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Doroshenko, V. T.

Normalized to: Doroshenko, V.

86 article(s) in total. 1116 co-authors, from 1 to 51 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 4,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.08919  [pdf] - 2051569
Switches between accretion structures during flares in 4U 1901+03
Comments: 11 pages, 8 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-02-20
We report on our analysis of the 2019 outburst of the X-ray accreting pulsar 4U 1901+03 observed with Insight-HXMT and NICER. Both spectra and pulse profiles evolve significantly in the decaying phase of the outburst. Dozens of flares are observed throughout the outburst. They are more frequent and brighter at the outburst peak. We find that the flares, which have a duration from tens to hundreds of seconds, are generally brighter than the persistent emission by a factor of $\sim$ 1.5. The pulse profile shape during the flares can be significantly different than that of the persistent emission. In particular, a phase shift is clearly observed in many cases. We interpret these findings as direct evidence of changes of the pulsed beam pattern, due to transitions between the sub- and super-critical accretion regimes on a short time scale. We also observe that at comparable luminosities the flares' pulse profiles are rather similar to those of the persistent emission. This indicates that the accretion on the polar cap of the neutron star is mainly determined by the luminosity, i.e., the mass accretion rate.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.02336  [pdf] - 2044121
Detection of very-high-energy {\gamma}-ray emission from the colliding wind binary {\eta} Car with H.E.S.S
Collaboration, H. E. S. S.; Abdalla, H.; Adam, R.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arcaro, C.; Armand, C.; Armstrong, T.; Ashkar, H.; Backes, M.; Martins, V. Barbosa; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Berge, D.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bregeon, J.; Breuhaus, M.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Bylund, T.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chand, T.; Chandra, S.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cotter, G.; Curyło, M.; Davids, I. D.; Davies, J.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Dmytriiev, A.; Donath, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Eichhorn, F.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Eschbach, S.; Feijen, K.; Fegan, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Giunti, L.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M. -H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Hörbe, M.; Horns, D.; Huber, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Kluźniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kostunin, D.; Kreter, M.; Lamanna, G.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J. -P.; Leser, E.; Levy, C.; Lohse, T.; Lypova, I.; Mackey, J.; Majumdar, J.; Malyshev, D.; Malyshev, D.; Marandon, V.; Marchegiani, P.; Marcowith, A.; Mares, A.; Martí-Devesa, G.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Meintjes, P. J.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Moore, C.; Morris, P.; Moulin, E.; Muller, J.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; Nakashima, K.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Wilhelmi, E. de Ona; Ostrowski, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P. -O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Noel, A. Priyana; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Remy, Q.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Sahakian, V.; Sailer, S.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Scalici, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schutte, H. M.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Senniappan, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sinha, A.; Sol, H.; Specovius, A.; Spencer, S.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Tomankova, L.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Watson, J.; Werner, F.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Yang, R.; Yoneda, H.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zorn, J.; Zywucka, N.
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, 3 tables, in press with A&A
Submitted: 2020-02-06
Aims. Colliding wind binary systems have long been suspected to be high-energy (HE; 100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) {\gamma}-ray emitters. {\eta} Car is the most prominent member of this object class and is confirmed to emit phase-locked HE {\gamma} rays from hundreds of MeV to ~100 GeV energies. This work aims to search for and characterise the very-high-energy (VHE; E >100 GeV) {\gamma}-ray emission from {\eta} Car around the last periastron passage in 2014 with the ground-based High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). Methods. The region around {\eta} Car was observed with H.E.S.S. between orbital phase p = 0.78 - 1.10, with a closer sampling at p {\approx} 0.95 and p {\approx} 1.10 (assuming a period of 2023 days). Optimised hardware settings as well as adjustments to the data reduction, reconstruction, and signal selection were needed to suppress and take into account the strong, extended, and inhomogeneous night sky background (NSB) in the {\eta} Car field of view. Tailored run-wise Monte-Carlo simulations (RWS) were required to accurately treat the additional noise from NSB photons in the instrument response functions. Results. H.E.S.S. detected VHE {\gamma}-ray emission from the direction of {\eta} Car shortly before and after the minimum in the X-ray light-curve close to periastron. Using the point spread function provided by RWS, the reconstructed signal is point-like and the spectrum is best described by a power law. The overall flux and spectral index in VHE {\gamma} rays agree within statistical and systematic errors before and after periastron. The {\gamma}-ray spectrum extends up to at least ~400 GeV. This implies a maximum magnetic field in a leptonic scenario in the emission region of 0.5 Gauss. No indication for phase-locked flux variations is detected in the H.E.S.S. data.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.05868  [pdf] - 2034524
H.E.S.S. and Fermi-LAT observations of PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 during its 2014 and 2017 periastron passages
Collaboration, H. E. S. S.; Abdalla, H.; Adam, R.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arcaro, C.; Armand, C.; Ashkar, H.; Backes, M.; Martins, V. Barbosa; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Berge, D.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bregeon, J.; Breuhaus, M.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Bylund, T.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chand, T.; Chandra, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Curyło, M.; Davids, I. D.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Dmytriiev, A.; Donath, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Eschbach, S.; Feijen, K.; Fegan, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Giunti, L.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M. -H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Huber, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Kluźniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kostunin, D.; Kreter, M.; Lamanna, G.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J. -P.; Leser, E.; Levy, C.; Lohse, T.; Lypova, I.; Mackey, J.; Majumdar, J.; Malyshev, D.; Malyshev, D.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mares, A.; Mariaud, C.; Martí-Devesa, G.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Meintjes, P. J.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Moore, C.; Moulin, E.; Muller, J.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Wilhelmi, E. de Ona; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P. -O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Noel, A. Priyana; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Remy, Q.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Sahakian, V.; Sailer, S.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schutte, H. M.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Senniappan, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sinha, A.; Sol, H.; Specovius, A.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Yang, R.; Yoneda, H.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zorn, J.; Żywucka, N.; Bordas, P.
Comments: 16 pages, 7 figures Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-12-12
PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 is a gamma-ray binary system consisting of a pulsar in an eccentric orbit around a bright Oe stellar-type companion star that features a dense circumstellar disc. The high- and very-high-energy (HE, VHE) gamma-ray emission from PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 around the times of its periastron passage are characterised, in particular, at the time of the HE gamma-ray flares reported to have occurred in 2011, 2014, and 2017. Spectra and light curves were derived from observations conducted with the H.E.S.S.-II array in 2014 and 2017. A local double-peak profile with asymmetric peaks in the VHE light curve is measured, with a flux minimum at the time of periastron $t_p$ and two peaks coinciding with the times at which the neutron star crosses the companion's circumstellar disc ($\sim t_p \pm 16$ d). A high VHE gamma-ray flux is also observed at the times of the HE gamma-ray flares ($\sim t_p + 30$ d) and at phases before the first disc crossing ($\sim t_p - 35$ d). PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 displays periodic flux variability at VHE gamma-rays without clear signatures of super-orbital modulation in the time span covered by H.E.S.S. observations. In contrast, the photon index of the measured power-law spectra remains unchanged within uncertainties for about 200 d around periastron. Lower limits on exponential cut-off energies up to $\sim 40$ TeV are placed. At HE gamma-rays, PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 has now been detected also before and after periastron, close to the disc crossing times. Repetitive flares with distinct variability patterns are detected in this energy range. Such outbursts are not observed at VHEs, although a relatively high emission level is measured. The spectra obtained in both energy regimes displays a similar slope, although a common physical origin either in terms of a related particle population, emission mechanism, or emitter location is ruled out.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.11397  [pdf] - 2002920
Distances to Accreting X-ray pulsars: impact of the Gaia DR2
Comments: submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2018-06-29, last modified: 2019-11-24
A well constrained estimate of the distance remains one of the main factors to properly interpret the observations of accreting X-ray pulsars. Since these objects are typically well studied, multiple distance estimates obtained with different methods are available for many members of the class. Here we summarize all distance estimates published in the literature for a sample of Galactic X-ray pulsars, and compare them with direct distance measurements obtained by the Gaia mission. We conclude that the spread of distance values obtained for individual objects by the different conventional methods is usually larger than one might expect from the quoted individual uncertainties, such that Gaia values are in many cases a very useful additional information. For distances larger than 5 kpc, however, the uncertainties of all distance estimates (including those of Gaia) remain comparatively large, so conventional methods will likely retain their importance. We provide, therefore, an aposteriori estimate of the systematic uncertainty for each method based on the comparison with the more accurate Gaia distance measurements.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.08961  [pdf] - 2001505
A very-high-energy component deep in the Gamma-ray Burst afterglow
Arakawa, H. Abdalla R. Adam F. Aharonian F. Ait Benkhali E. O. Anguener M.; Arcaro, C.; Armand, C.; Ashkar, H.; Backes, M.; Martins, V. Barbosa; Becherini, M. Barnard Y.; Berge, D.; Bernloehr, K.; Bissaldi, E.; Blackwell, R.; Boettcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bregeon, J.; Breuhaus, M.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Buechele, M.; Bulik, T.; Bylund, T.; Capasso, M.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chand, T.; Chandra, S.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Curylo, M.; Davids, I. D.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Atai, A.; Dmytriiev, A.; Donath, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Eschbach, S.; Feijen, K.; Fegan, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Fuessling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gate, F.; Giavitto, G.; Giunti, L.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M. -H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Huber, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzynski, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Khangulyan, D.; Khelifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Kluzniak, W.; Komin, N.; Kosack, K.; Kostunin, D.; Kreter, M.; Lamanna, G.; Lemiere, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J. -P.; Leser, E.; Levy, C.; Lohse, T.; Lypova, I.; Mackey, J.; Majumdar, J.; Malyshev, D.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mares, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marti-Devesa, G.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Meintjes, P. J.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Moore, C.; Moulin, E.; Muller, J.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; Brien, P. O; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Wilhelmi, E. de Ona; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P. -O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Noel, A. Priyana; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Puehlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Remy, Q.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Sahakian, V.; Sailer, S.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schuessler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schutte, H. M.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Senniappan, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sinha, A.; Sol, H.; Specovius, A.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voelk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Yang, R.; Yoneda, H.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Zywucka, N.; de Palma, F.; Axelsson, M.; Roberts, O. J.
Comments: Preprint version of Nature paper. Contacts: E.Ruiz-Velasco, F. Aharonian, E.Bissaldi, C.Hoischen, R.D Parsons, Q.Piel, A.Taylor, D.Khangulyan
Submitted: 2019-11-20
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are brief flashes of gamma rays, considered to be the most energetic explosive phenomena in the Universe. The emission from GRBs comprises a short (typically tens of seconds) and bright prompt emission, followed by a much longer afterglow phase. During the afterglow phase, the shocked outflow -- produced by the interaction between the ejected matter and the circumburst medium -- slows down, and a gradual decrease in brightness is observed. GRBs typically emit most of their energy via gamma-rays with energies in the kiloelectronvolt-to-megaelectronvolt range, but a few photons with energies of tens of gigaelectronvolts have been detected by space-based instruments. However, the origins of such high-energy (above one gigaelectronvolt) photons and the presence of very-high-energy (more than 100 gigaelectronvolts) emission have remained elussive. Here we report observations of very-high-energy emission in the bright GRB 180720B deep in the GRB afterglow -ten hours after the end of the prompt emission phase, when the X-ray flux had already decayed by four orders of magnitude. Two possible explanations exist for the observed radiation: inverse Compton emission and synchrotron emission of ultrarelativistic electrons. Our observations show that the energy fluxes in the X-ray and gamma-ray range and their photon indices remain comparable to each other throughout the afterglow. This discovery places distinct constraints on the GRB environment for both emission mechanisms, with the inverse Compton explanation alleviating the particle energy requirements for the emission observed at late times. The late timing of this detection has consequences for the future observations of GRBs at the highest energies.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.04761  [pdf] - 2038321
H.E.S.S. detection of very-high-energy gamma-ray emission from the quasar PKS 0736+017
Collaboration, H. E. S. S.; :; Abdalla, H.; Adam, R.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arcaro, C.; Armand, C.; Ashkar, H.; Backes, M.; Martins, V. Barbosa; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Berge, D.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bregeon, J.; Breuhaus, M.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Bylund, T.; Capasso, M.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chand, T.; Chandra, S.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Curylo, M.; Davids, I. D.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Dmytriiev, A.; Donath, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Eschbach, S.; Feijen, K.; Fegan, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M. -H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Huber, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzynski, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Kluzniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kostunin, D.; Kraus, M.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J. -P.; Leser, E.; Levy, C.; Lohse, T.; Lypova, I.; Mackey, J.; Majumdar, J.; Malyshev, D.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mares, A.; Mariaud, C.; Martí-Devesa, G.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Meintjes, P. J.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Muller, J.; Moore, C.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Wilhelmi, E. de Oña; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P. -O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Noel, A. Priyana; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Remy, Q.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schutte, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Senniappan, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sinha, A.; Sol, H.; Specovius, A.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Yang, R.; Yoneda, H.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Zywucka, N.; Smith, P. S.
Comments: In press in A&A. 13 pages, 5 figures. Abstract abridged
Submitted: 2019-11-12
Flat-spectrum radio-quasars (FSRQs) are rarely detected at very-high-energies (VHE; E>100 GeV) due to their low-frequency-peaked SEDs. At present, only 6 FSRQs are known to emit VHE photons, representing only 7% of the VHE extragalactic catalog. Following the detection of MeV-GeV gamma-ray flaring activity from the FSRQ PKS 0736+017 (z=0.189) with Fermi, the H.E.S.S. array of Cherenkov telescopes triggered ToO observations on February 18, 2015, with the goal of studying the gamma-ray emission in the VHE band. H.E.S.S. ToO observations were carried out during the nights of February 18, 19, 21, and 24, 2015. Together with Fermi-LAT, the multi-wavelength coverage of the flare includes Swift observations in soft-X-rays and optical/UV, and optical monitoring (photometry and spectro-polarimetry) by the Steward Observatory, the ATOM, the KAIT and the ASAS-SN telescope. VHE emission from PKS 0736+017 was detected with H.E.S.S. during the night of February 19, 2015, only. Fermi data indicate the presence of a gamma-ray flare, peaking at the time of the H.E.S.S. detection, with a flux doubling time-scale of around six hours. The gamma-ray flare was accompanied by at least a 1 mag brightening of the non-thermal optical continuum. No simultaneous observations at longer wavelengths are available for the night of the H.E.S.S. detection. The gamma-ray observations with H.E.S.S. and Fermi are used to put constraints on the location of the gamma-ray emitting region during the flare: it is constrained to be just outside the radius of the broad-line-region with a bulk Lorentz factor $\simeq 20$, or at the level of the radius of the dusty torus with Gamma > 60. PKS 0736+017 is the seventh FSRQ known to emit VHE photons and, at z=0.189, is the nearest so far. The location of the gamma-ray emitting region during the flare can be tightly constrained thanks to opacity, variability, and collimation arguments.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.01057  [pdf] - 2046304
First characterization of Swift J1845.7-0037 with NuSTAR
Comments: submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2019-11-04
The hard X-ray transient source Swift J1845.7-0037 was discovered in 2012 by Swift/BAT. However, at that time no dedicated observations of the source were performed. On Oct 2019 the source became active again, and X-ray pulsations with a period of ~199s were detected with Swift/XRT. This triggered follow-up observations with NuSTAR. Here we report on the timing and spectral analysis of the source properties using NuSTAR and Swift/XRT. The main goal was to confirm pulsations and search for possible cyclotron lines in the broadband spectrum of the source to probe its magnetic field. Despite highly significant pulsations with period of 207.379(2) were detected, no evidence for a cyclotron line was found in the spectrum of the source. We therefore discuss the strength of the magnetic field based on the source flux and the detection of the transition to the "cold-disc" accretion regime during the 2012 outburst. Our conclusion is that, most likely, the source is a highly magnetized neutron star with B 1e13G at a large distance of d~10 kpc. The latter one consistent with the non-detection of a cyclotron line in the NuSTAR energy band.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.03955  [pdf] - 1994294
Timing analysis of 2S 1417-624 observed with NICER and Insight-HXMT
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, 1 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-10-09
We present a study of timing properties of the accreting pulsar 2S 1417-624 observed during its 2018 outburst, based on Swift/BAT, Fermi/GBM, Insight-HXMT and NICER observations. We report a dramatic change of the pulse profiles with luminosity. The morphology of the profile in the range 0.2-10.0keV switches from double to triple peaks at $\sim2.5$ $\rm \times 10^{37}{\it D}_{10}^2\ erg\ s^{-1}$ and from triple to quadruple peaks at $\sim7$ $\rm \times 10^{37}{\it D}_{10}^2\ erg\ s^{-1}$. The profile at high energies (25-100keV) shows significant evolutions as well. We explain this phenomenon according to existing theoretical models. We argue that the first change is related to the transition from the sub to the super-critical accretion regime, while the second to the transition of the accretion disc from the gas-dominated to the radiation pressure-dominated state. Considering the spin-up as well due to the accretion torque, this interpretation allows to estimate the magnetic field self-consistently at $\sim7\times 10^{12}$G.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.12614  [pdf] - 1994265
Hot disk of the Swift J0243.6+6124 revealed by Insight-HXMT
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-09-27
We report on analysis of observations of the bright transient X-ray pulsar \src obtained during its 2017-2018 giant outburst with Insight-HXMT, \emph{NuSTAR}, and \textit{Swift} observatories. We focus on the discovery of a sharp state transition of the timing and spectral properties of the source at super-Eddington accretion rates, which we associate with the transition of the accretion disk to a radiation pressure dominated (RPD) state, the first ever directly observed for magnetized neutron star. This transition occurs at slightly higher luminosity compared to already reported transition of the source from sub- to super-critical accretion regime associate with onset of an accretion column. We argue that this scenario can only be realized for comparatively weakly magnetized neutron star, not dissimilar to other ultra-luminous X-ray pulsars (ULPs), which accrete at similar rates. Further evidence for this conclusion is provided by the non-detection of the transition to the propeller state in quiescence which strongly implies compact magnetosphere and thus rules out magnetar-like fields.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.09494  [pdf] - 1965710
Resolving the Crab pulsar wind nebula at teraelectronvolt energies
Collaboration, H. E. S. S.; Abdalla, H.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arcaro, C.; Arm, C.; Backes, M.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Bylund, T.; Capasso, M.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Ch, T.; Ch, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Condon, B.; Davids, I. D.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Dmytriiev, A.; Donath, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Eschbach, S.; Fegan, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M. -H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Huber, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Kluźniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kraus, M.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J. -P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Malyshev, D.; Mar, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Martí-Devesa, G.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Meintjes, P. J.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Moore, C.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P. -O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Noel, A. Priyana; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schutte, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Senniappan, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sinha, A.; Sol, H.; Specovius, A.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J. -P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Yang, R.; Yoneda, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Żywucka, N.
Comments: 23 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2019-09-20, last modified: 2019-09-23
The Crab nebula is one of the most studied cosmic particle accelerators, shining brightly across the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to very high-energy gamma rays. It is known from radio to gamma-ray observations that the nebula is powered by a pulsar, which converts most of its rotational energy losses into a highly relativistic outflow. This outflow powers a pulsar wind nebula (PWN), a region of up to 10~light-years across, filled with relativistic electrons and positrons. These particles emit synchrotron photons in the ambient magnetic field and produce very high-energy gamma rays by Compton up-scattering of ambient low-energy photons. While the synchrotron morphology of the nebula is well established, it was up to now not known in which region the very high-energy gamma rays are emitted. Here we report that the Crab nebula has an angular extension at gamma-ray energies of 52 arcseconds (assuming a Gaussian source width), significantly larger than at X-ray energies. This result closes a gap in the multi-wavelength coverage of the nebula, revealing the emission region of the highest energy gamma rays. These gamma rays are a new probe of a previously inaccessible electron and positron energy range. We find that simulations of the electromagnetic emission reproduce our new measurement, providing a non-trivial test of our understanding of particle acceleration in the Crab nebula.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.12923  [pdf] - 1958234
NuSTAR observations of the wind-fed X-ray pulsar GX 301--2 during an unusual spin-up event
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-07-30
We report on \textit{NuSTAR} observations of the well-known wind-accreting X-ray pulsar \source\ during a strong spin-up episode that took place in January-March 2019. A high luminosity of the source in a most recent observation allowed us to detect a positive correlation of the cyclotron line energy with luminosity. Beyond that, only minor differences in spectral and temporal properties of the source during the spin-up, presumably associated with the formation of a transient accretion disk, and the normal wind-fed state could be detected. We finally discuss conditions for the formation of the disk and possible reasons for lack of any appreciable variations in most of the observed source properties induced by the change of the accretion mechanism, and conclude that the bulk of the observed X-ray emission is still likely powered by direct accretion from the wind.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.10190  [pdf] - 1922531
The X-ray Polarization Probe mission concept
Jahoda, Keith; Krawczynski, Henric; Kislat, Fabian; Marshall, Herman; Okajima, Takashi; Agudo, Ivan; Angelini, Lorella; Bachetti, Matteo; Baldini, Luca; Baring, Matthew; Baumgartner, Wayne; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Bianchi, Stefano; Bucciantini, Niccolo; Caiazzo, Ilaria; Capitanio, Fiamma; Coppi, Paolo; Costa, Enrico; De Rosa, Alessandra; Del Monte, Ettore; Dexter, Jason; Di Gesu, Laura; Di Lalla, Niccolo; Doroshenko, Victor; Dovciak, Michal; Ferrazzoli, Riccardo; Fuerst, Felix; Garner, Alan; Ghosh, Pranab; Gonzalez-Caniulef, Denis; Grinberg, Victoria; Gunji, Shuichi; Hartman, Dieter; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Heyl, Jeremy; Hill, Joanne; Ingram, Adam; Iwakiri, Wataru Buz; Jorstad, Svetlana; Kaaret, Phil; Kallman, Timothy; Karas, Vladimir; Khabibullin, Ildar; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Liodakis, Yannis; Maccarone, Thomas; Manfreda, Alberto; Marin, Frederic; Marinucci, Andrea; Markwardt, Craig; Marscher, Alan; Matt, Giorgio; McConnell, Mark; Miller, Jon; Mitsubishi, Ikuyuki; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mushtukov, Alexander; Ng, Stephen; Nowak, Michael; O'Dell, Steve; Papitto, Alessandro; Pasham, Dheeraj; Pearce, Mark; Peirson, Lawrence; Perri, Matteo; Rollins, Melissa Pesce; Petrosian, Vahe; Petrucci, Pierre-Olivier; Pilia, Maura; Possenti, Andrea; Poutanen, Juri; Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Puccetti, Simonetta; Salmi, Tuomo; Shi, Kevin; Soffita, Paolo; Spandre, Gloria; Steiner, Jack; Strohmayer, Tod; Suleimanov, Valery; Svoboda, Jiri; Swank, Jean; Tamagawa, Toru; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Taverna, Roberto; Tomsick, John; Trois, Alessio; Tsygankov, Sergey; Turolla, Roberto; Vink, Jacco; Wilms, Joern; Wu, Kinwah; Xie, Fei; Younes, George; Zaino, Alessandra; Zajczyk, Anna; Zane, Silvia; Zdziarski, Andrzej; Zhang, Haocheng; Zhang, Wenda; Zhou, Ping
Comments: submitted to Astrophysics Decadal Survey as a State of the Profession white paper
Submitted: 2019-07-23
The X-ray Polarization Probe (XPP) is a second generation X-ray polarimeter following up on the Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE). The XPP will offer true broadband polarimetery over the wide 0.2-60 keV bandpass in addition to imaging polarimetry from 2-8 keV. The extended energy bandpass and improvements in sensitivity will enable the simultaneous measurement of the polarization of several emission components. These measurements will give qualitatively new information about how compact objects work, and will probe fundamental physics, i.e. strong-field quantum electrodynamics and strong gravity.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.01938  [pdf] - 1915952
Insight-HXMT observations of Swift J0243.6+6124 during its 2017-2018 outburst
Comments: published
Submitted: 2019-06-05, last modified: 2019-07-14
The recently discovered neutron star transient Swift J0243.6+6124 has been monitored by {\it the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope} ({\it Insight-\rm HXMT). Based on the obtained data, we investigate the broadband spectrum of the source throughout the outburst. We estimate the broadband flux of the source and search for possible cyclotron line in the broadband spectrum. No evidence of line-like features is, however, found up to $\rm 150~keV$. In the absence of any cyclotron line in its energy spectrum, we estimate the magnetic field of the source based on the observed spin evolution of the neutron star by applying two accretion torque models. In both cases, we get consistent results with $B\rm \sim 10^{13}~G$, $D\rm \sim 6~kpc$ and peak luminosity of $\rm >10^{39}~erg~s^{-1}$ which makes the source the first Galactic ultraluminous X-ray source hosting a neutron star.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.04996  [pdf] - 1916969
Constraints on the emission region of 3C 279 during strong flares in 2014 and 2015 through VHE gamma-ray observations with H.E.S.S
Collaboration, H. E. S. S.; Abdalla, H.; Adam, R.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arcaro, C.; Armand, C.; Ashkar, H.; Backes, M.; Martins, V. Barbosa; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Berge, D.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bregeon, J.; Breuhaus, M.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Bylund, T.; Capasso, M.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chand, T.; Chandra, S.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Curylo, M.; Davids, I. D.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Atai, A.; Dmytriiev, A.; Donath, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Eschbach, S.; Feijen, K.; Fegan, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gate, F.; Giavitto, G.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M. -H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Huber, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzynski, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Khangulyan, D.; Khelifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Kluzniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kostunin, D.; Kraus, M.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lemiere, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J. -P.; Leser, E.; Levy, C.; Lohse, T.; Lypova, I.; Mackey, J.; Majumdar, J.; Malyshev, D.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mares, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marti-Devesa, G.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Meintjes, P. J.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Moore, C.; Moulin, E.; Muller, J.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Wilhelmi, E. de Ona; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P. -O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Noel, A. Priyana; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Remy, Q.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schutte, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Senniappan, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sinha, A.; Sol, H.; Specovius, A.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Yang, R.; Yoneda, H.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Zywucka, N.; Meyer, M.
Comments: 20 pages, 12 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2019-06-12
The flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 is known to exhibit pronounced variability in the high-energy ($100\,$MeV$<E<100\,$GeV) $\gamma$-ray band, which is continuously monitored with Fermi-LAT. During two periods of high activity in April 2014 and June 2015 Target-of-Opportunity observations were undertaken with H.E.S.S. in the very-high-energy (VHE, $E>100\,$GeV) $\gamma$-ray domain. While the observation in 2014 provides an upper limit, the observation in 2015 results in a signal with $8.7\,\sigma$ significance above an energy threshold of $66\,$GeV. No VHE variability has been detected during the 2015 observations. The VHE photon spectrum is soft and described by a power-law index of $4.2\pm 0.3$. The H.E.S.S. data along with a detailed and contemporaneous multiwavelength data set provide constraints on the physical parameters of the emission region. The minimum distance of the emission region from the central black hole is estimated using two plausible geometries of the broad-line region and three potential intrinsic spectra. The emission region is confidently placed at $r\gtrsim 1.7\times10^{17}\,$cm from the black hole, i.e., beyond the assumed distance of the broad-line region. Time-dependent leptonic and lepto-hadronic one-zone models are used to describe the evolution of the 2015 flare. Neither model can fully reproduce the observations, despite testing various parameter sets. Furthermore, the H.E.S.S. data are used to derive constraints on Lorentz invariance violation given the large redshift of 3C 279.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.09496  [pdf] - 1894383
Cyclotron emission, absorption, and the two faces of X-ray pulsar A 0535+262
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, accepted by MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2019-05-23
Deep NuSTAR observation of X-ray pulsar A 0535+262, performed at a very low luminosity of $\sim7\times10^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$, revealed the presence of two spectral components. We argue that the high-energy component is associated with cyclotron emission from recombination of electrons collisionally excited to the upper Landau levels. The cyclotron line energy of $E_{\rm cyc}=47.7\pm0.8$ keV was measured at the luminosity of almost an order of magnitude lower than what was achieved before. The data firmly exclude a positive correlation of the cyclotron energy with the mass accretion rate in this source.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.05593  [pdf] - 1905825
Evidence for the radiation-pressure dominated accretion disk in bursting pulsar GRO J1744-28 using timing analysis
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2019-05-14
The X-ray pulsar GRO J1744-28 is a unique source which shows both pulsations and type-II X-ray bursts, allowing studies of the interaction of the accretion disk with the magnetosphere at huge mass accretion rates exceeding $10^{19}$ g s$^{-1}$ during its super-Eddington outbursts. The magnetic field strength in the source, $B\approx 5\times 10^{11}$ G, is known from the cyclotron absorption feature discovered in the energy spectrum around 4.5 keV. Here, we explore the flux variability of the source in context of interaction of its magnetosphere with the radiation-pressure dominated accretion disk. Particularly, we present the results of the analysis of noise power density spectra (PDS) using the observations of the source in 1996-1997 by RXTE. Accreting compact objects commonly exhibit a broken power-law shape of the PDS with a break corresponding to the Keplerian orbital frequency of matter at the innermost disk radius. The observed frequency of the break can thus be used to estimate the size of the magnetosphere. We found, however, that the observed PDS of GRO J1744-28 differs dramatically from the canonical shape. Furthermore, the observed break frequency appears to be significantly higher than what is expected based on the magnetic field estimated from the cyclotron line energy. We argue that these observational facts can be attributed to the existence of the radiation-pressure dominated region in the accretion disk at luminosities above $\sim$2$\times 10^{37}$ erg s$^{-1}$. We discuss a qualitative model for the PDS formation in such disks, and show that its predictions are consistent with our observational findings. The presence of the radiation-pressure dominated region can also explain the observed weak luminosity-dependence of the inner radius, and we argue that the small inner radius can be explained by a quadrupole component dominating the magnetic field of the neutron star.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.10526  [pdf] - 1901900
Upper Limits on Very-High-Energy Gamma-ray Emission from Core-Collapse Supernovae Observed with H.E.S.S
Collaboration, H. E. S. S.; :; Abdalla, H.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arcaro, C.; Armand, C.; Ashkar, H.; Backes, M.; Martins, V. Barbosa; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Berge, D.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bregeon, J.; Breuhaus, M.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Bylund, T.; Capasso, M.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chand, T.; Chandra, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Curylo, M.; Davids, I. D.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Dmytriiev, A.; Donath, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Eschbach, S.; Feijen, K.; Fegan, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M. -H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Huber, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzynski, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Kluźniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kostunin, D.; Kraus, M.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J. -P.; Leser, E.; Levy, C.; Lohse, T.; Lypova, I.; Mackey, J.; Majumdar, J.; Malyshev, D.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mares, A.; Mariaud, C.; Martí-Devesa, G.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Meintjes, P. J.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Muller, J.; Moore, C.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Wilhelmi, E. de Ona; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P. -O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Noel, A. Priyana; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Remy, Q.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schutte, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Senniappan, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sinha, A.; Sol, H.; Specovius, A.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Yang, R.; Yoneda, H.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Żywucka, N.; Maxted, Nigel
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-04-23
Young core-collapse supernovae with dense-wind progenitors may be able to accelerate cosmic-ray hadrons beyond the knee of the cosmic-ray spectrum, and this may result in measurable gamma-ray emission. We searched for gamma-ray emission from ten supernovae observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) within a year of the supernova event. Nine supernovae were observed serendipitously in the H.E.S.S. data collected between December 2003 and December 2014, with exposure times ranging from 1.4 hours to 53 hours. In addition we observed SN 2016adj as a target of opportunity in February 2016 for 13 hours. No significant gamma-ray emission has been detected for any of the objects, and upper limits on the $>1$ TeV gamma-ray flux of the order of $\sim$10$^{-13}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ are established, corresponding to upper limits on the luminosities in the range $\sim$2 $\times$ 10$^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$ to $\sim$1 $\times$ 10$^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$. These values are used to place model-dependent constraints on the mass-loss rates of the progenitor stars, implying upper limits between $\sim$2 $\times 10^{-5}$ and $\sim$2 $\times 10^{-3}$M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$ under reasonable assumptions on the particle acceleration parameters.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.05139  [pdf] - 1878829
H.E.S.S. observations of the flaring gravitationally lensed galaxy PKS 1830-211
Collaboration, H. E. S. S.; :; Abdalla, H.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Anguener, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arcaro, C.; Armand, C.; Arrieta, M.; Backes, M.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernloehr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Boettcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Buchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Bylund, T.; Capasso, M.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chand, T.; Chandra, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Condon, B.; Davids, I. D.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Atai, A.; Dmytriiev, A.; Donath, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Eschbach, S.; Fegan, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Fuessling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M. -H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Huber, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzynski, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Kluzniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kraus, M.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J. -P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lopez-Coto, R.; Lorentz, M.; Lypova, I.; Malyshev, D.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marti-Devesa, G.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Meintjes, P. J.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Moore, C.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P. -O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Noel, A. Priyana; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Puehlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schuessler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schutte, H; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Senniappan, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sinha, A.; Sol, H.; Specovius, A.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J. -P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Voelk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Yang, R.; Yoneda, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Zywucka, N.
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-04-10
PKS 1830-211 is a known macrolensed quasar located at a redshift of z=2.5. Its high-energy gamma-ray emission has been detected with the Fermi-LAT instrument and evidence for lensing was obtained by several authors from its high-energy data. Observations of PKS 1830-211 were taken with the H.E.S.S. array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes in August 2014, following a flare alert by the Fermi- LAT collaboration. The H.E.S.S observations were aimed at detecting a gamma-ray flare delayed by 20-27 days from the alert flare, as expected from observations at other wavelengths. More than twelve hours of good quality data were taken with an analysis threshold of $\sim67$ GeV. The significance of a potential signal is computed as a function of the date as well as the average significance over the whole period. Data are compared to simultaneous observations by Fermi-LAT. No photon excess or significant signal is detected. An upper limit on PKS 1830-211 flux above 67 GeV is computed and compared to the extrapolation of the Fermi-LAT flare spectrum.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.05153  [pdf] - 1834324
GROJ1750-27: a neutron star far behind the Galactic Center switching into the propeller regime
Comments: 8 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-02-13
We report on analysis of properties of the X-ray binary pulsar GROJ1750-27 based on X-ray (Chandra, Swift, and Fermi/GBM), and near-infrared (VVV and UKIDSS surveys) observations. An accurate position of the source is determined for the first time and used to identify its infrared counterpart. Based on the VVV data we investigate the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the companion, taking into account a non-standard absorption law in the source direction. A comparison of this SED with those of known Be/X-ray binaries and early type stars has allowed us to estimate a lower distance limit to the source at $>12$ kpc. An analysis of the observed spin-up torque during a giant outburst in 2015 provides an independent distance estimate of $14-22$ kpc, and also allows to estimate the magnetic field on the surface of the neutron star at $B\simeq(3.5-4.5)\times10^{12}$ G. The latter value is in agreement with the possible transition to the propeller regime, a strong hint for which was revealed by Swift/XRT and Chandra. We conclude that GROJ1750-27 is located far behind the Galactic Center, which makes it one of the furthest Galactic X-ray binaries known.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.13307  [pdf] - 1806170
Dramatic spectral transition of X-ray pulsar GX 304-1 in low luminous state
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures, accepted by MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2018-10-31, last modified: 2018-12-20
We report on the discovery of a dramatic change in the energy spectrum of the X-ray pulsar GX 304-1 appearing at low luminosity. Particularly, we found that the cutoff power-law spectrum typical for accreting pulsars, including GX 304-1 at higher luminosities of $L_{\rm X}\sim 10^{36} - 10^{37}$ erg s$^{-1}$, transformed at lower luminosity of $L_{\rm X}\sim 10^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$ to a two-component spectrum peaking around 5 and 40 keV. We suggest that the observed transition corresponds to a change of the dominant mechanism responsible for the deceleration of the accretion flow. We argue that the accretion flow energy at low accretion rates is released in the atmosphere of the neutron star, and the low-energy component in the source spectrum corresponds to the thermal emission of the optically thick, heated atmospheric layers. The most plausible explanations for the high-energy component are either the cyclotron emission reprocessed by the magnetic Compton scattering or the thermal radiation of deep atmospheric layers partly Comptonized in the overheated upper layers. Alternative scenarios are also discussed.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.04460  [pdf] - 1796054
Physics and astrophysics of strong magnetic field systems with eXTP
Comments: Accepted for publication on Sci. China Phys. Mech. Astron. (2019)
Submitted: 2018-12-11
In this paper we present the science potential of the enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry (eXTP) mission for studies of strongly magnetized objects. We will focus on the physics and astrophysics of strongly magnetized objects, namely magnetars, accreting X-ray pulsars, and rotation powered pulsars. We also discuss the science potential of eXTP for QED studies. Developed by an international Consortium led by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the eXTP mission is expected to be launched in the mid 2020s.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.04023  [pdf] - 1795998
Observatory science with eXTP
Zand, Jean J. M. in 't; Bozzo, Enrico; Qu, Jinlu; Li, Xiang-Dong; Amati, Lorenzo; Chen, Yang; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Doroshenko, Victor; Drake, Stephen A.; Hernanz, Margarita; Jenke, Peter A.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Mahmoodifar, Simin; de Martino, Domitilla; De Rosa, Alessandra; Rossi, Elena M.; Rowlinson, Antonia; Sala, Gloria; Stratta, Giulia; Tauris, Thomas M.; Wilms, Joern; Wu, Xuefeng; Zhou, Ping; Agudo, Iván; Altamirano, Diego; Atteia, Jean-Luc; Andersson, Nils A.; Baglio, M. Cristina; Ballantyne, David R.; Baykal, Altan; Behar, Ehud; Belloni, Tomaso; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Bianchi, Stefano; Bilous, Anna; Blay, Pere; Braga, João; Brandt, Søren; Brown, Edward F.; Bucciantini, Niccolò; Burderi, Luciano; Cackett, Edward M.; Campana, Riccardo; Campana, Sergio; Casella, Piergiorgio; Cavecchi, Yuri; Chambers, Frank; Chen, Liang; Chen, Yu-Peng; Chenevez, Jérôme; Chernyakova, Maria; Chichuan, Jin; Ciolfi, Riccardo; Costantini, Elisa; Cumming, Andrew; D'Aı, Antonino; Dai, Zi-Gao; D'Ammando, Filippo; De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Degenaar, Nathalie; Del Santo, Melania; D'Elia, Valerio; Di Salvo, Tiziana; Doyle, Gerry; Falanga, Maurizio; Fan, Xilong; Ferdman, Robert D.; Feroci, Marco; Fraschetti, Federico; Galloway, Duncan K.; Gambino, Angelo F.; Gandhi, Poshak; Ge, Mingyu; Gendre, Bruce; Gill, Ramandeep; Götz, Diego; Gouiffès, Christian; Grandi, Paola; Granot, Jonathan; Güdel, Manuel; Heger, Alexander; Heinke, Craig O.; Homan, Jeroen; Iaria, Rosario; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Izzo, Luca; Ji, Long; Jonker, Peter G.; José, Jordi; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Kalemci, Emrah; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Keek, Laurens; Komossa, Stefanie; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kuiper, Lucien; Kunneriath, Devaky; Li, Gang; Liang, En-Wei; Linares, Manuel; Longo, Francesco; Lu, Fangjun; Lutovinov, Alexander A.; Malyshev, Denys; Malzac, Julien; Manousakis, Antonios; McHardy, Ian; Mehdipour, Missagh; Men, Yunpeng; Méndez, Mariano; Mignani, Roberto P.; Mikusincova, Romana; Miller, M. Coleman; Miniutti, Giovanni; Motch, Christian; Nättilä, Joonas; Nardini, Emanuele; Neubert, Torsten; O'Brien, Paul T.; Orlandini, Mauro; Osborne, Julian P.; Pacciani, Luigi; Paltani, Stéphane; Paolillo, Maurizio; Papadakis, Iossif E.; Paul, Biswajit; Pellizzoni, Alberto; Peretz, Uria; Torres, Miguel A. Pérez; Perinati, Emanuele; Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Reig, Pablo; Riggio, Alessandro; Rodriguez, Jerome; Rodrıguez-Gil, Pablo; Romano, Patrizia; Różańska, Agata; Sakamoto, Takanori; Salmi, Tuomo; Salvaterra, Ruben; Sanna, Andrea; Santangelo, Andrea; Savolainen, Tuomas; Schanne, Stéphane; Schatz, Hendrik; Shao, Lijing; Shearer, Andy; Shore, Steven N.; Stappers, Ben W.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Svoboda, Jirı; Thielemann, F. -K.; Tombesi, Francesco; Torres, Diego F.; Torresi, Eleonora; Turriziani, Sara; Vacchi, Andrea; Vercellone, Stefano; Vink, Jacco; Wang, Jian-Min; Wang, Junfeng; Watts, Anna L.; Weng, Shanshan; Weinberg, Nevin N.; Wheatley, Peter J.; Wijnands, Rudy; Woods, Tyrone E.; Woosley, Stan E.; Xiong, Shaolin; Xu, Yupeng; Yan, Zhen; Younes, George; Yu, Wenfei; Yuan, Feng; Zampieri, Luca; Zane, Silvia; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Xiao; Zingale, Michael
Comments: Accepted for publication on Sci. China Phys. Mech. Astron. (2019)
Submitted: 2018-12-10
In this White Paper we present the potential of the enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry (eXTP) mission for studies related to Observatory Science targets. These include flaring stars, supernova remnants, accreting white dwarfs, low and high mass X-ray binaries, radio quiet and radio loud active galactic nuclei, tidal disruption events, and gamma-ray bursts. eXTP will be excellently suited to study one common aspect of these objects: their often transient nature. Developed by an international Consortium led by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Science, the eXTP mission is expected to be launched in the mid 2020s.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.04020  [pdf] - 1795995
The enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry mission - eXTP
Zhang, ShuangNan; Santangelo, Andrea; Feroci, Marco; Xu, YuPeng; Lu, FangJun; Chen, Yong; Feng, Hua; Zhang, Shu; Brandt, Søren; Hernanz, Margarita; Baldini, Luca; Bozzo, Enrico; Campana, Riccardo; De Rosa, Alessandra; Dong, YongWei; Evangelista, Yuri; Karas, Vladimir; Meidinger, Norbert; Meuris, Aline; Nandra, Kirpal; Pan, Teng; Pareschi, Giovanni; Orleanski, Piotr; Huang, QiuShi; Schanne, Stephane; Sironi, Giorgia; Spiga, Daniele; Svoboda, Jiri; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Tenzer, Christoph; Vacchi, Andrea; Zane, Silvia; Walton, Dave; Wang, ZhanShan; Winter, Berend; Wu, Xin; Zand, Jean J. M. in 't; Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Ambrosi, Giovanni; Ambrosino, Filippo; Barbera, Marco; Basso, Stefano; Bayer, Jörg; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Bertucci, Bruna; Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Borghi, Giacomo; Cao, XueLei; Cadoux, Franck; Campana, Riccardo; Ceraudo, Francesco; Chen, TianXiang; Chen, YuPeng; Chevenez, Jerome; Civitani, Marta; Cui, Wei; Cui, WeiWei; Dauser, Thomas; Del Monte, Ettore; Di Cosimo, Sergio; Diebold, Sebastian; Doroshenko, Victor; Dovciak, Michal; Du, YuanYuan; Ducci, Lorenzo; Fan, QingMei; Favre, Yannick; Fuschino, Fabio; Gálvez, José Luis; Gao, Min; Ge, MingYu; Gevin, Olivier; Grassi, Marco; Gu, QuanYing; Gu, YuDong; Han, DaWei; Hong, Bin; Hu, Wei; Ji, Long; Jia, ShuMei; Jiang, WeiChun; Kennedy, Thomas; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kuvvetli, Irfan; Labanti, Claudio; Latronico, Luca; Li, Gang; Li, MaoShun; Li, Xian; Li, Wei; Li, ZhengWei; Limousin, Olivier; Liu, HongWei; Liu, XiaoJing; Lu, Bo; Luo, Tao; Macera, Daniele; Malcovati, Piero; Martindale, Adrian; Michalska, Malgorzata; Meng, Bin; Minuti, Massimo; Morbidini, Alfredo; Muleri, Fabio; Paltani, Stephane; Perinati, Emanuele; Picciotto, Antonino; Piemonte, Claudio; Qu, JinLu; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rashevskaya, Irina; Rodriguez, Jerome; Schanz, Thomas; Shen, ZhengXiang; Sheng, LiZhi; Song, JiangBo; Song, LiMing; Sgro, Carmelo; Sun, Liang; Tan, Ying; Uttley, Phil; Wang, Juan; Wang, LangPing; Wang, YuSa; Watts, Anna L.; Wen, XiangYang; Wilms, Jörn; Xiong, ShaoLin; Yang, JiaWei; Yang, Sheng; Yang, YanJi; Yu, Nian; Zhang, WenDa; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Zhang, AiMei; Zhang, ChengMo; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, XiaoLi; Zhang, ZiLiang; Zhao, BaoSheng; Zheng, ShiJie; Zhou, YuPeng; Zorzi, Nicola; Zwart, J. Frans
Comments: Accepted for publication on Sci. China Phys. Mech. Astron. (2019)
Submitted: 2018-12-10
In this paper we present the enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry mission - eXTP. eXTP is a space science mission designed to study fundamental physics under extreme conditions of density, gravity and magnetism. The mission aims at determining the equation of state of matter at supra-nuclear density, measuring effects of QED, and understanding the dynamics of matter in strong-field gravity. In addition to investigating fundamental physics, eXTP will be a very powerful observatory for astrophysics that will provide observations of unprecedented quality on a variety of galactic and extragalactic objects. In particular, its wide field monitoring capabilities will be highly instrumental to detect the electro-magnetic counterparts of gravitational wave sources. The paper provides a detailed description of: (1) the technological and technical aspects, and the expected performance of the instruments of the scientific payload; (2) the elements and functions of the mission, from the spacecraft to the ground segment.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.04021  [pdf] - 1795996
Dense matter with eXTP
Comments: Accepted for publication on Sci. China Phys. Mech. Astron. (2019)
Submitted: 2018-12-10
In this White Paper we present the potential of the Enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry (eXTP) mission for determining the nature of dense matter; neutron star cores host an extreme density regime which cannot be replicated in a terrestrial laboratory. The tightest statistical constraints on the dense matter equation of state will come from pulse profile modelling of accretion-powered pulsars, burst oscillation sources, and rotation-powered pulsars. Additional constraints will derive from spin measurements, burst spectra, and properties of the accretion flows in the vicinity of the neutron star. Under development by an international Consortium led by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Science, the eXTP mission is expected to be launched in the mid 2020s.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.12676  [pdf] - 1815018
Particle Transport within the Pulsar Wind Nebula HESS J1825-137
Collaboration, H. E. S. S.; Abdalla, H.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arcaro, C.; Armand, C.; Arrieta, M.; Backes, M.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Bylund, T.; Capasso, M.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chand, T.; Chandra, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Condon, B.; Davids, I. D.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Dmytriiev, A.; Donath, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Eschbach, S.; Fegan, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M. -H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Huber, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Kluźniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kraus, M.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J. -P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Malyshev, D.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Martí-Devesa, G.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Meintjes, P. J.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Moore, C.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P. -O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Noel, A. Priyana; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schutte, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Senniappan, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sinha, A.; Sol, H.; Specovius, A.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J. -P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Yang, R.; Yoneda, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Zywucka, N.
Comments: 20 pages, 10 figures, 5 tables, accepted for publication by Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2018-10-30, last modified: 2018-11-23
Aims: We present a detailed view of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) HESS J1825-137. We aim to constrain the mechanisms dominating the particle transport within the nebula, accounting for its anomalously large size and spectral characteristics. Methods: The nebula is studied using a deep exposure from over 12 years of H.E.S.S. I operation, together with data from H.E.S.S. II improving the low energy sensitivity. Enhanced energy-dependent morphological and spatially-resolved spectral analyses probe the Very High Energy (VHE, E > 0.1 TeV) gamma-ray properties of the nebula. Results: The nebula emission is revealed to extend out to 1.5 degrees from the pulsar, ~1.5 times further than previously seen, making HESS J1825--137, with an intrinsic diameter of ~100 pc, potentially the largest gamma-ray PWN currently known. Characterisation of the nebula's strongly energy-dependent morphology enables the particle transport mechanisms to be constrained. A dependence of the nebula extent with energy of R $\propto$ E^\alpha with \alpha = -0.29 +/- 0.04 (stat) +/- 0.05 (sys) disfavours a pure diffusion scenario for particle transport within the nebula. The total gamma-ray flux of the nebula above 1~TeV is found to be (1.12 +/- 0.03 (stat) +/- 0.25 (sys)) $\times 10^{-11}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, corresponding to ~64% of the flux of the Crab Nebula. Conclusions: HESS J1825-137 is a PWN with clear energy-dependent morphology at VHE gamma-ray energies. This source is used as a laboratory to investigate particle transport within middle-aged PWNe. Deep observations of this highly spatially-extended PWN enable a spectral map of the region to be produced, providing insights into the spectral variation within the nebula.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.08912  [pdf] - 1818769
Study of the X-ray pulsar IGR J19294+1816 with NuSTAR: detection of cyclotron line and transition to accretion from the cold disc
Comments: 7 pages, 8 figures, 2 tables; accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2018-11-21
In the work we present the results of two deep broad-band observations of the poorly studied X-ray pulsar IGR J19294+1816 obtained with the NuSTAR observatory. The source was observed during Type I outburst and in the quiescent state. In the bright state a cyclotron absorption line in the energy spectrum was discovered at $E_{\rm cyc}=42.8\pm0.7$ keV. Spectral and timing analysis prove the ongoing accretion also during the quiescent state of the source. Based on the long-term flux evolution, particularly on the transition of the source to the bright quiescent state with luminosity around $10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$, we concluded that IGR J19294+1816 switched to the accretion from the "cold" accretion disc between Type I outbursts. We also report the updated orbital period of the system.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.07654  [pdf] - 1815069
AGILE, Fermi, Swift, and GASP-WEBT multi-wavelength observations of the high-redshift blazar 4C $+$71.07 in outburst
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. 9 pages, 4 Figures, 3 Tables
Submitted: 2018-11-19
The flat-spectrum radio quasar 4C $+$71.07 is a high-redshift ($z=2.172$), $\gamma$-loud blazar whose optical emission is dominated by the thermal radiation from accretion disc. 4C $+$71.07 has been detected in outburst twice by the AGILE $\gamma$-ray satellite during the period end of October - mid November 2015, when it reached a $\gamma$-ray flux of the order of $F_{\rm E>100\,MeV} = (1.2 \pm 0.3)\times 10^{-6}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and $F_{\rm E>100\,MeV} = (3.1 \pm 0.6)\times 10^{-6}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, respectively, allowing us to investigate the properties of the jet and of the emission region. We investigated its spectral energy distribution by means of almost simultaneous observations covering the cm, mm, near-infrared, optical, ultra-violet, X-ray and $\gamma$-ray energy bands obtained by the GASP-WEBT Consortium, the Swift and the AGILE and Fermi satellites. The spectral energy distribution of the second $\gamma$-ray flare (the one whose energy coverage is more dense) can be modelled by means of a one-zone leptonic model, yielding a total jet power of about $4\times10^{47}$ erg s$^{-1}$. During the most prominent $\gamma$-ray flaring period our model is consistent with a dissipation region within the broad-line region. Moreover, this class of high-redshift, large-mass black-hole flat-spectrum radio quasars might be good targets for future $\gamma$-ray satellites such as e-ASTROGAM.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.01812  [pdf] - 1767735
Spectral and timing analysis of the bursting pulsar GRO J1744-28 with RXTE observations
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-10-03
We analyzed RXTE/PCA observations of the bursting pulsar GRO J1744-28 during its two outbursts in 1995-1997. We have found a significant transition, i.e., a sharp change, of both spectral and timing properties around a flux of $\rm 10^{-8}\ ergs\ cm^{-2}\ s^{-1}$ (3-30 keV), which corresponds to a luminosity of 2--8$\rm \times 10^{37}\ ergs\ s^{-1}$ for a distance of 4--8 kpc. We define the faint (bright) state when the flux is smaller (larger) than this threshold. In the faint state, the spectral hardness increases significantly with the increasing flux, while remaining almost constant in the bright state. In addition, we find that the pulsed fraction is positively related to both the flux and the energy (<30keV) in both states. Thanks to the very stable pulse profile shape in all energy bands, a hard X-ray lag could be measured. This lag is only significant in the faint state (reaching $\sim$ 20\,ms between 3-4 keV and 16-20 keV), and much smaller in the bright state ($\lesssim$2ms). We speculate that the discovered transition might be caused by changes of the accretion structure on the surface of the neutron star, and the hard X-ray lags are due to a geometry effect.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.00995  [pdf] - 1791093
Searches for gamma-ray lines and `pure WIMP' spectra from Dark Matter annihilations in dwarf galaxies with H.E.S.S
Collaboration, H. E. S. S.; :; Abdalla, H.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arcaro, C.; Armand, C.; Arrieta, M.; Backes, M.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Bylund, T.; Capasso, M.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chandra, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Condon, B.; Davids, I. D.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Dmytriiev, A.; Donath, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Eschbach, S.; Fegan, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M. -H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Huber, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Kluźniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J. -P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Malyshev, D.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Martí-Devesa, G.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Meintjes, P. J.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P. -O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Noel, A. Priyana; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Senniappan, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sinha, A.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Specovius, A.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J. -P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Yang, R.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Żywucka, N.; Cirelli, M.; Panci, P.; Sala, F.; Silk, J.; Taoso, M.
Comments: Accepted for publication in JCAP. 18 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-01
Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are among the most promising targets for detecting signals of Dark Matter (DM) annihilations. The H.E.S.S. experiment has observed five of these systems for a total of about 130 hours. The data are re-analyzed here, and, in the absence of any detected signals, are interpreted in terms of limits on the DM annihilation cross section. Two scenarios are considered: i) DM annihilation into mono-energetic gamma-rays and ii) DM in the form of pure WIMP multiplets that, annihilating into all electroweak bosons, produce a distinctive gamma-ray spectral shape with a high-energy peak at the DM mass and a lower-energy continuum. For case i), upper limits at 95\% confidence level of about $\langle \sigma v \rangle \lesssim 3 \times 10^{-25}$ cm$^3$ s$^{-1}$ are obtained in the mass range of 400 GeV to 1 TeV. For case ii), the full spectral shape of the models is used and several excluded regions are identified, but the thermal masses of the candidates are not robustly ruled out.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.05740  [pdf] - 1783906
Hard X-ray view on intermediate polars in the Gaia era
Comments: 14 pages, 16 figures, 4 tables, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-09-15
The hardness of the X-ray spectra of intermediate polars (IPs) is determined mainly by the white dwarf (WD) compactness (mass-radius ratio, M/R) and, thus, hard X-ray spectra can be used to constrain the WD mass. An accurate mass estimate requires the finite size of the WD magnetosphere R_m to be taken into the account. We suggested to derive it either directly from the observed break frequency in power spectrum of X-ray or optical lightcurves of a polar, or assuming the corotation. Here we apply this method to all IPs observed by NuSTAR (10 objects) and Swift/BAT (35 objects). For the dwarf nova GK Per we also observe a change of the break frequency with flux, which allows to constrain the dependence of the magnetosphere radius on the mass-accretion rate. For our analysis we calculated an additional grid of two-parameter (M and R_m/R) model spectra assuming a fixed, tall height of the accretion column H_sh/R=0.25, which is appropriate to determine WD masses in low mass-accretion IPs like EX\,Hya. Using the Gaia Data Release 2 we obtain for the first time reliable estimates of the mass-accretion rate and the magnetic field strength at the WD surface for a large fraction of objects in our sample. We find that most IPs accrete at rate of ~10^{-9} M_Sun/yr, and have magnetic fields in the range 1--10 MG. The resulting WD mass average of our sample is 0.79 +/- 0.16 M_Sun, which is consistent with earlier estimates.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.01302  [pdf] - 1790804
First Ground-based Measurement of Sub-20 GeV to 100 GeV $\gamma$-rays from the Vela Pulsar with H.E.S.S. II
Collaboration, H. E. S. S.; Abdalla, H.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arcaro, C.; Arm, C.; Arrieta, M.; Backes, M.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Bylund, T.; Capasso, M.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Ch, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Condon, B.; Davids, I. D.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Dmytriiev, A.; Donath, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Eschbach, S.; Fegan, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M. -H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Huber, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Kluźniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J. -P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Malyshev, D.; Mar, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Martí-Devesa, G.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Meintjes, P. J.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P. -O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Noel, A. Priyana; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Senniappan, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sinha, A.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Specovius, A.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J. -P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Yang, R.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Żywucka, N.; Kerr, M.; Johnston, S.; Shannon, R. M.
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. 16 Pages, 9 figures (slightly language edited version)
Submitted: 2018-07-03, last modified: 2018-07-24
We report on the measurement and investigation of pulsed high-energy $\gamma$-ray emission from the Vela pulsar, PSR B0833$-$45, based on 40.3 hours of observations with the largest telescope of H.E.S.S., CT5, in monoscopic mode, and on 8 years of data obtained with the Fermi-LAT. A dedicated very-low-threshold event reconstruction and analysis pipeline was developed and, together with the CT5 telescope response model, was validated using the Fermi-LAT data as reference. A pulsed $\gamma$-ray signal at a significance level of more than $15\sigma$ is detected from the P2 peak of the Vela pulsar light curve. Of a total of 15835 events, more than 6000 lie at an energy below 20 GeV, implying a significant overlap between H.E.S.S. II-CT5 and the Fermi-LAT. While the investigation of the pulsar light curve with the LAT confirms characteristics previously known up to 20 GeV, in the tens of GeV energy range, CT5 data show a change in the pulse morphology of P2, i.e., an extreme sharpening of its trailing edge, together with the possible onset of a new component at 3.4$\sigma$ significance level. Assuming a power-law model for the P2 spectrum, an excellent agreement is found for the photon indices ($\Gamma \simeq$ 4.1) obtained with the two telescopes above 10 GeV and an upper bound of 8% is derived on the relative offset between their energy scales. Using both instruments data, it is however shown that the spectrum of P2 in the 10-100 GeV has a pronounced curvature, i.e. a confirmation of the sub-exponential cutoff form found at lower energies with the LAT. This is further supported by the weak evidence for an emission above 100 GeV obtained with CT5. In contrast, converging indications are found from both CT5 and LAT data for the emergence of a hard component above 50 GeV in the leading wing (LW2) of P2, which possibly extends beyond 100 GeV.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.09946  [pdf] - 1705431
CXOU J160103.1-513353: another CCO with a carbon atmosphere?
Comments: accepted in A&A
Submitted: 2018-06-26
We report on the analysis of XMM-Newton observations of the central compact object CXOU J160103.1-513353 located in the center of the non-thermally emitting supernova remnant (SNR) G330.2+1.0. The X-ray spectrum of the source is well described with either single-component carbon or two-component hydrogen atmosphere models. In the latter case, the observed spectrum is dominated by the emission from a hot component with a temperature ~3.9MK, corresponding to the emission from a hotspot occupying ~1% of the stellar surface (assuming a neutron star with mass M = 1.5M$_\odot$, radius of 12 km, and distance of ~5 kpc as determined for the SNR). The statistics of the spectra and obtained upper limits on the pulsation amplitude expected for a rotating neutron star with hot spots do not allow us to unambiguously distinguish between these two scenarios. We discuss, however, that while the non-detection of the pulsations can be explained by the unfortunate orientation in CXOU J160103.1-513353, this is not the case when the entire sample of similar objects is considered. We therefore conclude that the carbon atmosphere scenario is more plausible.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.02283  [pdf] - 1713005
On the magnetic field of the first Galactic ultraluminous X-ray pulsar Swift J0243.6+6124
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2018-06-06, last modified: 2018-06-25
We report on the monitoring of the final stage of the outburst from the first Galactic ultraluminous X-ray pulsar Swift J0243.6+6124, which reached $\sim$40 Eddington luminosities at the peak of the outburst. The main aim of the monitoring program with the {\it Swift}/XRT telescope was to measure the magnetic field of the neutron star using the luminosity of transition to the "propeller" state. The visibility constraints, unfortunately, did not permit us to observe the source down to the fluxes low enough to detect such a transition. The tight upper limit on the propeller luminosity $L_{\rm prop}<6.8\times10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$ implies the dipole component of the magnetic field $B<10^{13}$ G, under plausible assumptions on the effective magnetosphere size. On the other hand, the observed evolution of the pulse profile and of the pulsed fraction with flux points to a change of the emission region geometry at the critical luminosity $L_{\rm crit}\sim3\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$ both in the rising and declining parts of the outburst. We associate the observed change with the onset of the accretion column, which allows us to get an independent estimate of the magnetic field strength close to the neutron stars surface of $B>10^{13}$ G. Given the existing uncertainty in the effective magnetosphere size, we conclude that both estimates are marginally compatible with each other.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.01349  [pdf] - 1648781
Changes in the cyclotron line energy on short and long timescales in V 0332+53
Comments: 7 pages, 7 figures; ; accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2018-01-04
We present the results of the pulse-amplitude-resolved spectroscopy of the accreting pulsar V 0332+53 using the NuSTAR observations of the source in 2015 and 2016. We investigate the dependence of the energy of the cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) as a function of X-ray luminosity on timescales comparable with the spin period of the pulsar within individual observations, and the behavior on longer timescales within and between the two observed outbursts. We confirm that in both cases the CRSF energy is negatively correlated with flux at luminosities higher than the critical luminosity and is positively correlated at lower luminosities. We also confirm the recently reported gradual decrease in the line energy during the giant outburst in 2015. Using the NuSTAR data, we find that this decrease was consistent with a linear decay throughout most of the outburst, and flattened or even reversed at the end of the 2015 outburst, approximately simultaneously with the transition to the subcritical regime. We also confirm that by the following outburst in 2016 the line energy rebounded to previous values. The observed behavior of the CRSF energy with time is discussed in terms of changes in the geometry of the CRSF forming region caused by changes in the effective magnetospheric radius.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.10912  [pdf] - 1690305
Orbit and intrinsic spin-up of the newly discovered transient X-ray pulsar Swift J0243.6+6124
Comments: accepted in A&A
Submitted: 2017-10-30, last modified: 2017-12-19
We present the orbital solution for the newly discovered transient Be X-ray binary Swift J0243.6+6124 based on the data from gamma-ray burst monitor onboard Fermi obtained during the Oct 2017 outburst. We model the Doppler induced and intrinsic spin variations of the neutron star assuming that the later is driven by accretion torque and discuss the implications of the observed spin variations for the parameters of the neutron star and the binary. In particular we conclude that the neutron star must be strongly magnetized, and estimate the distance to the source at $\sim$5 kpc.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.04528  [pdf] - 1593500
Stable accretion from a cold disc in highly magnetized neutron stars
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures, 1 table, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2017-03-13, last modified: 2017-09-28
The aim of this paper is to investigate the transition of a strongly magnetized neutron star into the accretion regime with very low accretion rate. For this purpose we monitored the Be-transient X-ray pulsar GRO J1008-57 throughout a full orbital cycle. The current observational campaign was performed with the Swift/XRT telescope in the soft X-ray band (0.5-10 keV) between two subsequent Type I outbursts in January and September 2016. The expected transition to the propeller regime was not observed. However, the transitions between different regimes of accretion were detected. In particular, after an outburst the source entered a stable accretion state characterised by the accretion rate of ~10^14-10^15 g/s. We associate this state with accretion from a cold (low-ionised) disc of temperature below ~6500 K. We argue that a transition to such accretion regime should be observed in all X-ray pulsars with certain combination of the rotation frequency and magnetic field strength. The proposed model of accretion from a cold disc is able to explain several puzzling observational properties of X-ray pulsars.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.04110  [pdf] - 1587072
XMM-Newton observations of the non-thermal supernova remnant HESS J1731-347 (G353.6-0.7)
Comments: 11 pages, accepted in A&A
Submitted: 2017-08-14
We report on the analysis of XMM-Newton observations of the non-thermal shell-type supernova remnant HESS J1731-347 (G353.6-0.7). For the first time the complete remnant shell has been covered in X-rays, which allowed direct comparison with radio and TeV observations. We carried out a spatially resolved spectral analysis of XMM-Newton data and confirmed the previously reported non-thermal power-law X-ray spectrum of the source with negligible variations of spectral index across the shell. On the other hand, the X-ray absorption column is strongly variable and correlates with the CO emission thus confirming that the absorbing material must be in the foreground and reinforcing the previously suggested lower limit on distance. Finally, we find that the X-ray emission of the remnant is suppressed towards the Galactic plane, which points to lower shock velocities in this region, likely due to the interaction of the shock with the nearby molecular cloud.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.00966  [pdf] - 1581374
SMC X-3: the closest ultraluminous X-ray source powered by a neutron star with non-dipole magnetic field
Comments: 8 pages, 9 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2017-02-03, last modified: 2017-06-19
Magnetic field of accreting neutron stars determines their overall behaviour including the maximum possible luminosity. Some models require an above-average magnetic field strength (> 10^13 G) in order to explain super-Eddington mass accretion rate in the recently discovered class of pulsating ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULX). The peak luminosity of SMC X-3 during its major outburst in 2016-2017 reached ~2.5x10^39 erg/s comparable to that in ULXs thus making this source the nearest ULX-pulsar. SMC X-3 belongs to the class of transient X-ray pulsars with Be optical companions, and exhibited a giant outburst in July 2016 - February 2017. The source has been observed during the entire outburst with the Swift/XRT and Fermi/GBM telescopes, as well as the NuSTAR observatory. Collected data allowed us to estimate the magnetic field strength of the neutron star in SMC X-3 using several independent methods. Spin evolution of the source during and between the outbursts and the luminosity of the transition to so-called propeller regime in the range of (0.3 - 7)x10^35 erg/s imply relatively weak dipole field of (1 - 5)x10^12 G. On the other hand, there is also evidence for much stronger field in the immediate vicinity of the neutron star surface. In particular, transition from super- to sub-critical accretion regime associated with cease of the accretion column, absence of cyclotron absorption features in the broadband X-ray spectrum of the source obtained with NuSTAR and very high peak luminosity favor an order of magnitude stronger field. This discrepancy makes SMC X-3 a good candidate to posses significant non-dipolar components of the field, and an intermediate source between classical X-ray pulsars and accreting magnetars which may constitute an appreciable fraction of ULX population.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.03805  [pdf] - 1554026
BeppoSAX observations of XTE J1946+274
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-02-13
We report on the BeppoSAX monitoring of a giant outburst of the transient X-ray pulsar XTE J1946+274 in 1998. The source was detected with a flux of ~ 4 x 10^(-9) erg cm^(-2) s^(-1) (in 0.1 - 120 keV range). The broadband spectrum, typical for accreting pulsars, is well described by a cutoff power law with a cyclotron resonance scattering feature (CRSF) at ~ 38 keV. This value is consistent with earlier reports based on the observations with Suzaku at factor of ten lower luminosity, which implies that the feature is formed close to the neutron star surface rather than in the accretion column. Pulsations with P ~ 15.82 s were observed up to ~ 70 keV. The pulse profile strongly depends on energy and is characterised by a "soft" and a "hard" peaks shifted by half period, which suggests a strong phase dependence of the spectrum, and that two components with roughly orthogonal beam patterns are responsible for the observed pulse shape. This conclusion is supported by the fact that the CRSF, despite its relatively high energy, is only detected in the spectrum of the soft peak of the pulse profile. Along with the absence of correlation of the line energy with luminosity, this could be explained in the framework of the recently proposed "reflection" model for CRSF formation. However more detailed modelling of both line and continuum formation are required to confirm this interpretation.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.03933  [pdf] - 1531030
Luminosity dependence of the cyclotron line and evidence for the accretion regime transition in V 0332+53
Comments: added journal reference&doi for proper indexing
Submitted: 2016-07-13, last modified: 2017-01-31
We report on the analysis of NuSTAR observations of the Be-transient X-ray pulsar V 0332+53 during the giant outburst in 2015 and another minor outburst in 2016. We confirm the cyclotron-line energy-luminosity correlation previously reported in the source and the line energy decrease during the giant outburst. Based on 2016 observations, we find that a year later the line energy has increased again essentially reaching the pre-outburst values. We discuss this behaviour and conclude that it is likely caused by a change of the emission region geometry rather than previously suggested accretion-induced decay of the neutron stars magnetic field. At lower luminosities, we find for the first time a hint of departure from the anticorrelation of line energy with flux, which we interpret as a transition from super- to sub-critical accretion associated with the disappearance of the accretion column. Finally, we confirm and briefly discuss the orbital modulation observed in the outburst light curve of the source.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.01378  [pdf] - 1510390
Optical and near-infrared photometric monitoring of the transient X-ray binary A0538-66 with REM
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-10-05
The transient Be/X-ray binary A0538-66 shows peculiar X-ray and optical variability. Despite numerous studies, the intrinsic properties underlying its anomalous behaviour remain poorly understood. Since 2014 September we are conducting the first quasi-simultaneous optical and near-infrared photometric monitoring of A0538-66 in seven filters with the Rapid Eye Mount (REM) telescope, aiming to understand the properties of this binary system. We found that the REM lightcurves show fast flares lasting one or two days that repeat almost regularly every ~16.6 days, the orbital period of the neutron star. If the optical flares are powered by X-ray outbursts through photon reprocessing, the REM lightcurves indicate that A0538-66 is still active in X-rays: bright X-ray flares (L_x > 1E37 erg/s) could be observable during the periastron passages. The REM lightcurves show a long-term variability that is especially pronounced in the g band and decreases with increasing wavelength, until it no longer appears in the near-infrared lightcurves. In addition, A0538-66 is fainter with respect to previous optical observations most likely due to the higher absorption of the stellar radiation of a denser circumstellar disc. On the basis of the current models, we interpret these observational results with a circumstellar disc around the Be star observed nearly edge-on during a partial depletion phase. The REM lightcurves also show short-term variability on timescales of ~1 day possibly indicative of perturbations in the density distribution of the circumstellar disc caused by the tidal interaction with the neutron star.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.08823  [pdf] - 1521272
eXTP -- enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry Mission
Zhang, S. N.; Feroci, M.; Santangelo, A.; Dong, Y. W.; Feng, H.; Lu, F. J.; Nandra, K.; Wang, Z. S.; Zhang, S.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; De Rosa, A.; Gou, L. J.; Hernanz, M.; van der Klis, M.; Li, X. D.; Liu, Y.; Orleanski, P.; Pareschi, G.; Pohl, M.; Poutanen, J.; Qu, J. L.; Schanne, S.; Stella, L.; Uttley, P.; Watts, A.; Xu, R. X.; Yu, W. F.; Zand, J. J. M. in 't; Zane, S.; Alvarez, L.; Amati, L.; Baldini, L.; Bambi, C.; Basso, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Belloni, T.; Bellutti, P.; Bianchi, S.; Brez, A.; Bursa, M.; Burwitz, V.; Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Caiazzo, I.; Campana, R.; Cao, X. L.; Casella, P.; Chen, C. Y.; Chen, L.; Chen, T. X.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. P.; Civitani, M.; Zelati, F. Coti; Cui, W.; Cui, W. W.; Dai, Z. G.; Del Monte, E.; De Martino, D.; Di Cosimo, S.; Diebold, S.; Dovciak, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Doroshenko, V.; Esposito, P.; Evangelista, Y.; Favre, Y.; Friedrich, P.; Fuschino, F.; Galvez, J. L.; Gao, Z. L.; Ge, M. Y.; Gevin, O.; Goetz, D.; Han, D. W.; Heyl, J.; Horak, J.; Hu, W.; Huang, F.; Huang, Q. S.; Hudec, R.; Huppenkothen, D.; Israel, G. L.; Ingram, A.; Karas, V.; Karelin, D.; Jenke, P. A.; Ji, L.; Kennedy, T.; Korpela, S.; Kunneriath, D.; Labanti, C.; Li, G.; Li, X.; Li, Z. S.; Liang, E. W.; Limousin, O.; Lin, L.; Ling, Z. X.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, Z.; Lu, B.; Lund, N.; Lai, D.; Luo, B.; Luo, T.; Ma, B.; Mahmoodifar, S.; Marisaldi, M.; Martindale, A.; Meidinger, N.; Men, Y. P.; Michalska, M.; Mignani, R.; Minuti, M.; Motta, S.; Muleri, F.; Neilsen, J.; Orlandini, M.; Pan, A T.; Patruno, A.; Perinati, E.; Picciotto, A.; Piemonte, C.; Pinchera, M.; Rachevski, A.; Rapisarda, M.; Rea, N.; Rossi, E. M. R.; Rubini, A.; Sala, G.; Shu, X. W.; Sgro, C.; Shen, Z. X.; Soffitta, P.; Song, L. M.; Spandre, G.; Stratta, G.; Strohmayer, T. E.; Sun, L.; Svoboda, J.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tenzer, C.; Tong, H.; Taverna, R.; Torok, G.; Turolla, R.; Vacchi, A.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. X.; Walton, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, J. F.; Wang, R. J.; Wang, Y. F.; Weng, S. S.; Wilms, J.; Winter, B.; Wu, X.; Wu, X. F.; Xiong, S. L.; Xu, Y. P.; Xue, Y. Q.; Yan, Z.; Yang, S.; Yang, X.; Yang, Y. J.; Yuan, F.; Yuan, W. M.; Yuan, Y. F.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zdziarski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, W. D.; Zheng, S. J.; Zhou, P.; Zhou, X. L.
Comments: 16 pages, 16 figures. Oral talk presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation, June 26 to July 1, 2016, Edingurgh, UK
Submitted: 2016-07-29
eXTP is a science mission designed to study the state of matter under extreme conditions of density, gravity and magnetism. Primary targets include isolated and binary neutron stars, strong magnetic field systems like magnetars, and stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. The mission carries a unique and unprecedented suite of state-of-the-art scientific instruments enabling for the first time ever the simultaneous spectral-timing-polarimetry studies of cosmic sources in the energy range from 0.5-30 keV (and beyond). Key elements of the payload are: the Spectroscopic Focusing Array (SFA) - a set of 11 X-ray optics for a total effective area of about 0.9 m^2 and 0.6 m^2 at 2 keV and 6 keV respectively, equipped with Silicon Drift Detectors offering <180 eV spectral resolution; the Large Area Detector (LAD) - a deployable set of 640 Silicon Drift Detectors, for a total effective area of about 3.4 m^2, between 6 and 10 keV, and spectral resolution <250 eV; the Polarimetry Focusing Array (PFA) - a set of 2 X-ray telescope, for a total effective area of 250 cm^2 at 2 keV, equipped with imaging gas pixel photoelectric polarimeters; the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) - a set of 3 coded mask wide field units, equipped with position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detectors, each covering a 90 degrees x 90 degrees FoV. The eXTP international consortium includes mostly major institutions of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Universities in China, as well as major institutions in several European countries and the United States. The predecessor of eXTP, the XTP mission concept, has been selected and funded as one of the so-called background missions in the Strategic Priority Space Science Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences since 2011. The strong European participation has significantly enhanced the scientific capabilities of eXTP. The planned launch date of the mission is earlier than 2025.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.03177  [pdf] - 1470583
Propeller effect in two brightest transient X-ray pulsars: 4U 0115+63 and V 0332+53
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2016-02-09, last modified: 2016-07-19
We present the results of the monitoring programmes performed with the Swift/XRT telescope and aimed specifically to detect an abrupt decrease of the observed flux associated with a transition to the propeller regime in two well known X-ray pulsars 4U 0115+63 and V 0332+53 during their giant outbursts in 2015. Such transitions were detected at the threshold luminosities of $(1.4\pm0.4)\times10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$ and $(2.0\pm0.4)\times10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$ for 4U 0115+63 and V 0332+53, respectively. Spectra of the sources are shown to be significantly softer during the low state. In both sources, the accretion at rates close to the aforementioned threshold values briefly resumes during the periastron passage following the transition into propeller regime. The strength of the dipole component of the magnetic field required to inhibit the accretion agrees well with estimates based on the position of the cyclotron lines in their spectra, thus excluding presence of a strong multipole component of the magnetic field in the vicinity of the neutron star.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.00249  [pdf] - 1447688
Polarization angle swings in blazars: The case of 3C 279
Comments: 19 pages, 15 figures, 6 tables
Submitted: 2016-03-01, last modified: 2016-06-21
Over the past few years, several occasions of large, continuous rotations of the electric vector position angle (EVPA) of linearly polarized optical emission from blazars have been reported. These events are often coincident with high energy gamma-ray flares and they have attracted considerable attention, as they could allow one to probe the magnetic field structure in the gamma-ray emitting region of the jet. The flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C279 is one of the most prominent examples showing this behaviour. Our goal is to study the observed EVPA rotations and to distinguish between a stochastic and a deterministic origin of the polarization variability. We have combined multiple data sets of R-band photometry and optical polarimetry measurements of 3C279, yielding exceptionally well-sampled flux density and polarization curves that cover a period of 2008-2012. Several large EVPA rotations are identified in the data. We introduce a quantitative measure for the EVPA curve smoothness, which is then used to test a set of simple random walk polarization variability models against the data. 3C279 shows different polarization variation characteristics during an optical low-flux state and a flaring state. The polarization variation during the flaring state, especially the smooth approx. 360 degrees rotation of the EVPA in mid-2011, is not consistent with the tested stochastic processes. We conclude that during the two different optical flux states, two different processes govern the polarization variation, possibly a stochastic process during the low-brightness state and a deterministic process during the flaring activity.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.09642  [pdf] - 1447782
RT Cru: a look into the X-ray emission of a peculiar symbiotic star
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics. 6 pages
Submitted: 2016-05-31
Symbiotic stars are a heterogeneous class of interacting binaries. Among them, RT Cru has been classified as prototype of a subclass that is characterised by hard X-ray spectra extending past ~20 keV. We analyse ~8.6 Ms of archival INTEGRAL data collected in the period 2003-2014, ~140 ks of Swift/XRT data, and a Suzaku observation of 39 ks, to study the spectral X-ray emission and investigate the nature of the compact object. Based on the 2MASS photometry, we estimate the distance to the source of 1.2-2.4 kpc. The X-ray spectrum obtained with Swift/XRT, JEM-X, IBIS/ISGRI, and Suzaku data is well fitted by a cooling flow model modified by an absorber that fully covers the source and two partial covering absorbers. Assuming that the hard X-ray emission of RT Cru originates from an optically thin boundary layer around a non-magnetic white dwarf, we estimated a mass of the WD of about 1.2 M_Sun. The mass accretion rate obtained for this source might be too high for the optically thin boundary layer scenario. Therefore we investigate other plausible scenarios to model its hard X-ray emission. We show that, alternatively, the observed X-ray spectrum can be explained with the X-ray emission from the post-shock region above the polar caps of a magnetised white dwarf with mass ~0.9-1.1 M_Sun.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.00232  [pdf] - 1422282
GK Per and EX Hya: Intermediate polars with small magnetospheres
Comments: 12 pages, 17 figures, submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-04-01
Observed hard X-ray spectra of intermediate polars are determined mainly by the accretion flow velocity at the white dwarf surface, which is normally close to the free-fall velocity. This allows to estimate the white dwarf masses as the white dwarf mass-radius relation M-R and the expected free-fall velocities at the surface are well known. This method is widely used, however, derived white dwarf masses M can be systematically underestimated because the accretion flow is stopped at and re-accelerates from the magnetospheric boundary R_m, and therefore, its velocity at the surface will be lower than free-fall.To avoid this problem we computed a two-parameter set of model hard X-ray spectra, which allows to constrain a degenerate M - R_m dependence. On the other hand, previous works showed that power spectra of accreting X-ray pulsars and intermediate polars exhibit breaks at the frequencies corresponding to the Keplerian frequencies at the magnetospheric boundary. Therefore, the break frequency \nu_b in an intermediate polar power spectrum gives another relation in the M - R_m plane. The intersection of the two dependences allows, therefore, to determine simultaneously the white dwarf mass and the magnetospheric radius. To verify the method we analyzed the archival Suzaku observation of EX Hya obtaining M /M_sun= 0.73 \pm 0.06 and R_ m / R = 2.6 \pm 0.4 consistent with the values determined by other authors. Subsequently, we applied the same method to a recent NuSTAR observation of another intermediate polar GK~Per performed during an outburst and found M/M_sun = 0.86 \pm 0.02 and R_ m / R = 2.8 \pm 0.2. The long duration observations of GK Per in quiescence performed by Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL observatories indicate increase of magnetosphere radius R_m at lower accretion rates.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.03557  [pdf] - 1369265
Evidence for a binary origin of a central compact object
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, accepted in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-08-14, last modified: 2016-03-07
Central compact objects (CCOs) are thought to be young thermally emitting isolated neutron stars that were born during the preceding core-collapse supernova explosion. Here we present evidence that at least in one case the CCO could have been formed within a binary system. We show that the highly reddened optical source IRAS~17287$-$3443, located $25^{\prime \prime}$ away from the CCO candidate XMMUJ173203.3$-$344518 and classified previously as a post asymptotic giant branch star, is indeed surrounded by a dust shell. This shell is heated by the central star to temperatures of $\sim90$\,K and observed as extended infrared emission in 8-160\,$\mu$m band. The dust temperature also increases in the vicinity of the CCO which implies that it likely resides within the shell. We estimate the total dust mass to be $\sim0.4-1.5\,M_\odot$ which significantly exceeds expected dust yields by normal stars and thus likely condensed from supernova ejecta. Taking into account that both the age of the supernova remnant and the duration of active mass loss phase by the optical star are much shorter than the total lifetime of either object, the supernova and the onset of the active mass loss phase of the companion have likely occurred approximately simultaneously. This is most easily explained if the evolution of both objects is interconnected. We conclude, therefore, that both stars were likely members of the same binary system disrupted by a supernova.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.04490  [pdf] - 1392702
Orbital parameters of V 0332+53 from 2015 giant outburst data
Comments: 3 pages, 2 figures, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2015-09-15, last modified: 2015-11-17
We present the updated orbital solution for the transient Be X-ray binary V 0332+53 comple- menting historical measurements with the data from the gamma-ray burst monitor onboard Fermi obtained during the outburst in June-October 2015. We model the observed changes in the spin- frequency of the pulsar and deduce the orbital parameters of the system. We significantly improve existing constrains and show that contrary to the previous findings no change in orbital parameters is required to explain the spin evolution of the source during the outbursts in 1983, 2005 and 2015. The reconstructed intrinsic spin-up of the neutron star during the latest outburst is found to be comparable with previosly observed values and predictions of the accretion torque theory.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.00548  [pdf] - 1154931
Properties and observability of glitches and anti-glitches in accreting pulsars
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics. 6 pages. Minor changes to match the final A&A version
Submitted: 2015-05-04, last modified: 2015-05-16
Several glitches have been observed in young, isolated radio pulsars, while a clear detection in accretion-powered X-ray pulsars is still lacking. We use the Pizzochero snowplow model for pulsar glitches as well as starquake models to determine for the first time the expected properties of glitches in accreting pulsars and their observability. Since some accreting pulsars show accretion-induced long-term spin-up, we also investigate the possibility that anti-glitches occur in these stars. We find that glitches caused by quakes in a slow accreting neutron star are very rare and their detection extremely unlikely. On the contrary, glitches and anti-glitches caused by a transfer of angular momentum between the superfluid neutron vortices and the non-superfluid component may take place in accreting pulsars more often. We calculate the maximum jump in angular velocity of an anti-glitch and we find that it is expected to be about 1E-5 - 1E-4 rad/s. We also note that since accreting pulsars usually have rotational angular velocities lower than those of isolated glitching pulsars, both glitches and anti-glitches are expected to have long rise and recovery timescales compared to isolated glitching pulsars, with glitches and anti-glitches appearing as a simple step in angular velocity. Among accreting pulsars, we find that GX 1+4 is the best candidate for the detection of glitches with currently operating X-ray instruments and future missions such as the proposed Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT).
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.09020  [pdf] - 973193
BeppoSAX observations of GRO J1744-28
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-03-31
We present an analysis of BeppoSAX observations of the unique transient bursting X-ray pulsar GRO J1744-28. The observations took place in March 1997 during the decay phase of the outburst. We find that the persistent broadband X-ray continuum of the source is consistent with a cutoff power law typical for the accreting pulsars. We also detect the fluorescence iron line at 6.7 keV and an absorption feature at ~4.5 keV, which we interpret as a cyclotron line. The corresponding magnetic field strength in the line forming region is ~3.7 x 10^11 G. Neither line is detected in the spectra of the bursts. However, additional soft thermal component with kT ~2 keV was required to describe the burst spectrum. We briefly discuss the nature of this component and argue that among other possibilities it might be connected with thermonuclear flashes at the neutron star surface which accompany the accretion-powered bursts in the source.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.03783  [pdf] - 1224417
Transient X-ray pulsar V0332+53: pulse phase-resolved spectroscopy and the reflection model
Comments: 12 pages, 10 figures, 3 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-01-20
We present the results of the pulse phase- and luminosity-resolved spectroscopy of the transient X-ray pulsar V0332+53, performed for the first time in a wide luminosity range (1-40)x10^{37} erg/s during a giant outburst observed by the RXTE observatory in Dec 2004 - Feb 2005. We characterize the spectra quantitatively and built the detailed "three-dimensional" picture of spectral variations with pulse phase and throughout the outburst. We show that all spectral parameters are strongly variable with the pulse phase, and the pattern of this variability significantly changes with luminosity directly reflecting the associated changes in the structure of emission regions and their beam patterns. Obtained results are qualitatively discussed in terms of the recently developed reflection model for the formation of cyclotron lines in the spectra of X-ray pulsars.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.02777  [pdf] - 922474
Probing stellar winds and accretion physics in high-mass X-ray binaries and ultra-luminous X-ray sources with LOFT
Comments: White Paper in Support of the Mission Concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing. (v2 few typos corrected)
Submitted: 2015-01-12, last modified: 2015-01-16
This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of high-mass X-ray binaries and ultra-luminous X-ray sources. For a summary, we refer to the paper.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.7264  [pdf] - 1231802
Searching for coherent pulsations in ultraluminous X-ray sources
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2014-10-27
Luminosities of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are uncomfortably large if compared to the Eddington limit for isotropic accretion onto stellar-mass object. Most often either supercritical accretion onto stellar mass black hole or accretion onto intermediate mass black holes is invoked the high luminosities of ULXs. However, the recent discovery of coherent pulsations from M82 ULX with NuSTAR showed that another scenario implying accretion onto a magnetized neutron star is possible for ULXs. Motivated by this discovery, we re-visited the available XMM-Newton archival observations of several bright ULXs with a targeted search for pulsations to check whether accreting neutron stars might power other ULXs as well. We have found no evidence for significant coherent pulsations in any of the sources including the M82 ULX. We provide upper limits for the amplitude of possibly undetected pulsed signal for the sources in the sample.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.4448  [pdf] - 1216964
Reverberation Mapping of the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 7469
Comments: 9 Pages, 7 figures, 6 tables. Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2014-09-15
A large reverberation mapping study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 7469 has yielded emission-line lags for Hbeta 4861 and He II 4686 and a central black hole mass measurement of about 10 million solar masses, consistent with previous measurements. A very low level of variability during the monitoring campaign precluded meeting our original goal of recovering velocity-delay maps from the data, but with the new Hbeta measurement, NGC 7469 is no longer an outlier in the relationship between the size of the Hbeta-emitting broad-line region and the AGN luminosity. It was necessary to detrend the continuum and Hbeta and He II 4686 line light curves and those from archival UV data for different time-series analysis methods to yield consistent results.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.1398  [pdf] - 1216711
The quiescent state of the accreting X-ray pulsar SAX J2103.5+4545
Comments: 7 pages, 2 Tables, 7 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-09-04
We present an X-ray timing and spectral analysis of the Be/X-ray binary SAX J2103.5+4545 at a time when the Be star's circumstellar disk had disappeared and thus the main reservoir of material available for accretion had extinguished. In this very low optical state, pulsed X-ray emission was detected at a level of L_X~10^{33} erg/s. This is the lowest luminosity at which pulsations have ever been detected in an accreting pulsar. The derived spin period is 351.13 s, consistent with previous observations. The source continues its overall long-term spin-up, which reduced the spin period by 7.5 s since its discovery in 1997. The X-ray emission is consistent with a purely thermal spectrum, represented by a blackbody with kT=1 keV. We discuss possible scenarios to explain the observed quiescent luminosity and conclude that the most likely mechanism is direct emission resulting from the cooling of the polar caps, heated either during the most recent outburst or via intermittent accretion in quiescence.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.5039  [pdf] - 1215785
Expected number of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the Milky Way
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics. 5 pages
Submitted: 2014-07-18
In the past fifteen years a new generation of X-ray satellites led to the discovery of a subclass of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) with supergiant companions and a peculiar transient behaviour: supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs). We calculate the expected number of Galactic SFXTs for the first time, using two different statistical approaches and two sets of data based on Swift and INTEGRAL surveys, with the aim to determine how common the SFXT phenomenon really is. We find that the expected number of SFXTs in the Galaxy is about 37(+53, -22) which shows that SFXTs constitute a large portion of X-ray binaries with supergiant companions in the Galaxy. We compare our estimate with the expected number of Galactic HMXBs predicted from observations and evolutionary models and discuss the implications for the nature of SFXTs.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.0802  [pdf] - 848155
Population of the Galactic X-ray binaries and eRosita
Comments: accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2014-05-05
The population of the Galactic X-ray binaries has been mostly probed with moderately sensitive hard X-ray surveys so far. The eRosita mission will provide, for the first time a sensitive all-sky X-ray survey in the 2-10 keV energy range, where the X-ray binaries emit most of the flux and discover the still unobserved low-luminosity population of these objects. In this paper, we briefly review the current constraints for the X-ray luminosity functions of high- and low-mass X-ray binaries and present our own analysis based the INTEGRAL 9-year Galactic survey, which yields improved constraints. Based on these results, we estimate the number of new XRBs to be detected in the eRosita all-sky survey
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.7553  [pdf] - 753008
XMM-Newton observations of 1A 0535+262 in quiescence
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2013-11-29
Accretion onto magnetized neutron stars is expected to be centrifugally inhibited at low accretion rates. Several sources, however, are known to pulsate in quiescence at luminosities below the theoretical limit predicted for the onset of the centrifugal barrier. The source 1A 0535+262 is one of them. Here we present the results of an analysis of a ~50 ks long XMM-Newton observation of 1A 0535+262 in quiescence. At the time of the observation, the neutron star was close to apastron, and the source had remained quiet for two orbital cycles. In spite of this, we detected a pulsed X-ray flux of ~3e-11 erg/cm2/s . Several observed properties, including the power spectrum, remained similar to those observed in the outbursts. Particularly, we have found that the frequency of the break detected in the quiescent noise power spectrum follows the same correlation with flux observed when the source is in outburst. This correlation has been associated with the truncation of the accretion disk at the magnetosphere boundary. We argue that our result, along with other arguments previously reported in the literature, suggests that the accretion in quiescence also proceeds from an accretion disk around the neutron star. The proposed scenario consistently explains the energy of the cyclotron line observed in 1A 0535+262, and the timing properties of the source including the spin frequency evolution within and between the outbursts, and the frequency of the break in power spectrum.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.3126  [pdf] - 1180690
Analyzing polarization swings in 3C 279
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures, 4 tables, proceeding to appear on EPJ Web of Conferences "The Innermost Regions of Relativistic Jets and their Magnetic Fields (Granada, Spain,10-14 June 2013)"
Submitted: 2013-11-13, last modified: 2013-11-15
Quasar 3C 279 is known to exhibit episodes of optical polarization angle rotation. We present new, well-sampled optical polarization data for 3C 279 and introduce a method to distinguish between random and deterministic electric vector position angle (EVPA) variations. We observe EVPA rotations in both directions with different amplitudes and find that the EVPA variation shows characteristics of both random and deterministic cases. Our analysis indicates that the EVPA variation is likely dominated by a random process in the low brightness state of the jet and by a deterministic process in the flaring state.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.4728  [pdf] - 1180019
Spectral and temporal properties of the supergiant fast X-ray transient IGR J18483-0311 observed by INTEGRAL
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics. 8 pages
Submitted: 2013-10-17
IGR J18483-0311 is a supergiant fast X-ray transient whose compact object is located in a wide (18.5 d) and eccentric (e~0.4) orbit, which shows sporadic outbursts that reach X-ray luminosities of ~1e36 erg/s. We investigated the timing properties of IGR J18483-0311 and studied the spectra during bright outbursts by fitting physical models based on thermal and bulk Comptonization processes for accreting compact objects. We analysed archival INTEGRAL data collected in the period 2003-2010, focusing on the observations with IGR J18483-0311 in outburst. We searched for pulsations in the INTEGRAL light curves of each outburst. We took advantage of the broadband observing capability of INTEGRAL for the spectral analysis. We observed 15 outbursts, seven of which we report here for the first time. This data analysis almost doubles the statistics of flares of this binary system detected by INTEGRAL. A refined timing analysis did not reveal a significant periodicity in the INTEGRAL observation where a ~21s pulsation was previously detected. Neither did we find evidence for pulsations in the X-ray light curve of an archival XMM-Newton observation of IGR J18483-0311. In the light of these results the nature of the compact object in IGR J18483-0311 is unclear. The broadband X-ray spectrum of IGR J18483-0311 in outburst is well fitted by a thermal and bulk Comptonization model of blackbody seed photons by the infalling material in the accretion column of a neutron star. We also obtained a new measurement of the orbital period using the Swift/BAT light curve.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.2520  [pdf] - 1179128
On the origin of cyclotron lines in the spectra of X-ray pulsars
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, proceedings of the conference "Physics at the Magnetospheric Boundary", Geneva, June 2013
Submitted: 2013-09-10
Cyclotron resonance scattering features are observed in the spectra of some X-ray pulsars and show significant changes in the line energy with the pulsar luminosity. In a case of bright sources, the line centroid energy is anti-correlated with the luminosity. Such a behaviour is often associated with the onset and growth of the accretion column, which is believed to be the origin of the observed emission and the cyclotron lines. However, this scenario inevitably implies large gradient of the magnetic field strength within the line-forming region, and it makes the formation of the observed line-like features problematic. Moreover, the observed variation of the cyclotron line energy is much smaller than could be anticipated for the corresponding luminosity changes. We argue that a more physically realistic situation is that the cyclotron line forms when the radiation emitted by the accretion column is reflected from the neutron star surface. The idea is based on the facts that a substantial part of column luminosity is intercepted by the neutron star surface and the reflected radiation should contain absorption features. The reflection model is developed and applied to explain the observed variations of the cyclotron line energy in a bright X-ray pulsar V 0332+53 over a wide range of luminosities.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.2633  [pdf] - 750203
A reflection model for the cyclotron lines in the spectra of X-ray pulsars
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures; version accepted to the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2013-04-09, last modified: 2013-09-10
Cyclotron resonance scattering features observed in the spectra of some X-ray pulsars show significant changes of the line energy with the pulsar luminosity. At high luminosities, these variations are often associated with the onset and growth of the accretion column, which is believed to be the origin of the observed emission and of the cyclotron lines. However, this scenario inevitably implies large gradient of the magnetic field strength within the line-forming region, which makes the formation of the observed line-like features problematic. Moreover, the observed variation of the cyclotron line energy is much smaller than could be anticipated for the corresponding luminosity changes. We argue here that a more physically realistic situation is that the cyclotron line forms when the radiation emitted by the accretion column is reflected from the neutron star surface, where the gradient of the magnetic field strength is significantly smaller. We develop here the reflection model and apply it to explain the observed variations of the cyclotron line energy in a bright X-ray pulsar V 0332+53 over a wide range of luminosities.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.7283  [pdf] - 1166257
Observations of The High Mass X-ray Binary A0535+26 in Quiescence
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures, and 4 tables. Accepted for publication in Ap.J
Submitted: 2013-04-26
We have analyzed 3 observations of the High Mass X-ray Binary A0535+26 performed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) 3, 5, and 6 months after the last outburst in 2011 February. We detect pulsations only in the second observation. The 3-20 keV spectra can be fit equally well with either an absorbed power law or absorbed thermal bremsstrahlung model. Re-analysis of 2 earlier RXTE observations made 4 years after the 1994 outburst, original BeppoSAX observations 2 years later, re-analysis of 4 EXOSAT observations made 2 years after the last 1984 outburst, and a recent XMM-Newton observation in 2012 reveal a stacked, quiescent flux level decreasing from ~2 to <1 x 10^{-11} ergs/cm2/s over 6.5 years after outburst. Detection of pulsations during half of the quiescent observations would imply that accretion onto the magnetic poles of the neutron star continues despite the fact that the circumstellar disk may no longer be present. The accretion could come from material built-up at the corotation radius or from an isotropic stellar wind.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.5965  [pdf] - 1166143
Footprints in the wind of Vela X-1 traced with MAXI
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, accepted in A&A
Submitted: 2013-04-22
The stellar wind around the compact object in luminous wind-accreting high mass X-ray binaries is expected to be strongly ionized with the X-rays coming from the compact object. The stellar wind of hot stars is mostly driven by light absorption in lines of heavier elements, and X-ray photo-ionization significantly reduces the radiative force within the so-called Stroemgren region leading to wind stagnation around the compact object. In close binaries like Vela X-1 this effect might alter the wind structure throughout the system. Using the spectral data from Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI), we study the observed dependence of the photoelectric absorption as function of orbital phase in Vela X-1, and find that it is inconsistent with expectations for a spherically-symmetric smooth wind. Taking into account previous investigations we develop a simple model for wind structure with a stream-like photoionization wake region of slower and denser wind trailing the neutron star responsible for the observed absorption curve.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.2397  [pdf] - 1151950
The Structure of the Broad Line Region in AGN: I. Reconstructed Velocity-Delay Maps
Comments: 23 pages, 17 Figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ. For a brief video explaining the key results of this paper, see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xAflzp-YlI
Submitted: 2012-10-08, last modified: 2012-12-11
We present velocity-resolved reverberation results for five active galactic nuclei. We recovered velocity-delay maps using the maximum-entropy method for four objects: Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, 3C120, and PG2130+099. For the fifth, Mrk 6, we were only able to measure mean time delays in different velocity bins of the Hbeta emission line. The four velocity-delay maps show unique dynamical signatures for each object. For 3C120, the Balmer lines show kinematic signatures consistent with both an inclined disk and infalling gas, but the HeII 4686 emission line is suggestive only of inflow. The Balmer lines in Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, and PG 2130+099 show signs of infalling gas, but the HeII emission in Mrk 335 is consistent with an inclined disk. We also see tentative evidence of combined virial motion and infalling gas from the velocity-binned analysis of Mrk 6. The maps for 3C120 and Mrk 335 are two of the most clearly defined velocity-delay maps to date. These maps constitute a large increase in the number of objects for which we have resolved velocity-delay maps and provide evidence supporting the reliability of reverberation-based black hole mass measurements.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.4428  [pdf] - 576753
Supergiant, fast, but not so transient 4U 1907+09
Comments: 4 pages 5 figures, accepted in A&A
Submitted: 2012-10-16
We have investigated the dipping activity observed in the high-mass X-ray binary 4U 1907+09 and shown that the source continues to pulsate in the "off" state, noting that the transition between the "on" and "off" states may be either dip-like or flare-like. This behavior may be explained in the framework of the "gated accretion" scenario proposed to explain the flares in supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs). We conclude that 4U 1907+09 might prove to be a missing link between the SFXTs and ordinary accreting pulsars.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.6523  [pdf] - 1124449
Reverberation Mapping Results for Five Seyfert 1 Galaxies
Comments: 45 pages, 5 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ. For a brief video explaining the key results of this paper, see http://www.youtube.com/user/OSUAstronomy
Submitted: 2012-06-27
We present the results from a detailed analysis of photometric and spectrophotometric data on five Seyfert 1 galaxies observed as a part of a recent reverberation mapping program. The data were collected at several observatories over a 140-day span beginning in 2010 August and ending in 2011 January. We obtained high sampling-rate light curves for Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, 3C120, Mrk 6, and PG2130+099, from which we have measured the time lag between variations in the 5100 Angstrom continuum and the H-beta broad emission line. We then used these measurements to calculate the mass of the supermassive black hole at the center of each of these galaxies. Our new measurements substantially improve previous measurements of MBH and the size of the broad line-emitting region for four sources and add a measurement for one new object. Our new measurements are consistent with photoionization physics regulating the location of the broad line region in active galactic nuclei.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.5475  [pdf] - 1123643
Outburst of GX 304-1 monitored with INTEGRAL: positive correlation between the cyclotron line energy and flux
Comments: Accepted for publications in A&A Letters
Submitted: 2012-05-24
X-ray spectra of many accreting pulsars exhibit significant variations as a function of flux and thus of mass accretion rate. In some of these pulsars, the centroid energy of the cyclotron line(s), which characterizes the magnetic field strength at the site of the X-ray emission, has been found to vary systematically with flux. GX 304-1 is a recently established cyclotron line source with a line energy around 50 keV. Since 2009, the pulsar shows regular outbursts with the peak flux exceeding one Crab. We analyze the INTEGRAL observations of the source during its outburst in January-February 2012. The observations covered almost the entire outburst, allowing us to measure the source's broad-band X-ray spectrum at different flux levels. We report on the variations in the spectral parameters with luminosity and focus on the variations in the cyclotron line. The centroid energy of the line is found to be positively correlated with the luminosity. We interpret this result as a manifestation of the local sub-Eddington (sub-critical) accretion regime operating in the source.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.6271  [pdf] - 491213
The hard X-ray emission of X Per
Comments: Published as a letter in A&A; 4 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2012-02-28, last modified: 2012-03-22
We present an analysis of the spectral properties of the peculiar X-ray pulsar X Per based on INTEGRAL observations. We show that the source exhibits an unusually hard spectrum and is confidently detected by ISGRI up to more than 100 keV. We find that two distinct components may be identified in the broadband 4-200 keV spectrum of the source. We interpret these components as the result of thermal and bulk Comptonization in the vicinity of the neutron star and describe them with several semi-phenomenological models. The previously reported absorption feature at ~30 keV is not required in the proposed scenario and therefore its physical interpretation must be taken with caution. We also investigated the timing properties of the source in the framework of existing torque theory, concluding that the observed phenomenology can be consistently explained if the magnetic field of the neutron star is ~10^14 G.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1203.2084  [pdf] - 1117191
BLR kinematics and Black Hole Mass in Markarian 6
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-03-09
We present results of the optical spectral and photometric observations of the nucleus of Markarian 6 made with the 2.6-m Shajn telescope at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. The continuum and emission Balmer line intensities varied more than by a factor of two during 1992-2008. The lag between the continuum and Hbeta emission line flux variations is 21.1+-1.9 days. For the Halpha line the lag is about 27 days but its uncertainty is much larger. We use Monte-Carlo simulation of the random time series to check the effect of our data sampling on the lag uncertainties and we compare our simulation results with those obtained by random subset selection (RSS) method of Peterson et al. (1998). The lag in the high-velocity wings are shorter than in the line core in accordance with the virial motions. However, the lag is slightly larger in the blue wing than in the red wing. This is a signature of the infall gas motion. Probably the BLR kinematic in the Mrk 6 nucleus is a combination of the Keplerian and infall motions. The velocity-delay dependence is similar for individual observational seasons. The measurements of the Hbeta line width in combination with the reverberation lag permits us to determine the black hole mass, M_BH=(1.8+-0.2)x10^8 M_sun. This result is consistent with the AGN scaling relationships between the BLR radius and the optical continuum luminosity (R_BLR is proportional to L^0.5) as well as with the black-hole mass-luminosity relationship (M_BH-L) under the Eddington luminosity ratio for Mrk 6 to be L_bol/L_Edd ~ 0.01.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.6179  [pdf] - 1091242
A Reverberation Lag for the High-Ionization Component of the Broad Line Region in the Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Mrk 335
Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ Letters. For a brief video explaining the key results of this paper, see http://www.youtube.com/user/OSUAstronomy#p/a/u/0/Z2UCxQG5iOo
Submitted: 2011-10-27, last modified: 2011-11-28
We present the first results from a detailed analysis of photometric and spectrophotometric data on the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 335, collected over a 120-day span in the fall of 2010. From these data we measure the lag in the He II 4686 broad emission line relative to the optical continuum to be 2.7 \pm 0.6 days and the lag in the H\beta 4861 broad emission line to be 13.9 \pm 0.9 days. Combined with the line width, the He II lag yields a black hole mass, MBH = (2.6 \pm 0.8)\times 10^7 Msun. This measurement is consistent with measurements made using the H\beta 4861 line, suggesting that the He II emission originates in the same region as H\beta, but at a much smaller radius. This constitutes the first robust lag measurement for a high-ionization line in a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.1800  [pdf] - 1091477
A Suzaku View of Cyclotron Line Sources and Candidates
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, 1 table, to appear in the proceedings of the conference "Suzaku 2011 Exploring the X-ray Universe: Suzaku and Beyond" which will be published electronically by AIP
Submitted: 2011-11-07
Seventeen accreting neutron star pulsars, mostly high mass X-ray binaries with half of them Be-type transients, are known to exhibit Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Features (CRSFs) in their X-ray spectra, with characteristic line energies from 10 to 60 keV. To date about two thirds of them, plus a few similar systems without known CRSFs, have been observed with Suzaku. We present an overview of results from these observations, including the discovery of a CRSF in the transient 1A 1118-61 and pulse phase resolved spectroscopy of GX 301-2. These observations allow for the determination of cyclotron line parameters to an unprecedented degree of accuracy within a moderate amount of observing time. This is important since these parameters vary - e.g., with orbital phase, pulse phase, or luminosity - depending on the geometry of the magnetic field of the pulsar and the properties of the accretion column at the magnetic poles. We briefly introduce a spectral model for CRSFs that is currently being developed and that for the first time is based on these physical properties. In addition to cyclotron line measurements, selected highlights from the Suzaku analyses include dip and flare studies, e.g., of 4U 1907+09 and Vela X-1, which show clumpy wind effects (like partial absorption and/or a decrease in the mass accretion rate supplied by the wind) and may also display magnetospheric gating effects.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.5254  [pdf] - 1052362
Witnessing the magnetospheric boundary at work in Vela X-1
Comments: 4 pages 4 figures; accepted for publication in A&A letters (20/02/2011); v1.1 - some changes in language + added 3 references
Submitted: 2011-02-25, last modified: 2011-03-14
We present an analysis of the Vela X-1's "off-states" based on Suzaku observations taken in June 2008. Defined as states in which the flux sudden decreases below the instrumental sensitivity, these "off-states" have been interpreted by several authors as the onset of the "propeller regime". For the first time ever, however, we find that the source does not turn off and, although the flux drops by a factor of 20 during the three recorded "off-states", pulsations are still observed. The spectrum and the pulse-profiles of the "off-states" are also presented. Eventually, we discuss our findings in framework of the "gated accretion" scenario and conclude that most likely the residual flux is due to the accretion of matter leaking through the magnetosphere by means of Kelvin-Helmholz instabilities (KHI).
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1103.1370  [pdf] - 1052542
Suzaku observations of the HMXB 1A 1118-61
Comments: accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2011-03-07
We present broad band analysis of the Be/X-ray transient 1A 1118-61 by Suzaku at the peak of its 3rd observed outburst in January 2009 and 2 weeks later when the source flux had decayed by an order of magnitude. The continuum was modeled with a \texttt{cutoffpl} model as well as a compTT model, with both cases requiring an additional black body component at lower energies. We confirm the detection of a cyclotron line at ~5 keV and discuss the possibility of a first harmonic at ~110 keV. Pulse profile comparisons show a change in the profile structure at lower energies, an indication for possible changes in the accretion geometry. Phase resolved spectroscopy in the outburst data show a change in the continuum throughout the pulse period. The decrease in the CRSF centroid energy also indicates that the viewing angle on the accretion column is changing throughout the pulse period.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.2459  [pdf] - 1042509
Finding a 24-day orbital period for the X-ray binary 1A 1118-616
Comments: 5 pages, 7 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2010-12-11, last modified: 2011-01-14
We report the first determination of the binary period and orbital ephemeris of the Be X-ray binary containing the pulsar 1A 1118-616 (35 years after the discovery of the source). The orbital period is found to be Porb = 24.0 +/- 0.4 days. The source was observed by RXTE during its last large X-ray outburst in January 2009, which peaked at MJD 54845.4, by taking short observations every few days, covering an elapsed time comparable to the orbital period. Using the phase connection technique, pulse arrival time delays could be measured and an orbital solution determined. The data are consistent with a circular orbit, and the time of 90 degrees longitude was found to be T90 = MJD 54845.37(10), which is coincident with that of the peak X-ray flux.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.4160  [pdf] - 1033224
Reverberation Mapping Measurements of Black Hole Masses in Six Local Seyfert Galaxies
Comments: 52 pages (AASTeX: 29 pages of text, 8 tables, 7 figures), accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2010-06-21
We present the final results from a high sampling rate, multi-month, spectrophotometric reverberation mapping campaign undertaken to obtain either new or improved Hbeta reverberation lag measurements for several relatively low-luminosity AGNs. We have reliably measured thetime delay between variations in the continuum and Hbeta emission line in six local Seyfert 1 galaxies. These measurements are used to calculate the mass of the supermassive black hole at the center of each of these AGNs. We place our results in context to the most current calibration of the broad-line region (BLR) R-L relationship, where our results remove outliers and reduce the scatter at the low-luminosity end of this relationship. We also present velocity-resolved Hbeta time delay measurements for our complete sample, though the clearest velocity-resolved kinematic signatures have already been published.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.4782  [pdf] - 1032747
RXTE observations of the 1A 1118-61 in an outburst, and the discovery of a cyclotron line
Comments: 5 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2010-05-26
We present the analysis of RXTE monitoring data obtained during the January 2009 outburst of the hard X-ray transient 1A 1118-61. Using these observations the broadband (3.5-120 keV) spectrum of the source was measured for the first time ever. We have found that the broadband continuum spectrum of the source is similar to other accreting pulsars and is well described by several conventionally used phenomenological models. We have discovered that regardless of the applied continuum model, a prominent broad absorption feature at ~55 keV is observed. We interpret this feature as a cyclotron resonance scattering feature (CRSF). The observed CRSF energy is one of the highest known and corresponds to a magnetic field of B~4.8 x 10^12 G in the scattering region. Our data also indicate the presence of an iron emission line presence that has not been previously reported for 1A 1118-61. Timing properties of the source, including a strong spin-up, were found to be similar to those observed by CGRO/BATSE during the previous outburst, but the broadband capabilities of RXTE reveal a more complicated energy dependency of the pulse-profile.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.1320  [pdf] - 901973
Relativistic plasma as the dominant source of the optical continuum emission in the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 120
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2009-10-07, last modified: 2010-04-02
We report a relation between radio emission in the inner jet of the Seyfert galaxy 3C 120 and optical continuum emission in this galaxy. Combining the optical variability data with multi-epoch high-resolution very long baseline interferometry observations reveals that an optical flare rises when a superluminal component emerges into the jet and its maxima is related to the passage of such component through the location a stationary feature at a distance of ~1.3 parsecs from the jet origin. This indicates that a significant fraction of the optical continuum produced in 3C 120 is non-thermal and it can ionize material in a sub-relativistic wind or outflow. We discuss implications of this finding for the ionization and structure of the broad emission line region, as well as for the use of broad emission lines for determining black hole masses in radio-loud AGN.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.3844  [pdf] - 1003035
Is there a highly magnetized neutron star in GX 301-2?
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics. Referee comments are implemented.
Submitted: 2009-07-22, last modified: 2010-03-11
We present the results of an in-depth study of the long-period X-ray pulsar GX 301-2. Using archival data of INTEGRAL, RXTE ASM, and CGRO BATSE, we study the spectral and timing properties of the source. Comparison of our timing results with previously published work reveals a secular decay of the orbital period at a rate of \simeq -3.25 \times 10^{-5} d yr^{-1}, which is an order of magnitude faster than for other known systems. We argue that this is probably result either of the apsidal motion or of gravitational coupling of the matter lost by the optical companion with the neutron star, although current observations do not allow us to distinguish between those possibilities. We also propose a model to explain the observed long pulse period. We find that a very strong magnetic field B \sim 10^{14} G can explain the observed pulse period in the framework of existing models for torques affecting the neutron star. We show that the apparent contradiction with the magnetic field strength B_{CRSF} \sim 4 \times 10^{12} G derived from the observed cyclotron line position may be resolved if the line formation region resides in a tall accretion column of height \sim 2.5 - 3 R_{NS}. The color temperature measured from the spectrum suggests that such a column may indeed be present, and our estimates show that its height is sufficient to explain the observed cyclotron line position.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:0908.0327  [pdf] - 294729
Diverse Broad Line Region Kinematic Signatures From Reverberation Mapping
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in ApJL
Submitted: 2009-08-04, last modified: 2009-09-25
A detailed analysis of the data from a high sampling rate, multi-month reverberation mapping campaign, undertaken primarily at MDM Observatory with supporting observations from telescopes around the world, reveals that the Hbeta emission region within the broad line regions (BLRs) of several nearby AGNs exhibit a variety of kinematic behaviors. While the primary goal of this campaign was to obtain either new or improved Hbeta reverberation lag measurements for several relatively low luminosity AGNs (presented in a separate work), we were also able to unambiguously reconstruct velocity-resolved reverberation signals from a subset of our targets. Through high cadence spectroscopic monitoring of the optical continuum and broad Hbeta emission line variations observed in the nuclear regions of NGC 3227, NGC 3516, and NGC 5548, we clearly see evidence for outflowing, infalling, and virialized BLR gas motions, respectively.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:0908.2763  [pdf] - 1017123
Long term variability of the Broad Emission Line profiles in AGN
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures, New Astronomy Reviews (Proceeding of 7th SCSLSA), in press
Submitted: 2009-08-19, last modified: 2009-09-25
Results of a long-term monitoring ($\gtrsim 10$ years) of the broad line and continuum fluxes of three Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), 3C 390.3, NGC 4151, and NGC 5548, are presented. We analyze the H$\alpha$ and H$\beta$ profile variations during the monitoring period and study different details (as bumps, absorption bands) which can indicate structural changes in the Broad Line Region (BLR). The BLR dimensions are estimated using the time lags between the continuum and the broad lines flux variations. We find that in the case of 3C 390.3 and NGC 5548 a disk geometry can explain both the broad line profiles and their flux variations, while the BLR of NGC 4151 seems more complex and is probably composed of two or three kinematically different regions.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.0251  [pdf] - 23004
A Revised Broad-Line Region Radius and Black Hole Mass for the Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 NGC 4051
Comments: 38 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ, changes from v1 reflect suggestions from anonymous referee
Submitted: 2009-04-01, last modified: 2009-07-21
We present the first results from a high sampling rate, multi-month reverberation mapping campaign undertaken primarily at MDM Observatory with supporting observations from telescopes around the world. The primary goal of this campaign was to obtain either new or improved Hbeta reverberation lag measurements for several relatively low luminosity AGNs. We feature results for NGC 4051 here because, until now, this object has been a significant outlier from AGN scaling relationships, e.g., it was previously a ~2-3sigma outlier on the relationship between the broad-line region (BLR) radius and the optical continuum luminosity - the R_BLR-L relationship. Our new measurements of the lag time between variations in the continuum and Hbeta emission line made from spectroscopic monitoring of NGC 4051 lead to a measured BLR radius of R_BLR = 1.87 (+0.54 -0.50) light days and black hole mass of M_BH = 1.73 (+0.55 -0.52) x 10^6 M_sun. This radius is consistent with that expected from the R_BLR-L relationship, based on the present luminosity of NGC 4051 and the most current calibration of the relation by Bentz et al. (2009a). We also present a preliminary look at velocity-resolved Hbeta light curves and time delay measurements, although we are unable to reconstruct an unambiguous velocity-resolved reverberation signal.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0612153  [pdf] - 87491
IX Russian-Finnish Symposium on Radio Astronomy "Multi-wavelength investigations of solar and stellar activity and active galactic nuclei"
Comments: 41 pages, abstracts of the Symposium papers
Submitted: 2006-12-06
The IX Russian-Finnish Symposium on Radio Astronomy was held in Special astrophysical observatory RAS in Nizhnij Arkhyz, Russia on 15-20 October 2006. It was dedicated to the two-side collaboration in the field of multi-wavelength investigations of solar radio emission, studies of polar regions of the Sun, studies of stellar activity, AGNs, quasars and BL Lac objects in radio bands from millimeter to decimetre wavelengths with RATAN-600, Metsahovi 14m, RT32m radio telescope and VLBI systems. Here abstracts of all forty papers are given. The Web-site of the Symposium is http://cats.sao.ru/~satr/RFSymp/ .
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0405191  [pdf] - 64711
Profile variability of the H-alpha and H-beta broad emission lines in NGC5548
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A; 24 pages, 14 postscript figures
Submitted: 2004-05-11
Between 1996 and 2002, we have carried out a spectral monitoring program for the Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548. High quality spectra (S/N>50), covering the spectral range (4000-7500)AA were obtained with the 6 m and 1 m telescopes of SAO (Russia) and with the 2.1 m telescope GHO (Mexico). We found that both the flux in the lines and the continuum gradually decreased, reaching minimum values during May-June 2002. The mean, rms, and the averaged over years, observed and difference line profiles of H-alpha and H-beta reveal the double peaked structure at the radial velocity ~+-1000km/s. The relative intensity of these peaks changes with time. During 1996, the red peak was the brightest, while in 1998 - 2002, the blue peak became the brighter one. In 2000-2002 a distinct third peak appeared in the red wing of H-alpha and H-beta line profiles. The radial velocity of this feature decreased between 2000 and 2002 from ~+2500 km/s to ~+2000 km/s. The fluxes of the various parts of the line profiles are well correlated with each other and also with the continuum flux. Shape changes of the different parts of the broad line are not correlated with continuum variations and, apparently, are not related to reverberation effects. Changes of the integral Balmer decrement are, on average, anticorrelated with the continuum flux variations. This is probably due to an increasing role of collisional excitation as the ionizing flux decreases. Our results favor the formation of the broad Balmer lines in a turbulent accretion disc with large and moving "optically thick" inhomogeneities, capable of reprocessing the central source continuum.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0110708  [pdf] - 45765
Variability of accretion flow in the core of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151
Comments: 21 pages, 19 figures, 4 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2001-10-31, last modified: 2003-03-13
We analyze observations of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 covering 90 years in the optical band and 27 years in the 2-10 keV X-ray band. We compute the Normalized Power Spectrum Density (NPSD), the Structure Function (SF) and the Autocorrelation Function (ACF) for these data. The results show that the optical and X-ray variability properties are significantly different. X-ray variations are predominantly in the timescale range of 5 - 1000 days. The optical variations have also a short timescale component which may be related to X-ray variability but the dominant effect is the long timescale variability, with timescales longer than $\sim$ 10 years. We compare our results with observations of NGC 5548 and Cyg X-1. We conclude that the long timescale variability may be caused by radiation pressure instability in the accretion disk, although the observed timescale in NGC 4151 is by a factor of few longer than expected. X-ray variability of this source is very similar to what is observed in Cyg X-1 but scaled with the mass of the black hole, which suggests that the radiation pressure instability does not affect considerably the X-ray production.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0106423  [pdf] - 43219
Intermediate resolution H-beta spectroscopy and photometric monitoring of 3C 390.3 I. Further evidence of a nuclear accretion disk
Comments: 18 pages, 13 figures, 4 tables. to appear in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2001-06-22, last modified: 2001-07-02
We have monitored the AGN 3C390.3 between 1995 and 2000.Two large amplitude outbursts, of different duration, in continuum and H beta light were observed ie.: in October 1994 a brighter flare that lasted about 1000 days and in July 1997 another one that lasted about 700 days were detected. The flux in the H beta wings and line core vary simultaneously, a behavior indicative of predominantly circular motions in the BLR.Important changes of the Hbeta emission profiles were detected: at times, we found profiles with prominent asymmetric wings, as those normaly seen in Sy1s, while at other times, we observe profiles with weak almost symmetrical wings, similar to those seen in Sy1.8s. We found that the radial velocity difference between the red and blue bumps is anticorrelated with the light curves of H beta and continuum radiation.e found that the radial velocity difference between the red and blue bumps is anticorrelated with the light curves of H-beta and continuum radiation. Theoretical H-beta profiles were computed for an accretion disk, the observed profiles are best reproduced by an inclined disk (25 deg) whose region of maximum emission is located roughly at 200 Rg. The mass of the black hole in 3C 390.3, estimated from the reverberation analysis is Mrev = 2.1 x 10^9 Msun, ie. 5 times larger than previous estimates