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de Haan, T.

Normalized to: De Haan, T.

122 article(s) in total. 1101 co-authors, from 1 to 109 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 17,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.06197  [pdf] - 2050467
An Improved Measurement of the Secondary Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies from the SPT-SZ + SPTpol Surveys
Comments: Submitted to ApJ, 16 pages. (revised portions of the introduction and description of bandpower estimation)
Submitted: 2020-02-13, last modified: 2020-02-18
We report new measurements of millimeter-wave power spectra in the angular multipole range $2000 \le \ell \le 11,000$ (angular scales $5^\prime \gtrsim \theta \gtrsim 1^\prime$). By adding 95 and 150\,GHz data from the low-noise 500 deg$^2$ SPTpol survey to the SPT-SZ three-frequency 2540 deg$^2$ survey, we substantially reduce the uncertainties in these bands. These power spectra include contributions from the primary cosmic microwave background, cosmic infrared background, radio galaxies, and thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects. The data favor a thermal SZ (tSZ) power at 143\,GHz of $D^{\rm tSZ}_{3000} = 3.42 \pm 0.54~ \mu {\rm K}^2$ and a kinematic SZ (kSZ) power of $D^{\rm kSZ}_{3000} = 3.0 \pm 1.0~ \mu {\rm K}^2$. This is the first measurement of kSZ power at $\ge 3\,\sigma$. We study the implications of the measured kSZ power for the epoch of reionization, finding the duration of reionization to be $\Delta z_{re} = 1.0^{+1.6}_{-0.7}$ ($\Delta z_{re}< 4.1$ at 95% confidence), when combined with our previously published tSZ bispectrum measurement.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.07157  [pdf] - 2042222
Constraints on Cosmological Parameters from the 500 deg$^2$ SPTpol Lensing Power Spectrum
Comments: 16 pages, 8 figures, 3 tables, updated to match the version published on ApJ
Submitted: 2019-10-15, last modified: 2020-02-04
We present cosmological constraints based on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing potential power spectrum measurement from the recent 500 deg$^2$ SPTpol survey, the most precise CMB lensing measurement from the ground to date. We fit a flat $\Lambda$CDM model to the reconstructed lensing power spectrum alone and in addition with other data sets: baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) as well as primary CMB spectra from Planck and SPTpol. The cosmological constraints based on SPTpol and Planck lensing band powers are in good agreement when analysed alone and in combination with Planck full-sky primary CMB data. With weak priors on the baryon density and other parameters, the CMB lensing data alone provide a 4\% constraint on $\sigma_8\Omega_m^{0.25} = 0.0593 \pm 0.025$.. Jointly fitting with BAO data, we find $\sigma_8=0.779 \pm 0.023$, $\Omega_m = 0.368^{+0.032}_{-0.037}$, and $H_0 = 72.0^{+2.1}_{-2.5}\,\text{km}\,\text{s}^{-1}\,\text{Mpc}^{-1} $, up to $2\,\sigma$ away from the central values preferred by Planck lensing + BAO. However, we recover good agreement between SPTpol and Planck when restricting the analysis to similar scales. We also consider single-parameter extensions to the flat $\Lambda$CDM model. The SPTpol lensing spectrum constrains the spatial curvature to be $\Omega_K = -0.0007 \pm 0.0025$ and the sum of the neutrino masses to be $\sum m_{\nu} < 0.23$ eV at 95\% C.L. (with Planck primary CMB and BAO data), in good agreement with the Planck lensing results. With the differences in the $S/N$ of the lensing modes and the angular scales covered in the lensing spectra, this analysis represents an important independent check on the full-sky Planck lensing measurement.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.02156  [pdf] - 2032804
Fractional Polarisation of Extragalactic Sources in the 500-square-degree SPTpol Survey
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-03, last modified: 2020-01-17
We study the polarisation properties of extragalactic sources at 95 and 150 GHz in the SPTpol 500 deg$^2$ survey. We estimate the polarised power by stacking maps at known source positions, and correct for noise bias by subtracting the mean polarised power at random positions in the maps. We show that the method is unbiased using a set of simulated maps with similar noise properties to the real SPTpol maps. We find a flux-weighted mean-squared polarisation fraction $\langle p^2 \rangle= [8.9\pm1.1] \times 10^{-4}$ at 95 GHz and $[6.9\pm1.1] \times 10^{-4}$ at 150~GHz for the full sample. This is consistent with the values obtained for a sub-sample of active galactic nuclei. For dusty sources, we find 95 per cent upper limits of $\langle p^2 \rangle_{\rm 95}<16.9 \times 10^{-3}$ and $\langle p^2 \rangle_{\rm 150}<2.6 \times 10^{-3}$. We find no evidence that the polarisation fraction depends on the source flux or observing frequency. The 1-$\sigma$ upper limit on measured mean squared polarisation fraction at 150 GHz implies that extragalactic foregrounds will be subdominant to the CMB E and B mode polarisation power spectra out to at least $\ell\lesssim5700$ ($\ell\lesssim4700$) and $\ell\lesssim5300$ ($\ell\lesssim3600$), respectively at 95 (150) GHz.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.09621  [pdf] - 2030492
Galaxy Clusters Selected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in the SPTpol 100-Square-Degree Survey
Comments: 21 pages, 7 figures, associated data available at http://pole.uchicago.edu/public/data/sptsz-clusters. V2 was accepted to the AJ, and includes minor changes requested by the reviewer
Submitted: 2019-07-22, last modified: 2020-01-13
We present a catalog of galaxy cluster candidates detected in 100 square degrees surveyed with the SPTpol receiver on the South Pole Telescope. The catalog contains 89 candidates detected with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 4.6. The candidates are selected using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect at 95 and 150 GHz. Using both space- and ground-based optical and infrared telescopes, we have confirmed 81 candidates as galaxy clusters. We use these follow-up images and archival images to estimate photometric redshifts for 66 galaxy clusters and spectroscopic observations to obtain redshifts for 13 systems. An additional 2 galaxy clusters are confirmed using the overdensity of near-infrared galaxies only, and are presented without redshifts. We find that 15 candidates (18% of the total sample) are at redshift of $z \geq 1.0$, with a maximum confirmed redshift of $z_{\rm{max}} = 1.38 \pm 0.10$. We expect this catalog to contain every galaxy cluster with $M_{500c} > 2.6 \times 10^{14} M_\odot h^{-1}_{70}$ and $z > 0.25$ in the survey area. The mass threshold is approximately constant above $z = 0.25$, and the complete catalog has a median mass of approximately $ M_{500c} = 2.7 \times 10^{14} M_\odot h^{-1}_{70}$. Compared to previous SPT works, the increased depth of the millimeter-wave data (11.2 and 6.5 $\mu$K-arcmin at 95 and 150 GHz, respectively) makes it possible to find more galaxy clusters at high redshift and lower mass.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.01724  [pdf] - 2026608
Updated design of the CMB polarization experiment satellite LiteBIRD
Sugai, H.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Alonso, D.; Arnold, K.; Aumont, J.; Austermann, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Barreiro, R. B.; Basak, S.; Beall, J.; Beckman, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Buzzelli, A.; Calabrese, E.; Casas, F. J.; Challinor, A.; Chan, V.; Chinone, Y.; Cliche, J. -F.; Columbro, F.; Cukierman, A.; Curtis, D.; Danto, P.; de Bernardis, P.; de Haan, T.; De Petris, M.; Dickinson, C.; Dobbs, M.; Dotani, T.; Duband, L.; Ducout, A.; Duff, S.; Duivenvoorden, A.; Duval, J. -M.; Ebisawa, K.; Elleflot, T.; Enokida, H.; Eriksen, H. K.; Errard, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Finelli, F.; Flauger, R.; Franceschet, C.; Fuskeland, U.; Ganga, K.; Gao, J. -R.; Génova-Santos, R.; Ghigna, T.; Gomez, A.; Gradziel, M. L.; Grain, J.; Grupp, F.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halverson, N. W.; Hargrave, P.; Hasebe, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, M.; Hazumi, M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herranz, D.; Hill, C.; Hilton, G.; Hirota, Y.; Hivon, E.; Hlozek, R.; Hoang, D. -T.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Iida, T.; Imada, H.; Ishimura, K.; Ishino, H.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jones, M.; Kaga, T.; Kashima, S.; Kataoka, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Keskitalo, R.; Kibayashi, A.; Kikuchi, T.; Kimura, K.; Kisner, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kogiso, N.; Kogut, A.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Komatsu, K.; Konishi, K.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kuo, C. L.; Kurinsky, N.; Kushino, A.; Kuwata-Gonokami, M.; Lamagna, L.; Lattanzi, M.; Lee, A. T.; Linder, E.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Maki, M.; Mangilli, A.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Mathon, R.; Matsumura, T.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Minami, Y.; Mistuda, K.; Molinari, D.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mot, B.; Murata, Y.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagai, M.; Nagata, R.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Natoli, P.; Nerva, S.; Nishibori, T.; Nishino, H.; Nomura, Y.; Noviello, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Ochi, H.; Ogawa, H.; Ogawa, H.; Ohsaki, H.; Ohta, I.; Okada, N.; Okada, N.; Pagano, L.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piacentini, F.; Pisano, G.; Polenta, G.; Poletti, D.; Prouvé, T.; Puglisi, G.; Rambaud, D.; Raum, C.; Realini, S.; Remazeilles, M.; Roudil, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Russell, M.; Sakurai, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Sekimoto, Y.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shinozaki, K.; Shiraishi, M.; Shirron, P.; Signorelli, G.; Smecher, G.; Spizzi, P.; Stever, S. L.; Stompor, R.; Sugiyama, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, J.; Switzer, E.; Takaku, R.; Takakura, H.; Takakura, S.; Takeda, Y.; Taylor, A.; Taylor, E.; Terao, Y.; Thompson, K. L.; Thorne, B.; Tomasi, M.; Tomida, H.; Trappe, N.; Tristram, M.; Tsuji, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Tucker, C.; Ullom, J.; Uozumi, S.; Utsunomiya, S.; Van Lanen, J.; Vermeulen, G.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vissers, M.; Vittorio, N.; Voisin, F.; Walker, I.; Watanabe, N.; Wehus, I.; Weller, J.; Westbrook, B.; Winter, B.; Wollack, E.; Yamamoto, R.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Yanagisawa, M.; Yoshida, T.; Yumoto, J.; Zannoni, M.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Journal of Low Temperature Physics, in press
Submitted: 2020-01-06
Recent developments of transition-edge sensors (TESs), based on extensive experience in ground-based experiments, have been making the sensor techniques mature enough for their application on future satellite CMB polarization experiments. LiteBIRD is in the most advanced phase among such future satellites, targeting its launch in Japanese Fiscal Year 2027 (2027FY) with JAXA's H3 rocket. It will accommodate more than 4000 TESs in focal planes of reflective low-frequency and refractive medium-and-high-frequency telescopes in order to detect a signature imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the primordial gravitational waves predicted in cosmic inflation. The total wide frequency coverage between 34GHz and 448GHz enables us to extract such weak spiral polarization patterns through the precise subtraction of our Galaxy's foreground emission by using spectral differences among CMB and foreground signals. Telescopes are cooled down to 5Kelvin for suppressing thermal noise and contain polarization modulators with transmissive half-wave plates at individual apertures for separating sky polarization signals from artificial polarization and for mitigating from instrumental 1/f noise. Passive cooling by using V-grooves supports active cooling with mechanical coolers as well as adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators. Sky observations from the second Sun-Earth Lagrangian point, L2, are planned for three years. An international collaboration between Japan, USA, Canada, and Europe is sharing various roles. In May 2019, the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA selected LiteBIRD as the strategic large mission No. 2.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.04121  [pdf] - 2015078
The SPTpol Extended Cluster Survey
Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Stalder, B.; Gladders, M. D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Allen, S. W.; Anderson, A. J.; Annis, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Austermann, J. E.; Avila, S.; Avva, J. S.; Bayliss, M.; Beall, J. A.; Bechtol, K.; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bianchini, F.; Blake, C.; Brodwin, M.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Citron, R.; Moran, C. Corbett; Costanzi, M.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; da Costa, L. N.; de Haan, T.; De Vicente, J.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Eifler, T. F.; Everett, W.; Flaugher, B.; Floyd, B.; Frieman, J.; Gallicchio, J.; García-Bellido, J.; George, E. M.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gilbert, A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N.; Henning, J. W.; Heymans, C.; Holder, G. P.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Joudaki, S.; Khullar, G.; Klein, M.; Knox, L.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lee, A. T.; Li, D.; Lidman, C.; Lowitz, A.; MacCrann, N.; Mahler, G.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Montgomery, J.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Noble, G.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Palmese, A.; Parkinson, D.; Patil, S.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Ramachandra, N. S.; Reichardt, C. L.; González, J. D. Remolina; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sanchez, E.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schrabback, T.; Serrano, S.; Sharon, K.; Sievers, C.; Smecher, G.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Veach, T.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Weller, J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yefremenko, V.; Zhang, Y.
Comments: 49 pages, 14 figures, 10 tables. Minor changes to match accepted version in ApJS
Submitted: 2019-10-09, last modified: 2019-12-13
We describe the observations and resultant galaxy cluster catalog from the 2770 deg$^2$ SPTpol Extended Cluster Survey (SPT-ECS). Clusters are identified via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, and confirmed with a combination of archival and targeted follow-up data, making particular use of data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). With incomplete followup we have confirmed as clusters 244 of 266 candidates at a detection significance $\xi \ge 5$ and an additional 204 systems at $4<\xi<5$. The confirmed sample has a median mass of $M_{500c} \sim {4.4 \times 10^{14} M_\odot h_{70}^{-1}}$, a median redshift of $z=0.49$, and we have identified 44 strong gravitational lenses in the sample thus far. Radio data are used to characterize contamination to the SZ signal; the median contamination for confirmed clusters is predicted to be $\sim$1% of the SZ signal at the $\xi>4$ threshold, and $<4\%$ of clusters have a predicted contamination $>10\% $ of their measured SZ flux. We associate SZ-selected clusters, from both SPT-ECS and the SPT-SZ survey, with clusters from the DES redMaPPer sample, and find an offset distribution between the SZ center and central galaxy in general agreement with previous work, though with a larger fraction of clusters with significant offsets. Adopting a fixed Planck-like cosmology, we measure the optical richness-to-SZ-mass ($\lambda-M$) relation and find it to be 28% shallower than that from a weak-lensing analysis of the DES data---a difference significant at the 4 $\sigma$ level---with the relations intersecting at $\lambda=60$ . The SPT-ECS cluster sample will be particularly useful for studying the evolution of massive clusters and, in combination with DES lensing observations and the SPT-SZ cluster sample, will be an important component of future cosmological analyses.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.04272  [pdf] - 2012021
Broadband, millimeter-wave antireflection coatings for large-format, cryogenic aluminum oxide optics
Comments: 16 pages, 9 figures; submitted to Applied Optics (05 Dec 2019)
Submitted: 2019-12-06
We present two prescriptions for broadband (~77 - 252 GHz), millimeter-wave antireflection coatings for cryogenic, sintered polycrystalline aluminum oxide optics: one for large-format (700 mm diameter) planar and plano-convex elements, the other for densely packed arrays of quasi-optical elements, in our case 5 mm diameter half-spheres (called "lenslets"). The coatings comprise three layers of commercially-available, polytetrafluoroethylene-based, dielectric sheet material. We review the fabrication processes for both prescriptions then discuss laboratory measurements of their transmittance and reflectance. In addition, we present the inferred refractive indices and loss tangents for the coating materials and the aluminum oxide substrate.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.08047  [pdf] - 2000343
Particle Physics with the Cosmic Microwave Background with SPT-3G
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures, TAUP 2019
Submitted: 2019-11-18
The cosmic microwave background (CMB) encodes information about the content and evolution of the universe. The presence of light, weakly interacting particles impacts the expansion history of the early universe, which alters the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB. In this way, current measurements of the CMB place interesting constraints on the neutrino energy density and mass, as well as on the abundance of other possible light relativistic particle species. We present the status of an on-going 1500 sq. deg. survey with the SPT-3G receiver, a new mm-wavelength camera on the 10-m diameter South Pole Telescope (SPT). The SPT-3G camera consists of 16,000 superconducting transition edge sensors, a 10x increase over the previous generation camera, which allows it to map the CMB with an unprecedented combination of sensitivity and angular resolution. We highlight projected constraints on the abundance of sterile neutrinos and the sum of the neutrino masses for the SPT-3G survey, which could help determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.05777  [pdf] - 1983858
A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Lensing Potential and Power Spectrum from 500 deg$^2$ of SPTpol Temperature and Polarization Data
Comments: 18 pages, 8 figures; updated to match published version
Submitted: 2019-05-14, last modified: 2019-10-22
We present a measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing potential using 500 deg$^2$ of 150 GHz data from the SPTpol receiver on the South Pole Telescope. The lensing potential is reconstructed with signal-to-noise per mode greater than unity at lensing multipoles $L \lesssim 250$, using a quadratic estimator on a combination of CMB temperature and polarization maps. We report measurements of the lensing potential power spectrum in the multipole range of $100< L < 2000$ from sets of temperature-only, polarization-only, and minimum-variance estimators. We measure the lensing amplitude by taking the ratio of the measured spectrum to the expected spectrum from the best-fit $\Lambda$CDM model to the $\textit{Planck}$ 2015 TT+lowP+lensing dataset. For the minimum-variance estimator, we find $A_{\rm{MV}} = 0.944 \pm 0.058{\rm (Stat.)}\pm0.025{\rm (Sys.)}$; restricting to only polarization data, we find $A_{\rm{POL}} = 0.906 \pm 0.090 {\rm (Stat.)} \pm 0.040 {\rm (Sys.)}$. Considering statistical uncertainties alone, this is the most precise polarization-only lensing amplitude constraint to date (10.1 $\sigma$), and is more precise than our temperature-only constraint. We perform null tests and consistency checks and find no evidence for significant contamination.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.05748  [pdf] - 1978910
Measurements of B-mode Polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background from 500 Square Degrees of SPTpol Data
Comments: 16 pages, 4 figures, Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2019-10-13
We report a B-mode power spectrum measurement from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization anisotropy observations made using the SPTpol instrument on the South Pole Telescope. This work uses 500 deg$^2$ of SPTpol data, a five-fold increase over the last SPTpol B-mode release. As a result, the bandpower uncertainties have been reduced by more than a factor of two, and the measurement extends to lower multipoles: $52 < \ell < 2301$. Data from both 95 and 150 GHz are used, allowing for three cross-spectra: 95 GHz x 95 GHz, 95 GHz x 150 GHz, and 150 GHz x 150 GHz. B-mode power is detected at very high significance; we find $P(BB < 0) = 5.8 \times 10^{-71}$, corresponding to a $18.1 \sigma$ detection of power. An upper limit is set on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r < 0.44$ at 95% confidence (the expected $1 \sigma$ constraint on $r$ given the measurement uncertainties is 0.22). We find the measured B-mode power is consistent with the Planck best-fit $\Lambda$CDM model predictions. Scaling the predicted lensing B-mode power in this model by a factor Alens, the data prefer Alens = $1.17 \pm 0.13$. These data are currently the most precise measurements of B-mode power at $\ell > 320$.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.08605  [pdf] - 1994098
A Detection of CMB-Cluster Lensing using Polarization Data from SPTpol
Raghunathan, S.; Patil, S.; Baxter, E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Crawford, T. M.; Holder, G. P.; McClintock, T.; Reichardt, C. L.; Varga, T. N.; Whitehorn, N.; Ade, P. A. R.; Allam, S.; Anderson, A. J.; Austermann, J. E.; Avila, S.; Avva, J. S.; Bacon, D.; Beall, J. A.; Bender, A. N.; Bianchini, F.; Bocquet, S.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Citron, R.; Costanzi, M.; Crites, A. T.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Doel, P.; Everett, S.; Evrard, A. E.; Feng, C.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gallicchio, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; George, E. M.; Giannantonio, T.; Gilbert, A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, G.; de Haan, T.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeltema, T.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Knox, L.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lee, A. T.; Li, D.; Lima, M.; Lowitz, A.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Montgomery, J.; Moran, C. Corbett; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Noble, G.; Novosad, V.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Rapetti, D.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Rozo, E.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sievers, C.; Smecher, G.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Veach, T.; De Vicente, J.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Wang, G.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yefremenko, V.; Zhang, Y.
Comments: 10 pages, 3 figures, 1 table; typos fixed; accepted for publication in PRL
Submitted: 2019-07-19, last modified: 2019-09-24
We report the first detection of gravitational lensing due to galaxy clusters using only the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The lensing signal is obtained using a new estimator that extracts the lensing dipole signature from stacked images formed by rotating the cluster-centered Stokes $Q/U$ map cutouts along the direction of the locally measured background CMB polarization gradient. Using data from the SPTpol 500 deg$^{2}$ survey at the locations of roughly 18,000 clusters with richness $\lambda \ge 10$ from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year-3 full galaxy cluster catalog, we detect lensing at $4.8\sigma$. The mean stacked mass of the selected sample is found to be $(1.43 \pm 0.4)\ \times 10^{14}\ {\rm M_{\odot}}$ which is in good agreement with optical weak lensing based estimates using DES data and CMB-lensing based estimates using SPTpol temperature data. This measurement is a key first step for cluster cosmology with future low-noise CMB surveys, like CMB-S4, for which CMB polarization will be the primary channel for cluster lensing measurements.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.07642  [pdf] - 1947224
Recent Advances in Frequency-Multiplexed TES Readout: Vastly Reduced Parasitics and an Increase in Multiplexing Factor with sub-Kelvin SQUIDs
Comments: 7 pages, 6 figures, Submitted to the JLTP for LTD-18
Submitted: 2019-08-20
Cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements are fundamentally limited by photon statistics. Therefore, ground-based CMB observatories have been increasing the number of detectors that are simultaneously observing the sky. Thanks to the advent of monolithically fabricated transition edge sensor (TES) arrays, the number of on-sky detectors has been increasing exponentially for over a decade. The next-generation experiment CMB-S4 will increase this detector count by more than an order of magnitude from the current state-of-the-art to ~500,000. The readout of such a huge number of exquisitely precise sub-Kelvin sensors is feasible using an existing technology: frequency-domain multiplexing (fMux). To further optimize this system and reduce complexity and cost, we have recently made significant advances including the elimination of 4 K electronics, a massive decrease of parasitic in-series impedances, and a significant increase in multiplexing factor.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.01062  [pdf] - 1928247
CMB-S4 Decadal Survey APC White Paper
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Amin, Mustafa A.; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bock, James J.; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Project White Paper submitted to the 2020 Decadal Survey, 10 pages plus references. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1907.04473
Submitted: 2019-07-31
We provide an overview of the science case, instrument configuration and project plan for the next-generation ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4, for consideration by the 2020 Decadal Survey.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.11976  [pdf] - 2025648
Performance of Al-Mn Transition-Edge Sensor Bolometers in SPT-3G
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures, submitted to the Journal of Low Temperature Physics: LTD18 Special Edition
Submitted: 2019-07-27
SPT-3G is a polarization-sensitive receiver, installed on the South Pole Telescope, that measures the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from degree to arcminute scales. The receiver consists of ten 150~mm-diameter detector wafers, containing a total of 16,000 transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers observing at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. During the 2018-2019 austral summer, one of these detector wafers was replaced by a new wafer fabricated with Al-Mn TESs instead of the Ti/Au design originally deployed for SPT-3G. We present the results of in-lab characterization and on-sky performance of this Al-Mn wafer, including electrical and thermal properties, optical efficiency measurements, and noise-equivalent temperature. In addition, we discuss and account for several calibration-related systematic errors that affect measurements made using frequency-domain multiplexing readout electronics.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.12995  [pdf] - 1924142
Consistency of cosmic microwave background temperature measurements in three frequency bands in the 2500-square-degree SPT-SZ survey
Comments: 21 pages, 4 figures, current version matches version published in JCAP
Submitted: 2019-04-29, last modified: 2019-07-27
We present an internal consistency test of South Pole Telescope (SPT) measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropy using three-band data from the SPT-SZ survey. These measurements are made from observations of ~2500 deg^2 of sky in three frequency bands centered at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. We combine the information from these three bands into six semi-independent estimates of the CMB power spectrum (three single-frequency power spectra and three cross-frequency spectra) over the multipole range 650 < l < 3000. We subtract an estimate of foreground power from each power spectrum and evaluate the consistency among the resulting CMB-only spectra. We determine that the six foreground-cleaned power spectra are consistent with the null hypothesis, in which the six cleaned spectra contain only CMB power and noise. A fit of the data to this model results in a chi-squared value of 236.3 for 235 degrees of freedom, and the probability to exceed this chi-squared value is 46%.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.10947  [pdf] - 2025643
On-sky performance of the SPT-3G frequency-domain multiplexed readout
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures submitted to the Journal of Low Temperature Physics: LTD18 Special Edition
Submitted: 2019-07-25
Frequency-domain multiplexing (fMux) is an established technique for the readout of large arrays of transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. Each TES in a multiplexing module has a unique AC voltage bias that is selected by a resonant filter. This scheme enables the operation and readout of multiple bolometers on a single pair of wires, reducing thermal loading onto sub-Kelvin stages. The current receiver on the South Pole Telescope, SPT-3G, uses a 68x fMux system to operate its large-format camera of $\sim$16,000 TES bolometers. We present here the successful implementation and performance of the SPT-3G readout as measured on-sky. Characterization of the noise reveals a median pair-differenced 1/f knee frequency of 33 mHz, indicating that low-frequency noise in the readout will not limit SPT-3G's measurements of sky power on large angular scales. Measurements also show that the median readout white noise level in each of the SPT-3G observing bands is below the expectation for photon noise, demonstrating that SPT-3G is operating in the photon-noise-dominated regime.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02212  [pdf] - 1922933
Cosmological lensing ratios with DES Y1, SPT and Planck
Prat, J.; Baxter, E. J.; Shin, T.; Sánchez, C.; Chang, C.; Jain, B.; Miquel, R.; Alarcon, A.; Bacon, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Cawthon, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; Dodelson, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Friedrich, O.; Gatti, M.; Gruen, D.; Hartley, W. G.; Holder, G. P.; Hoyle, B.; Jarvis, M.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Mawdsley, B.; Nicola, A.; Omori, Y.; Pujol, A.; Rau, M. M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Samuroff, S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vielzeuf, P.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Avila, S.; Aylor, K.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bleem, L. E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Chown, R.; Crites, A. T.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Doel, P.; Everett, W. B.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; George, E. M.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; de Haan, T.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Knox, L.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lima, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Maia, M. A. G.; Manzotti, A.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. J.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Simard, G.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-04, last modified: 2019-07-25
Correlations between tracers of the matter density field and gravitational lensing are sensitive to the evolution of the matter power spectrum and the expansion rate across cosmic time. Appropriately defined ratios of such correlation functions, on the other hand, depend only on the angular diameter distances to the tracer objects and to the gravitational lensing source planes. Because of their simple cosmological dependence, such ratios can exploit available signal-to-noise down to small angular scales, even where directly modeling the correlation functions is difficult. We present a measurement of lensing ratios using galaxy position and lensing data from the Dark Energy Survey, and CMB lensing data from the South Pole Telescope and Planck, obtaining the highest precision lensing ratio measurements to date. Relative to the concordance $\Lambda$CDM model, we find a best fit lensing ratio amplitude of $A = 1.1 \pm 0.1$. We use the ratio measurements to generate cosmological constraints, focusing on the curvature parameter. We demonstrate that photometrically selected galaxies can be used to measure lensing ratios, and argue that future lensing ratio measurements with data from a combination of LSST and Stage-4 CMB experiments can be used to place interesting cosmological constraints, even after considering the systematic uncertainties associated with photometric redshift and galaxy shear estimation.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.08284  [pdf] - 1976842
The Simons Observatory: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Adachi, Shunsuke; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Atkins, Zachary; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Lizancos, Anton Baleato; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bhandarkar, Tanay; Bhimani, Sanah; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bolliet, Boris; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Carl, Fred. M; Cayuso, Juan; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Clark, Susan; Clarke, Philip; Contaldi, Carlo; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Coulton, Will; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Bouhargani, Hamza El; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Fergusson, James; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Halpern, Mark; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hensley, Brandon; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hoang, Thuong D.; Hoh, Jonathan; Hotinli, Selim C.; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Johnson, Matthew; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Kofman, Anna; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kusaka, Akito; LaPlante, Phil; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Liu, Jia; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McCarrick, Heather; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Mertens, James; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Moore, Jenna; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Murata, Masaaki; Naess, Sigurd; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Nicola, Andrina; Niemack, Mike; Nishino, Haruki; Nishinomiya, Yume; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Pagano, Luca; Partridge, Bruce; Perrotta, Francesca; Phakathi, Phumlani; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Rotti, Aditya; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Saunders, Lauren; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Shellard, Paul; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sifon, Cristobal; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Smith, Kendrick; Sohn, Wuhyun; Sonka, Rita; Spergel, David; Spisak, Jacob; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Treu, Jesse; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Wang, Yuhan; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Young, Edward; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zannoni, Mario; Zhang, Hezi; Zheng, Kaiwen; Zhu, Ningfeng; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1808.07445
Submitted: 2019-07-16
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment sited on Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert in Chile that promises to provide breakthrough discoveries in fundamental physics, cosmology, and astrophysics. Supported by the Simons Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and with contributions from collaborating institutions, SO will see first light in 2021 and start a five year survey in 2022. SO has 287 collaborators from 12 countries and 53 institutions, including 85 students and 90 postdocs. The SO experiment in its currently funded form ('SO-Nominal') consists of three 0.4 m Small Aperture Telescopes (SATs) and one 6 m Large Aperture Telescope (LAT). Optimized for minimizing systematic errors in polarization measurements at large angular scales, the SATs will perform a deep, degree-scale survey of 10% of the sky to search for the signature of primordial gravitational waves. The LAT will survey 40% of the sky with arc-minute resolution. These observations will measure (or limit) the sum of neutrino masses, search for light relics, measure the early behavior of Dark Energy, and refine our understanding of the intergalactic medium, clusters and the role of feedback in galaxy formation. With up to ten times the sensitivity and five times the angular resolution of the Planck satellite, and roughly an order of magnitude increase in mapping speed over currently operating ("Stage 3") experiments, SO will measure the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations to exquisite precision in six frequency bands from 27 to 280 GHz. SO will rapidly advance CMB science while informing the design of future observatories such as CMB-S4.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.04473  [pdf] - 1914295
CMB-S4 Science Case, Reference Design, and Project Plan
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; McQuinn, Matthew; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: 287 pages, 82 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-09
We present the science case, reference design, and project plan for the Stage-4 ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.10643  [pdf] - 1953348
Measurements of the Cross Spectra of the Cosmic Infrared and Microwave Backgrounds from 95 to 1200 GHz
Comments: 21 pages, 3 figures; Accepted by ApJS (updated to accepted version)
Submitted: 2018-10-24, last modified: 2019-06-28
We present measurements of the power spectra of cosmic infrared background (CIB) and cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations in six frequency bands. Maps at the lower three frequency bands, 95, 150, and 220 GHz (3330, 2000, 1360 $\mu$m) are from the South Pole Telescope, while the upper three frequency bands, 600, 857, and 1200 GHz (500, 350, 250 $\mu$m) are observed with Herschel/SPIRE. From these data, we produce 21 angular power spectra (six auto- and fifteen cross-frequency) spanning the multipole range $600 \le \ell \le 11,000$. Our measurements are the first to cross-correlate measurements near the peak of the CIB spectrum with maps at 95 GHz, complementing and extending the measurements from Planck Collaboration et al. (2014) at 218, 550, and 857 GHz. The observed fluctuations originate largely from clustered, infrared-emitting, dusty star-forming galaxies, the CMB, and to a lesser extent radio galaxies, active galactic nuclei, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.01679  [pdf] - 1901769
Cluster Cosmology Constraints from the 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ Survey: Inclusion of Weak Gravitational Lensing Data from Magellan and the Hubble Space Telescope
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ (v2 is accepted version), the catalog can be found at https://pole.uchicago.edu/public/data/sptsz-clusters/
Submitted: 2018-12-04, last modified: 2019-05-20
We derive cosmological constraints using a galaxy cluster sample selected from the 2500~deg$^2$ SPT-SZ survey. The sample spans the redshift range $0.25< z<1.75$ and contains 343 clusters with SZ detection significance $\xi>5$. The sample is supplemented with optical weak gravitational lensing measurements of 32 clusters with $0.29<z<1.13$ (from Magellan and HST) and X-ray measurements of 89 clusters with $0.25<z<1.75$ (from Chandra). We rely on minimal modeling assumptions: i) weak lensing provides an accurate means of measuring halo masses, ii) the mean SZ and X-ray observables are related to the true halo mass through power-law relations in mass and dimensionless Hubble parameter $E(z)$ with a-priori unknown parameters, iii) there is (correlated, lognormal) intrinsic scatter and measurement noise relating these observables to their mean relations. We simultaneously fit for these astrophysical modeling parameters and for cosmology. Assuming a flat $\nu\Lambda$CDM model, in which the sum of neutrino masses is a free parameter, we measure $\Omega_\mathrm{m}=0.276\pm0.047$, $\sigma_8=0.781\pm0.037$, and $\sigma_8(\Omega_\mathrm{m}/0.3)^{0.2}=0.766\pm0.025$. The redshift evolution of the X-ray $Y_\mathrm{X}$-mass and $M_\mathrm{gas}$-mass relations are both consistent with self-similar evolution to within $1\sigma$. The mass-slope of the $Y_\mathrm{X}$-mass relation shows a $2.3\sigma$ deviation from self-similarity. Similarly, the mass-slope of the $M_\mathrm{gas}$-mass relation is steeper than self-similarity at the $2.5\sigma$ level. In a $\nu w$CDM cosmology, we measure the dark energy equation of state parameter $w=-1.55\pm0.41$ from the cluster data. We perform a measurement of the growth of structure since redshift $z\sim1.7$ and find no evidence for tension with the prediction from General Relativity. We provide updated redshift and mass estimates for the SPT sample. (abridged)
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.07445  [pdf] - 1841339
The Simons Observatory: Science goals and forecasts
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Dusatko, John; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Fuzia, Brittany; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; He, Yizhou; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Howe, Logan; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Kernasovskiy, Sarah S.; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kuenstner, Stephen E.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Kusaka, Akito; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Leon, David; Leung, Jason S. -Y.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lowry, Lindsay; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Niemack, Michael; Nishino, Haruki; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Page, Lyman; Partridge, Bruce; Peloton, Julien; Perrotta, Francesca; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Siritanasak, Praween; Smith, Kendrick; Smith, Stephen R.; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward J.; Xu, Zhilei; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zhang, Hezi; Zhu, Ningfeng
Comments: This paper presents an overview of the Simons Observatory science goals, details about the instrument will be presented in a companion paper. The author contribution to this paper is available at https://simonsobservatory.org/publications.php (Abstract abridged) -- matching version published in JCAP
Submitted: 2018-08-22, last modified: 2019-03-01
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a new cosmic microwave background experiment being built on Cerro Toco in Chile, due to begin observations in the early 2020s. We describe the scientific goals of the experiment, motivate the design, and forecast its performance. SO will measure the temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background in six frequency bands: 27, 39, 93, 145, 225 and 280 GHz. The initial configuration of SO will have three small-aperture 0.5-m telescopes (SATs) and one large-aperture 6-m telescope (LAT), with a total of 60,000 cryogenic bolometers. Our key science goals are to characterize the primordial perturbations, measure the number of relativistic species and the mass of neutrinos, test for deviations from a cosmological constant, improve our understanding of galaxy evolution, and constrain the duration of reionization. The SATs will target the largest angular scales observable from Chile, mapping ~10% of the sky to a white noise level of 2 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, to measure the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, at a target level of $\sigma(r)=0.003$. The LAT will map ~40% of the sky at arcminute angular resolution to an expected white noise level of 6 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, overlapping with the majority of the LSST sky region and partially with DESI. With up to an order of magnitude lower polarization noise than maps from the Planck satellite, the high-resolution sky maps will constrain cosmological parameters derived from the damping tail, gravitational lensing of the microwave background, the primordial bispectrum, and the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects, and will aid in delensing the large-angle polarization signal to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio. The survey will also provide a legacy catalog of 16,000 galaxy clusters and more than 20,000 extragalactic sources.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.09640  [pdf] - 1838469
Design and Bolometer Characterization of the SPT-3G First-year Focal Plane
Comments: Conference proceeding for Low Temperature Detectors 2017. Accepted for publication: 27 August 2018
Submitted: 2019-02-25
During the austral summer of 2016-17, the third-generation camera, SPT-3G, was installed on the South Pole Telescope, increasing the detector count in the focal plane by an order of magnitude relative to the previous generation. Designed to map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, SPT-3G contains ten 6-in-hexagonal modules of detectors, each with 269 trichroic and dual-polarization pixels, read out using 68x frequency-domain multiplexing. Here we discuss design, assembly, and layout of the modules, as well as early performance characterization of the first-year array, including yield and detector properties.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.10998  [pdf] - 1835485
Mass Calibration of Optically Selected DES clusters using a Measurement of CMB-Cluster Lensing with SPTpol Data
Raghunathan, S.; Patil, S.; Baxter, E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Chou, T. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Holder, G. P.; McClintock, T.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rozo, E.; Varga, T. N.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Ade, P. A. R.; Allam, S.; Anderson, A. J.; Annis, J.; Austermann, J. E.; Avila, S.; Beall, J. A.; Bechtol, K.; Bender, A. N.; Bernstein, G.; Bertin, E.; Bianchini, F.; Bleem, L.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carretero, J.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Cho, H-M.; Citron, R.; Crites, A. T.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Everett, W.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gallicchio, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; George, E. M.; Gilbert, A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gruen, D.; Gschwend, J.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, G.; de Haan, T.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N.; Hartley, W. G.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; Hoyle, B.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Kim, A. G.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Knox, L.; Kovacs, A.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lee, A. T.; Lima, M.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L.; Montgomery, J.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Rapetti, D.; Romer, A. K.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smecher, G.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; De Vicente, J.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Wu, W. L. K.; Zhang, Y.
Comments: 19 pages, 6 figures, published in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-10-25, last modified: 2019-02-20
We use cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps from the 500 deg$^{2}$ SPTpol survey to measure the stacked lensing convergence of galaxy clusters from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year-3 redMaPPer (RM) cluster catalog. The lensing signal is extracted through a modified quadratic estimator designed to be unbiased by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel{'}dovich (tSZ) effect. The modified estimator uses a tSZ-free map, constructed from the SPTpol 95 and 150 GHz datasets, to estimate the background CMB gradient. For lensing reconstruction, we employ two versions of the RM catalog: a flux-limited sample containing 4003 clusters and a volume-limited sample with 1741 clusters. We detect lensing at a significance of 8.7$\sigma$(6.7$\sigma$) with the flux(volume)-limited sample. By modeling the reconstructed convergence using the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, we find the average lensing masses to be $M_{200m}$ = ($1.62^{+0.32}_{-0.25}$ [stat.] $\pm$ 0.04 [sys.]) and ($1.28^{+0.14}_{-0.18}$ [stat.] $\pm$ 0.03 [sys.]) $\times\ 10^{14}\ M_{\odot}$ for the volume- and flux-limited samples respectively. The systematic error budget is much smaller than the statistical uncertainty and is dominated by the uncertainties in the RM cluster centroids. We use the volume-limited sample to calibrate the normalization of the mass-richness scaling relation, and find a result consistent with the galaxy weak-lensing measurements from DES (Mcclintock et al. 2018).
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.10682  [pdf] - 1785287
Maps of the Southern Millimeter-wave Sky from Combined 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ and Planck Temperature Data
Comments: 21 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2018-03-28, last modified: 2018-11-13
We present three maps of the millimeter-wave sky created by combining data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and the Planck satellite. We use data from the SPT-SZ survey, a survey of 2540 deg$^2$ of the the sky with arcminute resolution in three bands centered at 95, 150, and 220 GHz, and the full-mission Planck temperature data in the 100, 143, and 217 GHz bands. A linear combination of the SPT-SZ and Planck data is computed in spherical harmonic space, with weights derived from the noise of both instruments. This weighting scheme results in Planck data providing most of the large-angular-scale information in the combined maps, with the smaller-scale information coming from SPT-SZ data. A number of tests have been done on the maps. We find their angular power spectra to agree very well with theoretically predicted spectra and previously published results.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.05344  [pdf] - 1830374
Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and X-ray Scaling Relations from Weak-Lensing Mass Calibration of 32 SPT Selected Galaxy Clusters
Comments: accepted for publication in MNRAS, 41 pages, 34 figures
Submitted: 2017-11-14, last modified: 2018-11-09
Uncertainty in the mass-observable scaling relations is currently the limiting factor for galaxy cluster based cosmology. Weak gravitational lensing can provide a direct mass calibration and reduce the mass uncertainty. We present new ground-based weak lensing observations of 19 South Pole Telescope (SPT) selected clusters at redshifts $0.29 \leq z \leq 0.61$ and combine them with previously reported space-based observations of 13 galaxy clusters at redshifts $0.576 \leq z \leq 1.132$ to constrain the cluster mass scaling relations with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE), the cluster gas mass \mgas, and \yx, the product of \mgas\ and X-ray temperature. We extend a previously used framework for the analysis of scaling relations and cosmological constraints obtained from SPT-selected clusters to make use of weak lensing information. We introduce a new approach to estimate the effective average redshift distribution of background galaxies and quantify a number of systematic errors affecting the weak lensing modelling. These errors include a calibration of the bias incurred by fitting a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the reduced shear using $N$-body simulations. We blind the analysis to avoid confirmation bias. We are able to limit the systematic uncertainties to 5.6% in cluster mass (68% confidence). Our constraints on the mass--X-ray observable scaling relations parameters are consistent with those obtained by earlier studies, and our constraints for the mass--SZE scaling relation are consistent with the simulation-based prior used in the most recent SPT-SZ cosmology analysis. We can now replace the external mass calibration priors used in previous SPT-SZ cosmology studies with a direct, internal calibration obtained on the same clusters.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02441  [pdf] - 1945701
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Cross-correlation between DES Y1 galaxy weak lensing and SPT+Planck CMB weak lensing
Omori, Y.; Baxter, E.; Chang, C.; Kirk, D.; Alarcon, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bleem, L. E.; Cawthon, R.; Choi, A.; Chown, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; DeRose, J.; Dodelson, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Fosalba, P.; Friedrich, O.; Gatti, M.; Gaztanaga, E.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Hartley, W. G.; Holder, G. P.; Hoyle, B.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Miquel, R.; Prat, J.; Rau, M. M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rozo, E.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Secco, L. F.; Sheldon, E.; Simard, G.; Troxel, M. A.; Vielzeuf, P.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Avila, S.; Aylor, K.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Crites, A. T.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Everett, W. B.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; George, E. M.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hollowood, D. L.; Honscheid, K.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Luong-Van, D.; Maia, M. A. G.; Manzotti, A.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Natoli, T.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schindler, R.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Williamson, R.; Wu, W. L. K.; Zahn, O.
Comments: 15 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-04
We cross-correlate galaxy weak lensing measurements from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) year-one (Y1) data with a cosmic microwave background (CMB) weak lensing map derived from South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck data, with an effective overlapping area of 1289 deg$^{2}$. With the combined measurements from four source galaxy redshift bins, we reject the hypothesis of no lensing with a significance of $10.8\sigma$. When employing angular scale cuts, this significance is reduced to $6.8\sigma$, which remains the highest signal-to-noise measurement of its kind to date. We fit the amplitude of the correlation functions while fixing the cosmological parameters to a fiducial $\Lambda$CDM model, finding $A = 0.99 \pm 0.17$. We additionally use the correlation function measurements to constrain shear calibration bias, obtaining constraints that are consistent with previous DES analyses. Finally, when performing a cosmological analysis under the $\Lambda$CDM model, we obtain the marginalized constraints of $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.261^{+0.070}_{-0.051}$ and $S_{8}\equiv \sigma_{8}\sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3} = 0.660^{+0.085}_{-0.100}$. These measurements are used in a companion work that presents cosmological constraints from the joint analysis of two-point functions among galaxies, galaxy shears, and CMB lensing using DES, SPT and Planck data.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02342  [pdf] - 1929685
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: tomographic cross-correlations between DES galaxies and CMB lensing from SPT+Planck
Omori, Y.; Giannantonio, T.; Porredon, A.; Baxter, E.; Chang, C.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Alarcon, A.; Banik, N.; Blazek, J.; Bleem, L. E.; Bridle, S. L.; Cawthon, R.; Choi, A.; Chown, R.; Crawford, T.; Dodelson, S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Friedrich, O.; Gruen, D.; Holder, G. P.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Kirk, D.; Kokron, N.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Muir, J.; Prat, J.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sánchez, C.; Secco, L. F.; Simard, G.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Avila, S.; Aylor, K.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Bianchini, F.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Crites, A. T.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; de Haan, T.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Everett, W. B.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; George, E. M.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hartley, W. G.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; Hoyle, B.; Hrubes, J. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lima, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Manzotti, A.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Walker, A. R.; Wu, W. L. K.; Zahn, O.
Comments: 17 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-04
We measure the cross-correlation between redMaGiC galaxies selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year-1 data and gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) reconstructed from South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck data over 1289 sq. deg. When combining measurements across multiple galaxy redshift bins spanning the redshift range of $0.15<z<0.90$, we reject the hypothesis of no correlation at 19.9$\sigma$ significance. When removing small-scale data points where thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal and nonlinear galaxy bias could potentially bias our results, the detection significance is reduced to 9.9$\sigma$. We perform a joint analysis of galaxy-CMB lensing cross-correlations and galaxy clustering to constrain cosmology, finding $\Omega_{\rm m} = 0.276^{+0.029}_{-0.030}$ and $S_{8}=\sigma_{8}\sqrt{\mathstrut \Omega_{\rm m}/0.3} = 0.800^{+0.090}_{-0.094}$. We also perform two alternate analyses aimed at constraining only the growth rate of cosmic structure as a function of redshift, finding consistency with predictions from the concordance $\Lambda$CDM model. The measurements presented here are part of a joint cosmological analysis that combines galaxy clustering, galaxy lensing and CMB lensing using data from DES, SPT and Planck.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02322  [pdf] - 1924924
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Joint Analysis of Galaxy Clustering, Galaxy Lensing, and CMB Lensing Two-point Functions
Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Alarcon, A.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Avila, S.; Aylor, K.; Banerji, M.; Banik, N.; Baxter, E. J.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Bianchini, F.; Blazek, J.; Bleem, L.; Bleem, L. E.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Choi, A.; Chown, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; de Haan, T.; DeRose, J.; Desai, S.; De Vicente, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Everett, W. B.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Friedrich, O.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gatti, M.; Gaztanaga, E.; George, E. M.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hartley, W. G.; Holder, G. P.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; Hoyle, B.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kent, S.; Kirk, D.; Knox, L.; Kokron, N.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Luong-Van, D.; MacCrann, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Manzotti, A.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, J. J.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Muir, J.; Natoli, T.; Nicola, A.; Nord, B.; Omori, Y.; Padin, S.; Pandey, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Porredon, A.; Prat, J.; Pryke, C.; Rau, M. M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rollins, R. P.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Secco, L. F.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Shirokoff, E.; Simard, G.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vielzeuf, P.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Williamson, R.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yanny, B.; Zahn, O.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: 20 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-04
We perform a joint analysis of the auto and cross-correlations between three cosmic fields: the galaxy density field, the galaxy weak lensing shear field, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) weak lensing convergence field. These three fields are measured using roughly 1300 sq. deg. of overlapping optical imaging data from first year observations of the Dark Energy Survey and millimeter-wave observations of the CMB from both the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich survey and Planck. We present cosmological constraints from the joint analysis of the two-point correlation functions between galaxy density and galaxy shear with CMB lensing. We test for consistency between these measurements and the DES-only two-point function measurements, finding no evidence for inconsistency in the context of flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmological models. Performing a joint analysis of five of the possible correlation functions between these fields (excluding only the CMB lensing autospectrum) yields $S_{8}\equiv \sigma_8\sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3} = 0.782^{+0.019}_{-0.025}$ and $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.260^{+0.029}_{-0.019}$. We test for consistency between these five correlation function measurements and the Planck-only measurement of the CMB lensing autospectrum, again finding no evidence for inconsistency in the context of flat $\Lambda$CDM models. Combining constraints from all six two-point functions yields $S_{8}=0.776^{+0.014}_{-0.021}$ and $\Omega_{\rm m}= 0.271^{+0.022}_{-0.016}$. These results provide a powerful test and confirmation of the results from the first year DES joint-probes analysis.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.09903  [pdf] - 1767338
Galaxy Kinematics and Mass Calibration in Massive SZE Selected Galaxy Clusters to z=1.3
Comments: 20 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-11-27, last modified: 2018-09-26
The galaxy phase-space distribution in galaxy clusters provides insights into the formation and evolution of cluster galaxies, and it can also be used to measure cluster mass profiles. We present a dynamical study based on $\sim$3000 passive, non-emission line cluster galaxies drawn from 110 galaxy clusters. The galaxy clusters were selected using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) in the 2500~deg$^2$ SPT-SZ survey and cover the redshift range $0.2 < z < 1.3$. We model the clusters using the Jeans equation, while adopting NFW mass profiles and a broad range of velocity dispersion anisotropy profiles. The data prefer velocity dispersion anisotropy profiles that are approximately isotropic near the center and increasingly radial toward the cluster virial radius, and this is true for all redshifts and masses we study. The pseudo-phase-space density profile of the passive galaxies is consistent with expectations for dark matter particles and subhalos from cosmological $N$-body simulations. The dynamical mass constraints are in good agreement with external mass estimates of the SPT cluster sample from either weak lensing, velocity dispersions, or X-ray $Y_X$ measurements. However, the dynamical masses are lower (at the 2.2$\sigma$ level) when compared to the mass calibration favored when fitting the SPT cluster data to a $\Lambda$CDM model with external cosmological priors, including CMB anisotropy data from Planck. The discrepancy grows with redshift, where in the highest redshift bin the ratio of dynamical to SPT+Planck masses is $\eta=0.63^{+0.13}_{-0.08}\pm0.06$ (statistical and systematic), corresponding to a $2.6\sigma$ discrepancy.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.00036  [pdf] - 1743942
Year two instrument status of the SPT-3G cosmic microwave background receiver
Comments: 21 pages, 9 Figures, Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2018
Submitted: 2018-08-31
The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a millimeter-wavelength telescope designed for high-precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The SPT measures both the temperature and polarization of the CMB with a large aperture, resulting in high resolution maps sensitive to signals across a wide range of angular scales on the sky. With these data, the SPT has the potential to make a broad range of cosmological measurements. These include constraining the effect of massive neutrinos on large-scale structure formation as well as cleaning galactic and cosmological foregrounds from CMB polarization data in future searches for inflationary gravitational waves. The SPT began observing in January 2017 with a new receiver (SPT-3G) containing $\sim$16,000 polarization-sensitive transition-edge sensor bolometers. Several key technology developments have enabled this large-format focal plane, including advances in detectors, readout electronics, and large millimeter-wavelength optics. We discuss the implementation of these technologies in the SPT-3G receiver as well as the challenges they presented. In late 2017 the implementations of all three of these technologies were modified to optimize total performance. Here, we present the current instrument status of the SPT-3G receiver.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.00030  [pdf] - 1848536
Broadband anti-reflective coatings for cosmic microwave background experiments
Comments: 13 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-31
The desire for higher sensitivity has driven ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments to employ ever larger focal planes, which in turn require larger reimaging optics. Practical limits to the maximum size of these optics motivates the development of quasi-optically-coupled (lenslet-coupled), multi-chroic detectors. These detectors can be sensitive across a broader bandwidth compared to waveguide-coupled detectors. However, the increase in bandwidth comes at a cost: the lenses (up to $\sim$700 mm diameter) and lenslets ($\sim$5 mm diameter, hemispherical lenses on the focal plane) used in these systems are made from high-refractive-index materials (such as silicon or amorphous aluminum oxide) that reflect nearly a third of the incident radiation. In order to maximize the faint CMB signal that reaches the detectors, the lenses and lenslets must be coated with an anti-reflective (AR) material. The AR coating must maximize radiation transmission in scientifically interesting bands and be cryogenically stable. Such a coating was developed for the third generation camera, SPT-3G, of the South Pole Telescope (SPT) experiment, but the materials and techniques used in the development are general to AR coatings for mm-wave optics. The three-layer polytetrafluoroethylene-based AR coating is broadband, inexpensive, and can be manufactured with simple tools. The coating is field tested; AR coated focal plane elements were deployed in the 2016-2017 austral summer and AR coated reimaging optics were deployed in 2017-2018.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.00033  [pdf] - 1743941
Characterization and performance of the second-year SPT-3G focal plane
Comments: 13 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-31
The third-generation instrument for the 10-meter South Pole Telescope, SPT-3G, was first installed in January 2017. In addition to completely new cryostats, secondary telescope optics, and readout electronics, the number of detectors in the focal plane has increased by an order of magnitude from previous instruments to ~16,000. The SPT-3G focal plane consists of ten detector modules, each with an array of 269 trichroic, polarization-sensitive pixels on a six-inch silicon wafer. Within each pixel is a broadband, dual-polarization sinuous antenna; the signal from each orthogonal linear polarization is divided into three frequency bands centered at 95, 150, and 220 GHz by in-line lumped element filters and transmitted via superconducting microstrip to Ti/Au transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers. Properties of the TES film, microstrip filters, and bolometer island must be tightly controlled to achieve optimal performance. For the second year of SPT-3G operation, we have replaced all ten wafers in the focal plane with new detector arrays tuned to increase mapping speed and improve overall performance. Here we discuss the TES superconducting transition temperature and normal resistance, detector saturation power, bandpasses, optical efficiency, and full array yield for the 2018 focal plane.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.00032  [pdf] - 1743940
Design and characterization of the SPT-3G receiver
Comments: Conference Presentation at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2018, conference 10708
Submitted: 2018-08-31
The SPT-3G receiver was commissioned in early 2017 on the 10-meter South Pole Telescope (SPT) to map anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). New optics, detector, and readout technologies have yielded a multichroic, high-resolution, low-noise camera with impressive throughput and sensitivity, offering the potential to improve our understanding of inflationary physics, astroparticle physics, and growth of structure. We highlight several key features and design principles of the new receiver, and summarize its performance to date.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.01962  [pdf] - 1811055
Spectroscopic Confirmation of Five Galaxy Clusters at z > 1.25 in the 2500 sq. deg. SPT-SZ Survey
Comments: 21 pages, 10 figures, 5 tables, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2018-06-05
We present spectroscopic confirmation of five galaxy clusters at $1.25 < \textit{z} < 1.5$, discovered in the $2500$ deg$^{2}$ South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey. These clusters, taken from a mass-limited sample with a nearly redshift independent selection function, have multi-wavelength follow-up imaging data from the X-ray to near-infrared, and currently form the most homogeneous massive high-redshift cluster sample known. We identify $44$ member galaxies, along with $25$ field galaxies, among the five clusters, and describe the full set of observations and data products from Magellan/LDSS3 multi-object spectroscopy of these cluster fields. We briefly describe the analysis pipeline, and present ensemble analyses of cluster member galaxies that demonstrate the reliability of the measured redshifts. We report $\textit{z} = 1.259, 1.288, 1.316, 1.401$ and $1.474$ for the five clusters from a combination of absorption-line (Ca II H$\&$K doublet - $3968,3934$ {\AA}) and emission-line ([OII] $3727,3729$ {\AA}) spectral features. Moreover, the calculated velocity dispersions yield dynamical cluster masses in good agreement with SZ masses for these clusters. We discuss the velocity and spatial distributions of passive and [OII]-emitting galaxies in these clusters, showing that they are consistent with velocity segregation and biases observed in lower redshift SPT clusters. We identify modest [OII] emission and pronounced CN and H$\delta$ absorption in a stacked spectrum of $28$ passive galaxies with Ca II H$\&$K-derived redshifts. This work increases the number of spectroscopically-confirmed SZ-selected galaxy clusters at $\textit{z} > 1.25$ from three to eight, further demonstrating the efficacy of SZ selection for the highest redshift massive clusters, and enabling detailed study of these systems.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.03219  [pdf] - 1679898
Optical Characterization of the SPT-3G Focal Plane
Comments: Conference proceeding for Low Temperature Detectors 2017
Submitted: 2018-05-08
The third-generation South Pole Telescope camera is designed to measure the cosmic microwave background across three frequency bands (95, 150 and 220 GHz) with ~16,000 transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers. Each multichroic pixel on a detector wafer has a broadband sinuous antenna that couples power to six TESs, one for each of the three observing bands and both polarization directions, via lumped element filters. Ten detector wafers populate the focal plane, which is coupled to the sky via a large-aperture optical system. Here we present the frequency band characterization with Fourier transform spectroscopy, measurements of optical time constants, beam properties, and optical and polarization efficiencies of the focal plane. The detectors have frequency bands consistent with our simulations, and have high average optical efficiency which is 86%, 77% and 66% for the 95, 150 and 220 GHz detectors. The time constants of the detectors are mostly between 0.5 ms and 5 ms. The beam is round with the correct size, and the polarization efficiency is more than 90% for most of the bolometers
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.09353  [pdf] - 1664889
Measurements of the Temperature and E-Mode Polarization of the CMB from 500 Square Degrees of SPTpol Data
Comments: Updated to match version accepted to ApJ. 34 pages, 17 figures, 6 tables
Submitted: 2017-07-28, last modified: 2018-04-11
We present measurements of the $E$-mode polarization angular auto-power spectrum ($EE$) and temperature-$E$-mode cross-power spectrum ($TE$) of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using 150 GHz data from three seasons of SPTpol observations. We report the power spectra over the spherical harmonic multipole range $50 < \ell \leq 8000$, and detect nine acoustic peaks in the $EE$ spectrum with high signal-to-noise ratio. These measurements are the most sensitive to date of the $EE$ and $TE$ power spectra at $\ell > 1050$ and $\ell > 1475$, respectively. The observations cover 500 deg$^2$, a fivefold increase in area compared to previous SPTpol analyses, which increases our sensitivity to the photon diffusion damping tail of the CMB power spectra enabling tighter constraints on \LCDM model extensions. After masking all sources with unpolarized flux $>50$ mJy we place a 95% confidence upper limit on residual polarized point-source power of $D_\ell = \ell(\ell+1)C_\ell/2\pi <0.107\,\mu{\rm K}^2$ at $\ell=3000$, suggesting that the $EE$ damping tail dominates foregrounds to at least $\ell = 4050$ with modest source masking. We find that the SPTpol dataset is in mild tension with the $\Lambda CDM$ model ($2.1\,\sigma$), and different data splits prefer parameter values that differ at the $\sim 1\,\sigma$ level. When fitting SPTpol data at $\ell < 1000$ we find cosmological parameter constraints consistent with those for $Planck$ temperature. Including SPTpol data at $\ell > 1000$ results in a preference for a higher value of the expansion rate ($H_0 = 71.3 \pm 2.1\,\mbox{km}\,s^{-1}\mbox{Mpc}^{-1}$ ) and a lower value for present-day density fluctuations ($\sigma_8 = 0.77 \pm 0.02$).
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.06987  [pdf] - 1698011
The LiteBIRD Satellite Mission - Sub-Kelvin Instrument
Suzuki, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Alonso, D.; Arnold, K.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barron, D.; Basak, S.; Beckman, S.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Calabrese, E.; Chinone, Y.; Cho, H-M.; Cukierman, A.; Curtis, D. W.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Dominjon, A.; Dotani, T.; Duband, L.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Duval, J. M.; Elleflot, T.; Eriksen, H. K.; Errard, J.; Fischer, J.; Fujino, T.; Funaki, T.; Fuskeland, U.; Ganga, K.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Grain, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Hamada, T.; Hasebe, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hattori, M.; Hayes, L.; Hazumi, M.; Hidehira, N.; Hill, C. A.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Iida, T.; Imada, H.; Inoue, M.; Inoue, Y.; D., K.; Ishino, H.; Jeong, O.; Kanai, H.; Kaneko, D.; Kashima, S.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Keskitalo, R.; Kibayashi, A.; Kida, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kisner, T.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Komatsu, K.; Kuo, C. L.; Kurinsky, N. A.; Kusaka, A.; Lazarian, A.; Lee, A. T.; Li, D.; Linder, E.; Maffei, B.; Mangilli, A.; Maki, M.; Matsumura, T.; Matsuura, S.; Meilhan, D.; Mima, S.; Minami, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Montier, L.; Nagai, M.; Nagasaki, T.; Nagata, R.; Nakajima, M.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Naruse, M.; Nishino, H.; Nitta, T.; Noguchi, T.; Ogawa, H.; Oguri, S.; Okada, N.; Okamoto, A.; Okamura, T.; Otani, C.; Patanchon, G.; Pisano, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Remazeilles, M.; Richards, P. L.; Sakai, S.; Sakurai, Y.; Sato, Y.; Sato, N.; Sawada, M.; Segawa, Y.; Sekimoto, Y.; Seljak, U.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shimizu, T.; Shinozaki, K.; Stompor, R.; Sugai, H.; Sugita, H.; Suzuki, J.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takaku, R.; Takakura, S.; Takatori, S.; Tanabe, D.; Taylor, E.; Thompson, K. L.; Thorne, B.; Tomaru, T.; Tomida, T.; Tomita, N.; Tristram, M.; Tucker, C.; Turin, P.; Tsujimoto, M.; Uozumi, S.; Utsunomiya, S.; Uzawa, Y.; Vansyngel, F.; Wehus, I. K.; Westbrook, B.; Willer, M.; Whitehorn, N.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, R.; Yamasaki, N.; Yamashita, T.; Yoshida, M.
Comments: 7 pages 2 figures Journal of Low Temperature Physics - Special edition - LTD17 Proceeding
Submitted: 2018-01-22, last modified: 2018-03-15
Inflation is the leading theory of the first instant of the universe. Inflation, which postulates that the universe underwent a period of rapid expansion an instant after its birth, provides convincing explanation for cosmological observations. Recent advancements in detector technology have opened opportunities to explore primordial gravitational waves generated by the inflation through B-mode (divergent-free) polarization pattern embedded in the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies. If detected, these signals would provide strong evidence for inflation, point to the correct model for inflation, and open a window to physics at ultra-high energies. LiteBIRD is a satellite mission with a goal of detecting degree-and-larger-angular-scale B-mode polarization. LiteBIRD will observe at the second Lagrange point with a 400 mm diameter telescope and 2,622 detectors. It will survey the entire sky with 15 frequency bands from 40 to 400 GHz to measure and subtract foregrounds. The U.S. LiteBIRD team is proposing to deliver sub-Kelvin instruments that include detectors and readout electronics. A lenslet-coupled sinuous antenna array will cover low-frequency bands (40 GHz to 235 GHz) with four frequency arrangements of trichroic pixels. An orthomode-transducer-coupled corrugated horn array will cover high-frequency bands (280 GHz to 402 GHz) with three types of single frequency detectors. The detectors will be made with Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers cooled to a 100 milli-Kelvin base temperature by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.The TES bolometers will be read out using digital frequency multiplexing with Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) amplifiers. Up to 78 bolometers will be multiplexed with a single SQUID amplidier. We report on the sub-Kelvin instrument design and ongoing developments for the LiteBIRD mission.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.00884  [pdf] - 1636606
A Comparison of Maps and Power Spectra Determined from South Pole Telescope and Planck Data
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures. Published in The Astrophysical Journal. Current arxiv version matches published version
Submitted: 2017-04-04, last modified: 2018-02-18
We study the consistency of 150 GHz data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and 143 GHz data from the Planck satellite over the patch of sky covered by the SPT-SZ survey. We first visually compare the maps and find that the residuals appear consistent with noise after accounting for differences in angular resolution and filtering. We then calculate (1) the cross-spectrum between two independent halves of SPT data, (2) the cross-spectrum between two independent halves of Planck data, and (3) the cross-spectrum between SPT and Planck data. We find the three cross-spectra are well-fit (PTE = 0.30) by the null hypothesis in which both experiments have measured the same sky map up to a single free calibration parameter---i.e., we find no evidence for systematic errors in either data set. As a by-product, we improve the precision of the SPT calibration by nearly an order of magnitude, from 2.6% to 0.3% in power. Finally, we compare all three cross-spectra to the full-sky Planck power spectrum and find marginal evidence for differences between the power spectra from the SPT-SZ footprint and the full sky. We model these differences as a power law in spherical harmonic multipole number. The best-fit value of this tilt is consistent among the three cross-spectra in the SPT-SZ footprint, implying that the source of this tilt is a sample variance fluctuation in the SPT-SZ region relative to the full sky. The consistency of cosmological parameters derived from these datasets is discussed in a companion paper.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.01360  [pdf] - 1641262
A Measurement of CMB Cluster Lensing with SPT and DES Year 1 Data
Baxter, E. J.; Raghunathan, S.; Crawford, T. M.; Fosalba, P.; Hou, Z.; Holder, G. P.; Omori, Y.; Patil, S.; Rozo, E.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Annis, J.; Aylor, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bleem, L.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Crites, A. T.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Davis, C.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dodelson, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Estrada, J.; Everett, W. B.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; George, E. M.; Gaztanaga, E.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hartley, W. G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jeltema, T.; Knox, L.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Manzotti, A.; March, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Natoli, T.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Staniszewski, F. Z.; Stark, A.; Story, K.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Walker, A. R.; Williamson, R.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: 16 pages, 5 figures; replaced to match version accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-08-03, last modified: 2018-02-16
Clusters of galaxies gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, resulting in a distinct imprint in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurement of this effect offers a promising way to constrain the masses of galaxy clusters, particularly those at high redshift. We use CMB maps from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) survey to measure the CMB lensing signal around galaxy clusters identified in optical imaging from first year observations of the Dark Energy Survey. The cluster catalog used in this analysis contains 3697 members with mean redshift of $\bar{z} = 0.45$. We detect lensing of the CMB by the galaxy clusters at $8.1\sigma$ significance. Using the measured lensing signal, we constrain the amplitude of the relation between cluster mass and optical richness to roughly $17\%$ precision, finding good agreement with recent constraints obtained with galaxy lensing. The error budget is dominated by statistical noise but includes significant contributions from systematic biases due to the thermal SZ effect and cluster miscentering.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.07541  [pdf] - 1709302
Constraints on Cosmological Parameters from the Angular Power Spectrum of a Combined 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ and Planck Gravitational Lensing Map
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, submitted to ApJ, typo in bandpower table corrected
Submitted: 2017-12-20, last modified: 2018-01-23
We report constraints on cosmological parameters from the angular power spectrum of a cosmic microwave background (CMB) gravitational lensing potential map created using temperature data from 2500 deg$^2$ of South Pole Telescope (SPT) data supplemented with data from Planck in the same sky region, with the statistical power in the combined map primarily from the SPT data. We fit the corresponding lensing angular power spectrum to a model including cold dark matter and a cosmological constant ($\Lambda$CDM), and to models with single-parameter extensions to $\Lambda$CDM. We find constraints that are comparable to and consistent with constraints found using the full-sky Planck CMB lensing data. Specifically, we find $\sigma_8 \Omega_{\rm m}^{0.25}=0.598 \pm 0.024$ from the lensing data alone with relatively weak priors placed on the other $\Lambda$CDM parameters. In combination with primary CMB data from Planck, we explore single-parameter extensions to the $\Lambda$CDM model. We find $\Omega_k = -0.012^{+0.021}_{-0.023}$ or $M_{\nu}< 0.70$eV both at 95% confidence, all in good agreement with results that include the lensing potential as measured by Planck over the full sky. We include two independent free parameters that scale the effect of lensing on the CMB: $A_{L}$, which scales the lensing power spectrum in both the lens reconstruction power and in the smearing of the acoustic peaks, and $A^{\phi \phi}$, which scales only the amplitude of the CMB lensing reconstruction power spectrum. We find $A^{\phi \phi} \times A_{L} =1.01 \pm 0.08$ for the lensing map made from combined SPT and Planck temperature data, indicating that the amount of lensing is in excellent agreement with what is expected from the observed CMB angular power spectrum when not including the information from smearing of the acoustic peaks.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.10286  [pdf] - 1606245
A Comparison of Cosmological Parameters Determined from CMB Temperature Power Spectra from the South Pole Telescope and the Planck Satellite
Comments: 14 pages, 7 figures. Updated 1 figure and expanded on the reasoning for fixing the affect of lensing on the power spectrum instead of varying Alens
Submitted: 2017-06-30, last modified: 2017-12-19
The Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature data are best fit with a LCDM model that is in mild tension with constraints from other cosmological probes. The South Pole Telescope (SPT) 2540 $\text{deg}^2$ SPT-SZ survey offers measurements on sub-degree angular scales (multipoles $650 \leq \ell \leq 2500$) with sufficient precision to use as an independent check of the Planck data. Here we build on the recent joint analysis of the SPT-SZ and Planck data in \citet{hou17} by comparing LCDM parameter estimates using the temperature power spectrum from both data sets in the SPT-SZ survey region. We also restrict the multipole range used in parameter fitting to focus on modes measured well by both SPT and Planck, thereby greatly reducing sample variance as a driver of parameter differences and creating a stringent test for systematic errors. We find no evidence of systematic errors from such tests. When we expand the maximum multipole of SPT data used, we see low-significance shifts in the angular scale of the sound horizon and the physical baryon and cold dark matter densities, with a resulting trend to higher Hubble constant. When we compare SPT and Planck data on the SPT-SZ sky patch to Planck full-sky data but keep the multipole range restricted, we find differences in the parameters $n_s$ and $A_se^{-2\tau}$. We perform further checks, investigating instrumental effects and modeling assumptions, and we find no evidence that the effects investigated are responsible for any of the parameter shifts. Taken together, these tests reveal no evidence for systematic errors in SPT or Planck data in the overlapping sky coverage and multipole range and, at most, weak evidence for a breakdown of LCDM or systematic errors influencing either the Planck data outside the SPT-SZ survey area or the SPT data at $\ell >2000$.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.04396  [pdf] - 1581178
CMB Polarization B-mode Delensing with SPTpol and Herschel
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures. Comments are welcomed
Submitted: 2017-01-16, last modified: 2017-11-04
We present a demonstration of delensing the observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization anisotropy. This process of reducing the gravitational-lensing generated B-mode component will become increasingly important for improving searches for the B modes produced by primordial gravitational waves. In this work, we delens B-mode maps constructed from multi-frequency SPTpol observations of a 90 deg$^2$ patch of sky by subtracting a B-mode template constructed from two inputs: SPTpol E-mode maps and a lensing potential map estimated from the $\textit{Herschel}$ $500\,\mu m$ map of the CIB. We find that our delensing procedure reduces the measured B-mode power spectrum by 28% in the multipole range $300 < \ell < 2300$; this is shown to be consistent with expectations from theory and simulations and to be robust against systematics. The null hypothesis of no delensing is rejected at $6.9 \sigma$. Furthermore, we build and use a suite of realistic simulations to study the general properties of the delensing process and find that the delensing efficiency achieved in this work is limited primarily by the noise in the lensing potential map. We demonstrate the importance of including realistic experimental non-idealities in the delensing forecasts used to inform instrument and survey-strategy planning of upcoming lower-noise experiments, such as CMB-S4.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.03866  [pdf] - 1580585
Cluster Mass Calibration at High Redshift: HST Weak Lensing Analysis of 13 Distant Galaxy Clusters from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey
Comments: 49 pages, 11 tables, 38 figures. Matches the version accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-11-11, last modified: 2017-10-30
We present an HST/ACS weak gravitational lensing analysis of 13 massive high-redshift (z_median=0.88) galaxy clusters discovered in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey. This study is part of a larger campaign that aims to robustly calibrate mass-observable scaling relations over a wide range in redshift to enable improved cosmological constraints from the SPT cluster sample. We introduce new strategies to ensure that systematics in the lensing analysis do not degrade constraints on cluster scaling relations significantly. First, we efficiently remove cluster members from the source sample by selecting very blue galaxies in V-I colour. Our estimate of the source redshift distribution is based on CANDELS data, where we carefully mimic the source selection criteria of the cluster fields. We apply a statistical correction for systematic photometric redshift errors as derived from Hubble Ultra Deep Field data and verified through spatial cross-correlations. We account for the impact of lensing magnification on the source redshift distribution, finding that this is particularly relevant for shallower surveys. Finally, we account for biases in the mass modelling caused by miscentring and uncertainties in the concentration-mass relation using simulations. In combination with temperature estimates from Chandra we constrain the normalisation of the mass-temperature scaling relation ln(E(z) M_500c/10^14 M_sun)=A+1.5 ln(kT/7.2keV) to A=1.81^{+0.24}_{-0.14}(stat.) +/- 0.09(sys.), consistent with self-similar redshift evolution when compared to lower redshift samples. Additionally, the lensing data constrain the average concentration of the clusters to c_200c=5.6^{+3.7}_{-1.8}.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.02464  [pdf] - 1584411
CMB-S4 Technology Book, First Edition
Comments: 191 pages
Submitted: 2017-06-08, last modified: 2017-07-05
CMB-S4 is a proposed experiment to map the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to nearly the cosmic variance limit for angular scales that are accessible from the ground. The science goals and capabilities of CMB-S4 in illuminating cosmic inflation, measuring the sum of neutrino masses, searching for relativistic relics in the early universe, characterizing dark energy and dark matter, and mapping the matter distribution in the universe have been described in the CMB-S4 Science Book. This Technology Book is a companion volume to the Science Book. The ambitious science goals of CMB-S4, a "Stage-4" experiment, require a step forward in experimental capability from the current Stage=II experiments. To guide this process, we summarize the current state of CMB instrumentation technology, and identify R&D efforts necessary to advance it for use in CMB-S4. The book focuses on technical challenges in four broad areas: Telescope Design; Receiver Optics; Focal-Plane Optical Coupling; and Focal-Plane Sensor and Readout.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00743  [pdf] - 1583013
A 2500 square-degree CMB lensing map from combined South Pole Telescope and Planck data
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2017-05-01
We present a cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing map produced from a linear combination of South Pole Telescope (SPT) and \emph{Planck} temperature data. The 150 GHz temperature data from the $2500\ {\rm deg}^{2}$ SPT-SZ survey is combined with the \emph{Planck} 143 GHz data in harmonic space, to obtain a temperature map that has a broader $\ell$ coverage and less noise than either individual map. Using a quadratic estimator technique on this combined temperature map, we produce a map of the gravitational lensing potential projected along the line of sight. We measure the auto-spectrum of the lensing potential $C_{L}^{\phi\phi}$, and compare it to the theoretical prediction for a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology consistent with the \emph{Planck} 2015 data set, finding a best-fit amplitude of $0.95_{-0.06}^{+0.06}({\rm Stat.})\! _{-0.01}^{+0.01}({\rm Sys.})$. The null hypothesis of no lensing is rejected at a significance of $24\,\sigma$. One important use of such a lensing potential map is in cross-correlations with other dark matter tracers. We demonstrate this cross-correlation in practice by calculating the cross-spectrum, $C_{L}^{\phi G}$, between the SPT+\emph{Planck} lensing map and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (\emph{WISE}) galaxies. We fit $C_{L}^{\phi G}$ to a power law of the form $p_{L}=a(L/L_{0})^{-b}$ with $a=2.15 \times 10^{-8}$, $b=1.35$, $L_{0}=490$, and find $\eta^{\phi G}=0.94^{+0.04}_{-0.04}$, which is marginally lower, but in good agreement with $\eta^{\phi G}=1.00^{+0.02}_{-0.01}$, the best-fit amplitude for the cross-correlation of \emph{Planck}-2015 CMB lensing and \emph{WISE} galaxies over $\sim67\%$ of the sky. The lensing potential map presented here will be used for cross-correlation studies with the Dark Energy Survey (DES), whose footprint nearly completely covers the SPT $2500\ {\rm deg}^2$ field.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.00966  [pdf] - 1530656
Maps of the Magellanic Clouds from Combined South Pole Telescope and Planck Data
Comments: 25 pages, 15 figures. Published in ApJS. All data products described in this paper are available for download at http://pole.uchicago.edu/public/data/maps/magclouds and from the NASA LAMBDA server
Submitted: 2016-05-03, last modified: 2016-12-09
We present maps of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds from combined South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck data. The Planck satellite observes in nine bands, while the SPT data used in this work were taken with the three-band SPT-SZ camera, The SPT-SZ bands correspond closely to three of the nine Planck bands, namely those centered at 1.4, 2.1, and 3.0 mm. The angular resolution of the Planck data ranges from 5 to 10 arcmin, while the SPT resolution ranges from 1.0 to 1.7 arcmin. The combined maps take advantage of the high resolution of the SPT data and the long-timescale stability of the space-based Planck observations to deliver robust brightness measurements on scales from the size of the maps down to ~1 arcmin. In each band, we first calibrate and color-correct the SPT data to match the Planck data, then we use noise estimates from each instrument and knowledge of each instrument's beam to make the inverse-variance-weighted combination of the two instruments' data as a function of angular scale. We create maps assuming a range of underlying emission spectra and at a range of final resolutions. We perform several consistency tests on the combined maps and estimate the expected noise in measurements of features in the maps. We compare maps from this work to maps from the Herschel HERITAGE survey, finding general consistency between the datasets. All data products described in this paper are available for download from the NASA Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis server.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.02743  [pdf] - 1494117
CMB-S4 Science Book, First Edition
Abazajian, Kevork N.; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bartlett, James G.; Battaglia, Nicholas; Benson, Bradford A.; Bischoff, Colin A.; Borrill, Julian; Buza, Victor; Calabrese, Erminia; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Chang, Clarence L.; Crawford, Thomas M.; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; De Bernardis, Francesco; de Haan, Tijmen; Alighieri, Sperello di Serego; Dunkley, Joanna; Dvorkin, Cora; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Fuller, George M.; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renee; Holder, Gilbert; Holzapfel, William; Hu, Wayne; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Keskitalo, Reijo; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Kusaka, Akito; Jeune, Maude Le; Lee, Adrian T.; Lilley, Marc; Loverde, Marilena; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Marsh, David J. E.; McMahon, Jeffrey; Meerburg, Pieter Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber D.; Munoz, Julian B.; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Niemack, Michael D.; Peloso, Marco; Peloton, Julien; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Raveri, Marco; Reichardt, Christian L.; Rocha, Graca; Rotti, Aditya; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sherwin, Blake D.; Smith, Tristan L.; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Starkman, Glenn D.; Story, Kyle T.; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Watson, Scott; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wu, W. L. Kimmy
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-10-09
This book lays out the scientific goals to be addressed by the next-generation ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment, CMB-S4, envisioned to consist of dedicated telescopes at the South Pole, the high Chilean Atacama plateau and possibly a northern hemisphere site, all equipped with new superconducting cameras. CMB-S4 will dramatically advance cosmological studies by crossing critical thresholds in the search for the B-mode polarization signature of primordial gravitational waves, in the determination of the number and masses of the neutrinos, in the search for evidence of new light relics, in constraining the nature of dark energy, and in testing general relativity on large scales.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.05211  [pdf] - 1513682
SPT-GMOS: A Gemini/GMOS-South Spectroscopic Survey of Galaxy Clusters in the SPT-SZ Survey
Comments: 24 pages in eapj format. Accepted to the Astrophysical Journal Supplements
Submitted: 2016-09-16
We present the results of SPT-GMOS, a spectroscopic survey with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) on Gemini South. The targets of SPT-GMOS are galaxy clusters identified in the SPT-SZ survey, a millimeter-wave survey of 2500 squ. deg. of the southern sky using the South Pole Telescope (SPT). Multi-object spectroscopic observations of 62 SPT-selected galaxy clusters were performed between January 2011 and December 2015, yielding spectra with radial velocity measurements for 2595 sources. We identify 2243 of these sources as galaxies, and 352 as stars. Of the galaxies, we identify 1579 as members of SPT-SZ galaxy clusters. The primary goal of these observations was to obtain spectra of cluster member galaxies to estimate cluster redshifts and velocity dispersions. We describe the full spectroscopic dataset and resulting data products, including galaxy redshifts, cluster redshifts and velocity dispersions, and measurements of several well-known spectral indices for each galaxy: the equivalent width, W, of [O II] 3727,3729 and H-delta, and the 4000A break strength, D4000. We use the spectral indices to classify galaxies by spectral type (i.e., passive, post-starburst, star-forming), and we match the spectra against photometric catalogs to characterize spectroscopically-observed cluster members as a function of brightness (relative to m*). Finally, we report several new measurements of redshifts for ten bright, strongly-lensed background galaxies in the cores of eight galaxy clusters. Combining the SPT-GMOS dataset with previous spectroscopic follow-up of SPT-SZ galaxy clusters results in spectroscopic measurements for >100 clusters, or ~20% of the full SPT-SZ sample.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.06262  [pdf] - 1460113
ICE: a scalable, low-cost FPGA-based telescope signal processing and networking system
Comments: 20 pages, 8 figures. Submitted to JAI special issue on Digital Signal Processing in Radio Astronomy (2016)
Submitted: 2016-08-22
We present an overview of the 'ICE' hardware and software framework that implements large arrays of interconnected FPGA-based data acquisition, signal processing and networking nodes economically. The system was conceived for application to radio, millimeter and sub-millimeter telescope readout systems that have requirements beyond typical off-the-shelf processing systems, such as careful control of interference signals produced by the digital electronics, and clocking of all elements in the system from a single precise observatory-derived oscillator. A new generation of telescopes operating at these frequency bands and designed with a vastly increased emphasis on digital signal processing to support their detector multiplexing technology or high-bandwidth correlators---data rates exceeding a terabyte per second---are becoming common. The ICE system is built around a custom FPGA motherboard that makes use of an Xilinx Kintex-7 FPGA and ARM-based co-processor. The system is specialized for specific applications through software, firmware, and custom mezzanine daughter boards that interface to the FPGA through the industry-standard FMC specifications. For high density applications, the motherboards are packaged in 16-slot crates with ICE backplanes that implement a low-cost passive full-mesh network between the motherboards in a crate, allow high bandwidth interconnection between crates, and enable data offload to a computer cluster. A Python-based control software library automatically detects and operates the hardware in the array. Examples of specific telescope applications of the ICE framework are presented, namely the frequency-multiplexed bolometer readout systems used for the SPT and Simons Array and the digitizer, F-engine, and networking engine for the CHIME and HIRAX radio interferometers.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.03025  [pdf] - 1531238
POLARBEAR-2: an instrument for CMB polarization measurements
Comments: 9pages,8figures
Submitted: 2016-08-09
POLARBEAR-2 (PB-2) is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment that will be located in the Atacama highland in Chile at an altitude of 5200 m. Its science goals are to measure the CMB polarization signals originating from both primordial gravitational waves and weak lensing. PB-2 is designed to measure the tensor to scalar ratio, r, with precision {\sigma}(r) < 0.01, and the sum of neutrino masses, {\Sigma}m{\nu}, with {\sigma}({\Sigma}m{\nu}) < 90 meV. To achieve these goals, PB-2 will employ 7588 transition-edge sensor bolometers at 95 GHz and 150 GHz, which will be operated at the base temperature of 250 mK. Science observations will begin in 2017.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.03507  [pdf] - 1498272
Millimeter Transient Point Sources in the SPTpol 100 Square Degree Survey
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures. As accepted by ApJ. Updated version expands sections 3 and 5
Submitted: 2016-04-12, last modified: 2016-07-28
The millimeter transient sky is largely unexplored, with measurements limited to follow-up of objects detected at other wavelengths. High-angular-resolution telescopes designed for measurement of the cosmic microwave background offer the possibility to discover new, unknown transient sources in this band, particularly the afterglows of unobserved gamma-ray bursts. Here we use the 10-meter millimeter-wave South Pole Telescope, designed for the primary purpose of observing the cosmic microwave background at arcminute and larger angular scales, to conduct a search for such objects. During the 2012-2013 season, the telescope was used to continuously observe a 100 square degree patch of sky centered at RA 23h30m and declination -55 degrees using the polarization-sensitive SPTpol camera in two bands centered at 95 and 150 GHz. These 6000 hours of observations provided continuous monitoring for day- to month-scale millimeter-wave transient sources at the 10 mJy level. One candidate object was observed with properties broadly consistent with a gamma-ray burst afterglow, but at a statistical significance too low (p=0.01) to confirm detection.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.03904  [pdf] - 1442670
Detection of the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with DES Year 1 and SPT
Comments: 23 pages, 14 figures; matches version published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-03-12, last modified: 2016-07-25
We detect the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect with a statistical significance of $4.2 \sigma$ by combining a cluster catalogue derived from the first year data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with CMB temperature maps from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) Survey. This measurement is performed with a differential statistic that isolates the pairwise kSZ signal, providing the first detection of the large-scale, pairwise motion of clusters using redshifts derived from photometric data. By fitting the pairwise kSZ signal to a theoretical template we measure the average central optical depth of the cluster sample, $\bar{\tau}_e = (3.75 \pm 0.89)\cdot 10^{-3}$. We compare the extracted signal to realistic simulations and find good agreement with respect to the signal-to-noise, the constraint on $\bar{\tau}_e$, and the corresponding gas fraction. High-precision measurements of the pairwise kSZ signal with future data will be able to place constraints on the baryonic physics of galaxy clusters, and could be used to probe gravity on scales $ \gtrsim 100$ Mpc.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.07384  [pdf] - 1459368
Joint Measurement of Lensing-Galaxy Correlations Using SPT and DES SV Data
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS. This version has been revised in response to referee comments
Submitted: 2016-02-23, last modified: 2016-06-30
We measure the correlation of galaxy lensing and cosmic microwave background lensing with a set of galaxies expected to trace the matter density field. The measurements are performed using pre-survey Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification optical imaging data and millimeter-wave data from the 2500 square degree South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey. The two lensing-galaxy correlations are jointly fit to extract constraints on cosmological parameters, constraints on the redshift distribution of the lens galaxies, and constraints on the absolute shear calibration of DES galaxy lensing measurements. We show that an attractive feature of these fits is that they are fairly insensitive to the clustering bias of the galaxies used as matter tracers. The measurement presented in this work confirms that DES and SPT data are consistent with each other and with the currently favored $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. It also demonstrates that joint lensing-galaxy correlation measurement considered here contains a wealth of information that can be extracted using current and future surveys.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.03035  [pdf] - 1447693
The Evolution of the Intracluster Medium Metallicity in Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-Selected Galaxy Clusters at 0 < z < 1.5
Comments: 11 pages, 8 figures, 2 tables. Submitted to ApJ. Comments welcome!
Submitted: 2016-03-09, last modified: 2016-06-03
We present the results of an X-ray spectral analysis of 153 galaxy clusters observed with the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku space telescopes. These clusters, which span 0 < z < 1.5, were drawn from a larger, mass-selected sample of galaxy clusters discovered in the 2500 square degree South Pole Telescope Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey. With a total combined exposure time of 9.1 Ms, these data yield the strongest constraints to date on the evolution of the metal content of the intracluster medium (ICM). We find no evidence for strong evolution in the global (r<R500) ICM metallicity (dZ/dz = -0.06 +/- 0.04 Zsun), with a mean value at z=0.6 of <Z> = 0.23 +/- 0.01 Zsun and a scatter of 0.08 +/- 0.01 Zsun. These results imply that >60% of the metals in the ICM were already in place at z=1 (at 95% confidence), consistent with the picture of an early (z>1) enrichment. We find, in agreement with previous works, a significantly higher mean value for the metallicity in the centers of cool core clusters versus non-cool core clusters. We find weak evidence for evolution in the central metallicity of cool core clusters (dZ/dz = -0.21 +/- 0.11 Zsun), which is sufficient to account for this enhanced central metallicity over the past ~10 Gyr. We find no evidence for metallicity evolution outside of the core (dZ/dz = -0.03 +/- 0.06 Zsun), and no significant difference in the core-excised metallicity between cool core and non-cool core clusters. This suggests that strong radio-mode AGN feedback does not significantly alter the distribution of metals at r>0.15R500. Given the limitations of current-generation X-ray telescopes in constraining the ICM metallicity at z>1, significant improvements on this work will likely require next-generation X-ray missions.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.05329  [pdf] - 1530713
High Frequency Cluster Radio Galaxies: Luminosity Functions and Implications for SZE Selected Cluster Samples
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-05-17
We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the Meta-Catalog of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC; $\langle z \rangle = 0.14$) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multi-frequency catalog of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogs. We find that the high frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. We use the 150 GHz LF to estimate the impact of cluster radio galaxies on an SPT-SZ like survey. The radio galaxy flux typically produces a small bias on the SZE signal and has negligible impact on the observed scatter in the SZE mass-observable relation. If we assume there is no redshift evolution in the radio galaxy LF then $1.8\pm0.7$ percent of the clusters would be lost from the sample. Allowing for redshift evolution of the form $(1+z)^{2.5}$ increases the incompleteness to $5.6\pm1.0$ percent. Improved constraints on the evolution of the cluster radio galaxy LF require a larger cluster sample extending to higher redshift.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.06522  [pdf] - 1528034
Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Clusters in the 2500 square-degree SPT-SZ Survey
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-03-21
(abridged) We present cosmological constraints obtained from galaxy clusters identified by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect signature in the 2500 square degree South Pole Telescope Sunyaev Zel'dovich survey. We consider the 377 cluster candidates identified at z>0.25 with a detection significance greater than five, corresponding to the 95% purity threshold for the survey. We compute constraints on cosmological models using the measured cluster abundance as a function of mass and redshift. We include additional constraints from multi-wavelength observations, including Chandra X-ray data for 82 clusters and a weak lensing-based prior on the normalization of the mass-observable scaling relations. Assuming a LCDM cosmology, where the species-summed neutrino mass has the minimum allowed value (mnu = 0.06 eV) from neutrino oscillation experiments, we combine the cluster data with a prior on H0 and find sigma_8 = 0.797+-0.031 and Omega_m = 0.289+-0.042, with the parameter combination sigma_8(Omega_m/0.27)^0.3 = 0.784+-0.039. These results are in good agreement with constraints from the CMB from SPT, WMAP, and Planck, as well as with constraints from other cluster datasets. Adding mnu as a free parameter, we find mnu = 0.14+-0.08 eV when combining the SPT cluster data with Planck CMB data and BAO data, consistent with the minimum allowed value. Finally, we consider a cosmology where mnu and N_eff are fixed to the LCDM values, but the dark energy equation of state parameter w is free. Using the SPT cluster data in combination with an H0 prior, we measure w = -1.28+-0.31, a constraint consistent with the LCDM cosmological model and derived from the combination of growth of structure and geometry. When combined with primarily geometrical constraints from Planck CMB, H0, BAO and SNe, adding the SPT cluster data improves the w constraint from the geometrical data alone by 14%, to w = -1.023+-0.042.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.07663  [pdf] - 1359112
Development of readout electronics for POLARBEAR-2 Cosmic Microwave Background experiment
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-12-23
The readout of transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers with a large multiplexing factor is key for the next generation Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment, Polarbear-2, having 7,588 TES bolometers. To enable the large arrays, we have been developing a readout system with a multiplexing factor of 40 in the frequency domain. Extending that architecture to 40 bolometers requires an increase in the bandwidth of the SQUID electronics above 4 MHz. This paper focuses on cryogenic readout and shows how it affects cross talk and the responsivity of the TES bolometers. A series resistance, such as equivalent series resistance (ESR) of capacitors for LC filters, leads to non-linear response of the bolometers. A wiring inductance modulates a voltage across the bolometers and causes cross talk. They should be controlled well to reduce systematic errors in CMB observations. We have been developing a cryogenic readout with a low series impedance and have tuned bolometers in the middle of their transition at a high frequency (> 3 MHz).
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.07299  [pdf] - 1359106
The POLARBEAR-2 and the Simons Array Experiment
Comments: Accepted to Journal of Low Temperature Physics LTD16 Special Issue, Low Temperature Detector 16 Conference Proceedings, 5 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2015-12-22
We present an overview of the design and status of the \Pb-2 and the Simons Array experiments. \Pb-2 is a Cosmic Microwave Background polarimetry experiment which aims to characterize the arc-minute angular scale B-mode signal from weak gravitational lensing and search for the degree angular scale B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. The receiver has a 365~mm diameter focal plane cooled to 270~milli-Kelvin. The focal plane is filled with 7,588 dichroic lenslet-antenna coupled polarization sensitive Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometric pixels that are sensitive to 95~GHz and 150~GHz bands simultaneously. The TES bolometers are read-out by SQUIDs with 40 channel frequency domain multiplexing. Refractive optical elements are made with high purity alumina to achieve high optical throughput. The receiver is designed to achieve noise equivalent temperature of 5.8~$\mu$K$_{CMB}\sqrt{s}$ in each frequency band. \Pb-2 will deploy in 2016 in the Atacama desert in Chile. The Simons Array is a project to further increase sensitivity by deploying three \Pb-2 type receivers. The Simons Array will cover 95~GHz, 150~GHz and 220~GHz frequency bands for foreground control. The Simons Array will be able to constrain tensor-to-scalar ratio and sum of neutrino masses to $\sigma(r) = 6\times 10^{-3}$ at $r = 0.1$ and $\sum m_\nu (\sigma =1)$ to 40 meV.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.4760  [pdf] - 1276959
A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Gravitational Lensing Potential from 100 Square Degrees of SPTpol Data
Comments: 16 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2014-12-15, last modified: 2015-09-15
We present a measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) gravitational lensing potential using data from the first two seasons of observations with SPTpol, the polarization-sensitive receiver currently installed on the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The observations used in this work cover 100 deg$^2$ of sky with arcminute resolution at 150 GHz. Using a quadratic estimator, we make maps of the CMB lensing potential from combinations of CMB temperature and polarization maps. We combine these lensing potential maps to form a minimum-variance (MV) map. The lensing potential is measured with a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than one for angular multipoles between $100< L <250$. This is the highest signal-to-noise mass map made from the CMB to date and will be powerful in cross-correlation with other tracers of large-scale structure. We calculate the power spectrum of the lensing potential for each estimator, and we report the value of the MV power spectrum between $100< L <2000$ as our primary result. We constrain the ratio of the spectrum to a fiducial $\Lambda$CDM model to be $A_{\rm MV}=0.92 \pm 0.14 {\rm\, (Stat.)} \pm 0.08 {\rm\, (Sys.)}$. Restricting ourselves to polarized data only, we find $A_{\rm POL}=0.92 \pm 0.24 {\rm\, (Stat.)} \pm 0.11 {\rm\, (Sys.)}$. This measurement rejects the hypothesis of no lensing at $5.9 \sigma$ using polarization data alone, and at $14 \sigma$ using both temperature and polarization data.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.07814  [pdf] - 1296193
Constraints on the Richness-Mass Relation and the Optical-SZE Positional Offset Distribution for SZE-Selected Clusters
Comments: 15 pages, 8 Figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-06-25
We cross-match galaxy cluster candidates selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures in 129.1 deg$^2$ of the South Pole Telescope 2500d SPT-SZ survey with optically identified clusters selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We identify 25 clusters between $0.1\lesssim z\lesssim 0.8$ in the union of the SPT-SZ and redMaPPer (RM) samples. RM is an optical cluster finding algorithm that also returns a richness estimate for each cluster. We model the richness $\lambda$-mass relation with the following function $\langle\ln\lambda|M_{500}\rangle\propto B_\lambda\ln M_{500}+C_\lambda\ln E(z)$ and use SPT-SZ cluster masses and RM richnesses $\lambda$ to constrain the parameters. We find $B_\lambda= 1.14^{+0.21}_{-0.18}$ and $C_\lambda=0.73^{+0.77}_{-0.75}$. The associated scatter in mass at fixed richness is $\sigma_{\ln M|\lambda} = 0.18^{+0.08}_{-0.05}$ at a characteristic richness $\lambda=70$. We demonstrate that our model provides an adequate description of the matched sample, showing that the fraction of SPT-SZ selected clusters with RM counterparts is consistent with expectations and that the fraction of RM selected clusters with SPT-SZ counterparts is in mild tension with expectation. We model the optical-SZE cluster positional offset distribution with the sum of two Gaussians, showing that it is consistent with a dominant, centrally peaked population and a sub-dominant population characterized by larger offsets. We also cross-match the RM catalog with SPT-SZ candidates below the official catalog threshold significance $\xi=4.5$, using the RM catalog to provide optical confirmation and redshifts for additional low-$\xi$ SPT-SZ candidates.In this way, we identify 15 additional clusters with $\xi\in [4,4.5]$ over the redshift regime explored by RM in the overlapping region between DES science verification data and the SPT-SZ survey.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.7521  [pdf] - 1237207
A Measurement of Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Galaxy Clusters Using Data from the South Pole Telescope
Comments: 14 pages, 3 figures. Published in ApJ. Replaced to match published version
Submitted: 2014-12-23, last modified: 2015-06-23
Clusters of galaxies are expected to gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby generate a distinct signal in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurements of this effect can be used to constrain the masses of galaxy clusters with CMB data alone. Here we present a measurement of lensing of the CMB by galaxy clusters using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We develop a maximum likelihood approach to extract the CMB cluster lensing signal and validate the method on mock data. We quantify the effects on our analysis of several potential sources of systematic error and find that they generally act to reduce the best-fit cluster mass. It is estimated that this bias to lower cluster mass is roughly $0.85\sigma$ in units of the statistical error bar, although this estimate should be viewed as an upper limit. We apply our maximum likelihood technique to 513 clusters selected via their SZ signatures in SPT data, and rule out the null hypothesis of no lensing at $3.1\sigma$. The lensing-derived mass estimate for the full cluster sample is consistent with that inferred from the SZ flux: $M_{200,\mathrm{lens}} = 0.83_{-0.37}^{+0.38}\, M_{200,\mathrm{SZ}}$ (68% C.L., statistical error only).
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.7520  [pdf] - 1088334
Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Mass-Observable Relations using South Pole Telescope Observations of an X-ray Selected Sample of Low Mass Galaxy Clusters and Groups
Comments: 15 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2014-07-28, last modified: 2015-05-29
(Abridged) We use 95, 150, and 220GHz observations from the SPT to examine the SZE signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from ~6 deg^2 of the XMM-BCS. These systems extend to redshift z=1.02, have characteristic masses ~3x lower than clusters detected directly in the SPT data and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (>10^42 erg s^-1) yet. We develop an analysis tool that combines the SZE information for the full ensemble of X-ray-selected clusters. Using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, we extract selection-bias corrected constraints on the SZE significance- and Y_500-mass relations. The SZE significance- mass relation is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high mass clusters. However, the fit to the Y_500-mass relation at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from high mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8 sigma with the constraints from the Planck sample. We examine the tension with the Planck relation, discussing sample differences and biases that could contribute. We also present an analysis of the radio galaxy point source population in this ensemble of X-ray selected systems. We find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz SUMSS sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8$\sigma$ significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y_500 signal that is (17+-9) per cent in this sample of low mass systems.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.02315  [pdf] - 1245696
Measurements of Sub-degree B-mode Polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background from 100 Square Degrees of SPTpol Data
Comments: 21 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2015-03-08
We present a measurement of the $B$-mode polarization power spectrum (the $BB$ spectrum) from 100 $\mathrm{deg}^2$ of sky observed with SPTpol, a polarization-sensitive receiver currently installed on the South Pole Telescope. The observations used in this work were taken during 2012 and early 2013 and include data in spectral bands centered at 95 and 150 GHz. We report the $BB$ spectrum in five bins in multipole space, spanning the range $300 \le \ell \le 2300$, and for three spectral combinations: 95 GHz $\times$ 95 GHz, 95 GHz $\times$ 150 GHz, and 150 GHz $\times$ 150 GHz. We subtract small ($< 0.5 \sigma$ in units of statistical uncertainty) biases from these spectra and account for the uncertainty in those biases. The resulting power spectra are inconsistent with zero power but consistent with predictions for the $BB$ spectrum arising from the gravitational lensing of $E$-mode polarization. If we assume no other source of $BB$ power besides lensed $B$ modes, we determine a preference for lensed $B$ modes of $4.9 \sigma$. After marginalizing over tensor power and foregrounds, namely polarized emission from galactic dust and extragalactic sources, this significance is $4.3 \sigma$. Fitting for a single parameter, $A_\mathrm{lens}$, that multiplies the predicted lensed $B$-mode spectrum, and marginalizing over tensor power and foregrounds, we find $A_\mathrm{lens} = 1.08 \pm 0.26$, indicating that our measured spectra are consistent with the signal expected from gravitational lensing. The data presented here provide the best measurement to date of the $B$-mode power spectrum on these angular scales.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.0850  [pdf] - 935780
Galaxy Clusters Discovered via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in the 2500-square-degree SPT-SZ survey
Comments: Minor changes to match accepted version; Associated data products available at http://pole.uchicago.edu/public/data/sptsz-clusters/index.html
Submitted: 2014-09-02, last modified: 2015-02-13
We present a catalog of galaxy clusters selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect signature from 2500 deg$^2$ of South Pole Telescope (SPT) data. This work represents the complete sample of clusters detected at high significance in the 2500-square-degree SPT-SZ survey, which was completed in 2011. A total of 677 (409) cluster candidates are identified above a signal-to-noise threshold of $\xi$ =4.5 (5.0). Ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared (NIR) imaging confirms overdensities of similarly colored galaxies in the direction of 516 (or 76%) of the $\xi$>4.5 candidates and 387 (or 95%) of the $\xi$>5 candidates; the measured purity is consistent with expectations from simulations. Of these confirmed clusters, 415 were first identified in SPT data, including 251 new discoveries reported in this work. We estimate photometric redshifts for all candidates with identified optical and/or NIR counterparts; we additionally report redshifts derived from spectroscopic observations for 141 of these systems. The mass threshold of the catalog is roughly independent of redshift above $z$~0.25 leading to a sample of massive clusters that extends to high redshift. The median mass of the sample is $M_{\scriptsize 500c}(\rho_\mathrm{crit})$ ~ 3.5 x 10$^{14} M_\odot h^{-1}$, the median redshift is $z_{med}$ =0.55, and the highest-redshift systems are at $z$>1.4. The combination of large redshift extent, clean selection, and high typical mass makes this cluster sample of particular interest for cosmological analyses and studies of cluster formation and evolution.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.2942  [pdf] - 1215595
Mass Calibration and Cosmological Analysis of the SPT-SZ Galaxy Cluster Sample Using Velocity Dispersion $\sigma_v$ and X-ray $Y_\textrm{X}$ Measurements
Comments: Accepted by ApJ (v2 is accepted version); 17 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2014-07-10, last modified: 2014-12-02
We present a velocity dispersion-based mass calibration of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey (SPT-SZ) galaxy cluster sample. Using a homogeneously selected sample of 100 cluster candidates from 720 deg2 of the survey along with 63 velocity dispersion ($\sigma_v$) and 16 X-ray Yx measurements of sample clusters, we simultaneously calibrate the mass-observable relation and constrain cosmological parameters. The calibrations using $\sigma_v$ and Yx are consistent at the $0.6\sigma$ level, with the $\sigma_v$ calibration preferring ~16% higher masses. We use the full cluster dataset to measure $\sigma_8(\Omega_ m/0.27)^{0.3}=0.809\pm0.036$. The SPT cluster abundance is lower than preferred by either the WMAP9 or Planck+WMAP9 polarization (WP) data, but assuming the sum of the neutrino masses is $\sum m_\nu=0.06$ eV, we find the datasets to be consistent at the 1.0$\sigma$ level for WMAP9 and 1.5$\sigma$ for Planck+WP. Allowing for larger $\sum m_\nu$ further reconciles the results. When we combine the cluster and Planck+WP datasets with BAO and SNIa, the preferred cluster masses are $1.9\sigma$ higher than the Yx calibration and $0.8\sigma$ higher than the $\sigma_v$ calibration. Given the scale of these shifts (~44% and ~23% in mass, respectively), we execute a goodness of fit test; it reveals no tension, indicating that the best-fit model provides an adequate description of the data. Using the multi-probe dataset, we measure $\Omega_ m=0.299\pm0.009$ and $\sigma_8=0.829\pm0.011$. Within a $\nu$CDM model we find $\sum m_\nu = 0.148\pm0.081$ eV. We present a consistency test of the cosmic growth rate. Allowing both the growth index $\gamma$ and the dark energy equation of state parameter $w$ to vary, we find $\gamma=0.73\pm0.28$ and $w=-1.007\pm0.065$, demonstrating that the expansion and the growth histories are consistent with a LCDM model ($\gamma=0.55; \,w=-1$).
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3161  [pdf] - 931385
A measurement of secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies from the 2500-square-degree SPT-SZ survey
Comments: Accepted by ApJ (v2 is accepted version); 12 figures; 24 pages
Submitted: 2014-08-13, last modified: 2014-12-01
We present measurements of secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) covering the complete 2540 sq.deg. SPT-SZ survey area. Data in the three SPT-SZ frequency bands centered at 95, 150, and 220 GHz, are used to produce six angular power spectra (three single-frequency auto-spectra and three cross-spectra) covering the multipole range 2000 < ell < 11000 (angular scales 5' > \theta > 1'). These are the most precise measurements of the angular power spectra at ell > 2500 at these frequencies. The main contributors to the power spectra at these angular scales and frequencies are the primary CMB, CIB, thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects (tSZ and kSZ), and radio galaxies. We include a constraint on the tSZ power from a measurement of the tSZ bispectrum from 800 sq.deg. of the SPT-SZ survey. We measure the tSZ power at 143 GHz to be DtSZ = 4.08 +0.58 -0.67 \mu K^2 and the kSZ power to be DkSZ = 2.9 +- 1.3 \mu K^2. The data prefer positive kSZ power at 98.1% CL. We measure a correlation coefficient of \xi = 0.113 +0.057 -0.054 between sources of tSZ and CIB power, with \xi < 0 disfavored at a confidence level of 99.0%. The constraint on kSZ power can be interpreted as an upper limit on the duration of reionization. When the post-reionization homogeneous kSZ signal is accounted for, we find an upper limit on the duration \Delta z < 5.4 at 95% CL.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.1042  [pdf] - 1055713
Measurements of E-Mode Polarization and Temperature-E-Mode Correlation in the Cosmic Microwave Background from 100 Square Degrees of SPTpol Data
Comments:
Submitted: 2014-11-04
We present measurements of $E$-mode polarization and temperature-$E$-mode correlation in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using data from the first season of observations with SPTpol, the polarization-sensitive receiver currently installed on the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The observations used in this work cover 100~\sqdeg\ of sky with arcminute resolution at $150\,$GHz. We report the $E$-mode angular auto-power spectrum ($EE$) and the temperature-$E$-mode angular cross-power spectrum ($TE$) over the multipole range $500 < \ell \leq5000$. These power spectra improve on previous measurements in the high-$\ell$ (small-scale) regime. We fit the combination of the SPTpol power spectra, data from \planck\, and previous SPT measurements with a six-parameter \LCDM cosmological model. We find that the best-fit parameters are consistent with previous results. The improvement in high-$\ell$ sensitivity over previous measurements leads to a significant improvement in the limit on polarized point-source power: after masking sources brighter than 50\,mJy in unpolarized flux at 150\,GHz, we find a 95\% confidence upper limit on unclustered point-source power in the $EE$ spectrum of $D_\ell = \ell (\ell+1) C_\ell / 2 \pi < 0.40 \ \mu{\mbox{K}}^2$ at $\ell=3000$, indicating that future $EE$ measurements will not be limited by power from unclustered point sources in the multipole range $\ell < 3600$, and possibly much higher in $\ell.$
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.2903  [pdf] - 1172637
SPT-CLJ2040-4451: An SZ-Selected Galaxy Cluster at z = 1.478 With Significant Ongoing Star Formation
Comments: 14 pages, 8 figures, 4 tables, Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2013-07-10, last modified: 2014-08-06
SPT-CLJ2040-4451 -- spectroscopically confirmed at z = 1.478 -- is the highest redshift galaxy cluster yet discovered via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. SPT-CLJ2040-4451 was a candidate galaxy cluster identified in the first 720 deg^2 of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey, and confirmed in follow-up imaging and spectroscopy. From multi-object spectroscopy with Magellan-I/Baade+IMACS we measure spectroscopic redshifts for 15 cluster member galaxies, all of which have strong [O II] 3727 emission. SPT-CLJ2040-4451 has an SZ-measured mass of M_500,SZ = 3.2 +/- 0.8 X 10^14 M_Sun/h_70, corresponding to M_200,SZ = 5.8 +/- 1.4 X 10^14 M_Sun/h_70. The velocity dispersion measured entirely from blue star forming members is sigma_v = 1500 +/- 520 km/s. The prevalence of star forming cluster members (galaxies with > 1.5 M_Sun/yr) implies that this massive, high-redshift cluster is experiencing a phase of active star formation, and supports recent results showing a marked increase in star formation occurring in galaxy clusters at z >1.4. We also compute the probability of finding a cluster as rare as this in the SPT-SZ survey to be >99%, indicating that its discovery is not in tension with the concordance Lambda-CDM cosmological model.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.4953  [pdf] - 1180847
Optical Spectroscopy and Velocity Dispersions of Galaxy Clusters from the SPT-SZ Survey
Comments: Accepted to ApJ. 20 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2013-11-19, last modified: 2014-07-17
We present optical spectroscopy of galaxies in clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We report our own measurements of $61$ spectroscopic cluster redshifts, and $48$ velocity dispersions each calculated with more than $15$ member galaxies. This catalog also includes $19$ dispersions of SPT-observed clusters previously reported in the literature. The majority of the clusters in this paper are SPT-discovered; of these, most have been previously reported in other SPT cluster catalogs, and five are reported here as SPT discoveries for the first time. By performing a resampling analysis of galaxy velocities, we find that unbiased velocity dispersions can be obtained from a relatively small number of member galaxies ($\lesssim 30$), but with increased systematic scatter. We use this analysis to determine statistical confidence intervals that include the effect of membership selection. We fit scaling relations between the observed cluster velocity dispersions and mass estimates from SZ and X-ray observables. In both cases, the results are consistent with the scaling relation between velocity dispersion and mass expected from dark-matter simulations. We measure a $\sim$30% log-normal scatter in dispersion at fixed mass, and a $\sim$10% offset in the normalization of the dispersion-mass relation when compared to the expectation from simulations, which is within the expected level of systematic uncertainty.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.3161  [pdf] - 1215622
Digital frequency domain multiplexing readout electronics for the next generation of millimeter telescopes
Comments: 15 pages, 10 figures. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9153. Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2014, conference 9153
Submitted: 2014-07-11
Frequency domain multiplexing (fMux) is an established technique for the readout of transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers in millimeter-wavelength astrophysical instrumentation. In fMux, the signals from multiple detectors are read out on a single pair of wires reducing the total cryogenic thermal loading as well as the cold component complexity and cost of a system. The current digital fMux system, in use by POLARBEAR, EBEX, and the South Pole Telescope, is limited to a multiplexing factor of 16 by the dynamic range of the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device pre-amplifier and the total system bandwidth. Increased multiplexing is key for the next generation of large format TES cameras, such as SPT-3G and POLARBEAR2, which plan to have on the of order 15,000 detectors. Here, we present the next generation fMux readout, focusing on the warm electronics. In this system, the multiplexing factor increases to 64 channels per module (2 wires) while maintaining low noise levels and detector stability. This is achieved by increasing the system bandwidth, reducing the dynamic range requirements though active feedback, and digital synthesis of voltage biases with a novel polyphase filter algorithm. In addition, a version of the new fMux readout includes features such as low power consumption and radiation-hard components making it viable for future space-based millimeter telescopes such as the LiteBIRD satellite.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.2973  [pdf] - 1215600
SPT-3G: A Next-Generation Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiment on the South Pole Telescope
Comments: 21 pages, 9 figures. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9153. Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2014, conference 9153
Submitted: 2014-07-10
We describe the design of a new polarization sensitive receiver, SPT-3G, for the 10-meter South Pole Telescope (SPT). The SPT-3G receiver will deliver a factor of ~20 improvement in mapping speed over the current receiver, SPTpol. The sensitivity of the SPT-3G receiver will enable the advance from statistical detection of B-mode polarization anisotropy power to high signal-to-noise measurements of the individual modes, i.e., maps. This will lead to precise (~0.06 eV) constraints on the sum of neutrino masses with the potential to directly address the neutrino mass hierarchy. It will allow a separation of the lensing and inflationary B-mode power spectra, improving constraints on the amplitude and shape of the primordial signal, either through SPT-3G data alone or in combination with BICEP-2/KECK, which is observing the same area of sky. The measurement of small-scale temperature anisotropy will provide new constraints on the epoch of reionization. Additional science from the SPT-3G survey will be significantly enhanced by the synergy with the ongoing optical Dark Energy Survey (DES), including: a 1% constraint on the bias of optical tracers of large-scale structure, a measurement of the differential Doppler signal from pairs of galaxy clusters that will test General Relativity on ~200 Mpc scales, and improved cosmological constraints from the abundance of clusters of galaxies.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.6250  [pdf] - 1209161
The Redshift Evolution of the Mean Temperature, Pressure, and Entropy Profiles in 80 SPT-Selected Galaxy Clusters
Comments: 17 pages, 13 figures, submitted to ApJ. Updated following referee report
Submitted: 2014-04-24, last modified: 2014-07-04
(Abridged) We present the results of an X-ray analysis of 80 galaxy clusters selected in the 2500 deg^2 South Pole Telescope survey and observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We divide the full sample into subsamples of ~20 clusters based on redshift and central density, performing an X-ray fit to all clusters in a subsample simultaneously, assuming self-similarity of the temperature profile. This approach allows us to constrain the shape of the temperature profile over 0<r<1.5R500, which would be impossible on a per-cluster basis, since the observations of individual clusters have, on average, 2000 X-ray counts. The results presented here represent the first constraints on the evolution of the average temperature profile from z=0 to z=1.2. We find that high-z (0.6<z<1.2) clusters are slightly (~40%) cooler both in the inner (r<0.1R500) and outer (r>R500) regions than their low-z (0.3<z<0.6) counterparts. Combining the average temperature profile with measured gas density profiles from our earlier work, we infer the average pressure and entropy profiles for each subsample. Overall, our observed pressure profiles agree well with earlier lower-redshift measurements, suggesting minimal redshift evolution in the pressure profile outside of the core. We find no measurable redshift evolution in the entropy profile at r<0.7R500. We observe a slight flattening of the entropy profile at r>R500 in our high-z subsample. This flattening is consistent with a temperature bias due to the enhanced (~3x) rate at which group-mass (~2 keV) halos, which would go undetected at our survey depth, are accreting onto the cluster at z~1. This work demonstrates a powerful method for inferring spatially-resolved cluster properties in the case where individual cluster signal-to-noise is low, but the number of observed clusters is high.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.3535  [pdf] - 808485
A measurement of the secondary-CMB and millimeter-wave-foreground bispectrum using 800 square degrees of South Pole Telescope data
Comments: 23 emulateapj pages, 4 figures, revised to match published version. Data products available at http://pole.uchicago.edu/public/data/crawford13
Submitted: 2013-03-14, last modified: 2014-04-09
We present a measurement of the angular bispectrum of the millimeter-wave sky in observing bands centered at roughly 95, 150, and 220 GHz, on angular scales of $1^\prime \lesssim \theta \lesssim 10^\prime$ (multipole number $1000 \lesssim l \lesssim 10000$). At these frequencies and angular scales, the main contributions to the bispectrum are expected to be the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect and emission from extragalactic sources, predominantly dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) and active galactic nuclei. We measure the bispectrum in 800 $\mathrm{deg}^2$ of three-band South Pole Telescope data, and we use a multi-frequency fitting procedure to separate the bispectrum of the tSZ effect from the extragalactic source contribution. We simultaneously detect the bispectrum of the tSZ effect at $>$10$\sigma$, the unclustered component of the extragalactic source bispectrum at $>$5$\sigma$ in each frequency band, and the bispectrum due to the clustering of DSFGs---i.e., the clustered cosmic infrared background (CIB) bispectrum---at $>$5$\sigma$. This is the first reported detection of the clustered CIB bispectrum. We use the measured tSZ bispectrum amplitude, compared to model predictions, to constrain the normalization of the matter power spectrum to be $\sigma_8 = 0.787 \pm 0.031$ and to predict the amplitude of the tSZ power spectrum at $l = 3000$. This prediction improves our ability to separate the thermal and kinematic contributions to the total SZ power spectrum. The addition of bispectrum data improves our constraint on the tSZ power spectrum amplitude by a factor of two compared to power spectrum measurements alone and demonstrates a preference for a nonzero kinematic SZ (kSZ) power spectrum, with a derived constraint on the kSZ amplitude at $l=3000$ of A_kSZ $ = 2.9 \pm 1.6 \ \mu$K$^2$, or A_kSZ $ = 2.6 \pm 1.8 \ \mu$K$^2$ if the default A_kSZ > 0 prior is removed.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1212.6267  [pdf] - 781455
Constraints on Cosmology from the Cosmic Microwave Background Power Spectrum of the 2500 ${\rm deg}^2$ SPT-SZ Survey
Comments: 27 pages, 20 figures. Replaced with version accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2012-12-26, last modified: 2014-02-06
We explore extensions to the $\Lambda$CDM cosmology using measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the recent SPT-SZ survey, along with data from WMAP7 and measurements of $H_0$ and BAO. We check for consistency within $\Lambda$CDM between these datasets, and find some tension. The CMB alone gives weak support to physics beyond $\Lambda$CDM, due to a slight trend relative to $\Lambda$CDM of decreasing power towards smaller angular scales. While it may be due to statistical fluctuation, this trend could also be explained by several extensions. We consider running index (nrun), as well as two extensions that modify the damping tail power (the primordial helium abundance $Y_p$ and the effective number of neutrino species $N_{\rm eff}$) and one that modifies the large-scale power due to the ISW effect (the sum of neutrino masses $\sum m_\nu$). These extensions have similar observational consequences and are partially degenerate when considered simultaneously. Of the 6 one-parameter extensions considered, we find CMB to have the largest preference for nrun with -0.046<nrun<-0.003 at 95% confidence, which strengthens to a 2.7$\sigma$ indication of nrun<0 from CMB+BAO+$H_0$. Detectable non-zero nrun is difficult to explain in the context of single-field, slow-roll inflation models. We find $N_{\rm eff}=3.62\pm0.48$ for the CMB, which tightens to $N_{\rm eff}=3.71\pm0.35$ from CMB+BAO+$H_0$. Larger values of $N_{\rm eff}$ relieve the mild tension between CMB, BAO and $H_0$. When the SZ selected galaxy cluster abundances ($\rm{SPT_{CL}}$) data are also included, we obtain $N_{\rm eff}=3.29\pm0.31$. Allowing for $\sum m_\nu$ gives a 3$\sigma$ detection of $\sum m_\nu$>0 from CMB+BAO+$H_0$+$\rm{SPT_{CL}}$. The median value is $(0.32\pm0.11)$ eV, a factor of six above the lower bound set by neutrino oscillation observations. ... [abridged]
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.3015  [pdf] - 1490622
Measurement of Galaxy Cluster Integrated Comptonization and Mass Scaling Relations with the South Pole Telescope
Comments: Submitted to ApJ. 13 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2013-12-10
We describe a method for measuring the integrated Comptonization (YSZ) of clusters of galaxies from measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in multiple frequency bands and use this method to characterize a sample of galaxy clusters detected in South Pole Telescope (SPT) data. We test this method on simulated cluster observations and verify that it can accurately recover cluster parameters with negligible bias. In realistic simulations of an SPT-like survey, with realizations of cosmic microwave background anisotropy, point sources, and atmosphere and instrumental noise at typical SPT-SZ survey levels, we find that YSZ is most accurately determined in an aperture comparable to the SPT beam size. We demonstrate the utility of this method to measure YSZ and to constrain mass scaling relations using X-ray mass estimates for a sample of 18 galaxy clusters from the SPT-SZ survey. Measuring YSZ within a 0.75' radius aperture, we find an intrinsic log-normal scatter of 21+/-11% in YSZ at a fixed mass. Measuring YSZ within a 0.3 Mpc projected radius (equivalent to 0.75' at the survey median redshift z = 0.6), we find a scatter of 26+/-9%. Prior to this study, the SPT observable found to have the lowest scatter with mass was cluster detection significance. We demonstrate, from both simulations and SPT observed clusters, that YSZ measured within an aperture comparable to the SPT beam size is equivalent, in terms of scatter with cluster mass, to SPT cluster detection significance.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.2462  [pdf] - 1202130
Constraints on the CMB Temperature Evolution using Multi-Band Measurements of the Sunyaev Zel'dovich Effect with the South Pole Telescope
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2013-12-09
The adiabatic evolution of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a key prediction of standard cosmology. We study deviations from the expected adiabatic evolution of the CMB temperature of the form $T(z) =T_0(1+z)^{1-\alpha}$ using measurements of the spectrum of the Sunyaev Zel'dovich Effect with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We present a method for using the ratio of the Sunyaev Zel'dovich signal measured at 95 and 150 GHz in the SPT data to constrain the temperature of the CMB. We demonstrate that this approach provides unbiased results using mock observations of clusters from a new set of hydrodynamical simulations. We apply this method to a sample of 158 SPT-selected clusters, spanning the redshift range $0.05 < z < 1.35$, and measure $\alpha = 0.017^{+0.030}_{-0.028}$, consistent with the standard model prediction of $\alpha=0$. In combination with other published results, we constrain $\alpha = 0.011 \pm 0.016$, an improvement of $\sim 20\%$ over published constraints. This measurement also provides a strong constraint on the effective equation of state in models of decaying dark energy $w_\mathrm{eff} = -0.987^{+0.016}_{-0.017}$.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.7231  [pdf] - 1152496
A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Damping Tail from the 2500-square-degree SPT-SZ survey
Comments: 21 pages, 10 figures. Replaced with version accepted by ApJ. Data products are available at http://pole.uchicago.edu/public/data/story12/
Submitted: 2012-10-26, last modified: 2013-12-09
We present a measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum using data from the recently completed South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey. This measurement is made from observations of 2540 deg$^2$ of sky with arcminute resolution at $150\,$GHz, and improves upon previous measurements using the SPT by tripling the sky area. We report CMB temperature anisotropy power over the multipole range $650<\ell<3000$. We fit the SPT bandpowers, combined with the seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) data, with a six-parameter LCDM cosmological model and find that the two datasets are consistent and well fit by the model. Adding SPT measurements significantly improves LCDM parameter constraints; in particular, the constraint on $\theta_s$ tightens by a factor of 2.7. The impact of gravitational lensing is detected at $8.1\, \sigma$, the most significant detection to date. This sensitivity of the SPT+WMAP7 data to lensing by large-scale structure at low redshifts allows us to constrain the mean curvature of the observable universe with CMB data alone to be $\Omega_k=-0.003^{+0.014}_{-0.018}$. Using the SPT+WMAP7 data, we measure the spectral index of scalar fluctuations to be $n_s=0.9623 \pm 0.0097$ in the LCDM model, a $3.9\,\sigma$ preference for a scale-dependent spectrum with $n_s<1$. The SPT measurement of the CMB damping tail helps break the degeneracy that exists between the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ and $n_s$ in large-scale CMB measurements, leading to an upper limit of $r<0.18$ (95%,C.L.) in the LCDM+$r$ model. Adding low-redshift measurements of the Hubble constant ($H_0$) and the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature to the SPT+WMAP7 data leads to further improvements. The combination of SPT+WMAP7+$H_0$+BAO constrains $n_s=0.9538 \pm 0.0081$ in the LCDM model, a $5.7\,\sigma$ detection of $n_s < 1$, ... [abridged]
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.1706  [pdf] - 1172529
A direct measurement of the linear bias of mid-infrared-selected quasars at z~1 using cosmic microwave background lensing
Comments: replaced with version accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, ApJ, 776, L41
Submitted: 2013-07-05, last modified: 2013-10-09
We measure the cross-power spectrum of the projected mass density as traced by the convergence of the cosmic microwave background lensing field from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and a sample of Type 1 and 2 (unobscured and obscured) quasars at z~1 selected with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, over 2500 deg^2. The cross-power spectrum is detected at ~7-sigma, and we measure a linear bias b=1.67+/-0.24, consistent with clustering analyses. Using an independent lensing map, derived from Planck observations, to measure the cross-spectrum, we find excellent agreement with the SPT analysis. The bias of the combined sample of Type 1 and 2 quasars determined in this work is similar to that previously determined for Type 1 quasars alone; we conclude that that obscured and unobscured quasars must trace the matter field in a similar way. This result has implications for our understanding of quasar unification and evolution schemes.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.5830  [pdf] - 739037
Detection of B-mode Polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background with Data from the South Pole Telescope
Comments: Two additional null tests, matches version published in PRL
Submitted: 2013-07-22, last modified: 2013-10-07
Gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background generates a curl pattern in the observed polarization. This "B-mode" signal provides a measure of the projected mass distribution over the entire observable Universe and also acts as a contaminant for the measurement of primordial gravity-wave signals. In this Letter we present the first detection of gravitational lensing B modes, using first-season data from the polarization-sensitive receiver on the South Pole Telescope (SPTpol). We construct a template for the lensing B-mode signal by combining E-mode polarization measured by SPTpol with estimates of the lensing potential from a Herschel-SPIRE map of the cosmic infrared background. We compare this template to the B modes measured directly by SPTpol, finding a non-zero correlation at 7.7 sigma significance. The correlation has an amplitude and scale-dependence consistent with theoretical expectations, is robust with respect to analysis choices, and constitutes the first measurement of a powerful cosmological observable.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.2915  [pdf] - 1166592
The Growth of Cool Cores and Evolution of Cooling Properties in a Sample of 83 Galaxy Clusters at 0.3 < z < 1.2 Selected from the SPT-SZ Survey
Comments: 17 pages with 15 figures, plus appendix. Published in ApJ
Submitted: 2013-05-13, last modified: 2013-09-09
We present first results on the cooling properties derived from Chandra X-ray observations of 83 high-redshift (0.3 < z < 1.2) massive galaxy clusters selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. We measure each cluster's central cooling time, central entropy, and mass deposition rate, and compare to local cluster samples. We find no significant evolution from z~0 to z~1 in the distribution of these properties, suggesting that cooling in cluster cores is stable over long periods of time. We also find that the average cool core entropy profile in the inner ~100 kpc has not changed dramatically since z ~ 1, implying that feedback must be providing nearly constant energy injection to maintain the observed "entropy floor" at ~10 keV cm^2. While the cooling properties appear roughly constant over long periods of time, we observe strong evolution in the gas density profile, with the normalized central density (rho_0/rho_crit) increasing by an order of magnitude from z ~ 1 to z ~ 0. When using metrics defined by the inner surface brightness profile of clusters, we find an apparent lack of classical, cuspy, cool-core clusters at z > 0.75, consistent with earlier reports for clusters at z > 0.5 using similar definitions. Our measurements indicate that cool cores have been steadily growing over the 8 Gyr spanned by our sample, consistent with a constant, ~150 Msun/yr cooling flow that is unable to cool below entropies of 10 keV cm^2 and, instead, accumulates in the cluster center. We estimate that cool cores began to assemble in these massive systems at z ~ 1, which represents the first constraints on the onset of cooling in galaxy cluster cores. We investigate several potential biases which could conspire to mimic this cool core evolution and are unable to find a bias that has a similar redshift dependence and a substantial amplitude.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.1869  [pdf] - 1171901
Adaptation of frequency-domain readout for Transition Edge Sensor bolometers for the POLARBEAR-2 Cosmic Microwave Background experiment
Comments:
Submitted: 2013-06-07, last modified: 2013-07-04
The POLARBEAR-2 CosmicMicrowave Background (CMB) experiment aims to observe B-mode polarization with high sensitivity to explore gravitational lensing of CMB and inflationary gravitational waves. POLARBEAR-2 is an upgraded experiment based on POLARBEAR-1, which had first light in January 2012. For POLARBEAR-2, we will build a receiver that has 7,588 Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers coupled to two-band (95 and 150 GHz) polarization-sensitive antennas. For the large array's readout, we employ digital frequency-domain multiplexing and multiplex 32 bolometers through a single superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). An 8-bolometer frequency-domain multiplexing readout has been deployed on POLARBEAR-1 experiment. Extending that architecture to 32 bolometers requires an increase in the bandwidth of the SQUID electronics to 3 MHz. To achieve this increase in bandwidth, we use Digital Active Nulling (DAN) on the digital frequency multiplexing platform. In this paper, we present requirements and improvements on parasitic inductance and resistance of cryogenic wiring and capacitors used for modulating bolometers. These components are problematic above 1 MHz. We also show that our system is able to bias a bolometer in its superconducting transition at 3 MHz.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.3470  [pdf] - 1172048
Extragalactic millimeter-wave point source catalog, number counts and statistics from 771 square degrees of the SPT-SZ Survey
Comments: 23 pages, 8 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2013-06-14
We present a point source catalog from 771 square degrees of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. We detect 1545 sources above 4.5 sigma significance in at least one band. Based on their relative brightness between survey bands, we classify the sources into two populations, one dominated by synchrotron emission from active galactic nuclei, and one dominated by thermal emission from dust-enshrouded star-forming galaxies. We find 1238 synchrotron and 307 dusty sources. We cross-match all sources against external catalogs and find 189 unidentified synchrotron sources and 189 unidentified dusty sources. The dusty sources without counterparts are good candidates for high-redshift, strongly lensed submillimeter galaxies. We derive number counts for each population from 1 Jy down to roughly 9, 5, and 11 mJy at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. We compare these counts with galaxy population models and find that none of the models we consider for either population provide a good fit to the measured counts in all three bands. The disparities imply that these measurements will be an important input to the next generation of millimeter-wave extragalactic source population models.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.5048  [pdf] - 1165421
A CMB lensing mass map and its correlation with the cosmic infrared background
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, to be submitted to ApJL
Submitted: 2013-03-20
We use a temperature map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) obtained using the South Pole Telescope at 150 GHz to construct a map of the gravitational convergence to z ~ 1100, revealing the fluctuations in the projected mass density. This map shows individual features that are significant at the ~ 4 sigma level, providing the first image of CMB lensing convergence. We cross-correlate this map with Herschel/SPIRE maps covering 90 square degrees at wavelengths of 500, 350, and 250 microns. We show that these submillimeter-wavelength (submm) maps are strongly correlated with the lensing convergence map, with detection significances in each of the three submm bands ranging from 6.7 to 8.8 sigma. We fit the measurement of the cross power spectrum assuming a simple constant bias model and infer bias factors of b=1.3-1.8, with a statistical uncertainty of 15%, depending on the assumed model for the redshift distribution of the dusty galaxies that are contributing to the Herschel/SPIRE maps.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.2726  [pdf] - 1165184
ALMA redshifts of millimeter-selected galaxies from the SPT survey: The redshift distribution of dusty star-forming galaxies
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2013-03-11
Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), we have conducted a blind redshift survey in the 3 mm atmospheric transmission window for 26 strongly lensd dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The sources were selected to have S_1.4mm>20 mJy and a dust-like spectrum and, to remove low-z sources, not have bright radio (S_843MHz<6mJy) or far-infrared counterparts (S_100um<1 Jy, S_60um<200mJy). We robustly detect 44 line features in our survey, which we identify as redshifted emission lines of 12CO, 13CO, [CI], H2O, and H2O+. We find one or more spectral features in 23 sources yielding a ~90% detection rate for this survey; in 12 of these sources we detect multiple lines, while in 11 sources we detect only a single line. For the sources with only one detected line, we break the redshift degeneracy with additional spectroscopic observations if available, or infer the most likely line identification based on photometric data. This yields secure redshifts for ~70% of the sample. The three sources with no lines detected are tentatively placed in the redshift desert between 1.7<z<2.0. The resulting mean redshift of our sample is <z>=3.5. This finding is in contrast to the redshift distribution of radio-identified DSFGs, which have a significantly lower mean redshift of <z>=2.3 and for which only 10-15% of the population is expected to be at z>3. We discuss the effect of gravitational lensing on the redshift distribution and compare our measured redshift distribution to that of models in the literature.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.2723  [pdf] - 1566733
Dusty starburst galaxies in the early Universe as revealed by gravitational lensing
Comments: Accepted for publication in Nature. Under press embargo till 18:00 GMT on Wednesday March 13th
Submitted: 2013-03-11
In the past decade, our understanding of galaxy evolution has been revolutionized by the discovery that luminous, dusty, starburst galaxies were 1,000 times more abundant in the early Universe than at present. It has, however, been difficult to measure the complete redshift 2 distribution of these objects, especially at the highest redshifts (z > 4). Here we report a redshift survey at a wavelength of three millimeters, targeting carbon monoxide line emission from the star-forming molecular gas in the direction of extraordinarily bright millimetrewave-selected sources. High-resolution imaging demonstrates that these sources are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. We detect spectral lines in 23 out of 26 sources and multiple lines in 12 of those 23 sources, from which we obtain robust, unambiguous redshifts. At least 10 of the sources are found to lie at z > 4, indicating that the fraction of dusty starburst galaxies at high redshifts is greater than previously thought. Models of lens geometries in the sample indicate that the background objects are ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, powered by extreme bursts of star formation.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.2722  [pdf] - 1165183
ALMA Observations of SPT-Discovered, Strongly Lensed, Dusty, Star-Forming Galaxies
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysics Journal
Submitted: 2013-03-11
We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 860 micrometer imaging of four high-redshift (z=2.8-5.7) dusty sources that were detected using the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at 1.4 mm and are not seen in existing radio to far-infrared catalogs. At 1.5 arcsec resolution, the ALMA data reveal multiple images of each submillimeter source, separated by 1-3 arcsec, consistent with strong lensing by intervening galaxies visible in near-IR imaging of these sources. We describe a gravitational lens modeling procedure that operates on the measured visibilities and incorporates self-calibration-like antenna phase corrections as part of the model optimization, which we use to interpret the source structure. Lens models indicate that SPT0346-52, located at z=5.7, is one of the most luminous and intensely star-forming sources in the universe with a lensing corrected FIR luminosity of 3.7 X 10^13 L_sun and star formation surface density of 4200 M_sun yr^-1 kpc^-2. We find magnification factors of 5 to 22, with lens Einstein radii of 1.1-2.0 arcsec and Einstein enclosed masses of 1.6-7.2x10^11 M_sun. These observations confirm the lensing origin of these objects, allow us to measure the their intrinsic sizes and luminosities, and demonstrate the important role that ALMA will play in the interpretation of lensed submillimeter sources.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.3368  [pdf] - 600266
High-Redshift Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev--Zel'dovich Effect in the South Pole Telescope Survey
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures. Version as published in December 20th, 2012 issue of ApJ
Submitted: 2012-08-16, last modified: 2012-12-07
We report the first investigation of cool-core properties of galaxy clusters selected via their Sunyaev--Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We use 13 galaxy clusters uniformly selected from 178 deg^2 observed with the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and followed up by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. They form an approximately mass-limited sample (> 3 x 10^14 M_sun h^-1_70) spanning redshifts 0.3 < z < 1.1. Using previously published X-ray-selected cluster samples, we compare two proxies of cool-core strength: surface brightness concentration (cSB) and cuspiness ({\alpha}). We find that cSB is better constrained. We measure cSB for the SPT sample and find several new z > 0.5 cool-core clusters, including two strong cool cores. This rules out the hypothesis that there are no z > 0.5 clusters that qualify as strong cool cores at the 5.4{\sigma} level. The fraction of strong cool-core clusters in the SPT sample in this redshift regime is between 7% and 56% (95% confidence). Although the SPT selection function is significantly different from the X-ray samples, the high-z cSB distribution for the SPT sample is statistically consistent with that of X-ray-selected samples at both low and high redshifts. The cool-core strength is inversely correlated with the offset between the brightest cluster galaxy and the X-ray centroid, providing evidence that the dynamical state affects the cool-core strength of the cluster. Larger SZ-selected samples will be crucial in understanding the evolution of cluster cool cores over cosmic time.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.4369  [pdf] - 593105
Redshifts, Sample Purity, and BCG Positions for the Galaxy Cluster Catalog from the first 720 Square Degrees of the South Pole Telescope Survey
Comments: 22 pages, 7 figures, 1 multi-page table at the end of the article
Submitted: 2012-07-18, last modified: 2012-11-21
We present the results of the ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up of 224 galaxy cluster candidates detected with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in the 720 deg^2 of the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey completed in the 2008 and 2009 observing seasons. We use the optical/NIR data to establish whether each candidate is associated with an overdensity of galaxies and to estimate the cluster redshift. Most photometric redshifts are derived through a combination of three different cluster redshift estimators using red-sequence galaxies, resulting in an accuracy of \Delta z/(1+z)=0.017, determined through comparison with a subsample of 57 clusters for which we have spectroscopic redshifts. We successfully measure redshifts for 158 systems and present redshift lower limits for the remaining candidates. The redshift distribution of the confirmed clusters extends to z=1.35 with a median of z_{med}=0.57. Approximately 18% of the sample with measured redshifts lies at z>0.8. We estimate a lower limit to the purity of this SPT SZ-selected sample by assuming that all unconfirmed clusters are noise fluctuations in the SPT data. We show that the cumulative purity at detection significance \xi>5 (\xi>4.5) is >= 95 (>= 70%). We present the red brightest cluster galaxy (rBCG) positions for the sample and examine the offsets between the SPT candidate position and the rBCG. The radial distribution of offsets is similar to that seen in X-ray-selected cluster samples, providing no evidence that SZ-selected cluster samples include a different fraction of recent mergers than X-ray-selected cluster samples.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:1203.4808  [pdf] - 588683
A Measurement of the Correlation of Galaxy Surveys with CMB Lensing Convergence Maps from the South Pole Telescope
Comments:
Submitted: 2012-03-21, last modified: 2012-11-09
We compare cosmic microwave background lensing convergence maps derived from South Pole Telescope (SPT) data with galaxy survey data from the Blanco Cosmology Survey, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, and a new large Spitzer/IRAC field designed to overlap with the SPT survey. Using optical and infrared catalogs covering between 17 and 68 square degrees of sky, we detect correlation between the SPT convergence maps and each of the galaxy density maps at >4 sigma, with zero cross-correlation robustly ruled out in all cases. The amplitude and shape of the cross-power spectra are in good agreement with theoretical expectations and the measured galaxy bias is consistent with previous work. The detections reported here utilize a small fraction of the full 2500 square degree SPT survey data and serve as both a proof of principle of the technique and an illustration of the potential of this emerging cosmological probe.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.6354  [pdf] - 1152388
Lensing Noise in mm-wave Galaxy Cluster Surveys
Comments: 6 pages, 6 figures, submitted to the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2012-10-23
We study the effects of gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters of the background of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) and the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), and examine the implications for Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-based (SZ) galaxy cluster surveys. At the locations of galaxy clusters, gravitational lensing modifies the probability distribution of the background flux of the DSFGs as well as the CMB. We find that, in the case of a single-frequency 150 GHz survey, lensing of DSFGs leads to both a slight increase (~10%) in detected cluster number counts (due to a ~ 50% increase in the variance of the DSFG background, and hence an increased Eddington bias), as well as to a rare (occurring in ~2% of clusters) "filling-in" of SZ cluster signals by bright strongly lensed background sources. Lensing of the CMB leads to a ~55% reduction in CMB power at the location of massive galaxy clusters in a spatially-matched single-frequency filter, leading to a net decrease in detected cluster number counts. We find that the increase in DSFG power and decrease in CMB power due to lensing at cluster locations largely cancel, such that the net effect on cluster number counts for current SZ surveys is sub-dominant to Poisson errors.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.4966  [pdf] - 578365
South Pole Telescope Software Systems: Control, Monitoring, and Data Acquisition
Comments:
Submitted: 2012-10-17
We present the software system used to control and operate the South Pole Telescope. The South Pole Telescope is a 10-meter millimeter-wavelength telescope designed to measure anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at arcminute angular resolution. In the austral summer of 2011/12, the SPT was equipped with a new polarization-sensitive camera, which consists of 1536 transition-edge sensor bolometers. The bolometers are read out using 36 independent digital frequency multiplexing (\dfmux) readout boards, each with its own embedded processors. These autonomous boards control and read out data from the focal plane with on-board software and firmware. An overall control software system running on a separate control computer controls the \dfmux boards, the cryostat and all other aspects of telescope operation. This control software collects and monitors data in real-time, and stores the data to disk for transfer to the United States for analysis.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.4971  [pdf] - 578370
Performance and on-sky optical characterization of the SPTpol instrument
Comments: 15 pages, 6 figures. Conference: SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2012
Submitted: 2012-10-17
In January 2012, the 10m South Pole Telescope (SPT) was equipped with a polarization-sensitive camera, SPTpol, in order to measure the polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Measurements of the polarization of the CMB at small angular scales (~several arcminutes) can detect the gravitational lensing of the CMB by large scale structure and constrain the sum of the neutrino masses. At large angular scales (~few degrees) CMB measurements can constrain the energy scale of Inflation. SPTpol is a two-color mm-wave camera that consists of 180 polarimeters at 90 GHz and 588 polarimeters at 150 GHz, with each polarimeter consisting of a dual transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. The full complement of 150 GHz detectors consists of 7 arrays of 84 ortho-mode transducers (OMTs) that are stripline coupled to two TES detectors per OMT, developed by the TRUCE collaboration and fabricated at NIST. Each 90 GHz pixel consists of two antenna-coupled absorbers coupled to two TES detectors, developed with Argonne National Labs. The 1536 total detectors are read out with digital frequency-domain multiplexing (DfMUX). The SPTpol deployment represents the first on-sky tests of both of these detector technologies, and is one of the first deployed instruments using DfMUX readout technology. We present the details of the design, commissioning, deployment, on-sky optical characterization and detector performance of the complete SPTpol focal plane.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.4970  [pdf] - 578369
SPTpol: an instrument for CMB polarization measurements with the South Pole Telescope
Comments: 18 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2012-10-17
SPTpol is a dual-frequency polarization-sensitive camera that was deployed on the 10-meter South Pole Telescope in January 2012. SPTpol will measure the polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on angular scales spanning an arcminute to several degrees. The polarization sensitivity of SPTpol will enable a detection of the CMB "B-mode" polarization from the detection of the gravitational lensing of the CMB by large scale structure, and a detection or improved upper limit on a primordial signal due to inflationary gravity waves. The two measurements can be used to constrain the sum of the neutrino masses and the energy scale of inflation. These science goals can be achieved through the polarization sensitivity of the SPTpol camera and careful control of systematics. The SPTpol camera consists of 768 pixels, each containing two transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers coupled to orthogonal polarizations, and a total of 1536 bolometers. The pixels are sensitive to light in one of two frequency bands centered at 90 and 150 GHz, with 180 pixels at 90 GHz and 588 pixels at 150 GHz. The SPTpol design has several features designed to control polarization systematics, including: single-moded feedhorns with low cross-polarization, bolometer pairs well-matched to difference atmospheric signals, an improved ground shield design based on far-sidelobe measurements of the SPT, and a small beam to reduce temperature to polarization leakage. We present an overview of the SPTpol instrument design, project status, and science projections.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.4969  [pdf] - 578368
Feedhorn-coupled TES polarimeter camera modules at 150 GHz for CMB polarization measurements with SPTpol
Comments: 15 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2012-10-17
The SPTpol camera is a dichroic polarimetric receiver at 90 and 150 GHz. Deployed in January 2012 on the South Pole Telescope (SPT), SPTpol is looking for faint polarization signals in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The camera consists of 180 individual Transition Edge Sensor (TES) polarimeters at 90 GHz and seven 84-polarimeter camera modules (a total of 588 polarimeters) at 150 GHz. We present the design, dark characterization, and in-lab optical properties of the 150 GHz camera modules. The modules consist of photolithographed arrays of TES polarimeters coupled to silicon platelet arrays of corrugated feedhorns, both of which are fabricated at NIST-Boulder. In addition to mounting hardware and RF shielding, each module also contains a set of passive readout electronics for digital frequency-domain multiplexing. A single module, therefore, is fully functional as a miniature focal plane and can be tested independently. Across the modules tested before deployment, the detectors average a critical temperature of 478 mK, normal resistance R_N of 1.2 Ohm, unloaded saturation power of 22.5 pW, (detector-only) optical efficiency of ~ 90%, and have electrothermal time constants < 1 ms in transition.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.4968  [pdf] - 578367
Design and characterization of 90 GHz feedhorn-coupled TES polarimeter pixels in the SPTpol camera
Comments:
Submitted: 2012-10-17
The SPTpol camera is a two-color, polarization-sensitive bolometer receiver, and was installed on the 10 meter South Pole Telescope in January 2012. SPTpol is designed to study the faint polarization signals in the Cosmic Microwave Background, with two primary scientific goals. One is to constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio of perturbations in the primordial plasma, and thus constrain the space of permissible inflationary models. The other is to measure the weak lensing effect of large-scale structure on CMB polarization, which can be used to constrain the sum of neutrino masses as well as other growth-related parameters. The SPTpol focal plane consists of seven 84-element monolithic arrays of 150 GHz pixels (588 total) and 180 individual 90 GHz single-pixel modules. In this paper we present the design and characterization of the 90 GHz modules.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.4967  [pdf] - 578366
Improved Performance of TES Bolometers using Digital Feedback
Comments:
Submitted: 2012-10-17
Voltage biased, frequency multiplexed TES bolometers have become a widespread tool in mm-wave astrophysics. However, parasitic impedance and dynamic range issues can limit stability, performance, and multiplexing factors. Here, we present novel methods of overcoming these challenges, achieved through digital feedback, implemented on a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). In the first method, known as Digital Active Nulling (DAN), the current sensor (e.g. SQUID) is nulled in a separate digital feedback loop for each bolometer frequency. This nulling removes the dynamic range limitation on the current sensor, increases its linearity, and reduces its effective input impedance. Additionally, DAN removes constraints on wiring lengths and maximum multiplexing frequency. DAN has been fully implemented and tested. Integration for current experiments, including the South Pole Telescope, will be discussed. We also present a digital mechanism for strongly increasing stability in the presence of large series impedances, known as Digitally Enhanced Voltage Bias (DEVB).
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.6478  [pdf] - 1123746
SPT-CL J0205-5829: A z = 1.32 Evolved Massive Galaxy Cluster in the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Survey
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2012-05-29, last modified: 2012-10-11
The galaxy cluster SPT-CL J0205-5829 currently has the highest spectroscopically-confirmed redshift, z=1.322, in the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey. XMM-Newton observations measure a core-excluded temperature of Tx=8.7keV producing a mass estimate that is consistent with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich derived mass. The combined SZ and X-ray mass estimate of M500=(4.9+/-0.8)e14 h_{70}^{-1} Msun makes it the most massive known SZ-selected galaxy cluster at z>1.2 and the second most massive at z>1. Using optical and infrared observations, we find that the brightest galaxies in SPT-CL J0205-5829 are already well evolved by the time the universe was <5 Gyr old, with stellar population ages >3 Gyr, and low rates of star formation (<0.5Msun/yr). We find that, despite the high redshift and mass, the existence of SPT-CL J0205-5829 is not surprising given a flat LambdaCDM cosmology with Gaussian initial perturbations. The a priori chance of finding a cluster of similar rarity (or rarer) in a survey the size of the 2500 deg^2 SPT-SZ survey is 69%.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.3103  [pdf] - 1123371
Weak-Lensing Mass Measurements of Five Galaxy Clusters in the South Pole Telescope Survey Using Magellan/Megacam
Comments: Main body: 18 pages, 7 figures, 6 tables. Appendix: 6 pages, 10 figures. Accepted by ApJ. New version incorporates changes from accepted article
Submitted: 2012-05-14, last modified: 2012-09-13
We use weak gravitational lensing to measure the masses of five galaxy clusters selected from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey, with the primary goal of comparing these with the SPT Sunyaev--Zel'dovich (SZ) and X-ray based mass estimates. The clusters span redshifts 0.28 < z < 0.43 and have masses M_500 > 2 x 10^14 h^-1 M_sun, and three of the five clusters were discovered by the SPT survey. We observed the clusters in the g'r'i' passbands with the Megacam imager on the Magellan Clay 6.5m telescope. We measure a mean ratio of weak lensing (WL) aperture masses to inferred aperture masses from the SZ data, both within an aperture of R_500,SZ derived from the SZ mass, of 1.04 +/- 0.18. We measure a mean ratio of spherical WL masses evaluated at R_500,SZ to spherical SZ masses of 1.07 +/- 0.18, and a mean ratio of spherical WL masses evaluated at R_500,WL to spherical SZ masses of 1.10 +/- 0.24. We explore potential sources of systematic error in the mass comparisons and conclude that all are subdominant to the statistical uncertainty, with dominant terms being cluster concentration uncertainty and N-body simulation calibration bias. Expanding the sample of SPT clusters with WL observations has the potential to significantly improve the SPT cluster mass calibration and the resulting cosmological constraints from the SPT cluster survey. These are the first WL detections using Megacam on the Magellan Clay telescope.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.6386  [pdf] - 1091937
Cosmic microwave background constraints on the duration and timing of reionization from the South Pole Telescope
Comments: 16 pages, 13 figures, version accepted by ApJ, improved forecast of Herschel-SPT reionization constraints
Submitted: 2011-11-28, last modified: 2012-08-20
The epoch of reionization is a milestone of cosmological structure formation, marking the birth of the first objects massive enough to yield large numbers of ionizing photons. The mechanism and timescale of reionization remain largely unknown. Measurements of the CMB Doppler effect from ionizing bubbles embedded in large-scale velocity streams (the patchy kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect) can constrain the duration of reionization. When combined with large-scale CMB polarization measurements, the evolution of the ionized fraction can be inferred. Using new multi-frequency data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT), we show that the ionized fraction evolved relatively rapidly. For our basic foreground model, we find the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich power sourced by reionization at l=3000 to be <= 2.1 micro K^2 at 95% CL. Using reionization simulations, we translate this to a limit on the duration of reionization of Delta z <= 4.4 (95% CL). We find that this constraint depends on assumptions about the angular correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich power and the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Introducing the degree of correlation as a free parameter, we find that the limits on kSZ power weaken to <= 4.9 micro K^2, implying Delta z <= 7.9 (95% CL). We combine the SPT constraint on the duration of reionization with the WMAP7 measurement of the integrated optical depth to probe the cosmic ionization history. We find that reionization ended with 95% CL at z > 7.2 under the assumption of no tSZ-CIB correlation, and z>5.8 when correlations are allowed. Improved constraints from the full SPT data set in conjunction with upcoming Herschel and Planck data should detect extended reionization at >95% CL provided Delta z >= 4. (abbreviated)
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.2962  [pdf] - 1150677
A Massive, Cooling-Flow-Induced Starburst in the Core of a Highly Luminous Galaxy Cluster
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures, 1 table. Supplemental material contains 15 additional pages. Published in Nature
Submitted: 2012-08-14
In the cores of some galaxy clusters the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous "cooling flows" of gas sinking towards the cluster center, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star formation rates and cool gas masses for these "cool core" clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by astrophysical feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical, and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 at z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (L_2-10 keV = 8.2 x 10^45 erg/s) galaxy cluster which hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (dM/dt = 3820 +/- 530 Msun/yr). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (740 +/- 160 Msun/yr), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool core clusters may not yet be fully established in SPT-CLJ2344-4243. This large star formation rate implies that a significant fraction of the stars in the central galaxy of this cluster may form via accretion of the intracluster medium, rather than the current picture of central galaxies assembling entirely via mergers.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.4215  [pdf] - 1092468
Frequency Multiplexed SQUID Readout of Large Bolometer Arrays for Cosmic Microwave Background Measurements
Comments: 28 pages, 17 figures, accepted to Review of Scientific Instruments. Resubmitted revised version to arxiv July 2012 including very minor changes to address reviewer's comments
Submitted: 2011-12-18, last modified: 2012-07-17
A technological milestone for experiments employing Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers operating at sub-kelvin temperature is the deployment of detector arrays with 100s--1000s of bolometers. One key technology for such arrays is readout multiplexing: the ability to read out many sensors simultaneously on the same set of wires. This paper describes a frequency-domain multiplexed readout system which has been developed for and deployed on the APEX-SZ and South Pole Telescope millimeter wavelength receivers. In this system, the detector array is divided into modules of seven detectors, and each bolometer within the module is biased with a unique ~MHz sinusoidal carrier such that the individual bolometer signals are well separated in frequency space. The currents from all bolometers in a module are summed together and pre-amplified with Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) operating at 4 K. Room-temperature electronics demodulate the carriers to recover the bolometer signals, which are digitized separately and stored to disk. This readout system contributes little noise relative to the detectors themselves, is remarkably insensitive to unwanted microphonic excitations, and provides a technology pathway to multiplexing larger numbers of sensors.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.4550  [pdf] - 1124258
Submillimeter Observations of Millimeter Bright Galaxies Discovered by the South Pole Telescope
Comments: (15 pages, 6 color figures; accepted for publication in ApJ)
Submitted: 2012-06-20
We present APEX SABOCA 350micron and LABOCA 870micron observations of 11 representative examples of the rare, extremely bright (S_1.4mm > 15mJy), dust-dominated millimeter-selected galaxies recently discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT). All 11 sources are robustly detected with LABOCA with 40 < S_870micron < 130mJy, approximately an order of magnitude higher than the canonical submillimeter galaxy (SMG) population. Six of the sources are also detected by SABOCA at >3sigma, with the detections or upper limits providing a key constraint on the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED) near its peak. We model the SEDs of these galaxies using a simple modified blackbody and perform the same analysis on samples of SMGs of known redshift from the literature. These calibration samples inform the distribution of dust temperature for similar SMG populations, and this dust temperature prior allows us to derive photometric redshift estimates and far infrared luminosities for the sources. We find a median redshift of <z> = 3.0, higher than the <z> = 2.2 inferred for the normal SMG population. We also derive the apparent size of the sources from the temperature and apparent luminosity, finding them to appear larger than our unlensed calibration sample, which supports the idea that these sources are gravitationally magnified by massive structures along the line of sight.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.0932  [pdf] - 542651
A measurement of secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies with two years of South Pole Telescope observations
Comments: 25 pages; 14 figures; Submitted to ApJ (Updated to reflect referee comments)
Submitted: 2011-11-03, last modified: 2012-04-23
We present the first three-frequency South Pole Telescope (SPT) cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectra. The band powers presented here cover angular scales 2000 < ell < 9400 in frequency bands centered at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. At these frequencies and angular scales, a combination of the primary CMB anisotropy, thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects, radio galaxies, and cosmic infrared background (CIB) contributes to the signal. We combine Planck and SPT data at 220 GHz to constrain the amplitude and shape of the CIB power spectrum and find strong evidence for non-linear clustering. We explore the SZ results using a variety of cosmological models for the CMB and CIB anisotropies and find them to be robust with one exception: allowing for spatial correlations between the thermal SZ effect and CIB significantly degrades the SZ constraints. Neglecting this potential correlation, we find the thermal SZ power at 150 GHz and ell = 3000 to be 3.65 +/- 0.69 muK^2, and set an upper limit on the kinetic SZ power to be less than 2.8 muK^2 at 95% confidence. When a correlation between the thermal SZ and CIB is allowed, we constrain a linear combination of thermal and kinetic SZ power: D_{3000}^{tSZ} + 0.5 D_{3000}^{kSZ} = 4.60 +/- 0.63 muK^2, consistent with earlier measurements. We use the measured thermal SZ power and an analytic, thermal SZ model calibrated with simulations to determine sigma8 = 0.807 +/- 0.016. Modeling uncertainties involving the astrophysics of the intracluster medium rather than the statistical uncertainty in the measured band powers are the dominant source of uncertainty on sigma8 . We also place an upper limit on the kinetic SZ power produced by patchy reionization; a companion paper uses these limits to constrain the reionization history of the Universe.
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:1203.5775  [pdf] - 1117563
Galaxy clusters discovered via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the first 720 square degrees of the South Pole Telescope survey
Comments: 22 pages, 7 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2012-03-26
We present a catalog of 224 galaxy cluster candidates, selected through their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect signature in the first 720 deg2 of the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey. This area was mapped with the SPT in the 2008 and 2009 austral winters to a depth of 18 uK-arcmin at 150 GHz; 550 deg2 of it was also mapped to 44 uK-arcmin at 95 GHz. Based on optical imaging of all candidates and near-infrared imaging of the majority of candidates, we have found optical and/or infrared counterparts for 158 clusters. Of these, 135 were first identified as clusters in SPT data, including 117 new discoveries reported in this work. This catalog triples the number of confirmed galaxy clusters discovered through the SZ effect. We report photometrically derived (and in some cases spectroscopic) redshifts for confirmed clusters and redshift lower limits for the remaining candidates. The catalog extends to high redshift with a median redshift of z = 0.55 and maximum redshift of z = 1.37. Based on simulations, we expect the catalog to be nearly 100% complete above M500 ~ 5e14 Msun h_{70}^-1 at z > 0.6. There are 121 candidates detected at signal-to-noise greater than five, at which the catalog purity is measured to be 95%. From this high-purity subsample, we exclude the z < 0.3 clusters and use the remaining 100 candidates to improve cosmological constraints following the method presented by Benson et al., 2011. Adding the cluster data to CMB+BAO+H0 data leads to a preference for non-zero neutrino masses while only slightly reducing the upper limit on the sum of neutrino masses to sum mnu < 0.38 eV (95% CL). For a spatially flat wCDM cosmological model, the addition of this catalog to the CMB+BAO+H0+SNe results yields sigma8=0.807+-0.027 and w = -1.010+-0.058, improving the constraints on these parameters by a factor of 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. [abbrev]
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.0546  [pdf] - 1116363
A measurement of gravitational lensing of the microwave background using South Pole Telescope data
Comments: 20 pages, 12 figures, to be submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2012-02-02
We use South Pole Telescope data from 2008 and 2009 to detect the non-Gaussian signature in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) produced by gravitational lensing and to measure the power spectrum of the projected gravitational potential. We constrain the ratio of the measured amplitude of the lensing signal to that expected in a fiducial LCDM cosmological model to be 0.86 +/- 0.16, with no lensing disfavored at 6.3 sigma. Marginalizing over LCDM cosmological models allowed by the WMAP7 results in a measurement of A_lens=0.90+/-0.19, indicating that the amplitude of matter fluctuations over the redshift range 0.5 <~ z <~ 5 probed by CMB lensing is in good agreement with predictions. We present the results of several consistency checks. These include a clear detection of the lensing signature in CMB maps filtered to have no overlap in Fourier space, as well as a "curl" diagnostic that is consistent with the signal expected for LCDM. We perform a detailed study of bias in the measurement due to noise, foregrounds, and other effects and determine that these contributions are relatively small compared to the statistical uncertainty in the measurement. We combine this lensing measurement with results from WMAP7 to improve constraints on cosmological parameters when compared to those from WMAP7 alone: we find a factor of 3.9 improvement in the measurement of the spatial curvature of the Universe, Omega_k=-0.0014+/-0.0172; a 10% improvement in the amplitude of matter fluctuations within LCDM, sigma_8=0.810+/ 0.026; and a 5% improvement in the dark energy equation of state, w=-1.04+/-0.40. When compared with the measurement of w provided by the combination of WMAP7 and external constraints on the Hubble parameter, the addition of the lensing data improve the measurement of w by 15% to give w=-1.087+/-0.096.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.5435  [pdf] - 622849
Cosmological Constraints from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-Selected Clusters with X-ray Observations in the First 178 Square Degrees of the South Pole Telescope Survey
Comments: 21 pages, 8 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2011-12-22
We use measurements from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) cluster survey in combination with X-ray measurements to constrain cosmological parameters. We present a statistical method that fits for the scaling relations of the SZ and X-ray cluster observables with mass while jointly fitting for cosmology. The method is generalizable to multiple cluster observables, and self-consistently accounts for the effects of the cluster selection and uncertainties in cluster mass calibration on the derived cosmological constraints. We apply this method to a data set consisting of an SZ-selected catalog of 18 galaxy clusters at z > 0.3 from the first 178 deg2 of the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey, with 14 clusters having X-ray observations from either Chandra or XMM. Assuming a spatially flat LCDM cosmological model, we find the SPT cluster sample constrain sigma_8 (Omega_m/0.25)^0.30 = 0.785 +- 0.037. In combination with measurements of the CMB power spectrum from the SPT and the seven-year WMAP data, the SPT cluster sample constrain sigma_8 = 0.795 +- 0.016 and Omega_m = 0.255 +- 0.016, a factor of 1.5 improvement on each parameter over the CMB data alone. We consider several extensions beyond the LCDM model by including the following as free parameters: the dark energy equation of state (w), the sum of the neutrino masses (sum mnu), the effective number of relativistic species (Neff), and a primordial non-Gaussianity (fNL). We find that adding the SPT cluster data significantly improves the constraints on w and sum mnu beyond those found when using measurements of the CMB, supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and the Hubble constant. Considering each extension independently, we best constrain w=-0.973 +- 0.063 and the sum of neutrino masses sum mnu < 0.28 eV at 95% confidence, a factor of 1.25 and 1.4 improvement, respectively, over the constraints without clusters. [abbrev.]
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.7245  [pdf] - 1092039
The First Public Release of South Pole Telescope Data: Maps of a 95-square-degree Field from 2008 Observations
Comments: 22 pages, 12 figures, matches published version
Submitted: 2011-11-30
The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has nearly completed a 2500-square-degree survey of the southern sky in three frequency bands. Here we present the first public release of SPT maps and associated data products. We present arcminute-resolution maps at 150 GHz and 220 GHz of an approximately 95-square-degree field centered at R.A. 82.7 degrees, decl. -55 degrees. The field was observed to a depth of approximately 17 micro-K arcmin at 150 GHz and 41 micro-K arcmin at 220 GHz during the 2008 austral winter season. Two variations on map filtering and map projection are presented, one tailored for producing catalogs of galaxy clusters detected through their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect signature and one tailored for producing catalogs of emissive sources. We describe the data processing pipeline, and we present instrument response functions, filter transfer functions, and map noise properties. All data products described in this paper are available for download at http://pole.uchicago.edu/public/data/maps/ra5h30dec-55 and from the NASA Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis server. This is the first step in the eventual release of data from the full 2500-square-degree SPT survey.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.3182  [pdf] - 1076660
A Measurement of the Damping Tail of the Cosmic Microwave Background Power Spectrum with the South Pole Telescope
Comments: 23 pages, 13 figures. Replaced with version accepted by ApJ. Data products are available at http://pole.uchicago.edu/public/data/keisler11/index.html or http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/spt/spt_spectra_2011_get.cfm
Submitted: 2011-05-16, last modified: 2011-09-30
We present a measurement of the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The data consist of 790 square degrees of sky observed at 150 GHz during 2008 and 2009. Here we present the power spectrum over the multipole range 650 < ell < 3000, where it is dominated by primary CMB anisotropy. We combine this power spectrum with the power spectra from the seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data release to constrain cosmological models. We find that the SPT and WMAP data are consistent with each other and, when combined, are well fit by a spatially flat, LCDM cosmological model. The SPT+WMAP constraint on the spectral index of scalar fluctuations is ns = 0.9663 +/- 0.0112. We detect, at ~5-sigma significance, the effect of gravitational lensing on the CMB power spectrum, and find its amplitude to be consistent with the LCDM cosmological model. We explore a number of extensions beyond the LCDM model. Each extension is tested independently, although there are degeneracies between some of the extension parameters. We constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to be r < 0.21 (95% CL) and constrain the running of the scalar spectral index to be dns/dlnk = -0.024 +/- 0.013. We strongly detect the effects of primordial helium and neutrinos on the CMB; a model without helium is rejected at 7.7-sigma, while a model without neutrinos is rejected at 7.5-sigma. The primordial helium abundance is measured to be Yp = 0.296 +/- 0.030, and the effective number of relativistic species is measured to be Neff = 3.85 +/- 0.62. The constraints on these models are strengthened when the CMB data are combined with measurements of the Hubble constant and the baryon acoustic oscillation feature. Notable improvements include ns = 0.9668 +/- 0.0093, r < 0.17 (95% CL), and Neff = 3.86 +/- 0.42. The SPT+WMAP data show...
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.2189  [pdf] - 395750
South Pole Telescope Detections of the Previously Unconfirmed Planck Early SZ Clusters in the Southern Hemisphere
Comments: 7 emulateapj pages, 4 figures, 1 table. Revised to match published version
Submitted: 2011-02-10, last modified: 2011-08-02
We present South Pole Telescope (SPT) observations of the five galaxy cluster candidates in the southern hemisphere which were reported as unconfirmed in the Planck Early Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (ESZ) sample. One cluster candidate, PLCKESZ G255.62-46.16, is located in the 2500-square-degree SPT SZ survey region and was reported previously as SPT-CL J0411-4819. For the remaining four candidates, which are located outside of the SPT SZ survey region, we performed short, dedicated SPT observations. Each of these four candidates was strongly detected in maps made from these observations, with signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 6.3 to 13.8. We have observed these four candidates on the Magellan-Baade telescope and used these data to estimate cluster redshifts from the red sequence. Resulting redshifts range from 0.24 to 0.46. We report measurements of Y_0.75', the integrated Comptonization within a 0.75' radius, for all five candidates. We also report X-ray luminosities calculated from ROSAT All-Sky Survey catalog counts, as well as optical and improved SZ coordinates for each candidate. The combination of SPT SZ measurements, optical red-sequence measurements, and X-ray luminosity estimates demonstrates that these five Planck ESZ cluster candidates do indeed correspond to real galaxy clusters with redshifts and observable properties consistent with the rest of the ESZ sample.
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.1290  [pdf] - 1042936
An SZ-selected sample of the most massive galaxy clusters in the 2500-square-degree South Pole Telescope survey
Comments: Main body: 6 tables, 5 figures, 15 pages. Appendix: 26 full-color images, 14 pages. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2011-01-06, last modified: 2011-06-23
The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is currently surveying 2500 deg^2 of the southern sky to detect massive galaxy clusters out to the epoch of their formation using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. This paper presents a catalog of the 26 most significant SZ cluster detections in the full survey region. The catalog includes 14 clusters which have been previously identified and 12 that are new discoveries. These clusters were identified in fields observed to two differing noise depths: 1500 deg^2 at the final SPT survey depth of 18 uK-arcmin at 150 GHz, and 1000 deg^2 at a depth of 54 uK-arcmin. Clusters were selected on the basis of their SZ signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in SPT maps, a quantity which has been demonstrated to correlate tightly with cluster mass. The S/N thresholds were chosen to achieve a comparable mass selection across survey fields of both depths. Cluster redshifts were obtained with optical and infrared imaging and spectroscopy from a variety of ground- and space-based facilities. The redshifts range from 0.098 \leq z \leq 1.132 with a median of z_med = 0.40. The measured SZ S/N and redshifts lead to unbiased mass estimates ranging from 9.8 \times 10^14 M_sun/h_70 \leq M_200(rho_mean) \leq 3.1 \times 10^15 M_sun/h_70. Based on the SZ mass estimates, we find that none of the clusters are individually in significant tension with the LambdaCDM cosmological model. We also test for evidence of non-Gaussianity based on the cluster sample and find the data show no preference for non-Gaussian perturbations.
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.4788  [pdf] - 955793
Improved constraints on cosmic microwave background secondary anisotropies from the complete 2008 South Pole Telescope data
Comments: Minor additions in response to referee; results unchanged. 27 pages, 16 figures. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2010-12-21, last modified: 2011-03-14
We report measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum from the complete 2008 South Pole Telescope (SPT) data set. We analyze twice as much data as the first SPT power spectrum analysis, using an improved cosmological parameter estimator which fits multi-frequency models to the SPT 150 and $220\,$GHz bandpowers. We find an excellent fit to the measured bandpowers with a model that includes lensed primary CMB anisotropy, secondary thermal (tSZ) and kinetic (kSZ) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich anisotropies, unclustered synchrotron point sources, and clustered dusty point sources. In addition to measuring the power spectrum of dusty galaxies at high signal-to-noise, the data primarily constrain a linear combination of the kSZ and tSZ anisotropy contributions at $150\,$GHz and $\ell=3000$: $D^{tSZ}_{3000} + 0.5\,D^{kSZ}_{3000} = 4.5\pm 1.0 \,\mu{\rm K}^2$. The 95% confidence upper limits on secondary anisotropy power are $D^{tSZ}_{3000} < 5.3\,\mu{\rm K}^2$ and $D^{kSZ}_{3000} < 6.5\,\mu{\rm K}^2$. We also consider the potential correlation of dusty and tSZ sources, and find it incapable of relaxing the tSZ upper limit. These results increase the significance of the lower than expected tSZ amplitude previously determined from SPT power spectrum measurements. We find that models including non-thermal pressure support in groups and clusters predict tSZ power in better agreement with the SPT data. Combining the tSZ power measurement with primary CMB data halves the statistical uncertainty on $\sigma_8$. However, the preferred value of $\sigma_8$ varies significantly between tSZ models. Improved constraints on cosmological parameters from tSZ power spectrum measurements require continued progress in the modeling of the tSZ power.
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.2338  [pdf] - 325326
Extragalactic millimeter-wave sources in South Pole Telescope survey data: source counts, catalog, and statistics for an 87 square-degree field
Comments: 35 emulateapj pages, 12 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2009-12-11, last modified: 2011-03-01
We report the results of an 87 square-degree point-source survey centered at R.A. 5h30m, decl. -55 deg. taken with the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at 1.4 and 2.0 mm wavelengths with arc-minute resolution and milli-Jansky depth. Based on the ratio of flux in the two bands, we separate the detected sources into two populations, one consistent with synchrotron emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and one consistent with thermal emission from dust. We present source counts for each population from 11 to 640 mJy at 1.4 mm and from 4.4 to 800 mJy at 2.0 mm. The 2.0 mm counts are dominated by synchrotron-dominated sources across our reported flux range; the 1.4 mm counts are dominated by synchroton-dominated sources above ~15 mJy and by dust-dominated sources below that flux level. We detect 141 synchrotron-dominated sources and 47 dust-dominated sources at S/N > 4.5 in at least one band. All of the most significantly detected members of the synchrotron-dominated population are associated with sources in previously published radio catalogs. Some of the dust-dominated sources are associated with nearby (z << 1) galaxies whose dust emission is also detected by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). However, most of the bright, dust-dominated sources have no counterparts in any existing catalogs. We argue that these sources represent the rarest and brightest members of the population commonly referred to as sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs). Because these sources are selected at longer wavelengths than in typical SMG surveys, they are expected to have a higher mean redshift distribution and may provide a new window on galaxy formation in the early universe.
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.1286  [pdf] - 1042935
Discovery and Cosmological Implications of SPT-CL J2106-5844, the Most Massive Known Cluster at z > 1
Comments: 10 pages, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2011-01-06
Using the South Pole Telescope (SPT), we have discovered the most massive known galaxy cluster at z > 1, SPT-CL J2106-5844. In addition to producing a strong Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect signal, this system is a luminous X-ray source and its numerous constituent galaxies display spatial and color clustering, all indicating the presence of a massive galaxy cluster. VLT and Magellan spectroscopy of 18 member galaxies shows that the cluster is at z = 1.132^+0.002_-0.003. Chandra observations obtained through a combined HRC-ACIS GTO program reveal an X-ray spectrum with an Fe K line redshifted by z = 1.18 +/- 0.03. These redshifts are consistent with galaxy colors in extensive optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared imaging. SPT-CL J2106-5844 displays extreme X-ray properties for a cluster, having a core-excluded temperature of kT = 11.0^+2.6_-1.9 keV and a luminosity (within r_500) of L_X (0.5 - 2.0 keV) = (13.9 +/- 1.0) x 10^44 erg/s. The combined mass estimate from measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and X-ray data is M_200 = (1.27 +/- 0.21) x 10^15 M_sun. The discovery of such a massive gravitationally collapsed system at high redshift provides an interesting laboratory for galaxy formation and evolution, and is a powerful probe of extreme perturbations of the primordial matter density field. We discuss the latter, determining that, under the assumption of LambdaCDM cosmology with only Gaussian perturbations, there is only a 7% chance of finding a galaxy cluster similar to SPT-CL J2106-5844 in the 2500 deg^2 SPT survey region, and that only one such galaxy cluster is expected in the entire sky.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:1003.0003  [pdf] - 1025419
Galaxy Clusters Selected with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect from 2008 South Pole Telescope Observations
Comments: 19 pages, 9 figures, 4 appendices
Submitted: 2010-03-01, last modified: 2010-11-30
We present a detection-significance-limited catalog of 21 Sunyaev-Zel'dovich selected galaxy clusters. These clusters, along with 1 unconfirmed candidate, were identified in 178 deg^2 of sky surveyed in 2008 by the South Pole Telescope to a depth of 18 uK-arcmin at 150 GHz. Optical imaging from the Blanco Cosmology Survey (BCS) and Magellan telescopes provided photometric (and in some cases spectroscopic) redshift estimates, with catalog redshifts ranging from z=0.15 to z>1, with a median z = 0.74. Of the 21 confirmed galaxy clusters, three were previously identified as Abell clusters, three were presented as SPT discoveries in Staniszewski et al, 2009, and three were first identified in a recent analysis of BCS data by Menanteau et al, 2010; the remaining 12 clusters are presented for the first time in this work. Simulated observations of the SPT fields predict the sample to be nearly 100% complete above a mass threshold of M_200 ~ 5x10^14 M_sun/h at z = 0.6. This completeness threshold pushes to lower mass with increasing redshift, dropping to ~4x10^14 M_sun/h at z=1. The size and redshift distribution of this catalog are in good agreement with expectations based on our current understanding of galaxy clusters and cosmology. In combination with other cosmological probes, we use the cluster catalog to improve estimates of cosmological parameters. Assuming a standard spatially flat wCDM cosmological model, the addition of our catalog to the WMAP 7-year analysis yields sigma_8 = 0.81 +- 0.09 and w = -1.07 +- 0.29, a ~50% improvement in precision on both parameters over WMAP7 alone.
[116]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.5639  [pdf] - 1033390
SPT-CL J0546-5345: A Massive z > 1 Galaxy Cluster Selected Via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect with the South Pole Telescope
Comments: ApJ, in press
Submitted: 2010-06-29, last modified: 2010-07-26
We report the spectroscopic confirmation of SPT-CL J0546-5345 at <z> = 1.067. To date this is the most distant cluster to be spectroscopically confirmed from the 2008 South Pole Telescope (SPT) catalog, and indeed the first z > 1 cluster discovered by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE). We identify 21 secure spectroscopic members within 0.9 Mpc of the SPT cluster position, 18 of which are quiescent, early-type galaxies. From these quiescent galaxies we obtain a velocity dispersion of 1179^{+232}_{-167} km/s, ranking SPT-CL J0546-5345 as the most dynamically massive cluster yet discovered at z > 1. Assuming that SPT-CL J0546-5345 is virialized, this implies a dynamical mass of M_200 = 1.0^{+0.6}_{-0.4} x 10^{15} Msun, in agreement with the X-ray and SZE mass measurements. Combining masses from several independent measures leads to a best-estimate mass of M_200 = (7.95 +/- 0.92) x 10^{14} Msun. The spectroscopic confirmation of SPT-CL J0546-5345, discovered in the wide-angle, mass-selected SPT cluster survey, marks the onset of the high redshift SZE-selected galaxy cluster era.
[117]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.4315  [pdf] - 205108
Angular Power Spectra of the Millimeter Wavelength Background Light from Dusty Star-forming Galaxies with the South Pole Telescope
Comments: 18 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2009-12-22, last modified: 2010-07-21
We use data from the first 100 square-degree field observed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) in 2008 to measure the angular power spectrum of temperature anisotropies contributed by the background of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) at millimeter wavelengths. From the auto and cross-correlation of 150 and 220 GHz SPT maps, we significantly detect both Poisson distributed and, for the first time at millimeter wavelengths, clustered components of power from a background of DSFGs. The spectral indices between 150 and 220 GHz of the Poisson and clustered components are found to be 3.86 +- 0.23 and 3.8 +- 1.3 respectively, implying a steep scaling of the dust emissivity index beta ~ 2. The Poisson and clustered power detected in SPT, BLAST (at 600, 860, and 1200 GHz), and Spitzer (1900 GHz) data can be understood in the context of a simple model in which all galaxies have the same graybody spectrum with dust emissivity index of beta = 2 and dust temperature T_d = 34 K. In this model, half of the 150 GHz background light comes from redshifts greater than 3.2. We also use the SPT data to place an upper limit on the amplitude of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich power spectrum at l = 3000 of 13 uK^2 at 95% confidence.
[118]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.3068  [pdf] - 622841
X-ray Properties of the First SZE-selected Galaxy Cluster Sample from the South Pole Telescope
Comments: 28 pages, 19 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2010-06-15
We present results of X-ray observations of a sample of 15 clusters selected via their imprint on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. These clusters are a subset of the first SZ-selected cluster catalog, obtained from observations of 178 deg^2 of sky surveyed by the South Pole Telescope. Using X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton, we estimate the temperature, T_X, and mass, M_g, of the intracluster medium (ICM) within r_500 for each cluster. From these, we calculate Y_X=M_g T_X and estimate the total cluster mass using a M_500-Y_X scaling relation measured from previous X-ray studies. The integrated Comptonization, Y_SZ, is derived from the SZ measurements, using additional information from the X-ray measured gas density profiles and a universal temperature profile. We calculate scaling relations between the X-ray and SZ observables, and find results generally consistent with other measurements and the expectations from simple self-similar behavior. Specifically, we fit a Y_SZ-Y_X relation and find a normalization of 0.82 +- 0.07, marginally consistent with the predicted ratio of Y_SZ/Y_X=0.91+-0.01 that would be expected from the density and temperature models used in this work. Using the Y_X derived mass estimates, we fit a Y_SZ-M_500 relation and find a slope consistent with the self-similar expectation of Y_SZ ~ M^5/3 with a normalization consistent with predictions from other X-ray studies. We compare the X-ray mass estimates to previously published SZ mass estimates derived from cosmological simulations of the SPT survey. We find that the SZ mass estimates are lower by a factor of 0.89+-0.06, which is within the ~15% systematic uncertainty quoted for the simulation-based SZ masses.
[119]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.2444  [pdf] - 902400
Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Cluster Profiles Measured with the South Pole Telescope
Comments: 21 pages, 24 figures, updated to published version
Submitted: 2009-11-12, last modified: 2010-06-02
We present Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements of 15 massive X-ray selected galaxy clusters obtained with the South Pole Telescope. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) cluster signals are measured at 150 GHz, and concurrent 220 GHz data are used to reduce astrophysical contamination. Radial profiles are computed using a technique that takes into account the effects of the beams and filtering. In several clusters, significant SZ decrements are detected out to a substantial fraction of the virial radius. The profiles are fit to the beta model and to a generalized NFW pressure profile, and are scaled and stacked to probe their average behavior. We find model parameters that are consistent with previous studies: beta=0.86 and r_core/r_500 = 0.20 for the beta model, and (alpha, beta, gamma, c_500)=(1.0,5.5,0.5,1.0) for the generalized NFW model. Both models fit the SPT data comparably well, and both are consistent with the average SZ profile out to the virial radius. The integrated Compton-y parameter Y_SZ is computed for each cluster using both model-dependent and model-independent techniques, and the results are compared to X-ray estimates of cluster parameters. We find that Y_SZ scales with Y_X and gas mass with low scatter. Since these observables have been found to scale with total mass, our results point to a tight mass-observable relation for the SPT cluster survey.
[120]  oai:arXiv.org:1003.0005  [pdf] - 1025421
Optical Redshift and Richness Estimates for Galaxy Clusters Selected with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect from 2008 South Pole Telescope Observations
Comments: Main body: 2 tables, 6 figures, 12 pages. Appendix: 22 full-color images, 11 pages. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2010-03-01
We present redshifts and optical richness properties of 21 galaxy clusters uniformly selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature. These clusters, plus an additional, unconfirmed candidate, were detected in a 178 square-degree area surveyed by the South Pole Telescope in 2008. Using griz imaging from the Blanco Cosmology Survey and from pointed Magellan telescope observations, as well as spectroscopy using Magellan facilities, we confirm the existence of clustered red-sequence galaxies, report red-sequence photometric redshifts, present spectroscopic redshifts for a subsample, and derive R_200 radii and M_200 masses from optical richness. The clusters span redshifts from 0.15 to greater than 1, with a median redshift of 0.74; three clusters are estimated to be at z > 1. Redshifts inferred from mean red-sequence colors exhibit 2% RMS scatter in sigma_z/(1+z) with respect to the spectroscopic subsample for z < 1. We show that M_200 cluster masses derived from optical richness correlate with masses derived from South Pole Telescope data and agree with previously derived scaling relations to within the uncertainties. Optical and infrared imaging is an efficient means of cluster identification and redshift estimation in large Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys, and exploiting the same data for richness measurements, as we have done, will be useful for constraining cluster masses and radii for large samples in cosmological analysis.
[121]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.4317  [pdf] - 902829
Measurements of Secondary Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies with the South Pole Telescope
Comments: 28 pages, 11 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2009-12-22
We report cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum measurements from the first 100 sq. deg. field observed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at 150 and 220 GHz. On angular scales where the primary CMB anisotropy is dominant, ell ~< 3000, the SPT power spectrum is consistent with the standard LambdaCDM cosmology. On smaller scales, we see strong evidence for a point source contribution, consistent with a population of dusty, star-forming galaxies. After we mask bright point sources, anisotropy power on angular scales of 3000 < ell < 9500 is detected with a signal-to-noise > 50 at both frequencies. We combine the 150 and 220 GHz data to remove the majority of the point source power, and use the point source subtracted spectrum to detect Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) power at 2.6 sigma. At ell=3000, the SZ power in the subtracted bandpowers is 4.2 +/- 1.5 uK^2, which is significantly lower than the power predicted by a fiducial model using WMAP5 cosmological parameters. This discrepancy may suggest that contemporary galaxy cluster models overestimate the thermal pressure of intracluster gas. Alternatively, this result can be interpreted as evidence for lower values of sigma8. When combined with an estimate of the kinetic SZ contribution, the measured SZ amplitude shifts sigma8 from the primary CMB anisotropy derived constraint of 0.794 +/- 0.028 down to 0.773 +/- 0.025. The uncertainty in the constraint on sigma8 from this analysis is dominated by uncertainties in the theoretical modeling required to predict the amplitude of the SZ power spectrum for a given set of cosmological parameters.
[122]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.1578  [pdf] - 17251
Galaxy clusters discovered with a Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures, revised to match published version, uses emulateapj
Submitted: 2008-10-09, last modified: 2009-07-25
The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is conducting a Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect survey over large areas of the southern sky, searching for massive galaxy clusters to high redshift. In this preliminary study, we focus on a 40 square-degree area targeted by the Blanco Cosmology Survey (BCS), which is centered roughly at right ascension 5h30m, declination -53 degrees. Over two seasons of observations, this entire region has been mapped by the SPT at 95 GHz, 150 GHz, and 225 GHz. We report the four most significant SPT detections of SZ clusters in this field, three of which were previously unknown and, therefore, represent the first galaxy clusters discovered with an SZ survey. The SZ clusters are detected as decrements with greater than 5-sigma significance in the high-sensitivity 150 GHz SPT map. The SZ spectrum of these sources is confirmed by detections of decrements at the corresponding locations in the 95 GHz SPT map and non-detections at those locations in the 225 GHz SPT map. Multiband optical images from the BCS survey demonstrate significant concentrations of similarly colored galaxies at the positions of the SZ detections. Photometric redshift estimates from the BCS data indicate that two of the clusters lie at moderate redshift (z ~ 0.4) and two at high redshift (z >~ 0.8). One of the SZ detections was previously identified as a galaxy cluster using X-ray data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). Potential RASS counterparts (not previously identified as clusters) are also found for two of the new discoveries. These first four galaxy clusters are the most significant SZ detections from a subset of the ongoing SPT survey. As such, they serve as a demonstration that SZ surveys, and the SPT in particular, can be an effective means for finding galaxy clusters.