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Derkacy, James M.

Normalized to: Derkacy, J.

5 article(s) in total. 232 co-authors, from 1 to 8 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 41,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.01782  [pdf] - 2089303
SN 2019ehk: A Double-Peaked Ca-rich Transient with Luminous X-ray Emission and Shock-Ionized Spectral Features
Comments: 51 pages, 27 figures. Submitted to ApJ. Comments welcome!
Submitted: 2020-05-04
We present panchromatic observations and modeling of the Calcium-rich supernova 2019ehk in the star-forming galaxy M100 (d$\approx$16.2 Mpc) starting 10 hours after explosion and continuing for ~300 days. SN 2019ehk shows a double-peaked optical light curve peaking at $t = 3$ and $15$ days. The first peak is coincident with luminous, rapidly decaying $\textit{Swift}$-XRT discovered X-ray emission ($L_x\approx10^{41}~\rm{erg~s^{-1}}$ at 3 days; $L_x \propto t^{-3}$), and a Shane/Kast spectral detection of narrow H$\alpha$ and He II emission lines ($v \approx 500$ km/s) originating from pre-existent circumstellar material. We attribute this phenomenology to radiation from shock interaction with extended, dense material surrounding the progenitor star at $r<10^{15}$ cm and the resulting cooling emission. We calculate a total CSM mass of $\sim$ $7\times10^{-3}$ $\rm{M_{\odot}}$ with particle density $n\approx10^{9}\,\rm{cm^{-3}}$. Radio observations indicate a significantly lower density $n < 10^{4}\,\rm{cm^{-3}}$ at larger radii. The photometric and spectroscopic properties during the second light curve peak are consistent with those of Ca-rich transients (rise-time of $t_r =13.4\pm0.210$ days and a peak B-band magnitude of $M_B =-15.1\pm0.200$ mag). We find that SN 2019ehk synthesized $(3.1\pm0.11)\times10^{-2} ~ \rm{M_{\odot}}$ of ${}^{56}\textrm{Ni}$ and ejected $M_{\rm ej} = (0.72\pm 0.040)~\rm{M_{\odot}}$ total with a kinetic energy $E_{\rm k}=(1.8\pm0.10)\times10^{50}~\rm{erg}$. Finally, deep $\textit{HST}$ pre-explosion imaging at the SN site constrains the parameter space of viable stellar progenitors to massive stars in the lowest mass bin (~10 $\rm{M_{\odot}}$) in binaries that lost most of their He envelope or white dwarfs. The explosion and environment properties of SN 2019ehk further restrict the potential WD progenitor systems to low-mass hybrid HeCO WD + CO WD binaries.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.03076  [pdf] - 1833188
Observations of SN 2017ein Reveal Shock Breakout Emission and A Massive Progenitor Star for a Type Ic Supernova
Comments: 28 pages, 19 figures; accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2018-12-07
We present optical and ultraviolet observations of nearby type Ic supernova SN 2017ein as well as detailed analysis of its progenitor properties from both the early-time observations and the prediscovery Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. The optical light curves started from within one day to $\sim$275 days after explosion, and optical spectra range from $\sim$2 days to $\sim$90 days after explosion. Compared to other normal SNe Ic like SN 2007gr and SN 2013ge, \mbox{SN 2017ein} seems to have more prominent C{\footnotesize II} absorption and higher expansion velocities in early phases, suggestive of relatively lower ejecta mass. The earliest photometry obtained for \mbox{SN 2017ein} show indications of shock cooling. The best-fit obtained by including a shock cooling component gives an estimate of the envelope mass as $\sim$0.02 M$_{\odot}$ and stellar radius as 8$\pm$4 R$_{\odot}$. Examining the pre-explosion images taken with the HST WFPC2, we find that the SN position coincides with a luminous and blue point-like source, with an extinction-corrected absolute magnitude of M$_V$$\sim$$-$8.2 mag and M$_I$$\sim$$-$7.7 mag.Comparisons of the observations to the theoretical models indicate that the counterpart source was either a single WR star or a binary with whose members had high initial masses, or a young compact star cluster. To further distinguish between different scenarios requires revisiting the site of the progenitor with HST after the SN fades away.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.10056  [pdf] - 1811224
Photometric and Spectroscopic Properties of Type Ia Supernova 2018oh with Early Excess Emission from the $Kepler$ 2 Observations
Li, W.; Wang, X.; Vinkó, J.; Mo, J.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Sand, D. J.; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.; Zhang, T.; Wang, L.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Z.; Xiang, D.; Rui, L.; Huang, F.; Li, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, L.; Baron, E.; Derkacy, J. M.; Zhao, X.; Sai, H.; Zhang, K.; Wang, L.; Howell, D. A.; McCully, C.; Arcavi, I.; Valenti, S.; Hiramatsu, D.; Burke, J.; Rest, A.; Garnavich, P.; Tucker, B. E.; Narayan, G.; Shaya, E.; Margheim, S.; Zenteno, A.; Villar, A.; Dimitriadis, G.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y. -C.; Coulter, D. A.; Fox, O. D.; Jha, S. W.; Jones, D. O.; Kasen, D. N.; Kilpatrick, C. D.; Piro, A. L.; Riess, A. G.; Rojas-Bravo, C.; Shappee, B. J.; Holoien, T. W. -S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Drout, M. R.; Auchettl, K.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Bose, S.; Bersier, D.; Brimacombe, J.; Chen, P.; Dong, S.; Holmbo, S.; Muñoz, J. A.; Mutel, R. L.; Post, R. S.; Prieto, J. L.; Shields, J.; Tallon, D.; Thompson, T. A.; Vallely, P. J.; Villanueva, S.; Smartt, S. J.; Smith, K. W.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H. A.; Huber, M. E.; Magnier, E. A.; Waters, C. Z.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Bulger, J.; Lowe, T. B.; Willman, M.; Sárneczky, K.; Pál, A.; Wheeler, J. C.; Bódi, A.; Bognár, Zs.; Csák, B.; Cseh, B.; Csörnyei, G.; Hanyecz, O.; Ignácz, B.; Kalup, Cs.; Könyves-Tóth, R.; Kriskovics, L.; Ordasi, A.; Rajmon, I.; Sódor, A.; Szabó, R.; Szakáts, R.; Zsidi, G.; Milne, P.; Andrews, J. E.; Smith, N.; Bilinski, C.; Brown, P. J.; Nordin, J.; Williams, S. C.; Galbany, L.; Palmerio, J.; Hook, I. M.; Inserra, C.; Maguire, K.; Cartier, Régis; Razza, A.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hermes, J. J.; Reding, J. S.; Kaiser, B. C.; Tonry, J. L.; Heinze, A. N.; Denneau, L.; Weiland, H.; Stalder, B.; Barentsen, G.; Dotson, J.; Barclay, T.; Gully-Santiago, M.; Hedges, C.; Cody, A. M.; Howell, S.; Coughlin, J.; Van Cleve, J. E.; Cardoso, J. Vinícius de Miranda; Larson, K. A.; McCalmont-Everton, K. M.; Peterson, C. A.; Ross, S. E.; Reedy, L. H.; Osborne, D.; McGinn, C.; Kohnert, L.; Migliorini, L.; Wheaton, A.; Spencer, B.; Labonde, C.; Castillo, G.; Beerman, G.; Steward, K.; Hanley, M.; Larsen, R.; Gangopadhyay, R.; Kloetzel, R.; Weschler, T.; Nystrom, V.; Moffatt, J.; Redick, M.; Griest, K.; Packard, M.; Muszynski, M.; Kampmeier, J.; Bjella, R.; Flynn, S.; Elsaesser, B.
Comments: 48 pages, 23 figures. This paper is part of a coordinated effort between groups. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-11-25
Supernova (SN) 2018oh (ASASSN-18bt) is the first spectroscopically-confirmed type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observed in the $Kepler$ field. The $Kepler$ data revealed an excess emission in its early light curve, allowing to place interesting constraints on its progenitor system (Dimitriadis et al. 2018, Shappee et al. 2018b). Here, we present extensive optical, ultraviolet, and near-infrared photometry, as well as dense sampling of optical spectra, for this object. SN 2018oh is relatively normal in its photometric evolution, with a rise time of 18.3$\pm$0.3 days and $\Delta$m$_{15}(B)=0.96\pm$0.03 mag, but it seems to have bluer $B - V$ colors. We construct the "uvoir" bolometric light curve having peak luminosity as 1.49$\times$10$^{43}$erg s$^{-1}$, from which we derive a nickel mass as 0.55$\pm$0.04M$_{\odot}$ by fitting radiation diffusion models powered by centrally located $^{56}$Ni. Note that the moment when nickel-powered luminosity starts to emerge is +3.85 days after the first light in the Kepler data, suggesting other origins of the early-time emission, e.g., mixing of $^{56}$Ni to outer layers of the ejecta or interaction between the ejecta and nearby circumstellar material or a non-degenerate companion star. The spectral evolution of SN 2018oh is similar to that of a normal SN Ia, but is characterized by prominent and persistent carbon absorption features. The C II features can be detected from the early phases to about 3 weeks after the maximum light, representing the latest detection of carbon ever recorded in a SN Ia. This indicates that a considerable amount of unburned carbon exists in the ejecta of SN 2018oh and may mix into deeper layers.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.10061  [pdf] - 1811225
K2 Observations of SN 2018oh Reveal a Two-Component Rising Light Curve for a Type Ia Supernova
Dimitriadis, G.; Foley, R. J.; Rest, A.; Kasen, D.; Piro, A. L.; Polin, A.; Jones, D. O.; Villar, A.; Narayan, G.; Coulter, D. A.; Kilpatrick, C. D.; Pan, Y. -C.; Rojas-Bravo, C.; Fox, O. D.; Jha, S. W.; Nugent, P. E.; Riess, A. G.; Scolnic, D.; Drout, M. R.; Barentsen, G.; Dotson, J.; Gully-Santiago, M.; Hedges, C.; Cody, A. M.; Barclay, T.; Howell, S.; Garnavich, P.; Tucker, B. E.; Shaya, E.; Mushotzky, R.; Olling, R. P.; Margheim, S.; Zenteno, A.; Coughlin, J.; Van Cleve, J. E.; Cardoso, J. Vinicius de Miranda; Larson, K. A.; McCalmont-Everton, K. M.; Peterson, C. A.; Ross, S. E.; Reedy, L. H.; Osborne, D.; McGinn, C.; Kohnert, L.; Migliorini, L.; Wheaton, A.; Spencer, B.; Labonde, C.; Castillo, G.; Beerman, G.; Steward, K.; Hanley, M.; Larsen, R.; Gangopadhyay, R.; Kloetzel, R.; Weschler, T.; Nystrom, V.; Moffatt, J.; Redick, M.; Griest, K.; Packard, M.; Muszynski, M.; Kampmeier, J.; Bjella, R.; Flynn, S.; Elsaesser, B.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H. A.; Huber, M. E.; Magnier, E. A.; Waters, C. Z.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Bulger, J.; Lowe, T. B.; Willman, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Smith, K. W.; Points, S.; Strampelli, G. M.; Brimacombe, J.; Chen, P.; Munoz, J. A.; Mutel, R. L.; Shields, J.; Vallely, P. J.; Villanueva, S.; Li, W.; Wang, X.; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.; Mo, J.; Zhao, X.; Sai, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, T.; Wang, L.; Zhang, J.; Baron, E.; DerKacy, J. M.; Li, L.; Chen, Z.; Xiang, D.; Rui, L.; Wang, L.; Huang, F.; Li, X.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Howell, D. A.; Arcavi, I.; Hiramatsu, D.; Burke, J.; Valenti, S.; Tonry, J. L.; Denneau, L.; Heinze, A. N.; Weiland, H.; Stalder, B.; Vinko, J.; Sarneczky, K.; Pa, A.; Bodi, A.; Bognar, Zs.; Csak, B.; Cseh, B.; Csornyei, G.; Hanyecz, O.; Ignacz, B.; Kalup, Cs.; Konyves-Toth, R.; Kriskovics, L.; Ordasi, A.; Rajmon, I.; Sodor, A.; Szabo, R.; Szakats, R.; Zsidi, G.; Williams, S. C.; Nordin, J.; Cartier, R.; Frohmaier, C.; Galbany, L.; Gutierrez, C. P.; Hook, I.; Inserra, C.; Smith, M.; Sand, D. J.; Andrews, J. E.; Smith, N.; Bilinski, C.
Comments: 20 pages, 9 figures, 2 tables. Submitted to APJ Letters on 31 Jul 2018, Accepted for publication on 31 Aug 2018
Submitted: 2018-11-25
We present an exquisite, 30-min cadence Kepler (K2) light curve of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2018oh (ASASSN-18bt), starting weeks before explosion, covering the moment of explosion and the subsequent rise, and continuing past peak brightness. These data are supplemented by multi-color Pan-STARRS1 and CTIO 4-m DECam observations obtained within hours of explosion. The K2 light curve has an unusual two-component shape, where the flux rises with a steep linear gradient for the first few days, followed by a quadratic rise as seen for typical SNe Ia. This "flux excess" relative to canonical SN Ia behavior is confirmed in our $i$-band light curve, and furthermore, SN 2018oh is especially blue during the early epochs. The flux excess peaks 2.14$\pm0.04$ days after explosion, has a FWHM of 3.12$\pm0.04$ days, a blackbody temperature of $T=17,500^{+11,500}_{-9,000}$ K, a peak luminosity of $4.3\pm0.2\times10^{37}\,{\rm erg\,s^{-1}}$, and a total integrated energy of $1.27\pm0.01\times10^{43}\,{\rm erg}$. We compare SN 2018oh to several models that may provide additional heating at early times, including collision with a companion and a shallow concentration of radioactive nickel. While all of these models generally reproduce the early K2 light curve shape, we slightly favor a companion interaction, at a distance of $\sim$$2\times10^{12}\,{\rm cm}$ based on our early color measurements, although the exact distance depends on the uncertain viewing angle. Additional confirmation of a companion interaction in future modeling and observations of SN 2018oh would provide strong support for a single-degenerate progenitor system.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.11526  [pdf] - 1811084
Seeing Double: ASASSN-18bt Exhibits a Two-Component Rise in the Early-Time K2 Light Curve
Shappee, B. J.; Holoien, T. W. -s.; Drout, M. R.; Auchettl, K.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Shaya, E.; Narayan, G.; Brown, J. S.; Bose, S.; Bersier, D.; Brimacombe, J.; Chen, Ping; Dong, Subo; Holmbo, S.; Katz, B.; Munnoz, J. A.; Mutel, R. L.; Post, R. S.; Prieto, J. L.; Shields, J.; Tallon, D.; Thompson, T. A.; Vallely, P. J.; Villanueva, S.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Heinze, A. N.; Smith, K. W.; Stalder, B.; Tonry, J. L.; Weiland, H.; Barclay, T.; Barentsen, G.; Cody, A. M.; Dotson, J.; Foerster, F.; Garnavich, P.; Gully-santiago, M.; Hedges, C.; Howell, S.; Kasen, D.; Margheim, S.; Mushotzky, R.; Rest, A.; Tucker, B. E.; Villar, A.; Zenteno, A.; Beerman, G.; Bjella, R.; Castillo, G.; Coughlin, J.; Elsaesser, B.; Flynn, S.; Gangopadhyay, R.; Griest, K.; Hanley, M.; Kampmeier, J.; Kloetzel, R.; Kohnert, L.; Labonde, C.; Larsen, R.; Larson, K. A.; Mccalmont-everton, K. M.; Mcginn, C.; Migliorini, L.; Moffatt, J.; Muszynski, M.; Nystrom, V.; Osborne, D.; Packard, M.; Peterson, C. A.; Redick, M.; Reedy, L. H.; Ross, S. E.; Spencer, B.; Steward, K.; Van Cleve, J. E.; Cardoso, J. Vinicius De Miranda; Weschler, T.; Wheaton, A.; Bulger, J.; Lowe, T. B.; Magnier, E. A.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Waters, C. Z.; Willman, M.; Baron, Eddie; Chen, Zhihao; Derkacy, James M.; Huang, Fang; Li, Linyi; Li, Wenxiong; Li, Xue; Rui, Liming; Sai, Hanna; Wang, Lifan; Wang, Lingzhi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xiang, Danfeng; Zhang, Jicheng; Zhang, Jujia; Zhang, Kaicheng; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Xinghan; Zhao, Xulin; Brown, P. J.; Hermes, J. J.; Nordin, J.; Points, S.; Strampelli, G. M.; Zenteno, A.
Comments: 17 pages, 8 figures, 3 Tables. Accepted to ApJ. This work is part of a number of papers analyzing ASASSN-18bt, with coordinated papers from Dimitriadis et al. (2018) and Li et al. (2018)
Submitted: 2018-07-30, last modified: 2018-11-23
On 2018 Feb. 4.41, the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) discovered ASASSN-18bt in the K2 Campaign 16 field. With a redshift of z=0.01098 and a peak apparent magnitude of B_{max}=14.31, ASASSN-18bt is the nearest and brightest SNe Ia yet observed by the Kepler spacecraft. Here we present the discovery of ASASSN-18bt, the K2 light curve, and pre-discovery data from ASAS-SN and the Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System (ATLAS). The K2 early-time light curve has an unprecedented 30-minute cadence and photometric precision for an SN~Ia light curve, and it unambiguously shows a ~4 day nearly linear phase followed by a steeper rise. Thus, ASASSN-18bt joins a growing list of SNe Ia whose early light curves are not well described by a single power law. We show that a double-power-law model fits the data reasonably well, hinting that two physical processes must be responsible for the observed rise. However, we find that current models of the interaction with a non-degenerate companion predict an abrupt rise and cannot adequately explain the initial, slower linear phase. Instead, we find that existing, published models with shallow 56Ni are able to span the observed behavior and, with tuning, may be able to reproduce the ASASSN-18bt light curve. Regardless, more theoretical work is needed to satisfactorily model this and other early-time SNe~Ia light curves. Finally, we use Swift X-ray non-detections to constrain the presence of circumstellar material (CSM) at much larger distances and lower densities than possible with the optical light curve. For a constant density CSM these non-detections constrain rho<4.5 * 10^5 cm^-3 at a radius of 4 *10^15 cm from the progenitor star. Assuming a wind-like environment, we place mass-loss limits of Mdot< 8 * 10^-6 M_sun yr^-1 for v_w=100 km s^-1, ruling out some symbiotic progenitor systems.