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Drummond, Jack D.

Normalized to: Drummond, J.

28 article(s) in total. 495 co-authors, from 1 to 17 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 21,5.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.08520  [pdf] - 1988589
Spitzer Microlensing Program as a Probe for Globular Cluster Planets. Analysis of OGLE-2015-BLG-0448
Comments: ApJ submitted, 12 pages, 8 figures, 2 tabels
Submitted: 2015-12-28, last modified: 2019-10-29
The microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0448 was observed by Spitzer and lay within the tidal radius of the globular cluster NGC 6558. The event had moderate magnification and was intensively observed, hence it had the potential to probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters. We measure the proper motion of NGC 6558 ($\mu_{\rm cl}$(N,E) = (+0.36+-0.10, +1.42+-0.10) mas/yr) as well as the source and show that the lens is not a cluster member. Even though this particular event does not probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters, other potential cluster lens events can be verified using our methodology. Additionally, we find that microlens parallax measured using OGLE photometry is consistent with the value found based on the light curve displacement between Earth and Spitzer.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.07718  [pdf] - 1922977
OGLE-2017-BLG-1186: first application of asteroseismology and Gaussian processes to microlensing
Li, Shun-Sheng; Zang, Weicheng; Udalski, Andrzej; Shvartzvald, Yossi; Huber, Daniel; Lee, Chung-Uk; Sumi, Takahiro; Gould, Andrew; Mao, Shude; Fouqué, Pascal; Wang, Tianshu; Dong, Subo; Jørgensen, Uffe G.; Cole, Andrew; Mróz, Przemek; Szymański, Michał K.; Skowron, Jan; Poleski, Radosław; Soszyński, Igor; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Kozłowski, Szymon; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Rybicki, Krzysztof A.; Iwanek, Patryk; Yee, Jennifer C.; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; Beichman, Charles A.; Bryden, Geoffery; Carey, Sean; Gaudi, B. Scott; Henderson, Calen B.; Zhu, Wei; Albrow, Michael D.; Chung, Sun-Ju; Han, Cheongho; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Jung, Youn Kil; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Shin, In-Gu; Cha, Sang-Mok; Kim, Dong-Jin; Kim, Hyoun-Woo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Lee, Dong-Joo; Lee, Yongseok; Park, Byeong-Gon; Pogge, Richard W.; Bond, Ian A.; Abe, Fumio; Barry, Richard; Bennett, David P.; Bhattacharya, Aparna; Donachie, Martin; Fukui, Akihiko; Hirao, Yuki; Itow, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Iona; Koshimoto, Naoki; Li, Man Cheung Alex; Matsubara, Yutaka; Muraki, Yasushi; Miyazaki, Shota; Nagakane, Masayuki; Ranc, Clément; Rattenbury, Nicholas J.; Suematsu, Haruno; Sullivan, Denis J.; Suzuki, Daisuke; Tristram, Paul J.; Yonehara, Atsunori; Christie, Grant; Drummond, John; Green, Jonathan; Hennerley, Steve; Natusch, Tim; Porritt, Ian; Bachelet, Etienne; Maoz, Dan; Street, Rachel A.; Tsapras, Yiannis; Bozza, Valerio; Dominik, Martin; Hundertmark, Markus; Peixinho, Nuno; Sajadian, Sedighe; Burgdorf, Martin J.; Evans, Daniel F.; Jaimes, Roberto Figuera; Fujii, Yuri I.; Haikala, Lauri K.; Helling, Christiane; Henning, Thomas; Hinse, Tobias C.; Mancini, Luigi; Longa-Peña, Penelope; Rahvar, Sohrab; Rabus, Markus; Skottfelt, Jesper; Snodgrass, Colin; Southworth, John; Unda-Sanzana, Eduardo; von Essen, Carolina; Beaulieu, Jean-Phillipe; Blackman, Joshua; Hill, Kym
Comments: 18 pages, 4 figures, 5 tables. Revised to match version published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-04-16, last modified: 2019-07-24
We present the analysis of the event OGLE-2017-BLG-1186 from the 2017 Spitzer microlensing campaign. This is a remarkable microlensing event because its source is photometrically bright and variable, which makes it possible to perform an asteroseismic analysis using ground-based data. We find that the source star is an oscillating red giant with average timescale of $\sim 9$ d. The asteroseismic analysis also provides us source properties including the source angular size ($\sim 27~\mu{\rm as}$) and distance ($\sim 11.5$ kpc), which are essential for inferring the properties of the lens. When fitting the light curve, we test the feasibility of Gaussian Processes (GPs) in handling the correlated noise caused by the variable source. We find that the parameters from the GP model are generally more loosely constrained than those from the traditional $\chi^2$ minimization method. We note that this event is the first microlensing system for which asteroseismology and GPs have been used to account for the variable source. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measured, we find that the lens is likely a $\sim 0.045~M_{\odot}$ brown dwarf at distance $\sim 9.0$ kpc, or a $\sim 0.073~M_{\odot}$ ultracool dwarf at distance $\sim 9.8$ kpc. Combining the estimated lens properties with a Bayesian analysis using a Galactic model, we find a $\sim 35$ per cent probability for the lens to be a bulge object and $\sim 65$ per cent to be a background disc object.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.01890  [pdf] - 1851641
The homogeneous internal structure of CM-like asteroid (41) Daphne
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-01-07
Context. CM-like asteroids (Ch and Cgh classes) are a major population within the broader C-complex, encompassing about 10% of the mass of the main asteroid belt. Their internal structure has been predicted to be homogeneous, based on their compositional similarity as inferred from spectroscopy (Vernazza et al., 2016, AJ 152, 154) and numerical modeling of their early thermal evolution (Bland & Travis, 2017, Sci. Adv. 3, e1602514). Aims. Here we aim to test this hypothesis by deriving the density of the CM-like asteroid (41) Daphne from detailed modeling of its shape and the orbit of its small satellite. Methods. We observed Daphne and its satellite within our imaging survey with the Very Large Telescope extreme adaptive-optics SPHERE/ZIMPOL camera (ID 199.C-0074, PI P. Vernazza) and complemented this data set with earlier Keck/NIRC2 and VLT/NACO observations. We analyzed the dynamics of the satellite with our Genoid meta-heuristic algorithm. Combining our high-angular resolution images with optical lightcurves and stellar occultations, we determine the spin period, orientation, and 3-D shape, using our ADAM shape modeling algorithm. Results. The satellite orbits Daphne on an equatorial, quasi-circular, prograde orbit, like the satellites of many other large main-belt asteroids. The shape model of Daphne reveals several large flat areas that could be large impact craters. The mass determined from this orbit combined with the volume computed from the shape model implies a density for Daphne of 1.77+/-0.26 g/cm3 (3 {\sigma}). This density is consistent with a primordial CM-like homogeneous internal structure with some level of macroporosity (~17%). Conclusions. Based on our analysis of the density of Daphne and 75 other Ch/Cgh-type asteroids gathered from the literature, we conclude that the primordial internal structure of the CM parent bodies was homogeneous.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.02722  [pdf] - 1656369
Physical, spectral, and dynamical properties of asteroid (107) Camilla and its satellites
Comments: 40 pages, 16 figures, accepted for publication
Submitted: 2018-03-07
The population of large asteroids is thought to be primordial and they are the most direct witnesses of the early history of our Solar System. Those satellites allow study of the mass, and hence density and internal structure. We study here the properties of the triple asteroid (107) Camilla from lightcurves, stellar occultations, optical spectroscopy, and high-contrast and high-angular-resolution images and spectro-images. Using 80 positions over 15 years, we determine the orbit of its larger satellite to be circular, equatorial, and prograde, with RMS residuals of 7.8 mas. From 11 positions in three epochs only, in 2015 and 2016, we determine a preliminary orbit for the second satellite. We find the orbit to be somewhat eccentric and slightly inclined to the primary's equatorial plane, reminiscent of the inner satellites of other asteroid triple systems. Comparison of the near-infrared spectrum of the larger satellite reveals no significant difference with Camilla. Hence, these properties argue for a formation of the satellites by excavation from impact and re-accumulation of ejecta. We determine the spin and 3-D shape of Camilla. The model fits well each data set. We determine Camilla to be larger than reported from modeling of mid-infrared photometry, with a spherical-volume-equivalent diameter of 254 $\pm$ 36 km (3 $\sigma$ uncertainty), in agreement with recent results from shape modeling (Hanus2017+). Combining the mass of (1.12 $\pm$ 0.01) $\times$ 10$^{19}$ kg determined from the dynamics of the satellites and the volume from the 3-D shape model, we determine a density of 1,280 $\pm$ 130 SI. From this density, and considering Camilla's spectral similarities with (24) Themis and (65) Cybele (for which water ice coating on surface grains was reported), we infer a silicate-to-ice mass ratio of 1-6, with a 10-30% macroporosity.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.02292  [pdf] - 1513546
First simultaneous microlensing observations by two space telescopes: $Spitzer$ & $Swift$ reveal a brown dwarf in event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319
Comments: 28 pages, 6 figures, 2 tables. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2016-06-07
Simultaneous observations of microlensing events from multiple locations allow for the breaking of degeneracies between the physical properties of the lensing system, specifically by exploring different regions of the lens plane and by directly measuring the "microlens parallax". We report the discovery of a 30-55$M_J$ brown dwarf orbiting a K dwarf in microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319. The system is located at a distance of $\sim$5 kpc toward the Galactic bulge. The event was observed by several ground-based groups as well as by $Spitzer$ and $Swift$, allowing the measurement of the physical properties. However, the event is still subject to an 8-fold degeneracy, in particular the well-known close-wide degeneracy, and thus the projected separation between the two lens components is either $\sim$0.25 AU or $\sim$45 AU. This is the first microlensing event observed by $Swift$, with the UVOT camera. We study the region of microlensing parameter space to which $Swift$ is sensitive, finding that while for this event $Swift$ could not measure the microlens parallax with respect to ground-based observations, it can be important for other events. Specifically, for detecting nearby brown dwarfs and free-floating planets in high magnification events.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.05672  [pdf] - 1378838
Pluto's atmosphere from the 29 June 2015 ground-based stellar occultation at the time of the New Horizons flyby
Comments: 16 pages, 2 tables, 3 figures
Submitted: 2016-01-21, last modified: 2016-03-01
We present results from a multi-chord Pluto stellar occultation observed on 29 June 2015 from New Zealand and Australia. This occurred only two weeks before the NASA New Horizons flyby of the Pluto system and serves as a useful comparison between ground-based and space results. We find that Pluto's atmosphere is still expanding, with a significant pressure increase of 5$\pm$2\% since 2013 and a factor of almost three since 1988. This trend rules out, as of today, an atmospheric collapse associated with Pluto's recession from the Sun. A central flash, a rare occurrence, was observed from several sites in New Zealand. The flash shape and amplitude are compatible with a spherical and transparent atmospheric layer of roughly 3~km in thickness whose base lies at about 4~km above Pluto's surface, and where an average thermal gradient of about 5 K~km$^{-1}$ prevails. We discuss the possibility that small departures between the observed and modeled flash are caused by local topographic features (mountains) along Pluto's limb that block the stellar light. Finally, using two possible temperature profiles, and extrapolating our pressure profile from our deepest accessible level down to the surface, we obtain a possible range of 11.9-13.7~$\mu$bar for the surface pressure.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.08850  [pdf] - 1347475
OGLE-2012-BLG-0563Lb: a Saturn-mass Planet around an M Dwarf with the Mass Constrained by Subaru AO imaging
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures, an error in Figure 11 in the published version corrected
Submitted: 2015-06-29, last modified: 2016-01-26
We report the discovery of a microlensing exoplanet OGLE-2012-BLG-0563Lb with the planet-star mass ratio ~1 x 10^{-3}. Intensive photometric observations of a high-magnification microlensing event allow us to detect a clear signal of the planet. Although no parallax signal is detected in the light curve, we instead succeed at detecting the flux from the host star in high-resolution JHK'-band images obtained by the Subaru/AO188 and IRCS instruments, allowing us to constrain the absolute physical parameters of the planetary system. With the help of a spectroscopic information about the source star obtained during the high-magnification state by Bensby et al., we find that the lens system is located at 1.3^{+0.6}_{-0.8} kpc from us, and consists of an M dwarf (0.34^{+0.12}_{-0.20} M_sun) orbited by a Saturn-mass planet (0.39^{+0.14}_{-0.23} M_Jup) at the projected separation of 0.74^{+0.26}_{-0.42} AU (close model) or 4.3^{+1.5}_{-2.5} AU (wide model). The probability of contamination in the host star's flux, which would reduce the masses by a factor of up to three, is estimated to be 17%. This possibility can be tested by future high-resolution imaging. We also estimate the (J-Ks) and (H-Ks) colors of the host star, which are marginally consistent with a low metallicity mid-to-early M dwarf, although further observations are required for the metallicity to be conclusive. This is the fifth sub-Jupiter-mass (0.2<m_p/M_Jup<1) microlensing planet around an M dwarf with the mass well constrained. The relatively rich harvest of sub-Jupiters around M dwarfs is contrasted with a possible paucity of ~1--2 Jupiter-mass planets around the same type of star, which can be explained by the planetary formation process in the core-accretion scheme.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.06663  [pdf] - 1231850
Reanalyses of Anomalous Gravitational Microlensing Events in the OGLE-III Early Warning System Database with Combined Data
Comments: 10 pages, 4 tables, 9 figures. Accepted in ApJ, Author list updated
Submitted: 2015-02-23, last modified: 2015-03-02
We reanalyze microlensing events in the published list of anomalous events that were observed from the OGLE lensing survey conducted during 2004-2008 period. In order to check the existence of possible degenerate solutions and extract extra information, we conduct analyses based on combined data from other survey and follow-up observation and consider higher-order effects. Among the analyzed events, we present analyses of 8 events for which either new solutions are identified or additional information is obtained. We find that the previous binary-source interpretations of 5 events are better interpreted by binary-lens models. These events include OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2007-BLG-159, OGLE-2007-BLG-491, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, and OGLE-2008-BLG-210. With additional data covering caustic crossings, we detect finite-source effects for 6 events including OGLE-2006-BLG-215, OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2006-BLG-450, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. Among them, we are able to measure the Einstein radii of 3 events for which multi-band data are available. These events are OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. For OGLE-2008-BLG-143, we detect higher-order effect induced by the changes of the observer's position caused by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we present degenerate solutions resulting from the known close/wide or ecliptic degeneracy. Finally, we note that the masses of the binary companions of the lenses of OGLE-2006-BLG-450 and OGLE-2008-BLG-210 are in the brown-dwarf regime.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.1115  [pdf] - 1215402
A Terrestrial Planet in a ~1 AU Orbit Around One Member of a ~15 AU Binary
Comments: Published in Science, Main and supplementary material combined
Submitted: 2014-07-03
We detect a cold, terrestrial planet in a binary-star system using gravitational microlensing. The planet has low mass (2 Earth masses) and lies projected at $a_{\perp,ph}$ ~ 0.8 astronomical units (AU) from its host star, similar to the Earth-Sun distance. However, the planet temperature is much lower, T<60 Kelvin, because the host star is only 0.10--0.15 solar masses and therefore more than 400 times less luminous than the Sun. The host is itself orbiting a slightly more massive companion with projected separation $a_{\perp,ch}=$10--15 AU. Straightforward modification of current microlensing search strategies could increase their sensitivity to planets in binary systems. With more detections, such binary-star/planetary systems could place constraints on models of planet formation and evolution. This detection is consistent with such systems being very common.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.2428  [pdf] - 1179818
A Super-Jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406
Tsapras, Y.; Choi, J. -Y.; Street, R. A.; Han, C.; Bozza, V.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Udalski, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Sumi, T.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Ipatov, S.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Andersen, J. M.; Novati, S. Calchi; Damerdji, Y.; Diehl, C.; Elyiv, A.; Giannini, E.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Juncher, D.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Vilela, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Barry, R.; Batista, V.; Bhattacharya, A.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J.; P`ere, C.; Pollard, K. R.; Wouters, D.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hwang, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kavka, A.; Koo, J. -R.; Lee, C. -U.; Maoz, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Shin, I. -G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Tan, T. G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yonehara, P. C. M. Yock A.
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2013-10-09, last modified: 2013-12-05
We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the lightcurve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a $2.73\pm 0.43\ M_{\rm J}$ planet orbiting a $0.44\pm 0.07\ M_{\odot}$ early M-type star. The distance to the lens is $4.97\pm 0.29$\ kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is $3.45\pm 0.26$ AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.6041  [pdf] - 1152352
MOA-2010-BLG-311: A planetary candidate below the threshold of reliable detection
Yee, J. C.; Hung, L. -W.; Bond, I. A.; Allen, W.; Monard, L. A. G.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Dominik, M.; Tsapras, Y.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Zellem, R.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gorbikov, E.; Han, C.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Lee, C. -U.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Nola, M.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shporer, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Skowron, J.; Thornley, G.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beatty, T. G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Henderson, C. B.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J. W.; Shappee, B.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; van Saders, J.; Zub, M.; Street, R. A.; Horne, K.; Bramich, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Sahu, K. C.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsgans, J.
Comments: 29 pages, 6 Figures, 3 Tables. For a brief video presentation on this paper, please see http://www.youtube.com/user/OSUAstronomy 10/25/2012 - Updated author list. Replaced 10/10/13 to reflect the version published in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-10-22, last modified: 2013-10-10
We analyze MOA-2010-BLG-311, a high magnification (A_max>600) microlensing event with complete data coverage over the peak, making it very sensitive to planetary signals. We fit this event with both a point lens and a 2-body lens model and find that the 2-body lens model is a better fit but with only Delta chi^2~80. The preferred mass ratio between the lens star and its companion is $q=10^(-3.7+/-0.1), placing the candidate companion in the planetary regime. Despite the formal significance of the planet, we show that because of systematics in the data the evidence for a planetary companion to the lens is too tenuous to claim a secure detection. When combined with analyses of other high-magnification events, this event helps empirically define the threshold for reliable planet detection in high-magnification events, which remains an open question.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.7714  [pdf] - 1179574
MOA-2010-BLG-328Lb: a sub-Neptune orbiting very late M dwarf ?
Furusawa, K.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Gould, A.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Snodgrass, C.; Prester, D. Dominis; Albrow, M. D.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Choi, J. Y.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Hung, L. -W.; Jung, Y. -K.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Nola, M.; Ofek, E.; Park, B. G.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I. -G.; Skowron, J.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Street, R. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Horne, K.; Donatowicz, J.; Sahu, K. C.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beatty, T. G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, C. S.; Black, C.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Fouque, P.; Greenhill, J.; Henderson, C. B.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J. W.; Shappee, B.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; van Saders, J.; Zellem, R.; Zub, M.
Comments: 30 pages, 6 figures. accepted for publication in ApJ. Figure 1 and 2 are updated
Submitted: 2013-09-29, last modified: 2013-10-09
We analyze the planetary microlensing event MOA-2010-BLG-328. The best fit yields host and planetary masses of Mh = 0.11+/-0.01 M_{sun} and Mp = 9.2+/-2.2M_Earth, corresponding to a very late M dwarf and sub-Neptune-mass planet, respectively. The system lies at DL = 0.81 +/- 0.10 kpc with projected separation r = 0.92 +/- 0.16 AU. Because of the host's a-priori-unlikely close distance, as well as the unusual nature of the system, we consider the possibility that the microlens parallax signal, which determines the host mass and distance, is actually due to xallarap (source orbital motion) that is being misinterpreted as parallax. We show a result that favors the parallax solution, even given its close host distance. We show that future high-resolution astrometric measurements could decisively resolve the remaining ambiguity of these solutions.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.1184  [pdf] - 1165025
A Giant Planet beyond the Snow Line in Microlensing Event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251
Kains, N.; Street, R.; Choi, J. -Y.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Almeida, L. A.; Jablonski, F.; Tristram, P.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozlowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Skowron, J.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lundkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Sahu, K. C.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Bajek, D.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Ipatov, S.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, T.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Allen, W.; Batista, V.; Chung, S. -J.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Henderson, C.; Jung, Y. -K.; Koo, J. -R.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I. -G.; Yee, J.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouque, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Meintjes, P.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; Zub, M.
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, 3 tables; A&A in press
Submitted: 2013-03-05
We present the analysis of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251. This anomalous event was observed by several survey and follow-up collaborations conducting microlensing observations towards the Galactic Bulge. Based on detailed modelling of the observed light curve, we find that the lens is composed of two masses with a mass ratio q=1.9 x 10^-3. Thanks to our detection of higher-order effects on the light curve due to the Earth's orbital motion and the finite size of source, we are able to measure the mass and distance to the lens unambiguously. We find that the lens is made up of a planet of mass 0.53 +- 0.21,M_Jup orbiting an M dwarf host star with a mass of 0.26 +- 0.11 M_Sun. The planetary system is located at a distance of 2.57 +- 0.61 kpc towards the Galactic Centre. The projected separation of the planet from its host star is d=1.408 +- 0.019, in units of the Einstein radius, which corresponds to 2.72 +- 0.75 AU in physical units. We also identified a competitive model with similar planet and host star masses, but with a smaller orbital radius of 1.50 +- 0.50 AU. The planet is therefore located beyond the snow line of its host star, which we estimate to be around 1-1.5 AU.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.5101  [pdf] - 1159195
The Resolved Asteroid Program - Size, shape, and pole of (52) Europa
Comments: Accepted for publication in Icarus
Submitted: 2013-01-22
With the adaptive optics (AO) system on the 10 m Keck-II telescope, we acquired a high quality set of 84 images at 14 epochs of asteroid (52) Europa on 2005 January 20. The epochs covered its rotation period and, by following its changing shape and orientation on the plane of sky, we obtained its triaxial ellipsoid dimensions and spin pole location. An independent determination from images at three epochs obtained in 2007 is in good agreement with these results. By combining these two data sets, along with a single epoch data set obtained in 2003, we have derived a global fit for (52) Europa of diameters (379x330x249) +/- (16x8x10) km, yielding a volume-equivalent spherical-diameter of 315 +/- 7 km, and a rotational pole within 7 deg of [RA; Dec] = [257,+12] in an Equatorial J2000 reference frame (ECJ2000: 255,+35). Using the average of all mass determinations available forEuropa, we derive a density of 1.5 +/- 0.4, typical of C-type asteroids. Comparing our images with the shape model of Michalowski et al. (A&A 416, 2004), derived from optical lightcurves, illustrates excellent agreement, although several edge features visible in the images are not rendered by the model. We therefore derived a complete 3-D description of Europa's shape using the KOALA algorithm by combining our imaging epochs with 4 stellar occultations and 49 lightcurves. We use this 3-D shape model to assess these departures from ellipsoidal shape. Flat facets (possible giant craters) appear to be less distinct on (52) Europa than on other C-types that have been imaged in detail. We show that fewer giant craters, or smaller craters, is consistent with its expected impact history. Overall, asteroid (52) Europa is still well modeled as a smooth triaxial ellipsoid with dimensions constrained by observations obtained over several apparitions.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.3782  [pdf] - 1157842
MOA-2010-BLG-073L: An M-Dwarf with a Substellar Companion at the Planet/Brown Dwarf Boundary
Street, R. A.; Choi, J. -Y.; Tsapras, Y.; Han, C.; Furusawa, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Bond, I. A.; Wouters, D.; Zellem, R.; Udalski, A.; Snodgrass, C.; Horne, K.; Dominik, M.; Browne, P.; Kains, N.; Bramich, D. M.; Bajek, D.; Steele, I. A.; Ipatov, S.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagayama, T.; Nishimaya, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Yee, J.; Dong, S.; Shin, I. -G.; Lee, C. -U.; Skowron, J.; De Almeida, L. Andrade; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Hwang, K. -H.; Koo, J. -R.; Maoz, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishhook, D.; Shporer, A.; McCormick, J.; Christie, G.; Natusch, T.; Allen, B.; Drummond, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Thornley, G.; Knowler, M.; Bos, M.; Bolt, G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouque, P.; Bachelet, E.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F.; Hinse, T. C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.
Comments: 24 pages, 8 figures, best viewed in colour, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2012-11-15, last modified: 2012-12-11
We present an analysis of the anomalous microlensing event, MOA-2010-BLG-073, announced by the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics survey on 2010-03-18. This event was remarkable because the source was previously known to be photometrically variable. Analyzing the pre-event source lightcurve, we demonstrate that it is an irregular variable over time scales >200d. Its dereddened color, $(V-I)_{S,0}$, is 1.221$\pm$0.051mag and from our lens model we derive a source radius of 14.7$\pm$1.3 $R_{\odot}$, suggesting that it is a red giant star. We initially explored a number of purely microlensing models for the event but found a residual gradient in the data taken prior to and after the event. This is likely to be due to the variability of the source rather than part of the lensing event, so we incorporated a slope parameter in our model in order to derive the true parameters of the lensing system. We find that the lensing system has a mass ratio of q=0.0654$\pm$0.0006. The Einstein crossing time of the event, $T_{\rm{E}}=44.3$\pm$0.1d, was sufficiently long that the lightcurve exhibited parallax effects. In addition, the source trajectory relative to the large caustic structure allowed the orbital motion of the lens system to be detected. Combining the parallax with the Einstein radius, we were able to derive the distance to the lens, $D_L$=2.8$\pm$0.4kpc, and the masses of the lensing objects. The primary of the lens is an M-dwarf with $M_{L,p}$=0.16$\pm0.03M_{\odot}$ while the companion has $M_{L,s}$=11.0$\pm2.0M_{\rm{J}}$ putting it in the boundary zone between planets and brown dwarfs.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.4265  [pdf] - 1152158
The second multiple-planet system discovered by microlensing: OGLE-2012-BLG-0026Lb, c, a pair of jovian planets beyond the snow line
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2012-10-16, last modified: 2012-12-04
We report the discovery of a planetary system from observation of the high-magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026. The lensing light curve exhibits a complex central perturbation with multiple features. We find that the perturbation was produced by two planets located near the Einstein ring of the planet host star. We identify 4 possible solutions resulting from the well-known close/wide degeneracy. By measuring both the lens parallax and the Einstein radius, we estimate the physical parameters of the planetary system. According to the best-fit model, the two planet masses are ~0.11 M_Jupiter and 0.68 M_Jupiter and they are orbiting a G-type main sequence star with a mass ~0.82 M_Sun. The projected separations of the individual planets are beyond the snow line in all four solutions, being ~3.8 AU and 4.6 AU in the best-fit solution. The deprojected separations are both individually larger and possibly reversed in order. This is the second multi-planet system with both planets beyond the snow line discovered by microlensing. This is the only such a system (other than the Solar System) with measured planet masses without sin(i) degeneracy. The planetary system is located at a distance 4.1 kpc from the Earth toward the Galactic center. It is very likely that extra light from stars other than the lensed star comes from the lens itself. If this is correct, it will be possible to obtain detailed information about the planet-host star from follow-up observation.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.6323  [pdf] - 1123726
MOA-2010-BLG-477Lb: constraining the mass of a microlensing planet from microlensing parallax, orbital motion and detection of blended light
Bachelet, E.; Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Fouqué, P.; Gould, A.; Menzies, J. W.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Dong, Subo; Heyrovský, D.; Marquette, J. B.; Marshall, J.; Skowron, J.; Street, R. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Abe, L.; Agabi, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Allen, W.; Bertin, E.; Bos, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Chavez, J.; Christie, G. W.; Cole, A. A.; Crouzet, N.; Dieters, S.; Dominik, M.; Drummond, J.; Greenhill, J.; Guillot, T.; Henderson, C. B.; Hessman, F. V.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kandori, R.; Liebig, C.; Mékarnia, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Nagayama, T.; Nataf, D.; Natusch, T.; Nishiyama, S.; Rivet, J. -P.; Sahu, K. C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Thornley, G.; Tomczak, A. R.; Tsapras, Y.; Yee, J. C.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Kubas, D.; Martin, R.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; de Almeida, L. Andrade; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Lee, C. -U.; Lee, Y.; Koo, J. -R.; Maoz, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shporer, A.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Kobara, S.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Ohmori, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Kerins, E.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.
Comments: 3 Tables, 12 Figures, accepted in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-05-29
Microlensing detections of cool planets are important for the construction of an unbiased sample to estimate the frequency of planets beyond the snow line, which is where giant planets are thought to form according to the core accretion theory of planet formation. In this paper, we report the discovery of a giant planet detected from the analysis of the light curve of a high-magnification microlensing event MOA-2010-BLG-477. The measured planet-star mass ratio is $q=(2.181\pm0.004)\times 10^{-3}$ and the projected separation is $s=1.1228\pm0.0006$ in units of the Einstein radius. The angular Einstein radius is unusually large $\theta_{\rm E}=1.38\pm 0.11$ mas. Combining this measurement with constraints on the "microlens parallax" and the lens flux, we can only limit the host mass to the range $0.13<M/M_\odot<1.0$. In this particular case, the strong degeneracy between microlensing parallax and planet orbital motion prevents us from measuring more accurate host and planet masses. However, we find that adding Bayesian priors from two effects (Galactic model and Keplerian orbit) each independently favors the upper end of this mass range, yielding star and planet masses of $M_*=0.67^{+0.33}_{-0.13}\ M_\odot$ and $m_p=1.5^{+0.8}_{-0.3}\ M_{\rm JUP}$ at a distance of $D=2.3\pm0.6$ kpc, and with a semi-major axis of $a=2^{+3}_{-1}$ AU. Finally, we show that the lens mass can be determined from future high-resolution near-IR adaptive optics observations independently from two effects, photometric and astrometric.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.4032  [pdf] - 1091733
Characterizing Lenses and Lensed Stars of High-Magnification Single-lens Gravitational Microlensing Events With Lenses Passing Over Source Stars
Choi, J. -Y.; Shin, I. -G.; Park, S. -Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Street, R.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Janczak, J.; Lee, C. -U.; Mallia, F.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G. "TG"; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Barnard, E.; Baudry, J.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Menzies, J.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Clay, N.; Fraser, S.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Mottram, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Zimmer, F.
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2011-11-17, last modified: 2012-03-20
We present the analysis of the light curves of 9 high-magnification single-lens gravitational microlensing events with lenses passing over source stars, including OGLE-2004-BLG-254, MOA-2007-BLG-176, MOA-2007-BLG-233/OGLE-2007-BLG-302, MOA-2009-BLG-174, MOA-2010-BLG-436, MOA-2011-BLG-093, MOA-2011-BLG-274, OGLE-2011-BLG-0990/MOA-2011-BLG-300, and OGLE-2011-BLG-1101/MOA-2011-BLG-325. For all events, we measure the linear limb-darkening coefficients of the surface brightness profile of source stars by measuring the deviation of the light curves near the peak affected by the finite-source effect. For 7 events, we measure the Einstein radii and the lens-source relative proper motions. Among them, 5 events are found to have Einstein radii less than 0.2 mas, making the lenses candidates of very low-mass stars or brown dwarfs. For MOA-2011-BLG-274, especially, the small Einstein radius of $\theta_{\rm E}\sim 0.08$ mas combined with the short time scale of $t_{\rm E}\sim 2.7$ days suggests the possibility that the lens is a free-floating planet. For MOA-2009-BLG-174, we measure the lens parallax and thus uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens. We also find that the measured lens mass of $\sim 0.84\ M_\odot$ is consistent with that of a star blended with the source, suggesting that the blend is likely to be the lens. Although we find planetary signals for none of events, we provide exclusion diagrams showing the confidence levels excluding the existence of a planet as a function of the separation and mass ratio.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.5944  [pdf] - 1092618
Shape modeling technique KOALA validated by ESA Rosetta at (21) Lutetia
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures, 2 tables, accepted for publication in P&SS
Submitted: 2011-12-27
We present a comparison of our results from ground-based observations of asteroid (21) Lutetia with imaging data acquired during the flyby of the asteroid by the ESA Rosetta mission. This flyby provided a unique opportunity to evaluate and calibrate our method of determination of size, 3-D shape, and spin of an asteroid from ground-based observations. We present our 3-D shape-modeling technique KOALA which is based on multi-dataset inversion. We compare the results we obtained with KOALA, prior to the flyby, on asteroid (21) Lutetia with the high-spatial resolution images of the asteroid taken with the OSIRIS camera on-board the ESA Rosetta spacecraft, during its encounter with Lutetia. The spin axis determined with KOALA was found to be accurate to within two degrees, while the KOALA diameter determinations were within 2% of the Rosetta-derived values. The 3-D shape of the KOALA model is also confirmed by the spectacular visual agreement between both 3-D shape models (KOALA pre- and OSIRIS post-flyby). We found a typical deviation of only 2 km at local scales between the profiles from KOALA predictions and OSIRIS images, resulting in a volume uncertainty provided by KOALA better than 10%. Radiometric techniques for the interpretation of thermal infrared data also benefit greatly from the KOALA shape model: the absolute size and geometric albedo can be derived with high accuracy, and thermal properties, for example the thermal inertia, can be determined unambiguously. We consider this to be a validation of the KOALA method. Because space exploration will remain limited to only a few objects, KOALA stands as a powerful technique to study a much larger set of small bodies using Earth-based observations.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.3067  [pdf] - 1092357
Astronomical Sky Quality Near Eureka, in the Canadian High Arctic
Comments: 14 pages, 1 table, 11 figures; accepted for publication in PASP
Submitted: 2011-12-13
Nighttime visible-light sky brightness and transparency are reported for the Polar Environment Research Laboratory (PEARL), located on a 610-m high ridge near the Eureka research station, on Ellesmere Island, Canada. Photometry of Polaris obtained in V band with the PEARL All Sky Imager (PASI) over two winters is supported by standard meteorological measurements and visual estimates of sky conditions from sea level. These data show that during the period of the study, October through March of 2008/09 and 2009/10, the sky near zenith had a mean surface brightness of 19.7 mag/square-arcsec when the sun was more than 12 deg below the horizon, reaching 20.7 mag/square-arcsec during astronomical darkness with no moon. Skies were without thick cloud and potentially usable for astronomy 86% of the time (extinction <2 mag). Up to 68% of the time was spectroscopic (<0.5 mag), attenuated by ice crystals, or clear with stable atmospheric transparency. Those conditions can persist for over 100 hours at a time. Further analysis suggests the sky was entirely free of ice crystals (truly photometric) 48+/-3% of the time at PEARL in winter, and that a higher elevation location nearby may be better.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.3295  [pdf] - 1084111
Microlensing Binaries Discovered through High-Magnification Channel
Shin, I. -G.; Choi, J. -Y.; Park, S. -Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Janczak, J.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Mallia, F.; Maoz, D.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Shporer, A.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Calitz, J. J.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Cook, K. H.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Hoffman, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Meintjes, P.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Vinter, C.; Zub, M.; Allan, A.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Street, R.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Zimmer, F.
Comments: 10 figures, 6 tables, 26 pages
Submitted: 2011-09-15, last modified: 2011-11-28
Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of 8 binary lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010. The perturbations, which are confined near the peak of the light curves, can be easily distinguished from the central perturbations caused by planets. However, the degeneracy between close and wide binary solutions cannot be resolved with a $3\sigma$ confidence level for 3 events, implying that the degeneracy would be an important obstacle in studying binary distributions. The dependence of the degeneracy on the lensing parameters is consistent with a theoretic prediction that the degeneracy becomes severe as the binary separation and the mass ratio deviate from the values of resonant caustics. The measured mass ratio of the event OGLE-2008-BLG-510/MOA-2008-BLG-369 is $q\sim 0.1$, making the companion of the lens a strong brown-dwarf candidate.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.3312  [pdf] - 1051479
Binary microlensing event OGLE-2009-BLG-020 gives a verifiable mass, distance and orbit predictions
Comments: 51 pages, 8 figures, 2 appendices. Submitted to ApJ. Fortran codes for Appendix B are attached to this astro-ph submission and are also available at http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~jskowron/OGLE-2009-BLG-020/
Submitted: 2011-01-17
We present the first example of binary microlensing for which the parameter measurements can be verified (or contradicted) by future Doppler observations. This test is made possible by a confluence of two relatively unusual circumstances. First, the binary lens is bright enough (I=15.6) to permit Doppler measurements. Second, we measure not only the usual 7 binary-lens parameters, but also the 'microlens parallax' (which yields the binary mass) and two components of the instantaneous orbital velocity. Thus we measure, effectively, 6 'Kepler+1' parameters (two instantaneous positions, two instantaneous velocities, the binary total mass, and the mass ratio). Since Doppler observations of the brighter binary component determine 5 Kepler parameters (period, velocity amplitude, eccentricity, phase, and position of periapsis), while the same spectroscopy yields the mass of the primary, the combined Doppler + microlensing observations would be overconstrained by 6 + (5 + 1) - (7 + 1) = 4 degrees of freedom. This makes possible an extremely strong test of the microlensing solution. We also introduce a uniform microlensing notation for single and binary lenses, we define conventions, summarize all known microlensing degeneracies and extend a set of parameters to describe full Keplerian motion of the binary lenses.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.4792  [pdf] - 281289
A Minimized Mutual Information retrieval for simultaneous atmospheric pressure and temperature
Comments:
Submitted: 2010-12-21
The primary focus of the Mars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) collaboration between NASA and ESA is the detection of the temporal and spatial variation of the atmospheric trace gases using a solar occultation Fourier transform spectrometer. To retrieve any trace gas mixing ratios from these measurements, the atmospheric pressure and temperature have to be known accurately. Thus, a prototype retrieval model for the determination of pressure and temperature from a broadband high resolution infrared Fourier Transform spectrometer experiment with the Sun as a source on board a spacecraft orbiting the planet Mars is presented. It is found that the pressure and temperature can be uniquely solved from remote sensing spectroscopic measurements using a Regularized Total Least Squares method and selected pairs of micro-windows without any a-priori information of the state space parameters and other constraints. The selection of the pairs of suitable micro-windows is based on the information content analysis. A comparative information content calculation using Bayes theory and a hyperspace formulation are presented to understand the information available in measurement. A method of minimization of mutual information is used to search the suitable micro-windows for a simultaneous pressure and temperature retrieval.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.1809  [pdf] - 1041176
A sub-Saturn Mass Planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb
Miyake, N.; Sumi, T.; Dong, Subo; Street, R.; Mancini, L.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Tsapras, Y.; Yee, J. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Bond, I. A.; Fouque, P.; Browne, P.; Han, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Finet, F.; Furusawa, K.; Harpsoe, K.; Allen, W.; Hundertmark, M.; Freeman, M.; Suzuki, D.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Douchin, D.; Fukui, A.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagayama, T.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Collaboration, The MOA; Bolt, G.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gorbikov, E.; Higgins, D.; Janczak, K. -H. Hwang J.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Koo, J. -R.; lowski, S. Koz; Lee, Y.; Mallia, F.; Maury, A.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Mu~noz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Ofek, E. O.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Santallo, R.; Shporer, A.; Spector, O.; Thornley, G.; Collaboration, The Micro FUN; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Steele, I.; Collaboration, The RoboNet; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Glitrup, M.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mathiasen, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Zimmer, F.; Consortium, The MiNDSTEp; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Menzies, J.; Collaboration, The PLANET
Comments: accepted to ApJ, 28 pages, 6 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2010-10-09, last modified: 2010-12-10
We report the gravitational microlensing discovery of a sub-Saturn mass planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb, orbiting a K or M-dwarf star in the inner Galactic disk or Galactic bulge. The high cadence observations of the MOA-II survey discovered this microlensing event and enabled its identification as a high magnification event approximately 24 hours prior to peak magnification. As a result, the planetary signal at the peak of this light curve was observed by 20 different telescopes, which is the largest number of telescopes to contribute to a planetary discovery to date. The microlensing model for this event indicates a planet-star mass ratio of q = (3.95 +/- 0.02) x 10^{-4} and a separation of d = 0.97537 +/- 0.00007 in units of the Einstein radius. A Bayesian analysis based on the measured Einstein radius crossing time, t_E, and angular Einstein radius, \theta_E, along with a standard Galactic model indicates a host star mass of M_L = 0.38^{+0.34}_{-0.18} M_{Sun} and a planet mass of M_p = 50^{+44}_{-24} M_{Earth}, which is half the mass of Saturn. This analysis also yields a planet-star three-dimensional separation of a = 2.4^{+1.2}_{-0.6} AU and a distance to the planetary system of D_L = 6.1^{+1.1}_{-1.2} kpc. This separation is ~ 2 times the distance of the snow line, a separation similar to most of the other planets discovered by microlensing.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.4572  [pdf] - 1018889
Ultraviolet and visible photometry of asteroid (21) Lutetia using the Hubble Space Telescope
Comments: 14 pages, 2 tables, 8 figures
Submitted: 2009-12-23, last modified: 2010-07-06
The asteroid (21) Lutetia is the target of a planned close encounter by the Rosetta spacecraft in July 2010. To prepare for that flyby, Lutetia has been extensively observed by a variety of astronomical facilities. We used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to determine the albedo of Lutetia over a wide wavelength range, extending from ~150 nm to ~700 nm. Using data from a variety of HST filters and a ground-based visible light spectrum, we employed synthetic photometry techniques to derive absolute fluxes for Lutetia. New results from ground-based measurements of Lutetia's size and shape were used to convert the absolute fluxes into albedos. We present our best model for the spectral energy distribution of Lutetia over the wavelength range 120-800 nm. There appears to be a steep drop in the albedo (by a factor of ~2) for wavelengths shorter than ~300 nm. Nevertheless, the far ultraviolet albedo of Lutetia (~10%) is considerably larger than that of typical C-chondrite material (~4%). The geometric albedo at 550 nm is 16.5 +/- 1%. Lutetia's reflectivity is not consistent with a metal-dominated surface at infrared or radar wavelengths, and its albedo at all wavelengths (UV-visibile-IR-radar) is larger than observed for typical primitive, chondritic material. We derive a relatively high FUV albedo of ~10%, a result that will be tested by observations with the Alice spectrograph during the Rosetta flyby of Lutetia in July 2010.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.5353  [pdf] - 1550217
The triaxial ellipsoid dimensions, rotational pole, and bulk density of ESA Rosetta target asteroid (21) Lutetia
Comments: 9 pages, 8 figures, 5 tables, submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2010-05-28, last modified: 2010-06-17
We seek the best size estimates of the asteroid (21) Lutetia, the direction of its spin axis, and its bulk density, assuming its shape is well described by a smooth featureless triaxial ellipsoid, and to evaluate the deviations from this assumption. Methods. We derive these quantities from the outlines of the asteroid in 307 images of its resolved apparent disk obtained with adaptive optics (AO) at Keck II and VLT, and combine these with recent mass determinations to estimate a bulk density. Our best triaxial ellipsoid diameters for Lutetia, based on our AO images alone, are a x b x c = 132 x 101 x 93 km, with uncertainties of 4 x 3 x 13 km including estimated systematics, with a rotational pole within 5 deg. of ECJ2000 [long,lat] = [45, -7], or EQJ2000 [RA, DEC] = [44, +9]. The AO model fit itself has internal precisions of 1 x 1 x 8 km, but it is evident, both from this model derived from limited viewing aspects and the radius vector model given in a companion paper, that Lutetia has significant departures from an idealized ellipsoid. In particular, the long axis may be overestimated from the AO images alone by about 10 km. Therefore, we combine the best aspects of the radius vector and ellipsoid model into a hybrid ellipsoid model, as our final result, of 124 +/- 5 x 101 +/- 4 x 93 +/- 13 km that can be used to estimate volumes, sizes, and projected areas. The adopted pole position is within 5 deg. of [long, lat] = [52, -6] or[RA DEC] = [52, +12]. Using two separately determined masses and the volume of our hybrid model, we estimate a density of 3.5 +/- 1.1 or 4.3 +/- 0.8 g cm-3 . From the density evidence alone, we argue that this favors an enstatite-chondrite composition, although other compositions are formally allowed at the extremes (low-porosity CV/CO carbonaceous chondrite or high-porosity metallic). We discuss this in the context of other evidence.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.5356  [pdf] - 1032824
Physical properties of ESA Rosetta target asteroid (21) Lutetia: Shape and flyby geometry
Comments: 17 pages, 5 figures, 3 tables, submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2010-05-28, last modified: 2010-06-17
Aims. We determine the physical properties (spin state and shape) of asteroid (21) Lutetia, target of the ESA Rosetta mission, to help in preparing for observations during the flyby on 2010 July 10 by predicting the orientation of Lutetia as seen from Rosetta. Methods. We use our novel KOALA inversion algorithm to determine the physical properties of asteroids from a combination of optical lightcurves, disk-resolved images, and stellar occultations, although the latter are not available for (21) Lutetia. Results. We find the spin axis of (21) Lutetia to lie within 5 degrees of ({\lambda} = 52 deg., {\beta} = -6 deg.) in Ecliptic J2000 reference frame (equatorial {\alpha} = 52 deg., {\delta} = +12 deg.), and determine an improved sidereal period of 8.168 270 \pm 0.000 001 h. This pole solution implies the southern hemisphere of Lutetia will be in "seasonal" shadow at the time of the flyby. The apparent cross-section of Lutetia is triangular as seen "pole-on" and more rectangular as seen "equator-on". The best-fit model suggests the presence of several concavities. The largest of these is close to the north pole and may be associated with large impacts.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.3626  [pdf] - 31956
Physical Properties of (2) Pallas
Comments: 16 pages, 8 figures, 6 tables
Submitted: 2009-12-18
We acquired and analyzed adaptive-optics imaging observations of asteroid (2) Pallas from Keck II and the Very Large Telescope taken during four Pallas oppositions between 2003 and 2007, with spatial resolution spanning 32-88 km (image scales 13-20 km/pix). We improve our determination of the size, shape, and pole by a novel method that combines our AO data with 51 visual light-curves spanning 34 years of observations as well as occultation data. The shape model of Pallas derived here reproduces well both the projected shape of Pallas on the sky and light-curve behavior at all the epochs considered. We resolved the pole ambiguity and found the spin-vector coordinates to be within 5 deg. of [long, lat] = [30 deg., -16 deg.] in the ECJ2000.0 reference frame, indicating a high obliquity of ~84 deg., leading to high seasonal contrast. The best triaxial-ellipsoid fit returns radii of a=275 km, b= 258 km, and c= 238 km. From the mass of Pallas determined by gravitational perturbation on other minor bodies [(1.2 +/- 0.3) x 10-10 Solar Masses], we derive a density of 3.4 +/- 0.9 g.cm-3 significantly different from the density of C-type (1) Ceres of 2.2 +/- 0.1 g.cm-3. Considering the spectral similarities of Pallas and Ceres at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, this may point to fundamental differences in the interior composition or structure of these two bodies. We define a planetocentric longitude system for Pallas, following IAU guidelines. We also present the first albedo maps of Pallas covering ~80% of the surface in K-band. These maps reveal features with diameters in the 70-180 km range and an albedo contrast of about 6% wrt the mean surface albedo.