkov $\gamma$-ray telescope arrays. Evidence for a spectral break in the TeV energy range has been provided by indirect measurements of H.E.S.S., although the results were qualified by sizeable systematic uncertainties. Here we report a direct measurement of CREs in the energy range $25~{\rm GeV}-4.6~{\rm TeV}$ by the DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) with unprecedentedly high energy resolution and low background. The majority of the spectrum can be properly fitted by a smoothly broken power-law model rather than a single power-law model. The direct detection of a spectral break at $E \sim0.9$ TeV confirms the evidence found by H.E.S.S., clarifies the behavior of the CRE spectrum at energies above 1 TeV and sheds light on the physical origin of the sub-TeV CREs.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.02907  [pdf] - 1583212
A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background $B$-Mode Polarization Power Spectrum at Sub-Degree Scales from 2 years of POLARBEAR Data
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures. Minor changes to match the published version. For data and figures, see http://bolo.berkeley.edu/polarbear/data/polarbear_BB_2017/
Submitted: 2017-05-08, last modified: 2017-10-27
We report an improved measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) $B$-mode polarization power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment at 150 GHz. By adding new data collected during the second season of observations (2013-2014) to re-analyzed data from the first season (2012-2013), we have reduced twofold the band-power uncertainties. The band powers are reported over angular multipoles $500 \leq \ell \leq 2100$, where the dominant $B$-mode signal is expected to be due to the gravitational lensing of $E$-modes. We reject the null hypothesis of no $B$-mode polarization at a confidence of 3.1$\sigma$ including both statistical and systematic uncertainties. We test the consistency of the measured $B$-modes with the $\Lambda$ Cold Dark Matter ($\Lambda$CDM) framework by fitting for a single lensing amplitude parameter $A_L$ relative to the Planck best-fit model prediction. We obtain $A_L = 0.60 ^{+0.26} _{-0.24} ({\rm stat}) ^{+0.00} _{-0.04}({\rm inst}) \pm 0.14 ({\rm foreground}) \pm 0.04 ({\rm multi})$, where $A_{L}=1$ is the fiducial $\Lambda$CDM value, and the details of the reported uncertainties are explained later in the manuscript.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.09682  [pdf] - 1580728
Probing the Intergalactic Medium with Ly$\mathrm{\alpha}$ and 21 cm Fluctuations
Comments: 26 pages, 18 figures, 3 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-11-29, last modified: 2017-10-17
We study 21cm and Ly$\mathrm{\alpha}$ fluctuations, as well as H$\mathrm{\alpha}$, while distinguishing between Ly$\mathrm{\alpha}$ emission of galactic, diffuse, and scattered intergalactic medium (IGM) origin. Cross-correlation information about the state of the IGM is obtained, testing neutral versus ionized medium cases with different tracers in a seminumerical simulation setup. In order to pave the way toward constraints on reionization history and modeling beyond power spectrum information, we explore parameter dependencies of the cross-power signal between 21$\,$cm and Ly$\mathrm{\alpha}$, which displays a characteristic morphology and a turnover from negative to positive correlation at scales of a couple Mpc$^{-1}$. In a proof of concept for the extraction of further information on the state of the IGM using different tracers, we demonstrate the use of the 21$\,$cm and H$\mathrm{\alpha}$ cross-correlation signal to determine the relative strength of galactic and IGM emission in Ly$\mathrm{\alpha}$. We conclude by showing the detectability of the 21$\,$cm and Ly$\mathrm{\alpha}$ cross-correlation signal over more than one decade in scale at high signal-to-noise ratio for upcoming probes like SKA and the proposed all-sky intensity mapping satellites SPHEREx and CDIM, while also including the Ly$\mathrm{\alpha}$ damping tail and 21cm foreground avoidance in the modeling.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.02845  [pdf] - 1584462
Constraints on the dark matter and dark energy interactions from weak lensing bispectrum tomography
Comments: 13 pages, 6 figures, Accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2017-06-09, last modified: 2017-10-15
We estimate uncertainties of cosmological parameters for phenomenological interacting dark energy models using weak lensing convergence power spectrum and bispectrum. We focus on the bispectrum tomography and examine how well the weak lensing bispectrum with tomography can constrain the interactions between dark sectors, as well as other cosmological parameters. Employing the Fisher matrix analysis, we forecast parameter uncertainties derived from weak lensing bispectra with a two-bin tomography and place upper bounds on strength of the interactions between the dark sectors. The cosmic shear will be measured from upcoming weak lensing surveys with high sensitivity, thus it enables us to use the higher order correlation functions of weak lensing to constrain the interaction between dark sectors and will potentially provide more stringent results with other observations combined.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.08453  [pdf] - 1585147
The DArk Matter Particle Explorer mission
Chang, J.; Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bernardini, P.; Bertucci, B.; Cai, M. S.; Caragiulo, M.; Chen, D. Y.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, W.; Cui, M. Y.; Cui, T. S.; D'Amone, A.; De Benedittis, A.; De Mitri, I.; Di Santo, M.; Dong, J. N.; Dong, T. K.; Dong, Y. F.; Dong, Z. X.; Donvito, G.; Droz, D.; Duan, K. K.; Duan, J. L.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Fan, R. R.; Fan, Y. Z.; Fang, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Feng, L.; Fusco, P.; Gallo, V.; Gan, F. J.; Gan, W. Q.; Gao, M.; Gao, S. S.; Gargano, F.; Gong, K.; Gong, Y. Z.; Guo, J. H.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, Y. Y.; Ionica, M.; Jiang, D.; Jiang, W.; Jin, X.; Kong, J.; Lei, S. J.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, W. L.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. M.; Liao, N. H.; Liu, Q. Z.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, Q. Z.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, Y.; Loparco, F.; Lü, J.; Ma, M.; Ma, P. X.; Ma, S. Y.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Q.; Ma, X. Y.; Marsella, G.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mo, D.; Miao, T. T.; Niu, X. Y.; Pohl, M.; Peng, X. Y.; Peng, W. X.; Qiao, R.; Rao, J. N.; Salinas, M. M.; Shang, G. Z.; Shen, W. H.; Shen, Z. Q.; Shen, Z. T.; Song, J. X.; Su, H.; Su, M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Surdo, A.; Teng, X. J.; Tian, X. B.; Tykhonov, A.; Vagelli, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, Chi; Wang, H.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, L. G.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S.; Wang, X. H.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. P.; Wang, Y. Z.; Wen, S. C.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, D. M.; Wei, J. J.; Wei, Y. F.; Wu, D.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. S.; Wu, X.; Xi, K.; Xia, Z. Q.; Xin, Y. L.; Xu, H. T.; Xu, Z. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, G. F.; Yang, H. B.; Yang, J.; Yang, P.; Yang, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. L.; Yao, H. J.; Yu, Y. H.; Yuan, Q.; Yue, C.; Zang, J. J.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, D. L.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P. F.; Zhang, S. X.; Zhang, W. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Y. L.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Zhao, X. F.; Zhou, C. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Zimmer, S.
Comments: 45 pages, including 29 figures and 6 tables. Published in Astropart. Phys
Submitted: 2017-06-26, last modified: 2017-09-14
The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), one of the four scientific space science missions within the framework of the Strategic Pioneer Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is a general purpose high energy cosmic-ray and gamma-ray observatory, which was successfully launched on December 17th, 2015 from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. The DAMPE scientific objectives include the study of galactic cosmic rays up to $\sim 10$ TeV and hundreds of TeV for electrons/gammas and nuclei respectively, and the search for dark matter signatures in their spectra. In this paper we illustrate the layout of the DAMPE instrument, and discuss the results of beam tests and calibrations performed on ground. Finally we present the expected performance in space and give an overview of the mission key scientific goals.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.07005  [pdf] - 1581256
A Halo Model Approach to the $\rm{21\, cm}$ and $\rm{Ly}\alpha$ Cross-correlation
Comments: 13 pages, 17 figures. Version accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2017-01-24, last modified: 2017-09-05
We present a halo-model-based approach to calculate the cross-correlation between $\rm{21\,cm}$ HI intensity fluctuations and $\rm{Ly}\alpha$ emitters (LAE) during the epoch of reionization (EoR). Ionizing radiation around dark matter halos are modeled as bubbles with the size and growth determined based on the reionization photon production, among other physical parameters. The cross-correlation shows a clear negative-to-positive transition, associated with transition from ionized to neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium during EoR. The cross-correlation is subject to several foreground contaminants, including foreground radio point sources important for $\rm{21\,cm}$ experiments and low-$z$ interloper emission lines, such as $\rm{H}\alpha$, OIII, and OII, for $\rm{Ly}\alpha$ experiments. Our calculations show that by masking out high fluxes in the $\rm{Ly}\alpha$ measurement, the correlated foreground contamination on the $\rm{21\,cm}$-$\rm{Ly}\alpha$ cross-correlation can be dramatically reduced. We forecast the detectability of $\rm{21\,cm}$-$\rm{Ly}\alpha$ cross-correlation at different redshifts and adopt a Fisher matrix approach to estimate uncertainties on the key EoR parameters that have not been well constrained by other observations of reionization. This halo-model-based approach enables us to explore the EoR parameter space rapidly for different $\rm{21\,cm}$ and $\rm{Ly}\alpha$ experiments.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.01871  [pdf] - 1581404
Current and Future Constraints on Primordial Magnetic Fields
Comments: Submitted to ApJ, 10 pages
Submitted: 2017-02-06, last modified: 2017-08-09
We present new limits on the amplitude of potential primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) using temperature and polarization measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from Planck, BICEP2/Keck Array, POLARBEAR, and SPTpol. We reduce twofold the 95% CL upper limit on the CMB anisotropy power due to a nearly-scale-invariant PMF, with an allowed B-mode power at $\ell=1500$ of $D_{\ell=1500}^{BB} < 0.071 \mu K^2$ for Planck versus $D_{\ell=1500}^{BB} < 0.034 \mu K^2$ for the combined dataset. We also forecast the expected limits from soon-to-deploy CMB experiments (like SPT-3G, Adv. ACTpol, or the Simons Array) and the proposed CMB-S4 experiment. Future CMB experiments should dramatically reduce the current uncertainties, by one order of magnitude for the near-term experiments and two orders of magnitude for the CMB-S4 experiment. The constraints from CMB-S4 have the potential to rule out much of the parameter space for PMFs.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.02298  [pdf] - 1585671
Halo Pressure Profile through the Skew Cross-Power Spectrum of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and CMB Lensing in $\textit{Planck}$
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, ApJL submitted
Submitted: 2017-07-07
We measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) skewness power spectrum in $\textit{Planck}$, using frequency maps of the HFI instrument and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) component map. The two-to-one skewness power spectrum measures the cross-correlation between CMB lensing and the thermal SZ effect. We also directly measure the same cross-correlation using $\textit{Planck}$ CMB lensing map and the SZ map and compare it to the cross-correlation derived from the skewness power spectrum. We model fit the SZ power spectrum and CMB lensing-SZ cross power spectrum via the skewness power spectrum to constrain the gas pressure profile of dark matter halos. The gas pressure profile is compared to existing measurements in the literature including a direct estimate based on the stacking of SZ clusters in $\textit{Planck}$.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.01412  [pdf] - 1585548
EAS age determination from the study of the lateral distribution of charged particles near the shower axis with the ARGO-YBJ experiment
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-07-05
The ARGO-YBJ experiment, a full coverage extensive air shower (EAS) detector located at high altitude (4300 m a.s.l.) in Tibet, China, has smoothly taken data, with very high stability, since November 2007 to the beginning of 2013. The array consisted of a carpet of about 7000 m$^2$ Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) operated in streamer mode and equipped with both digital and analog readout, providing the measurement of particle densities up to few particles per cm$^2$. The unique detector features (full coverage, readout granularity, wide dynamic range, etc) and location (very high altitude) allowed a detailed study of the lateral density profile of charged particles at ground very close to the shower axis and its description by a proper lateral distribution function (LDF). In particular, the information collected in the first 10 m from the shower axis have been shown to provide a very effective tool for the determination of the shower development stage ("age") in the energy range 50 TeV - 10 PeV. The sensitivity of the age parameter to the mass composition of primary Cosmic Rays is also discussed.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.09490  [pdf] - 1583918
Action functional of the Cardassian universe
Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2017-05-26
It is known that the Cardassian universe is successful in describing the accelerated expansion of the universe, but its dynamical equations are hard to get from the action principle. In this paper, we establish the connection between the Cardassian universe and $f(T, \mathcal{T})$ gravity, where $T$ is the torsion scalar and $\mathcal{T}$ is the trace of the matter energy-momentum tensor. For dust matter, we find that the modified Friedmann equations from $f(T, \mathcal{T})$ gravity can correspond to those of Cardassian models, and thus, a possible origin of Cardassian universe is given. We obtain the original Cardassian model, the modified polytropic Cardassian model, and the exponential Cardassian model from the Lagrangians of $f(T,\mathcal{T})$ theory. Furthermore, by adding an additional term to the corresponding Lagrangians, we give three generalized Cardassian models from $f(T,\mathcal{T})$ theory. Using the observation data of type Ia supernovae, cosmic microwave background radiation, and baryon acoustic oscillations, we get the fitting results of the cosmological parameters and give constraints of model parameters for all of these models.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.09284  [pdf] - 1582164
Search for Gamma Ray Bursts with the ARGO-YBJ Detector in Shower Mode
Comments: 24pages and 12 figures
Submitted: 2017-03-23
The ARGO-YBJ detector, located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (4300 m a. s. l., Tibet, China), was a full coverage air shower array dedicated to gamma ray astronomy and cosmic ray studies. The wide field of view (~ 2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 86%), made ARGO-YBJ suitable to search for short and unexpected gamma ray emissions like gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Between 2007 November 6 and 2013 February 7, 156 satellite-triggered GRBs (24 of them with known redshift) occurred within the ARGO-YBJ field of view. A search for possible emission associated to these GRBs has been made in the two energy ranges 10-100 GeV and 10-1000 GeV. No significant excess has been found in time coincidence with the satellite detections nor in a time window of one hour after the bursts. Taking into account the EBL absorption, upper limits to the energy fluence at 99% of confidence level have been evaluated,with values ranging from ~ 10-5 erg cm-2 to ~10-1 erg cm-2.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.04351  [pdf] - 1531271
Planck Lensing and Cosmic Infrared Background Cross-Correlation with Fermi-LAT: Tracing Dark Matter Signals in the Gamma-Ray Background
Comments: 14 pages, 16 figures. Version accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-08-15, last modified: 2017-02-04
The extragalactic $\gamma$-ray background and its spatial anisotropy could potentially contain a signature of dark matter (DM) annihilation or particle decay. Astrophysical foregrounds, such as blazars and star-forming galaxies (SFGs), however, dominate the $\gamma$-ray background, precluding an easy detection of the signal associated with the DM annihilation or decay in the background intensity spectrum. The DM imprint on the $\gamma$-ray background is expected to be correlated with large-scale structure tracers. In some cases, such a cross-correlation is even expected to have a higher signal-to-noise ratio than the auto-correlation. One reliable tracer of the DM distribution in the large-scale structure is lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and the cosmic infrared background (CIB) is a reliable tracer of SFGs. We analyze Fermi-LAT data taken over 92 months and study the cross-correlation with Planck CMB lensing, Planck CIB, and Fermi-$\gamma$ maps. We put upper limits on the DM annihilation cross-section from the cross-power spectra with the $\gamma$-ray background anisotropies. The unbiased power spectrum estimation is validated with simulations that include cross-correlated signals. We also provide a set of systematic tests and show that no significant contaminations are found for the measurements presented here. Using $\gamma$-ray background map from data gathered over 92 months, we find the best constraint on the DM annihilation with a $1\sigma$ confidence level upper limit of $10^{-25}$-$10^{-24}$ cm$^{3}$ s$^{-1}$, when the mass of DM particles is between 20 and 100 GeV.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.09060  [pdf] - 1532306
Intensity mapping of H-alpha, H-beta, [OII] and [OIII] lines at z<5
Comments: 14 pages, 9 figures, 4 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-10-27, last modified: 2016-12-22
Intensity mapping is now becoming a useful tool to study the large-scale structure of the universe through spatial variations in the integrated emission from galaxies and the intergalactic medium. We study intensity mapping of the H-alpha 6563AA, [OIII]5007AA, [OII]3727AA and H-beta 4861AA lines at 0.8<z<5.2. The mean intensities of these four emission lines are estimated using the observed luminosity functions (LFs), cosmological simulations, and the star formation rate density (SFRD) derived from observations at z<5. We calculate the intensity power spectra and consider the foreground contamination of other lines at lower redshifts. We use the proposed NASA small explorer SPHEREx (the Spectro-Photometer for the History of the Universe, Epoch of Reionization, and Ices Explorer) as a case study for the detectability of the intensity power spectra of the four emission lines. We also investigate the cross correlation with the 21-cm line probed by CHIME (the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment), Tianlai experiment and SKA (the Square Kilometer Array) at 0.8<z<2.4. We find both the auto and cross power spectra can be well measured for the H-alpha, [OIII] and [OII] lines at z<3, while it is more challenging for the H-beta line. Finally, we estimate the constraint on the SFRD from intensity mapping, and find we can reach accuracy higher than 7% at z<4, which is better than usual measurements using the LFs of galaxies.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.03025  [pdf] - 1531238
POLARBEAR-2: an instrument for CMB polarization measurements
Comments: 9pages,8figures
Submitted: 2016-08-09
POLARBEAR-2 (PB-2) is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment that will be located in the Atacama highland in Chile at an altitude of 5200 m. Its science goals are to measure the CMB polarization signals originating from both primordial gravitational waves and weak lensing. PB-2 is designed to measure the tensor to scalar ratio, r, with precision {\sigma}(r) < 0.01, and the sum of neutrino masses, {\Sigma}m{\nu}, with {\sigma}({\Sigma}m{\nu}) < 90 meV. To achieve these goals, PB-2 will employ 7588 transition-edge sensor bolometers at 95 GHz and 150 GHz, which will be operated at the base temperature of 250 mK. Science observations will begin in 2017.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.07039  [pdf] - 1427541
Science Impacts of the SPHEREx All-Sky Optical to Near-Infrared Spectral Survey: Report of a Community Workshop Examining Extragalactic, Galactic, Stellar and Planetary Science
Comments: Report of the First SPHEREx Community Workshop, http://spherex.caltech.edu/Workshop.html , 84 pages, 28 figures
Submitted: 2016-06-22
SPHEREx is a proposed SMEX mission selected for Phase A. SPHEREx will carry out the first all-sky spectral survey and provide for every 6.2" pixel a spectra between 0.75 and 4.18 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$41.4] and 4.18 and 5.00 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$135]. The SPHEREx team has proposed three specific science investigations to be carried out with this unique data set: cosmic inflation, interstellar and circumstellar ices, and the extra-galactic background light. It is readily apparent, however, that many other questions in astrophysics and planetary sciences could be addressed with the SPHEREx data. The SPHEREx team convened a community workshop in February 2016, with the intent of enlisting the aid of a larger group of scientists in defining these questions. This paper summarizes the rich and varied menu of investigations that was laid out. It includes studies of the composition of main belt and Trojan/Greek asteroids; mapping the zodiacal light with unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution; identifying and studying very low-metallicity stars; improving stellar parameters in order to better characterize transiting exoplanets; studying aliphatic and aromatic carbon-bearing molecules in the interstellar medium; mapping star formation rates in nearby galaxies; determining the redshift of clusters of galaxies; identifying high redshift quasars over the full sky; and providing a NIR spectrum for most eROSITA X-ray sources. All of these investigations, and others not listed here, can be carried out with the nominal all-sky spectra to be produced by SPHEREx. In addition, the workshop defined enhanced data products and user tools which would facilitate some of these scientific studies. Finally, the workshop noted the high degrees of synergy between SPHEREx and a number of other current or forthcoming programs, including JWST, WFIRST, Euclid, GAIA, K2/Kepler, TESS, eROSITA and LSST.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.01326  [pdf] - 1408348
Detection of thermal neutrons with the PRISMA-YBJ array in Extensive Air Showers selected by the ARGO-YBJ experiment
Comments: 35 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2015-12-04, last modified: 2016-05-17
We report on a measurement of thermal neutrons, generated by the hadronic component of extensive air showers (EAS), by means of a small array of EN-detectors developed for the PRISMA project (PRImary Spectrum Measurement Array), novel devices based on a compound alloy of ZnS(Ag) and $^{6}$LiF. This array has been operated within the ARGO-YBJ experiment at the high altitude Cosmic Ray Observatory in Yangbajing (Tibet, 4300 m a.s.l.). Due to the tight correlation between the air shower hadrons and thermal neutrons, this technique can be envisaged as a simple way to estimate the number of high energy hadrons in EAS. Coincident events generated by primary cosmic rays of energies greater than 100 TeV have been selected and analyzed. The EN-detectors have been used to record simultaneously thermal neutrons and the air shower electromagnetic component. The density distributions of both components and the total number of thermal neutrons have been measured. The correlation of these data with the measurements carried out by ARGO-YBJ confirms the excellent performance of the EN-detector.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.01930  [pdf] - 1387222
Probing the Expansion history of the Universe by Model-Independent Reconstruction from Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts Measurements
Comments: 10 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2016-04-07
To probe the late evolution history of the Universe, we adopt two kinds of optimal basis systems. One of them is constructed by performing the principle component analysis (PCA) and the other is build by taking the multidimensional scaling (MDS) approach. Cosmological observables such as the luminosity distance can be decomposed into these basis systems. These basis are optimized for different kinds of cosmological models that based on different physical assumptions, even for a mixture model of them. Therefore, the so-called feature space that projected from the basis systems is cosmological model independent, and it provide a parameterization for studying and reconstructing the Hubble expansion rate from the supernova luminosity distance and even gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) data with self-calibration. The circular problem when using GRBs as cosmological candles is naturally eliminated in this procedure. By using the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) technique and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, we perform an observational constraint on this kind of parameterization. The data we used include the "joint light-curve analysis" (JLA) data set that consists of $740$ Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) as well as $109$ long gamma-ray bursts with the well-known Amati relation.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.02461  [pdf] - 1335455
POLARBEAR Constraints on Cosmic Birefringence and Primordial Magnetic Fields
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures. Phys. Rev. D Editors' Suggestion
Submitted: 2015-09-08, last modified: 2016-01-04
We constrain anisotropic cosmic birefringence using four-point correlations of even-parity $E$-mode and odd-parity $B$-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background measurements made by the POLARization of the Background Radiation (POLARBEAR) experiment in its first season of observations. We find that the anisotropic cosmic birefringence signal from any parity-violating processes is consistent with zero. The Faraday rotation from anisotropic cosmic birefringence can be compared with the equivalent quantity generated by primordial magnetic fields if they existed. The POLARBEAR nondetection translates into a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit of 93 nanogauss (nG) on the amplitude of an equivalent primordial magnetic field inclusive of systematic uncertainties. This four-point correlation constraint on Faraday rotation is about 15 times tighter than the upper limit of 1380 nG inferred from constraining the contribution of Faraday rotation to two-point correlations of $B$-modes measured by Planck in 2015. Metric perturbations sourced by primordial magnetic fields would also contribute to the $B$-mode power spectrum. Using the POLARBEAR measurements of the $B$-mode power spectrum (two-point correlation), we set a 95% C.L. upper limit of 3.9 nG on primordial magnetic fields assuming a flat prior on the field amplitude. This limit is comparable to what was found in the Planck 2015 two-point correlation analysis with both temperature and polarization. We perform a set of systematic error tests and find no evidence for contamination. This work marks the first time that anisotropic cosmic birefringence or primordial magnetic fields have been constrained from the ground at subdegree scales.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.07299  [pdf] - 1359106
The POLARBEAR-2 and the Simons Array Experiment
Comments: Accepted to Journal of Low Temperature Physics LTD16 Special Issue, Low Temperature Detector 16 Conference Proceedings, 5 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2015-12-22
We present an overview of the design and status of the \Pb-2 and the Simons Array experiments. \Pb-2 is a Cosmic Microwave Background polarimetry experiment which aims to characterize the arc-minute angular scale B-mode signal from weak gravitational lensing and search for the degree angular scale B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. The receiver has a 365~mm diameter focal plane cooled to 270~milli-Kelvin. The focal plane is filled with 7,588 dichroic lenslet-antenna coupled polarization sensitive Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometric pixels that are sensitive to 95~GHz and 150~GHz bands simultaneously. The TES bolometers are read-out by SQUIDs with 40 channel frequency domain multiplexing. Refractive optical elements are made with high purity alumina to achieve high optical throughput. The receiver is designed to achieve noise equivalent temperature of 5.8~$\mu$K$_{CMB}\sqrt{s}$ in each frequency band. \Pb-2 will deploy in 2016 in the Atacama desert in Chile. The Simons Array is a project to further increase sensitivity by deploying three \Pb-2 type receivers. The Simons Array will cover 95~GHz, 150~GHz and 220~GHz frequency bands for foreground control. The Simons Array will be able to constrain tensor-to-scalar ratio and sum of neutrino masses to $\sigma(r) = 6\times 10^{-3}$ at $r = 0.1$ and $\sum m_\nu (\sigma =1)$ to 40 meV.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.06851  [pdf] - 1342935
4.5 years multi-wavelength observations of Mrk 421 during the ARGO-YBJ and Fermi common operation time
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures, 5 tables, Accepted for publication in ApJS
Submitted: 2015-11-21
We report on the extensive multi-wavelength observations of the blazar Markarian 421 (Mrk 421) covering radio to gamma-rays, during the 4.5 year period of ARGO-YBJ and Fermi common operation time, from August 2008 to February 2013. In particular, thanks to the ARGO-YBJ and Fermi data, the whole energy range from 100 MeV to 10 TeV is covered without any gap. In the observation period, Mrk 421 showed both low and high activity states at all wavebands. The correlations among flux variations in different wavebands were analyzed. Seven large flares, including five X-ray flares and two GeV gamma-ray flares with variable durations (3-58 days), and one X-ray outburst phase were identified and used to investigate the variation of the spectral energy distribution with respect to a relative quiescent phase. During the outburst phase and the seven flaring episodes, the peak energy in X-rays is observed to increase from sub-keV to few keV. The TeV gamma-ray flux increases up to 0.9-7.2 times the flux of the Crab Nebula. The behavior of GeV gamma-rays is found to vary depending on the flare, a feature that leads us to classify flares into three groups according to the GeV flux variation. Finally, the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model was adopted to describe the emission spectra. Two out of three groups can be satisfactorily described using injected electrons with a power-law spectral index around 2.2, as expected from relativistic diffuse shock acceleration, whereas the remaining group requires a harder injected spectrum. The underlying physical mechanisms responsible for different groups may be related to the acceleration process or to the environment properties.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.07911  [pdf] - 1309971
Modeling atmospheric emission for CMB ground-based observations
Comments: 20 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2015-01-30, last modified: 2015-11-12
Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.06758  [pdf] - 1250942
Study of the diffuse gamma-ray emission from the Galactic plane with ARGO-YBJ
Comments: 11 pages, 6 figures, published in APJ
Submitted: 2015-07-24
The events recorded by ARGO-YBJ in more than five years of data collection have been analyzed to determine the diffuse gamma-ray emission in the Galactic plane at Galactic longitudes 25{\deg} < l < 100{\deg} and Galactic latitudes . The energy range covered by this analysis, from ~350 GeV to ~2 TeV, allows the connection of the region explored by Fermi with the multi-TeV measurements carried out by Milagro. Our analysis has been focused on two selected regions of the Galactic plane, i.e., 40{\deg} < l < 100{\deg} and 65{\deg} < l < 85{\deg} (the Cygnus region), where Milagro observed an excess with respect to the predictions of current models. Great care has been taken in order to mask the most intense gamma-ray sources, including the TeV counterpart of the Cygnus cocoon recently identified by ARGO-YBJ, and to remove residual contributions. The ARGO-YBJ results do not show any excess at sub-TeV energies corresponding to the excess found by Milagro, and are consistent with the predictions of the Fermi model for the diffuse Galactic emission. From the measured energy distribution we derive spectral indices and the differential flux at 1 TeV of the diffuse gamma-ray emission in the sky regions investigated.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.06327  [pdf] - 1241745
Development of Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array for a new EAS hybrid Experiment
Comments: 6 pages, 9 figures, Submitted to Chinese Physics C
Submitted: 2015-01-26, last modified: 2015-07-06
Aiming at the observation of cosmic-ray chemical composition at the "knee" energy region, we have been developinga new type air-shower core detector (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array) to be set up at Yangbajing (90.522$^\circ$ E, 30.102$^\circ$ N, 4300 m above sea level, atmospheric depth: 606 g/m$^2$) in Tibet, China. YAC works together with the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and an underground water cherenkov muon detector array (MD) as a hybrid experiment. Each YAC detector unit consists of lead plates of 3.5 cm thick and a scintillation counter which detects the burst size induced by high energy particles in the air-shower cores. The burst size can be measured from 1 MIP (Minimum Ionization Particle) to $10^{6}$ MIPs. The first phase of this experiment, named "YAC-I", consists of 16 YAC detectors each having the size 40 cm $\times$ 50 cm and distributing in a grid with an effective area of 10 m$^{2}$. YAC-I is used to check hadronic interaction models. The second phase of the experiment, called "YAC-II", consists of 124 YAC detectors with coverage about 500 m$^2$. The inner 100 detectors of 80 cm $\times $ 50 cm each are deployed in a 10 $\times$ 10 matrix from with a 1.9 m separation and the outer 24 detectors of 100 cm $\times$ 50 cm each are distributed around them to reject non-core events whose shower cores are far from the YAC-II array. YAC-II is used to study the primary cosmic-ray composition, in particular, to obtain the energy spectra of proton, helium and iron nuclei between 5$\times$$10^{13}$ eV and $10^{16}$ eV covering the "knee" and also being connected with direct observations at energies around 100 TeV. We present the design and performance of YAC-II in this paper.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.01510  [pdf] - 975705
The analog Resistive Plate Chamber detector of the ARGO-YBJ experiment
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-04-07
The ARGO-YBJ experiment has been in stable data taking from November 2007 till February 2013 at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory (4300 m a.s.l.). The detector consists of a single layer of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) ( about 6700 m^2}) operated in streamer mode. The signal pick-up is obtained by means of strips facing one side of the gas volume. The digital readout of the signals, while allows a high space-time resolution in the shower front reconstruction, limits the measurable energy to a few hundred TeV. In order to fully investigate the 1-10 PeV region, an analog readout has been implemented by instrumenting each RPC with two large size electrodes facing the other side of the gas volume. Since December 2009 the RPC charge readout has been in operation on the entire central carpet (about 5800 m^2). In this configuration the detector is able to measure the particle density at the core position where it ranges from tens to many thousands of particles per m^2. Thus ARGO-YBJ provides a highly detailed image of the charge component at the core of air showers. In this paper we describe the analog readout of RPCs in ARGO-YBJ and discuss both the performance of the system and the physical impact on the EAS measurements.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.07136  [pdf] - 1447623
The cosmic ray proton plus helium energy spectrum measured by the ARGO-YBJ experiment in the energy range 3-300 TeV
Comments: 18 pages, 8 figures, preprint submitted to Phys. Rev. D
Submitted: 2015-03-24
The ARGO-YBJ experiment is a full-coverage air shower detector located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Observatory (Tibet, People's Republic of China, 4300 m a.s.l.). The high altitude, combined with the full-coverage technique, allows the detection of extensive air showers in a wide energy range and offer the possibility of measuring the cosmic ray proton plus helium spectrum down to the TeV region, where direct balloon/space-borne measurements are available. The detector has been in stable data taking in its full configuration from November 2007 to February 2013. In this paper the measurement of the cosmic ray proton plus helium energy spectrum is presented in the region 3-300 TeV by analyzing the full collected data sample. The resulting spectral index is $\gamma = -2.64 \pm 0.01$. These results demonstrate the possibility of performing an accurate measurement of the spectrum of light elements with a ground based air shower detector.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.05622  [pdf] - 937817
Search for GeV Gamma Ray Bursts with the ARGO-YBJ Detector: Summary of Eight Years of Observations
Comments: 43 pages, 6 figures, published in APJ
Submitted: 2015-02-19
The search for Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) emission in the energy range 1-100 GeV in coincidence with the satellite detection has been carried out using the Astrophysical Radiation with Ground-based Observatory at YangBaJing (ARGO-YBJ) experiment. The high altitude location (4300 m a.s.l.), the large active surface ($\sim$ 6700 m$^2$ of Resistive Plate Chambers), the wide field of view ($\sim 2~$sr, limited only by the atmospheric absorption) and the high duty cycle ($>$ 86 %) make the ARGO-YBJ experiment particularly suitable to detect short and unexpected events like GRBs. With the scaler mode technique, i.e., counting all the particles hitting the detector with no measurement of the primary energy and arrival direction, the minimum threshold of $\sim$ 1 GeV can be reached, overlapping the direct measurements carried out by satellites. During the experiment lifetime, from December 17, 2004 to February 7, 2013, a total of 206 GRBs occurring within the ARGO-YBJ field of view (zenith angle $\theta$ $\le$ 45$^{\circ}$) have been analyzed. This is the largest sample of GRBs investigated with a ground-based detector. Two lightcurve models have been assumed and since in both cases no significant excess has been found, the corresponding fluence upper limits in the 1-100 GeV energy region have been derived, with values as low as 10$^{-5}~$erg cm$^{-2}$. The analysis of a subset of 24 GRBs with known redshift has been used to constrain the fluence extrapolation to the GeV region together with possible cutoffs under different assumptions on the spectrum.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.03164  [pdf] - 1311911
The Knee of the Cosmic Hydrogen and Helium Spectrum below 1 PeV Measured by ARGO-YBJ and a Cherenkov Telescope of LHAASO
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-02-10
The measurement of cosmic ray energy spectra, in particular for individual species, is an essential approach in finding their origin. Locating the "knees" of the spectra is an important part of the approach and has yet to be achieved. Here we report a measurement of the mixed Hydrogen and Helium spectrum using the combination of the ARGO-YBJ experiment and of a prototype Cherenkov telescope for the LHAASO experiment. A knee feature at 640+/-87 TeV, with a clear steepening of the spectrum, is observed. This gives fundamental inputs to galactic cosmic ray acceleration models.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.00585  [pdf] - 1260761
Planck Trispectrum Constraints on Primordial Non-Gaussianity at Cubic Order
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2015-02-02
Non-Gaussianity of the primordial density perturbations provides an important measure to constrain models of inflation. At cubic order the non-Gaussianity is captured by two parameters $\tau_{\rm NL}$ and $g_{\rm NL}$ that determine the amplitude of the density perturbation trispectrum. Here we report measurements of the kurtosis power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature as mapped by Planck by making use of correlations between square temperature-square temperature and cubic temperature-temperature anisotropies. In combination with noise simulations, we find the best joint estimates to be $\tau_{\rm{NL}}=0.3 \pm 0.9 \times 10^4$ and $g_{\rm{NL}}=-1.2 \pm 2.8 \times 10^5$. If $\tau_{\rm NL}=0$, we find $g_{\rm NL}= -1.3\pm 1.8 \times 10^5$.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.6203  [pdf] - 1223725
Spiral Density Waves in M81. II. Hydrodynamic Simulations for Gas Response to Stellar Spiral Density Waves
Comments: 20 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2014-12-18
Gas response to the underlying stellar spirals is explored for M81 using unmagnetized hydrodynamic simulations. Constrained within the uncertainty of observations, 18 simulations are carried out to study the effects of selfgravity and to cover the parameter space comprising three different sound speeds and three different arm strengths. The results are confronted with those data observed at wavelengths of 8 $\mu$m and 21 cm. In the outer disk, the ring-like structure observed in 8 $\mu$m image is consistent with the response of cold neutral medium with an effective sound speed 7 km s$^{-1}$, while for the inner disk, the presence of spiral shocks can be understood as a result of 4:1 resonances associated with the warm neutral medium with an effective sound speed 19 km s$^{-1}$. Simulations with single effective sound speed alone cannot simultaneously explain the structures in the outer and inner disks. This justifies the coexistence of cold and warm neutral media in M81. The anomalously high streaming motions observed in the northeast arm and the outward shifted turning points in the iso-velocity contours seen along the southwest arm are interpreted as signatures of interactions with companion galaxies. The level of simulated streaming motions narrows down the uncertainty of observed arm strength toward larger amplitudes.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.7488  [pdf] - 894214
Development and characterization of the readout system for POLARBEAR-2
Comments: Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VII. Published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9153
Submitted: 2014-10-27, last modified: 2014-11-06
POLARBEAR-2 is a next-generation receiver for precision measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)). Scheduled to deploy in early 2015, it will observe alongside the existing POLARBEAR-1 receiver, on a new telescope in the Simons Array on Cerro Toco in the Atacama desert of Chile. For increased sensitivity, it will feature a larger area focal plane, with a total of 7,588 polarization sensitive antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers, with a design sensitivity of 4.1 uKrt(s). The focal plane will be cooled to 250 milliKelvin, and the bolometers will be read-out with 40x frequency domain multiplexing, with 36 optical bolometers on a single SQUID amplifier, along with 2 dark bolometers and 2 calibration resistors. To increase the multiplexing factor from 8x for POLARBEAR-1 to 40x for POLARBEAR-2 requires additional bandwidth for SQUID readout and well-defined frequency channel spacing. Extending to these higher frequencies requires new components and design for the LC filters which define channel spacing. The LC filters are cold resonant circuits with an inductor and capacitor in series with each bolometer, and stray inductance in the wiring and equivalent series resistance from the capacitors can affect bolometer operation. We present results from characterizing these new readout components. Integration of the readout system is being done first on a small scale, to ensure that the readout system does not affect bolometer sensitivity or stability, and to validate the overall system before expansion into the full receiver. We present the status of readout integration, and the initial results and status of components for the full array.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.6436  [pdf] - 853240
Identification of the TeV Gamma-ray Source ARGO J2031+4157 with the Cygnus Cocoon
Comments: 16 pages, 3 figures, has been accepted by ApJ for publication
Submitted: 2014-06-24
The extended TeV gamma-ray source ARGO J2031+4157 (or MGRO J2031+41) is positionally consistent with the Cygnus Cocoon discovered by $Fermi$-LAT at GeV energies in the Cygnus superbubble. Reanalyzing the ARGO-YBJ data collected from November 2007 to January 2013, the angular extension and energy spectrum of ARGO J2031+4157 are evaluated. After subtracting the contribution of the overlapping TeV sources, the ARGO-YBJ excess map is fitted with a two-dimensional Gaussian function in a square region of $10^{\circ}\times 10^{\circ}$, finding a source extension $\sigma_{ext}$= 1$^{\circ}$.8$\pm$0$^{\circ}$.5. The observed differential energy spectrum is $dN/dE =(2.5\pm0.4) \times 10^{-11}(E/1 TeV)^{-2.6\pm0.3}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ TeV$^{-1}$, in the energy range 0.2-10 TeV. The angular extension is consistent with that of the Cygnus Cocoon as measured by $Fermi$-LAT, and the spectrum also shows a good connection with the one measured in the 1-100 GeV energy range. These features suggest to identify ARGO J2031+4157 as the counterpart of the Cygnus Cocoon at TeV energies. The Cygnus Cocoon, located in the star-forming region of Cygnus X, is interpreted as a cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays related to the Cygnus superbubble. The spectral similarity with Supernova Remnants indicates that the particle acceleration inside a superbubble is similar to that in a SNR. The spectral measurements from 1 GeV to 10 TeV allows for the first time to determine the possible spectrum slope of the underlying particle distribution. A hadronic model is adopted to explain the spectral energy distribution.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.3886  [pdf] - 836468
Design of the Readout Electronics for the Qualification Model of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter
Comments: 8 pages
Submitted: 2014-06-15
The DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientific satellite being developed in China, aimed at cosmic ray study, gamma ray astronomy, and searching for the clue of dark matter particles, with a planned mission period of more than 3 years and an orbit altitude of about 500 km. The BGO Calorimeter, which consists of 308 BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxid) crystal bars, 616 PMTs (photomultiplier tubes) and 1848 dynode signals, has approximately 32 radiation lengths. It is a crucial sub-detector of the DAMPE payload, with the functions of precisely measuring the energy of cosmic particles from 5 GeV to 10TeV, distinguishing positrons/electrons and gamma rays from hadron background, and providing trigger information for the whole DAMPE payload. The dynamic range for a single BGO crystal is about 2?105 and there are 1848 detector signals in total. To build such an instrument in space, the major design challenges for the readout electronics come from the large dynamic range, the high integrity inside the very compact structure, the strict power supply budget and the long term reliability to survive the hush environment during launch and in orbit. Currently the DAMPE mission is in the end of QM (Qualification Model) stage. This paper presents a detailed description of the readout electronics for the BGO calorimeter.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.3056  [pdf] - 903479
Towards a realistic solution of the cosmological constant fine-tuning problem by Higgs inflation
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1404.3817
Submitted: 2014-05-13
Why the cosmological constant $\Lambda$ observed today is so much smaller than the Planck scale or why the universe is accelerating at present? This is so-called the cosmological constant fine-tuning problem. In this paper, we find that this problem is solved with the help of Higgs inflation by simply assuming a variable cosmological "constant" during the inflation epoch. In the meanwhile, it could predict a large tensor-to-scalar ratio $r\approx 0.20$ and a large running of spectral index $n'_s \approx -0.028$ with a red-tilt spectrum $n_s \approx 0.96$, as well as a big enough number of e-folds $N\approx 40$ that required to solve the problems in the Big Bang cosmology with the help of $\Lambda$.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.0656  [pdf] - 894692
Take up the challenge for a single field inflation after BICEP2
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2014-05-04
The measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the detection of B-mode. In this paper, we propose a single inflation model with infinity pows series potential called the Infinity Power Series (IPS) inflation model, which is well consistent with latest observations from \textit{Planck} and BICEP2. Furthermore, it is found that in the IPS model, the absolute value the running of the spectral index increases while the tensor-to-scalar ratio becomes large, namely both large $r \approx 0.20$ and $|n_s'|\gtrsim \mathcal{O}(10^{-2})$ are realized in the IPS model. In the meanwhile, the number of e-folds is also big enough $N\approx 35\sim45$ to solve the problems in Big Bang cosmology.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.6646  [pdf] - 851338
Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Lensing Power Spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment
Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures. Matches Physical Review Letters accepted version. Submitted on 11 March 2014; accepted on 25 April 2014. The companion paper (arXiv:1312.6645) describes a measurement of polarization lensing in cross-correlation
Submitted: 2013-12-23, last modified: 2014-04-27
Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale $B$-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity $E$- and $B$-mode polarization mapped over $\sim30$ square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing $B$-modes is found at 4.2$\sigma$ (stat.+sys.) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of $27\%$, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda Cold Dark Matter ($\Lambda$CDM) cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing $B$-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.3817  [pdf] - 1208984
Is Cosmological Constant Needed in Higgs Inflation?
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2014-04-15
The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of $r$, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts $r\approx 0.2$, $n_s\approx0.96$ with e-folds number $N\approx 56$, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly $\Lambda \sim (10^{14} \text{GeV})^2 $, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.3612  [pdf] - 932980
K-Inflation in Noncommutative Space-Time
Comments: 9 pages, 2 figures. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1404.0168
Submitted: 2014-04-14
The power spectra of the scalar and tensor perturbations in the noncommutative k-inflation model are calculated in this paper. In this model, all the modes created when the stringy space-time uncertainty relation is satisfied are generated inside the sound/Hubble horizon during inflation for the scalar/tensor perturbations. It turns out that a linear term describing the noncommutative space-time effect contributes to the power spectra of the scalar and tensor perturbations. Confronting the general noncommutative k-inflation model with latest results from \textit{Planck} and BICEP2, and taking $c_S$ and $\lambda$ as free parameters, we find that it is well consistent with observations. However, for the two specific models, i.e. the tachyon and DBI inflation models, it is found that the DBI model is not favored, while the tachyon model lies inside the $1\sigma$ contour, if the e-folds number is assumed to be around $50\sim60$.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.0168  [pdf] - 804570
Note on Power-Law Inflation in Noncommutative Space-Time
Comments: 9 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2014-04-01
In this paper, we propose a new method to calculate the mode functions in the noncommutative power-law inflation model. In this model, all the modes created when the stringy space-time uncertainty relation is satisfied are generated inside the Hubble horizon during inflation. It turns out that a linear term describing the noncommutative space-time effect contributes to the power spectra of the scalar and tensor perturbations. Confronting this model with latest results from \textit{Planck} and BICEP2, we constrain the parameters in this model and we find it is well consistent with observations.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.4328  [pdf] - 797996
Bifurcation and Global Dynamical Behavior of the $f(T)$ Theory
Comments: 17pages, 9figures
Submitted: 2014-03-17
Usually, in order to investigate the evolution of a theory, one may find the critical points of the system and then perform perturbations around these critical points to see whether they are stable or not. This local method is very useful when the initial values of the dynamical variables are not far away from the critical points. Essentially, the nonlinear effects are totally neglected in such kind of approach. Therefore, one can not tell whether the dynamical system will evolute to the stable critical points or not when the initial values of the variables do not close enough to these critical points. Furthermore, when there are two or more stable critical points in the system, local analysis can not provide the informations that which one the system will finally evolute to. In this paper, we have further developed the nullcline method to study the bifurcation phenomenon and global dynamical behaviour of the $f(T)$ theory. We overcome the shortcoming of local analysis. And it is very clear to see the evolution of the system under any initial conditions.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.6645  [pdf] - 812508
Evidence for Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization from Cross-correlation with the Cosmic Infrared Background
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures. v2: replaced with version accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters. The companion paper (arXiv:1312.6646) describes a measurement of the polarization lensing power spectrum
Submitted: 2013-12-23, last modified: 2014-03-07
We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization data taken by the POLARBEAR experiment and cross-correlate it with Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross-spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0$\sigma$ and evidence for the presence of a lensing $B$-mode signal at a significance of 2.3$\sigma$. We demonstrate that our results are not biased by instrumental and astrophysical systematic errors by performing null-tests, checks with simulated and real data, and analytical calculations. This measurement of polarization lensing, made via the robust cross-correlation channel, not only reinforces POLARBEAR auto-correlation measurements, but also represents one of the early steps towards establishing CMB polarization lensing as a powerful new probe of cosmology and astrophysics.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.7315  [pdf] - 1203639
Spiral Density Waves in M81. I. Stellar Spiral Density Waves
Comments: 25 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-02-28
Aside from the grand-design stellar spirals appearing in the disk of M81, a pair of stellar spiral arms situated well inside the bright bulge of M81 has been recently discovered by Kendall et al. (2008). The seemingly unrelated pairs of spirals pose a challenge to the theory of spiral density waves. To address this problem, we have constructed a three component model for M81, including the contributions from a stellar disk, a bulge, and a dark matter halo subject to observational constraints. Given this basic state for M81, a modal approach is applied to search for the discrete unstable spiral modes that may provide an understanding for the existence of both spiral arms. It is found that the apparently separated inner and outer spirals can be interpreted as a single trailing spiral mode. In particular, these spirals share the same pattern speed 25.5 km s$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-1}$ with a corotation radius of 9.03 kpc. In addition to the good agreement between the calculated and the observed spiral pattern, the variation of the spiral amplitude can also be naturally reproduced.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.6987  [pdf] - 1203009
Energy Spectrum of Cosmic Protons and Helium Nuclei by a Hybrid Measurement at 4300 m a.s.l
Comments: To be published on Chinese Physics C
Submitted: 2014-01-27, last modified: 2014-02-06
The energy spectrum of cosmic Hydrogen and Helium nuclei has been measured, below the so-called "knee", by using a hybrid experiment with a wide field-of-view Cherenkov telescope and the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) array of the ARGO-YBJ experiment at 4300 m above sea level. The Hydrogen and Helium nuclei have been well separated from other cosmic ray components by using a multi-parameter technique. A highly uniform energy resolution of about 25% is achieved throughout the whole energy range (100 TeV - 700 TeV). The observed energy spectrum is compatible with a single power law with index gamma=-2.63+/-0.06.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.3376  [pdf] - 750726
TeV gamma-ray survey of the Northern sky using the ARGO-YBJ detector
Comments: 30 pages, 13 figures, Accepted for publication by ApJ
Submitted: 2013-11-13
The ARGO-YBJ detector is an extensive air shower array that has been used to monitor the northern $\gamma$-ray sky at energies above 0.3 TeV from 2007 November to 2013 January. In this paper, we present the results of a sky survey in the declination band from $-10^{\circ}$ to $70^{\circ}$, using data recorded over the past five years. With an integrated sensitivity ranging from 0.24 to $\sim$1 Crab units depending on the declination, six sources have been detected with a statistical significance greater than 5 standard deviations. Several excesses are also reported as potential $\gamma$-ray emitters. The features of each source are presented and discussed. Additionally, $95\%$ confidence level upper limits of the flux from the investigated sky region are shown. Specific upper limits for 663 GeV $\gamma$-ray AGNs inside the ARGO-YBJ field of view are reported. The effect of the absorption of $\gamma$-rays due to the interaction with extragalactic background light is estimated.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.3973  [pdf] - 722088
Simulation study on origin of multi-core events in cosmic rays extensive air showers
Comments: In Proceedings of the 33rd International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC2013), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)
Submitted: 2013-09-16, last modified: 2013-09-20
Some experiments have found multi-core events in cosmic rays extensive air showers which should be interpreted by hadronic interaction theory. In this paper, the multi-core events are reproduced by Monte Carlo simulation with CORSIKA. The origin of each sub-cores is tracked back from the observation level. The interaction mechanism and original particles of sub-core are studied in this paper.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.3009  [pdf] - 1172000
Probe of the Solar Magnetic Field Using the "Cosmic-Ray Shadow" of the Sun
Comments: 11 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2013-06-12, last modified: 2013-07-02
We report on a clear solar-cycle variation of the Sun's shadow in the 10 TeV cosmic-ray flux observed by the Tibet air shower array during a full solar cycle from 1996 to 2009. In order to clarify the physical implications of the observed solar cycle variation, we develop numerical simulations of the Sun's shadow, using the Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model and the Current Sheet Source Surface (CSSS) model for the coronal magnetic field. We find that the intensity deficit in the simulated Sun's shadow is very sensitive to the coronal magnetic field structure, and the observed variation of the Sun's shadow is better reproduced by the CSSS model. This is the first successful attempt to evaluate the coronal magnetic field models by using the Sun's shadow observed in the TeV cosmic-ray flux.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.2919  [pdf] - 637852
A Monte Carlo study to measure the energy spectra of the primary cosmic-ray components at the knee using a new Tibet AS core detector array
Comments: 4 pages,7 figures,In Proc 32nd Int. Cosmic Ray Conf. Vol.1,157 (2011)
Submitted: 2013-03-12
A new hybrid experiment has been started by AS{\gamma} experiment at Tibet, China, since August 2011, which consists of a low threshold burst-detector-grid (YAC-II, Yangbajing Air shower Core array), the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and a large underground water Cherenkov muon detector (MD). In this paper, the capability of the measurement of the chemical components (proton, helium and iron) with use of the (Tibet-III+YAC-II) is investigated by means of an extensive Monte Carlo simulation in which the secondary particles are propagated through the (Tibet-III+YAC-II) array and an artificial neural network (ANN) method is applied for the primary mass separation. Our simulation shows that the new installation is powerful to study the chemical compositions, in particular, to obtain the primary energy spectrum of the major component at the knee.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.1258  [pdf] - 647486
Observation of TeV gamma-rays from the unidentified source HESS J1841-055 with the ARGO-YBJ experiment
Comments: 17 pages, 4 figures, have been accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2013-03-06
We report the observation of a very high energy \gamma-ray source, whose position is coincident with HESS J1841-055. This source has been observed for 4.5 years by the ARGO-YBJ experiment from November 2007 to July 2012. Its emission is detected with a statistical significance of 5.3 standard deviations. Parameterizing the source shape with a two-dimensional Gaussian function we estimate an extension \sigma=(0.40(+0.32,-0.22}) degree, consistent with the HESS measurement. The observed energy spectrum is dN/dE =(9.0-+1.6) x 10^{-13}(E/5 TeV)^{-2.32-+0.23} photons cm^{-2} s^{-1} TeV^{-1}, in the energy range 0.9-50 TeV. The integral \gamma-ray flux above 1 TeV is 1.3-+0.4 Crab units, which is 3.2-+1.0 times the flux derived by HESS. The differences in the flux determination between HESS and ARGO-YBJ, and possible counterparts at other wavelengths are discussed.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.3253  [pdf] - 570180
Thermodynamic of the Ghost Dark Energy Universe
Comments: 8 pages, no figures
Submitted: 2011-05-16, last modified: 2012-10-02
Recently, the vacuum energy of the QCD ghost in a time-dependent background is proposed as a kind of dark energy candidate to explain the acceleration of the Universe. In this model, the energy density of the dark energy is proportional to the Hubble parameter $H$, which is the Hawking temperature on the Hubble horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) Universe. In this paper, we generalized this model and choice the Hawking temperature on the so-called trapping horizon, which will coincides with the Hubble temperature in the context of flat FRW Universe dominated by the dark energy component. We study the thermodynamics of Universe with this kind of dark energy and find that the entropy-area relation is modified, namely, there is an another new term besides the area term.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.3326  [pdf] - 566150
Measuring gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background using cross correlation with large scale structure
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2012-07-13, last modified: 2012-09-20
We cross correlate the gravitational lensing map extracted from cosmic microwave background measurements by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) with the radio galaxy distribution from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) by using a quadratic estimator technique. We use the full covariance matrix to filter the data, and calculate the cross-power spectra for the lensing-galaxy correlation. We explore the impact of changing the values of cosmological parameters on the lensing reconstruction, and obtain statistical detection significances at $>3\sigma$. The results of all cross correlations pass the curl null test as well as a complementary diagnostic test using the NVSS data in equatorial coordinates. We forecast the potential for Planck and NVSS to constrain the lensing-galaxy cross correlation as well as the galaxy bias. The lensing-galaxy cross-power spectra are found to be Gaussian distributed.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:1209.0534  [pdf] - 565311
Long-term Monitoring on Mrk 501 for Its VHE gamma Emission and a Flare in October 2011
Comments: have been accepted for publication at ApJ
Submitted: 2012-09-04
As one of the brightest active blazars in both X-ray and very high energy $\gamma$-ray bands, Mrk 501 is very useful for physics associated with jets from AGNs. The ARGO-YBJ experiment is monitoring it for $\gamma$-rays above 0.3 TeV since November 2007. Starting from October 2011 the largest flare since 2005 is observed, which lasts to about April 2012. In this paper, a detailed analysis is reported. During the brightest $\gamma$-rays flaring episodes from October 17 to November 22, 2011, an excess of the event rate over 6 $\sigma$ is detected by ARGO-YBJ in the direction of Mrk 501, corresponding to an increase of the $\gamma$-ray flux above 1 TeV by a factor of 6.6$\pm$2.2 from its steady emission. In particular, the $\gamma$-ray flux above 8 TeV is detected with a significance better than 4 $\sigma$. Based on time-dependent synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) processes, the broad-band energy spectrum is interpreted as the emission from an electron energy distribution parameterized with a single power-law function with an exponential cutoff at its high energy end. The average spectral energy distribution for the steady emission is well described by this simple one-zone SSC model. However, the detection of $\gamma$-rays above 8 TeV during the flare challenges this model due to the hardness of the spectra. Correlations between X-rays and $\gamma$-rays are also investigated.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.0063  [pdf] - 612334
A New Class of Parametrization for Dark Energy without Divergence
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2012-05-31
In this paper, we propose a new class of parametrization of the equation of state of dark energy. In contrast with the famous CPL parametrization, these new parametrization of the equation of state does not divergent during the evolution of the Universe even in the future. Also, we perform a observational constraint on two simplest dark energy models belonging to this new class of parametrization, by using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method and the combined latest observational data from the type Ia supernova compilations including Union2(557), cosmic microwave background, and baryon acoustic oscillation.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.4055  [pdf] - 1118083
Global behavior of cosmological dynamics with interacting Veneziano ghost
Comments: 8 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in JHEP
Submitted: 2012-04-18
In this paper, we shall study the dynamical behavior of the universe accelerated by the so called Veneziano ghost dark energy component locally and globally by using the linearization and nullcline method developed in this paper. The energy density is generalized to be proportional to the Hawking temperature defined on the trapping horizon instead of Hubble horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe. We also give a prediction of the fate of the universe and present the bifurcation phenomenon of the dynamical system of the universe. It seems that the universe could be dominated by dark energy at present in some region of the parameter space.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.0058  [pdf] - 629650
Latest Observational Constraints to the Ghost Dark Energy Model by Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Approach
Comments: 12 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2012-01-31
Recently, the vacuum energy of the QCD ghost in a time-dependent background is proposed as a kind of dark energy candidate to explain the acceleration of the universe. In this model, the energy density of the dark energy is proportional to the Hubble parameter $H$, which is the Hawking temperature on the Hubble horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe. In this paper, we perform a constraint on the ghost dark energy model with and without bulk viscosity, by using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method and the combined latest observational data from the type Ia supernova compilations including Union2.1(580) and Union2(557), cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillation, and the observational Hubble parameter data.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.1973  [pdf] - 461672
Observation of TeV gamma rays from the Cygnus region with the ARGO-YBJ experiment
Comments: 14 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2012-01-10
We report the observation of TeV gamma-rays from the Cygnus region using the ARGO-YBJ data collected from 2007 November to 2011 August. Several TeV sources are located in this region including the two bright extended MGRO J2019+37 and MGRO J2031+41. According to the Milagro data set, at 20 TeV MGRO J2019+37 is the most significant source apart from the Crab Nebula. No signal from MGRO J2019+37 is detected by the ARGO-YBJ experiment, and the derived flux upper limits at 90% confidence level for all the events above 600 GeV with medium energy of 3 TeV are lower than the Milagro flux, implying that the source might be variable and hard to be identified as a pulsar wind nebula. The only statistically significant (6.4 standard deviations) gamma-ray signal is found from MGRO J2031+41, with a flux consistent with the measurement by Milagro.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.2371  [pdf] - 483844
Reconstruction of Gravitational Lensing Using WMAP 7-Year Data
Comments: 10 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2011-11-09
Gravitational lensing by large scale structure introduces non-Gaussianity into the Cosmic Microwave Background and imprints a new observable, which can be used as a cosmological probe. We apply a four-point estimator to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 7-year coadded temperature maps alone to reconstruct the gravitational lensing signal. The Gaussian bias is simulated and subtracted, and the higher order bias is investigated. We measure a gravitational lensing signal with a statistical amplitude of $\mathcal {C}$ = $1.27\pm 0.98$ using all the correlations of the W- and V-band Differencing Assemblies (DAs). We therefore conclude that WMAP 7-year data alone, can not detect lensing.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.0896  [pdf] - 966917
Long-term monitoring of the TeV emission from Mrk 421 with the ARGO-YBJ experiment
Comments: 30 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2011-06-05
ARGO-YBJ is an air shower detector array with a fully covered layer of resistive plate chambers. It is operated with a high duty cycle and a large field of view. It continuously monitors the northern sky at energies above 0.3 TeV. In this paper, we report a long-term monitoring of Mrk 421 over the period from 2007 November to 2010 February. This source was observed by the satellite-borne experiments Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and Swift in the X-ray band. Mrk 421 was especially active in the first half of 2008. Many flares are observed in both X-ray and gamma-ray bands simultaneously. The gamma-ray flux observed by ARGO-YBJ has a clear correlation with the X-ray flux. No lag between the X-ray and gamma-ray photons longer than 1 day is found. The evolution of the spectral energy distribution is investigated by measuring spectral indices at four different flux levels. Hardening of the spectra is observed in both X-ray and gamma-ray bands. The gamma-ray flux increases quadratically with the simultaneously measured X-ray flux. All these observational results strongly favor the synchrotron self-Compton process as the underlying radiative mechanism.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.4261  [pdf] - 1051613
Mean Interplanetary Magnetic Field Measurement Using the ARGO-YBJ Experiment
Comments: 6 papges,3 figures
Submitted: 2011-01-21
The sun blocks cosmic ray particles from outside the solar system, forming a detectable shadow in the sky map of cosmic rays detected by the ARGO-YBJ experiment in Tibet. Because the cosmic ray particles are positive charged, the magnetic field between the sun and the earth deflects them from straight trajectories and results in a shift of the shadow from the true location of the sun. Here we show that the shift measures the intensity of the field which is transported by the solar wind from the sun to the earth.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:1008.1152  [pdf] - 568253
Non-Gaussianity with Lagrange Multiplier Field in the Curvaton Scenario
Comments: 18 pages, 22 figures, v2: accepte by JCAP, refs added
Submitted: 2010-08-06, last modified: 2010-10-06
In this paper, we will use $\delta \mathcal{N}$-formalism to calculate the primordial curvature perturbation for the curvaton model with a Lagrange multiplier field. We calculate the non-linearity parameters $f_{NL}$ and $g_{NL}$ in the sudden-decay approximation in this kind of model, and we find that one could get a large non-Gaussinity even if the curvaton dominates the total energy density before it decays, and this property will make the curvaton model much richer. We also calculate the probability density function of the primordial curvature perturbation in the sudden-decay approximation, as well as some moments of it.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:1004.1874  [pdf] - 903065
Preventing eternality in phantom inflation
Comments: 8 pages, V2 references added. V3 version published in Phys. Rev. D
Submitted: 2010-04-12, last modified: 2010-07-14
We have investigated the necessary conditions that prevent phantom inflation from being eternal. Allowing additionally for a nonminimal coupling between the phantom field and gravity, we present the slow-climb requirements, perform an analysis of the fluctuations, and finally we extract the overall conditions that are necessary in order to prevent eternality. Furthermore, we verify our results by solving explicitly the cosmological equations in a simple example of an exponential potential, formulating the classical motion plus the stochastic effect of the fluctuations through Langevin equations. Our analysis shows that phantom inflation can be finite without the need of additional exotic mechanisms.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.2646  [pdf] - 1024641
On Temporal Variations of the Multi-TeV Cosmic Ray Anisotropy using the Tibet III Air Shower Array
Comments: 18 pages, 2 figures, accepted by The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2010-01-15
We analyze the large-scale two-dimensional sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV cosmic rays by Tibet Air Shower Array, with the data taken from 1999 November to 2008 December. To explore temporal variations of the anisotropy, the data set is divided into nine intervals, each in a time span of about one year. The sidereal anisotropy of magnitude about 0.1% appears fairly stable from year to year over the entire observation period of nine years. This indicates that the anisotropy of TeV Galactic cosmic rays remains insensitive to solar activities since the observation period covers more than a half of the 23rd solar cycle.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.4793  [pdf] - 902855
Cardassian Universe Constrained by Latest Observations
Comments: 10 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2009-12-24
Several Cardassian universe models including the original, modified polytropic and exponential Cardassian models are constrained by the latest Constitution Type Ia supernova data, the position of the first acoustic peak of CMB from the five years WMAP data and the size of baryonic acoustic oscillation peak from the SDSS data. Both the spatial flat and curved universe are studied, and we also take account of the possible bulk viscosity of the matter fluid in the flat universe case.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.0386  [pdf] - 1018596
Observation of TeV Gamma Rays from the Fermi Bright Galactic Sources with the Tibet Air Shower Array
Comments: 17 pages, 2 figures, 1 table, Accepted for publication in ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2009-12-02
Using the Tibet-III air shower array, we search for TeV gamma-rays from 27 potential Galactic sources in the early list of bright sources obtained by the Fermi Large Area Telescope at energies above 100 MeV. Among them, we observe 7 sources instead of the expected 0.61 sources at a significance of 2 sigma or more excess. The chance probability from Poisson statistics would be estimated to be 3.8 x 10^-6. If the excess distribution observed by the Tibet-III array has a density gradient toward the Galactic plane, the expected number of sources may be enhanced in chance association. Then, the chance probability rises slightly, to 1.2 x 10^-5, based on a simple Monte Carlo simulation. These low chance probabilities clearly show that the Fermi bright Galactic sources have statistically significant correlations with TeV gamma-ray excesses. We also find that all 7 sources are associated with pulsars, and 6 of them are coincident with sources detected by the Milagro experiment at a significance of 3 sigma or more at the representative energy of 35 TeV. The significance maps observed by the Tibet-III air shower array around the Fermi sources, which are coincident with the Milagro >=3sigma sources, are consistent with the Milagro observations. This is the first result of the northern sky survey of the Fermi bright Galactic sources in the TeV region.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.3994  [pdf] - 902495
Is Non-minimal Inflation Eternal?
Comments: 9 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2009-11-20
The possibility that the non-minimal coupling inflation could be eternal is investigated. We calculate the quantum fluctuation of the inflaton in a Hubble time and find that it has the same value as in the minimal case in the slow-roll limit. Armed with this result, we have studied some concrete non-minimal inflationary models including the chaotic inflation and the natural inflation while the inflaton is non-minimally coupled to the gravity and we find that these non-minimal inflations could be eternal in some parameter regions.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.5476  [pdf] - 895191
Chaplygin gas and the cosmological evolution of alpha
Comments: Dedicated to the people's republic of China on her 60th anniversary 1949-2009. 12 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2009-09-29
The class of Chaplygin gas models regarded as a candidate of dark energy can be realized by a scalar field, which could drive the variation of the fine structure constant $\alpha$ during the cosmic time. This phenomenon has been observed for almost ten years ago from the quasar absorption spectra and attracted many attentions. In this paper, we reconstruct the class of Chaplygin gas models to a kind of scalar fields and confront the resulting $\Delta\alpha/\alpha$ with the observational constraints. We found that if the present observational value of the equation of state of the dark energy was not exactly equal to -1, various parameters of the class of Chaplygin gas models are allowed to satisfy the observational constraints, as well as the equivalence principle is also respected.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.0045  [pdf] - 22961
Holographic Ricci dark energy in Randall-Sundrum braneworld: Avoidance of big rip and steady state future
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures; v2: discussions added, accepted for publication in Phys. Lett. B; v3: published version
Submitted: 2009-03-31, last modified: 2009-09-27
In the holographic Ricci dark energy (RDE) model, the parameter $\alpha$ plays an important role in determining the evolutionary behavior of the dark energy. When $\alpha<1/2$, the RDE will exhibit a quintom feature, i.e., the equation of state of dark energy will evolve across the cosmological constant boundary $w=-1$. Observations show that the parameter $\alpha$ is indeed smaller than 1/2, so the late-time evolution of RDE will be really like a phantom energy. Therefore, it seems that the big rip is inevitable in this model. On the other hand, the big rip is actually inconsistent with the theoretical framework of the holographic model of dark energy. To avoid the big rip, we appeal to the extra dimension physics. In this Letter, we investigate the cosmological evolution of the RDE in the braneworld cosmology. It is of interest to find that for the far future evolution of RDE in a Randall-Sundrum braneworld, there is an attractor solution where the steady state (de Sitter) finale occurs, in stead of the big rip.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.1026  [pdf] - 28037
Large-scale sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV galactic cosmic rays and the heliosphere
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure, 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference (Lodz, Poland), 2009
Submitted: 2009-09-05
We develop a model anisotropy best-fitting to the two-dimensional sky-map of multi-TeV galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity observed with the Tibet III air shower (AS) array. By incorporating a pair of intensity excesses in the hydrogen deflection plane (HDP) suggested by Gurnett et al., together with the uni-directional and bi-directional flows for reproducing the observed global feature, this model successfully reproduces the observed sky-map including the "skewed" feature of the excess intensity from the heliotail direction, whose physical origin has long remained unknown. These additional excesses are modeled by a pair of the northern and southern Gaussian distributions, each placed ~50 degree away from the heliotail direction. The amplitude of the southern excess is as large as ~0.2 %, more than twice the amplitude of the northern excess. This implies that the Tibet AS experiment discovered for the first time a clear evidence of the significant modulation of GCR intensity in the heliotail and the asymmetric heliosphere.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.0527  [pdf] - 23931
Viscous Ricci Dark Energy
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2009-05-05
We investigate the viscous Ricci dark energy (RDE) model by assuming that there is bulk viscosity in the linear barotropic fluid and the RDE. In the RDE model without bulk viscosity, the universe is younger than some old objects at some redshifts. Since the age of the universe should be longer than any objects in the universe, the RDE model suffers the age problem, especially when we consider the object APM 08279+5255 at $z=3.91$, whose age is $t = 2.1$ Gyr. In this letter, we find that once the viscosity is taken into account, this age problem is alleviated.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.2972  [pdf] - 23474
Scalar Perturbation and Stability of Ricci Dark Energy
Comments: 6 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2009-04-20
The Ricci dark energy (RDE) proposed to explain the accelerating expansion of the universe requires its parameter $\alpha < 1$, whose value will determine the behavior of RDE. In this Letter, we study the scalar perturbation of RDE with and without matter in the universe, and we find that in both cases, the perturbation is stable if $\alpha> 1/3$, which gives a lower bound for $\alpha$ theoretically.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.2976  [pdf] - 23475
Ricci Dark Energy in braneworld models with a Gauss-Bonnet term in the bulk
Comments: 7 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2009-04-20
We investigate the Ricci Dark Energy (RDE) in the braneworld models with a Gauss-Bonnet term in the Bulk. We solve the generalized Friedmann equation on the brane analytically and find that the universe will finally enter into a pure de Sitter spacetime in stead of the big rip that appears in the usual 4D Ricci dark energy model with parameter $\alpha<1/2$. We also consider the Hubble horizon as the IR cutoff in holographic dark energy model and find it can not accelerate the universe as in the usual case without interacting.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.2502  [pdf] - 16329
Statefinder Diagnosis for Ricci Dark Energy
Comments: 14 pages, 3 figures, v2:minor error corrected in Section II, v3: refs added
Submitted: 2008-09-15, last modified: 2008-09-18
Statefinder diagnostic is a useful method which can differ one dark energy model from each others. In this letter, we apply this method to a holographic dark energy model from Ricci scalar curvature, called the Ricci dark energy model(RDE). We plot the evolutionary trajectories of this model in the statefinder parameter-planes, and it is found that the parameter of this model plays a significant role from the statefinder viewpoint. In a very special case, the statefinder diagnostic fails to discriminate LCDM and RDE models, thus we apply a new diagnostic called the Om diagnostic proposed recently to this model in this case in Appendix A and it works well.
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.0110  [pdf] - 11382
Observational constraints on the dark energy and dark matter mutual coupling
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in Phys. Lett. B
Submitted: 2008-04-01, last modified: 2008-05-30
We examine different phenomenological interaction models for Dark Energy and Dark Matter by performing statistical joint analysis with observational data arising from the 182 Gold type Ia supernova samples, the shift parameter of the Cosmic Microwave Background given by the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, the baryon acoustic oscillation measurement from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and age estimates of 35 galaxies. Including the time-dependent observable, we add sensitivity of measurement and give complementary results for the fitting. The compatibility among three different data sets seem to imply that the coupling between dark energy and dark matter is a small positive value, which satisfies the requirement to solve the coincidence problem and the second law of thermodynamics, being compatible with previous estimates.
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.1862  [pdf] - 1000701
An Updated Search of Steady TeV $\gamma-$Ray Point Sources in Northern Hemisphere Using the Tibet Air Shower Array
Comments: This paper has been accepted by hepnp
Submitted: 2008-04-11, last modified: 2008-04-15
Using the data taken from Tibet II High Density (HD) Array (1997 February-1999 September) and Tibet-III array (1999 November-2005 November), our previous northern sky survey for TeV $\gamma-$ray point sources has now been updated by a factor of 2.8 improved statistics. From $0.0^{\circ}$ to $60.0^{\circ}$ in declination (Dec) range, no new TeV $\gamma-$ray point sources with sufficiently high significance were identified while the well-known Crab Nebula and Mrk421 remain to be the brightest TeV $\gamma-$ray sources within the field of view of the Tibet air shower array. Based on the currently available data and at the 90% confidence level (C.L.), the flux upper limits for different power law index assumption are re-derived, which are approximately improved by 1.7 times as compared with our previous reported limits.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:0711.2002  [pdf] - 1943072
New estimation of the spectral index of high-energy cosmic rays as determined by the Compton-Getting anisotropy
Comments: accepted to ApJL
Submitted: 2007-11-13
The amplitude of the Compton-Getting (CG) anisotropy contains the power-law index of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum. Based on this relation and using the Tibet air-shower array data, we measure the cosmic-ray spectral index to be $-3.03 \pm 0.55_{stat} \pm < 0.62_{syst}$ between 6 TeV and 40 TeV, consistent with $-$2.7 from direct energy spectrum measurements. Potentially, this CG anisotropy analysis can be utilized to confirm the astrophysical origin of the ``knee'' against models for non-standard hadronic interactions in the atmosphere.
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:0710.2757  [pdf] - 6025
Future plan for observation of cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region with the Tibet air shower array : physics goal and overview
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference
Submitted: 2007-10-15
The Tibet air shower array, which has an effective area of 37,000 square meters and is located at 4300 m in altitude, has been observing air showers induced by cosmic rays with energies above a few TeV. We are planning to add a large muon detector array to it for the purpose of increasing its sensitivity to cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV (10 - 1000 TeV) energy region by discriminating them from cosmic-ray hadrons. We report on the possibility of detection of gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region in our field of view, based on the improved sensitivity of our air shower array deduced from the full Monte Carlo simulation.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:0710.2752  [pdf] - 6024
Future plan for observation of cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region with the Tibet air shower array : simulation and sensitivity
Comments: 4 pages, 5 figures, 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference
Submitted: 2007-10-15
The Tibet air shower array, which has an effective area of 37,000 square meters and is located at 4300 m in altitude, has been observing air showers induced by cosmic rays with energies above a few TeV. We have a plan to add a large muon detector array to it for the purpose of increasing its sensitivity to cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region by discriminating them from cosmic-ray hadrons. We have deduced the attainable sensitivity of the muon detector array using our Monte Carlo simulation. We report here on the detailed procedure of our Monte Carlo simulation.
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:0709.2456  [pdf] - 5002
Holographic Cosmological Constant and Dark Energy
Comments: 14 pages, 2 figures, harvmac, v2 references added, report-no added
Submitted: 2007-09-16, last modified: 2007-09-24
A general holographic relation between UV and IR cutoff of an effective field theory is proposed. Taking the IR cutoff relevant to the dark energy as the Hubble scale, we find that the cosmological constant is highly suppressed by a numerical factor and the fine tuning problem seems alleviative. We also use different IR cutoffs to study the case in which the universe is composed of matter and dark energy.
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:0706.4033  [pdf] - 2617
Testing the viability of the interacting holographic dark energy model by using combined observational constraints
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2007-06-27, last modified: 2007-08-15
Using the data coming from the new 182 Gold type Ia supernova samples, the shift parameter of the Cosmic Microwave Background given by the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, and the baryon acoustic oscillation measurement from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, $H(z)$ and lookback time measurements, we have performed a statistical joint analysis of the interacting holographic dark energy model. Consistent parameter estimations show us that the interacting holographic dark energy model is a viable candidate to explain the observed acceleration of our universe.