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Duncan, F.

Normalized to: Duncan, F.

11 article(s) in total. 324 co-authors, from 1 to 11 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 23,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.04048  [pdf] - 1924972
Search for dark matter with a 231-day exposure of liquid argon using DEAP-3600 at SNOLAB
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-02-11, last modified: 2019-07-04
DEAP-3600 is a single-phase liquid argon (LAr) direct-detection dark matter experiment, operating 2 km underground at SNOLAB (Sudbury, Canada). The detector consists of 3279 kg of LAr contained in a spherical acrylic vessel. This paper reports on the analysis of a 758 tonne\cdot day exposure taken over a period of 231 live-days during the first year of operation. No candidate signal events are observed in the WIMP-search region of interest, which results in the leading limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section on a LAr target of $3.9\times10^{-45}$ cm$^{2}$ ($1.5\times10^{-44}$ cm$^{2}$) for a 100 GeV/c$^{2}$ (1 TeV/c$^{2}$) WIMP mass at 90\% C. L. In addition to a detailed background model, this analysis demonstrates the best pulse-shape discrimination in LAr at threshold, employs a Bayesian photoelectron-counting technique to improve the energy resolution and discrimination efficiency, and utilizes two position reconstruction algorithms based on PMT charge and photon arrival times.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.05811  [pdf] - 1994027
Electromagnetic Backgrounds and Potassium-42 Activity in the DEAP-3600 Dark Matter Detector
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-05-14
The DEAP-3600 experiment is searching for WIMP dark matter with a 3.3 tonne single phase liquid argon (LAr) target, located 2.1 km underground at SNOLAB. The experimental signature of dark matter interactions is keV-scale $^{40}$Ar nuclear recoils (NR) producing 128 nm LAr scintillation photons observed by PMTs. The largest backgrounds in DEAP-3600 are electronic recoils (ER) induced by $\beta$ and $\gamma$-rays originating from internal and external radioactivity in the detector material. A background model of the ER interactions in DEAP-3600 was developed and is described in this work. The model is based on several components which are expected from radioisotopes in the LAr, from ex-situ material assay measurements, and from dedicated independent in-situ analyses. This prior information is used in a Bayesian fit of the ER components to a 247.2 d dataset to model the radioactivity in the surrounding detector materials. While excellent discrimination between ERs and NRs is reached with pulse shape discrimination, utilizing the large difference between fast and slow components of LAr scintillation light, detailed knowledge of the ER background and activity of detector components, sets valuable constraints on other key types of backgrounds in the detector: neutrons and alphas. In addition, the activity of $^{42}$Ar in LAr in DEAP-3600 is determined by measuring the daughter decay of $^{42}$K. This cosmogenically activated trace isotope is a relevant background at higher energies for other rare event searches using atmospheric argon e.g. DarkSide-20k, GERDA or LEGEND. The specific activity of $^{42}$Ar in the atmosphere is found to be $40.4 \pm 5.9$ $\mu$Bq/kg of argon.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.08042  [pdf] - 1735166
First results from the DEAP-3600 dark matter search with argon at SNOLAB
Comments: Accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2017-07-25, last modified: 2018-08-13
This paper reports the first results of a direct dark matter search with the DEAP-3600 single-phase liquid argon (LAr) detector. The experiment was performed 2 km underground at SNOLAB (Sudbury, Canada) utilizing a large target mass, with the LAr target contained in a spherical acrylic vessel of 3600 kg capacity. The LAr is viewed by an array of PMTs, which would register scintillation light produced by rare nuclear recoil signals induced by dark matter particle scattering. An analysis of 4.44 live days (fiducial exposure of 9.87 tonne-days) of data taken with the nearly full detector during the initial filling phase demonstrates the detector performance and the best electronic recoil rejection using pulse-shape discrimination in argon, with leakage $<1.2\times 10^{-7}$ (90% C.L.) between 16 and 33 keV$_{ee}$. No candidate signal events are observed, which results in the leading limit on WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section on argon, $<1.2\times 10^{-44}$ cm$^2$ for a 100 GeV/c$^2$ WIMP mass (90% C.L.).
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.01982  [pdf] - 1832993
Design and Construction of the DEAP-3600 Dark Matter Detector
Comments: minor corrections in version 2. 70 pages, 24 figures, to be submitted to Astroparticle Physics Journal
Submitted: 2017-12-05, last modified: 2018-04-10
The Dark matter Experiment using Argon Pulse-shape discrimination (DEAP) has been designed for a direct detection search for particle dark matter using a single-phase liquid argon target. The projected cross section sensitivity for DEAP-3600 to the spin-independent scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) on nucleons is $10^{-46}~\rm{cm}^{2}$ for a 100 GeV/$c^2$ WIMP mass with a fiducial exposure of 3 tonne-years. This paper describes the physical properties and construction of the DEAP-3600 detector.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.2930  [pdf] - 1488343
Measurement of the scintillation time spectra and pulse-shape discrimination of low-energy beta and nuclear recoils in liquid argon with DEAP-1
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astroparticle Physics
Submitted: 2009-04-20, last modified: 2016-09-14
The DEAP-1 low-background liquid argon detector was used to measure scintillation pulse shapes of electron and nuclear recoil events and to demonstrate the feasibility of pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) down to an electron-equivalent energy of 20 keV. In the surface dataset using a triple-coincidence tag we found the fraction of beta events that are misidentified as nuclear recoils to be $<1.4\times 10^{-7}$ (90% C.L.) for energies between 43-86 keVee and for a nuclear recoil acceptance of at least 90%, with 4% systematic uncertainty on the absolute energy scale. The discrimination measurement on surface was limited by nuclear recoils induced by cosmic-ray generated neutrons. This was improved by moving the detector to the SNOLAB underground laboratory, where the reduced background rate allowed the same measurement with only a double-coincidence tag. The combined data set contains $1.23\times10^8$ events. One of those, in the underground data set, is in the nuclear-recoil region of interest. Taking into account the expected background of 0.48 events coming from random pileup, the resulting upper limit on the electronic recoil contamination is $<2.7\times10^{-8}$ (90% C.L.) between 44-89 keVee and for a nuclear recoil acceptance of at least 90%, with 6% systematic uncertainty on the absolute energy scale. We developed a general mathematical framework to describe PSD parameter distributions and used it to build an analytical model of the distributions observed in DEAP-1. Using this model, we project a misidentification fraction of approx. $10^{-10}$ for an electron-equivalent energy threshold of 15 keV for a detector with 8 PE/keVee light yield. This reduction enables a search for spin-independent scattering of WIMPs from 1000 kg of liquid argon with a WIMP-nucleon cross-section sensitivity of $10^{-46}$ cm$^2$, assuming negligible contribution from nuclear recoil backgrounds.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.7673  [pdf] - 1416317
DEAP-3600 Dark Matter Search
Comments: International Conference on High Energy Physics (ICHEP 2014), Valencia, 2014
Submitted: 2014-10-27, last modified: 2015-08-25
The DEAP-3600 experiment is located 2 km underground at SNOLAB, in Sudbury, Ontario. It is a single-phase detector that searches for dark matter particle interactions within a 1000-kg fiducial mass target of liquid argon. A first generation prototype detector (DEAP-1) with a 7-kg liquid argon target mass demonstrated a high level of pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) for reducing $\beta$/$\gamma$ backgrounds and helped to develop low radioactivity techniques to mitigate surface-related $\alpha$ backgrounds. Construction of the DEAP-3600 detector is nearly complete and commissioning is starting in 2014. The target sensitivity to spin-independent scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) on nucleons of 10$^{-46}$ cm$^2$ will allow one order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over current searches at 100 GeV WIMP mass. This paper presents an overview and status of the DEAP-3600 project and discusses plans for a future multi-tonne experiment, DEAP-50T.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.1914  [pdf] - 1216195
Improving Photoelectron Counting and Particle Identification in Scintillation Detectors with Bayesian Techniques
Comments: 16 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2014-08-08, last modified: 2014-12-12
Many current and future dark matter and neutrino detectors are designed to measure scintillation light with a large array of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The energy resolution and particle identification capabilities of these detectors depend in part on the ability to accurately identify individual photoelectrons in PMT waveforms despite large variability in pulse amplitudes and pulse pileup. We describe a Bayesian technique that can identify the times of individual photoelectrons in a sampled PMT waveform without deconvolution, even when pileup is present. To demonstrate the technique, we apply it to the general problem of particle identification in single-phase liquid argon dark matter detectors. Using the output of the Bayesian photoelectron counting algorithm described in this paper, we construct several test statistics for rejection of backgrounds for dark matter searches in argon. Compared to simpler methods based on either observed charge or peak finding, the photoelectron counting technique improves both energy resolution and particle identification of low energy events in calibration data from the DEAP-1 detector and simulation of the larger MiniCLEAN dark matter detector.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.0909  [pdf] - 890838
Radon backgrounds in the DEAP-1 liquid-argon-based Dark Matter detector
Comments:
Submitted: 2012-11-05, last modified: 2014-04-23
The DEAP-1 \SI{7}{kg} single phase liquid argon scintillation detector was operated underground at SNOLAB in order to test the techniques and measure the backgrounds inherent to single phase detection, in support of the \mbox{DEAP-3600} Dark Matter detector. Backgrounds in DEAP are controlled through material selection, construction techniques, pulse shape discrimination and event reconstruction. This report details the analysis of background events observed in three iterations of the DEAP-1 detector, and the measures taken to reduce them. The $^{222}$Rn decay rate in the liquid argon was measured to be between 16 and \SI{26}{\micro\becquerel\per\kilogram}. We found that the background spectrum near the region of interest for Dark Matter detection in the DEAP-1 detector can be described considering events from three sources: radon daughters decaying on the surface of the active volume, the expected rate of electromagnetic events misidentified as nuclear recoils due to inefficiencies in the pulse shape discrimination, and leakage of events from outside the fiducial volume due to imperfect position reconstruction. These backgrounds statistically account for all observed events, and they will be strongly reduced in the DEAP-3600 detector due to its higher light yield and simpler geometry.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.0910  [pdf] - 1178987
A Search for Astrophysical Burst Signals at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory
Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S. N.; Anthony, A. E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S. D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y. D.; Chauhan, D.; Chen, M.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox, G. A.; Dai, X.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J. A.; DiMarco, M.; Diamond, M. D.; Doe, P. J.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P. -L.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Earle, E. D.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J. TM.; Graham, K.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Harvey, P. J.; Hazama, R.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Huang, M.; Jagam, P.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N. A.; Jerkins, M.; Keeter, K. J.; Klein, J. R.; Kormos, L. L.; Kos, M.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C. B.; Krueger, A.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J. C.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S. R.; Miller, M. L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Nickel, B. G.; Noble, A. J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Oblath, N. S.; Ollerhead, R. W.; Gann, G. D. Orebi; Oser, S. M.; Ott, R. A.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prior, G.; Reitzner, S. D.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schwendener, M. H.; Secrest, J. A.; Seibert, S. R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Sonley, T. J.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van Berg, R.; VanDevender, B. A.; Virtue, C. J.; Wall, B. L.; Waller, D.; Tseung, H. Wan Chan; Wark, D. L.; Watson, P. J. S.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.
Comments:
Submitted: 2013-09-04
The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has confirmed the standard solar model and neutrino oscillations through the observation of neutrinos from the solar core. In this paper we present a search for neutrinos associated with sources other than the solar core, such as gamma-ray bursters and solar flares. We present a new method for looking for temporal coincidences between neutrino events and astrophysical bursts of widely varying intensity. No correlations were found between neutrinos detected in SNO and such astrophysical sources.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.0763  [pdf] - 704596
Combined Analysis of all Three Phases of Solar Neutrino Data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory
SNO Collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S. N.; Anthony, A. E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S. D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y. D.; Chauhan, D.; Chen, M.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox, G. A.; Dai, X.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J. A.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P. J.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P. -L.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Earle, E. D.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J. TM.; Graham, K.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Harvey, P. J.; Hazama, R.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Huang, M.; Jagam, P.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N. A.; Jerkins, M.; Keeter, K. J.; Klein, J. R.; Kormos, L. L.; Kos, M.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C. B.; Kruger, A; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Loach, J. C.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S. R.; Miller, M. L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Nickel, B. G.; Noble, A. J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Oblath, N. S.; Ollerhead, R. W.; Gann, G. D. Orebi; Oser, S. M.; Ott, R. A.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prior, G.; Reitzner, S. D.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosten, R. C.; Schwendener, M. H.; Secrest, J. A.; Seibert, S. R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Skensved, P.; Sonley, T. J.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tešić, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van Berg, R.; VanDevender, B. A.; Virtue, C. J.; Tseung, H. Wan Chan; Wark, D. L.; Watson, P. J. S.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.
Comments:
Submitted: 2011-09-04
We report results from a combined analysis of solar neutrino data from all phases of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. By exploiting particle identification information obtained from the proportional counters installed during the third phase, this analysis improved background rejection in that phase of the experiment. The combined analysis resulted in a total flux of active neutrino flavors from 8B decays in the Sun of (5.25 \pm 0.16(stat.)+0.11-0.13(syst.))\times10^6 cm^{-2}s^{-1}. A two-flavor neutrino oscillation analysis yielded \Deltam^2_{21} = (5.6^{+1.9}_{-1.4})\times10^{-5} eV^2 and tan^2{\theta}_{12}= 0.427^{+0.033}_{-0.029}. A three-flavor neutrino oscillation analysis combining this result with results of all other solar neutrino experiments and the KamLAND experiment yielded \Deltam^2_{21} = (7.41^{+0.21}_{-0.19})\times10^{-5} eV^2, tan^2{\theta}_{12} = 0.446^{+0.030}_{-0.029}, and sin^2{\theta}_{13} = (2.5^{+1.8}_{-1.5})\times10^{-2}. This implied an upper bound of sin^2{\theta}_{13} < 0.053 at the 95% confidence level (C.L.).
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1107.2901  [pdf] - 1077970
Measurement of the $\nu_e$ and Total $^{8}$B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase-III Data Set
Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S. N.; Amsbaugh, J. F.; Anaya, J. M.; Anthony, A. E.; Banar, J.; Barros, N.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S. D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Bowles, T. J.; Browne, M. C.; Bullard, T. V.; Burritt, T. H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y. D.; Chauhan, D.; Chen, M.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox, G. A.; Currat, C. A.; Dai, X.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J. A.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P. J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Drouin, P. -L.; Duba, C. A.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Earle, E. D.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Gagnon, N.; Germani, J. V.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goon, J. TM.; Graham, K.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hamian, A. A.; Harper, G. C.; Harvey, P. J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M. A.; Huang, M.; Jagam, P.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Klein, J. R.; Kormos, L. L.; Kos, M.; Krueger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C. B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Loach, J. C.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S. R.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, G. G.; Miller, M. L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Morissette, B.; Myers, A. W.; Nickel, B. G.; Noble, A. J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Oblath, N. S.; Ollerhead, R. W.; Gann, G. D. Orebi; Oser, S. M.; Ott, R. A.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prior, G.; Reitzner, S. D.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M. H.; Secrest, J. A.; Seibert, S. R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M. W. E.; Sonley, T. J.; Steiger, T. D.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tesic, G.; Thornewell, P. M.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Tunnell, C. D.; Van Wechel, T.; Van Berg, R.; VanDevender, B. A.; Virtue, C. J.; Wall, B. L.; Waller, D.; Tseung, H. Wan Chan; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.
Comments: 104 pages, 26 figures, 20 tables, submitted to Phys. Rev. C
Submitted: 2011-07-14
This paper details the solar neutrino analysis of the 385.17-day Phase-III data set acquired by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). An array of $^3$He proportional counters was installed in the heavy-water target to measure precisely the rate of neutrino-deuteron neutral-current interactions. This technique to determine the total active $^8$B solar neutrino flux was largely independent of the methods employed in previous phases. The total flux of active neutrinos was measured to be $5.54^{+0.33}_{-0.31}(stat.)^{+0.36}_{-0.34}(syst.)\times 10^{6}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, consistent with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of solar and reactor neutrino mixing parameters yielded the best-fit values of $\Delta m^2 = 7.59^{+0.19}_{-0.21}\times 10^{-5}{eV}^2$ and $\theta = 34.4^{+1.3}_{-1.2}$ degrees.