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Conti, Dennis M.

Normalized to: Conti, D.

16 article(s) in total. 660 co-authors, from 1 to 20 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 33,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.09046  [pdf] - 2067615
Utilizing Small Telescopes Operated by Citizen Scientists for Transiting Exoplanet Follow-up
Comments: 26 pages, 15 figures; accepted for publication by PASP
Submitted: 2020-03-19
Due to the efforts by numerous ground-based surveys and NASA's Kepler and TESS, there will be hundreds, if not thousands, of transiting exoplanets ideal for atmospheric characterization via spectroscopy with large platforms such as JWST and ARIEL. However their next predicted mid-transit time could become so increasingly uncertain over time that significant overhead would be required to ensure the detection of the entire transit. As a result, follow-up observations to characterize these exoplanetary atmospheres would require less-efficient use of an observatory's time---which is an issue for large platforms where minimizing observing overheads is a necessity. Here we demonstrate the power of citizen scientists operating smaller observatories ($\le$1-m) to keep ephemerides "fresh", defined here as when the 1$\sigma$ uncertainty in the mid-transit time is less than half the transit duration. We advocate for the creation of a community-wide effort to perform ephemeris maintenance on transiting exoplanets by citizen scientists. Such observations can be conducted with even a 6-inch telescope, which has the potential to save up to $\sim$8000 days for a 1000-planet survey. Based on a preliminary analysis of 14 transits from a single 6-inch MicroObservatory telescope, we empirically estimate the ability of small telescopes to benefit the community. Observations with a small-telescope network operated by citizen scientists are capable of resolving stellar blends to within 5''/pixel, can follow-up long period transits in short-baseline TESS fields, monitor epoch-to-epoch stellar variability at a precision 0.67% $\pm$ 0.12% for a 11.3 V-mag star, and search for new planets or constrain the masses of known planets with transit timing variations greater than two minutes.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.01136  [pdf] - 2057980
A pair of TESS planets spanning the radius valley around the nearby mid-M dwarf LTT 3780
Cloutier, Ryan; Eastman, Jason D.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Mortier, Annelies; Watson, Christopher A.; Stalport, Manu; Pinamonti, Matteo; Lienhard, Florian; Harutyunyan, Avet; Damasso, Mario; Latham, David W.; Collins, Karen A.; Massey, Robert; Irwin, Jonathan; Winters, Jennifer G.; Charbonneau, David; Ziegler, Carl; Matthews, Elisabeth; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Kreidberg, Laura; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ricker, George; Vanderspek, Roland; Seager, Sara; Winn, Joshua; Jenkins, Jon M.; Vezie, Michael; Udry, Stéphane; Twicken, Joseph D.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Ségransan, Damien; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Santos, Nuno C.; Rice, Ken; Rackham, Benjamin V.; Poretti, Ennio; Piotto, Giampaolo; Phillips, David; Pepe, Francesco; Molinari, Emilio; Mignon, Lucile; Micela, Giuseppina; Melo, Claudio; de Medeiros, José R.; Mayor, Michel; Matson, Rachel; Fiorenzano, Aldo F. Martinez; Mann, Andrew W.; Magazzú, Antonio; Lovis, Christophe; López-Morales, Mercedes; Lopez, Eric; Lissauer, Jack J.; Lépine, Sébastien; Law, Nicholas; Kielkopf, John F.; Johnson, John A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Howell, Steve B.; Gonzales, Erica; Ghedina, Adriano; Forveille, Thierry; Figueira, Pedro; Dumusque, Xavier; Dressing, Courtney D.; Doyon, René; Díaz, Rodrigo F.; Di Fabrizio, Luca; Delfosse, Xavier; Cosentino, Rosario; Conti, Dennis M.; Collins, Kevin I.; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Ciardi, David; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Burke, Christopher; Buchhave, Lars; Briceño, César; Boyd, Patricia; Bouchy, François; Beichman, Charles; Artigau, Étienne; Almenara, Jose M.
Comments: 8 figures, 6 tables, submitted to AAS journals. CSV file of the RV measurements (i.e. Table 2) are included in the source code
Submitted: 2020-03-02
We present the confirmation of two new planets transiting the nearby mid-M dwarf LTT 3780 (TIC 36724087, TOI-732, $V=13.07$, $K_s=8.204$, $R_s$=0.374 R$_{\odot}$, $M_s$=0.401 M$_{\odot}$, d=22 pc). The two planet candidates are identified in a single TESS sector and are validated with reconnaissance spectroscopy, ground-based photometric follow-up, and high-resolution imaging. With measured orbital periods of $P_b=0.77$ days, $P_c=12.25$ days and sizes $r_{p,b}=1.33\pm 0.07$ R$_{\oplus}$, $r_{p,c}=2.30\pm 0.16$ R$_{\oplus}$, the two planets span the radius valley in period-radius space around low mass stars thus making the system a laboratory to test competing theories of the emergence of the radius valley in that stellar mass regime. By combining 55 precise radial-velocity measurements from HARPS and HARPS-N, we measure planet masses of $m_{p,b}=3.12\pm 0.51$ M$_{\oplus}$ and $m_{p,c}=8.5\pm 1.6$ M$_{\oplus}$ which indicates that LTT 3780b has a bulk composition consistent with being Earth-like, while LTT 3780c likely hosts an extended H/He envelope. We show that the recovered planetary masses are consistent with predictions from both photoevaporation and from core-powered mass loss models. The physical and orbital planet parameters, combined with the brightness and small size of LTT 3780, render both of the known LTT 3780 planets as accessible targets for atmospheric characterization of planets within the same planetary system and spanning the radius valley.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.09175  [pdf] - 2037604
A hot terrestrial planet orbiting the bright M dwarf L 168-9 unveiled by TESS
Comments: 14 pages, 8 figures, 3 tables. Accepted for publication in astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2020-01-24
We report the detection of a transiting super-Earth-sized planet (R=1.39+-0.09 Rearth) in a 1.4-day orbit around L 168-9 (TOI-134),a bright M1V dwarf (V=11, K=7.1) located at 25.15+-0.02 pc. The host star was observed in the first sector of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission and, for confirmation and planet mass measurement, was followed up with ground-based photometry, seeing-limited and high-resolution imaging, and precise radial velocity (PRV) observations using the HARPS and PFS spectrographs. Combining the TESS data and PRV observations, we find the mass of L168-9 b to be 4.60+-0.56 Mearth, and thus the bulk density to be 1.74+0.44-0.33 times larger than that of the Earth. The orbital eccentricity is smaller than 0.21 (95% confidence). This planet is a Level One Candidate for the TESS Mission's scientific objective - to measure the masses of 50 small planets - and is one of the most observationally accessible terrestrial planets for future atmospheric characterization.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.00952  [pdf] - 2023673
The First Habitable Zone Earth-sized Planet from TESS. I: Validation of the TOI-700 System
Gilbert, Emily A.; Barclay, Thomas; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Hord, Benjamin J.; Kostov, Veselin B.; Lopez, Eric D.; Rowe, Jason F.; Hoffman, Kelsey; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Silverstein, Michele L.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Suissa, Gabrielle; Airapetian, Vladimir S.; Clement, Matthew S.; Raymond, Sean N.; Mann, Andrew W.; Kruse, Ethan; Lissauer, Jack J.; Colón, Knicole D.; Kopparapu, Ravi kumar; Kreidberg, Laura; Zieba, Sebastian; Collins, Karen A.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Howell, Steve B.; Ziegler, Carl; Vrijmoet, Eliot Halley; Adams, Fred C.; Arney, Giada N.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Brande, Jonathan; Burke, Christopher J.; Cacciapuoti, Luca; Chance, Quadry; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Covone, Giovanni; Daylan, Tansu; Dineen, Danielle; Dressing, Courtney D.; Essack, Zahra; Fauchez, Thomas J.; Galgano, Brianna; Howe, Alex R.; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kane, Stephen R.; Lam, Christopher; Lee, Eve J.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Logsdon, Sarah E.; Mandell, Avi M.; Monsue, Teresa; Mullally, Fergal; Mullally, Susan E.; Paudel, Rishi; Pidhorodetska, Daria; Plavchan, Peter; Reyes, Naylynn Tañón; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Rojas-Ayala, Bárbara; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Vega, Laura D.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Wolf, Eric T.; Youngblood, Allison; Ricker, George R.; Vanderspek, Roland K.; Latham, David W.; Seager, Sara; Winn, Joshua N.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Briceño, César; Ciardi, David R.; Cloutier, Ryan; Conti, Dennis M.; Couperus, Andrew; Di Sora, Mario; Eisner, Nora L.; Everett, Mark E.; Gan, Tianjun; Hartman, Joel D.; Henry, Todd; Isopi, Giovanni; Jao, Wei-Chun; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Law, Nicholas; Mallia, Franco; Matson, Rachel A.; Shappee, Benjamin J.; Wood, Mackenna Lee; Winters, Jennifer G.
Comments: 29 pages, 15 figures, 4 tables, submitted to AAS Journals
Submitted: 2020-01-03
We present the discovery and validation of a three-planet system orbiting the nearby (31.1 pc) M2 dwarf star TOI-700 (TIC 150428135). TOI-700 lies in the TESS continuous viewing zone in the Southern Ecliptic Hemisphere; observations spanning 11 sectors reveal three planets with radii ranging from 1 R$_\oplus$ to 2.6 R$_\oplus$ and orbital periods ranging from 9.98 to 37.43 days. Ground-based follow-up combined with diagnostic vetting and validation tests enable us to rule out common astrophysical false-positive scenarios and validate the system of planets. The outermost planet, TOI-700 d, has a radius of $1.19\pm0.11$ R$_\oplus$ and resides in the conservative habitable zone of its host star, where it receives a flux from its star that is approximately 86% of the Earth's insolation. In contrast to some other low-mass stars that host Earth-sized planets in their habitable zones, TOI-700 exhibits low levels of stellar activity, presenting a valuable opportunity to study potentially-rocky planets over a wide range of conditions affecting atmospheric escape. While atmospheric characterization of TOI-700 d with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be challenging, the larger sub-Neptune, TOI-700 c (R = 2.63 R$_\oplus$), will be an excellent target for JWST and beyond. TESS is scheduled to return to the Southern Hemisphere and observe TOI-700 for an additional 11 sectors in its extended mission, which should provide further constraints on the known planet parameters and searches for additional planets and transit timing variations in the system.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.10186  [pdf] - 2020644
TOI 564 b and TOI 905 b: Grazing and Fully Transiting Hot Jupiters Discovered by TESS
Comments: 21 pages and 10 figures. Submitted to AJ
Submitted: 2019-12-20
We report the discovery and confirmation of two new hot Jupiters discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS): TOI 564 b and TOI 905 b. The transits of these two planets were initially observed by TESS with orbital periods of 1.651 d and 3.739 d, respectively. We conducted follow-up observations of each system from the ground, including photometry in multiple filters, speckle interferometry, and radial velocity measurements. For TOI 564 b, our global fitting revealed a classical hot Jupiter with a mass of $1.463^{+0.10}_{-0.096}\ M_J$ and a radius of $1.02^{+0.71}_{-0.29}\ R_J$. TOI 905 b is a classical hot Jupiter as well, with a mass of $0.667^{+0.042}_{-0.041}\ M_J$ and radius of $1.171^{+0.053}_{-0.051}\ R_J$. Both planets orbit Sun-like, moderately bright, mid-G dwarf stars with V ~ 11. While TOI 905 b fully transits its star, we found that TOI 564 b has a very high transit impact parameter of $0.994^{+0.083}_{-0.049}$, making it one of only ~20 known systems to exhibit a grazing transit and one of the brightest host stars among them. TOI 564 b is therefore one of the most attractive systems to search for additional non-transiting, smaller planets by exploiting the sensitivity of grazing transits to small changes in inclination and transit duration over the time scale of several years.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.01017  [pdf] - 2008062
KELT-25b and KELT-26b: A Hot Jupiter and a Substellar Companion Transiting Young A-stars Observed by TESS
Martínez, Romy Rodríguez; Gaudi, B. Scott; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Zhou, George; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Quinn, Samuel N.; Penev, Kaloyan Minev; Tan, Thiam-Guan; Latham, David W.; Paredes, Leonardo A.; Kielkopf, John; Addison, Brett C.; Wright, Duncan J.; Teske, Johanna K.; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Ziegler, Carl; Stassun, Keivan G.; Johnson, Marshall C.; Eastman, Jason D.; Siverd, Robert J.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Bouma, Luke G.; Pepper, Joshua; Lund, Michael B.; Villanueva, Steven; Stevens, Daniel J.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Kilby, Coleman; Cohen, David H.; Bayliss, Daniel; Bieryla, Allyson; Cargile, Phillip A.; Collins, Karen A.; Conti, Dennis M.; Colon, Knicole D.; Curtis, Ivan A.; DePoy, Darren L.; Evans, Phil A.; Feliz, Dax; Gregorio, Joao; Rothenberg, Jason; James, David J.; Penny, Matthew T.; Reed, Phillip A.; Relles, Howard M.; Stephens, Denise C.; Joner, Michael D.; Kuhn, Rudolf B.; Stockdale, Chris; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia; Yao, Xinyu; Zambelli, Roberto; Vanderspek, Roland; Seager, Sara; Winn, Joshua N.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Henry, Todd J.; James, Hodari-Sadiki; Jao, Wei-Chun; Wang, Sharon X.; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Ian B.; Schectman, Stephen; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Bedding, Timothy R.; Okumura, Jack; Plavchan, Peter; Bowler, Brendan P.; Horner, Jonathan; Kane, Stephen R.; Mengel, Matthew W.; Morton, Timothy D.; Tinney, C. G.; Zhang, Hui; Scott, Nicholas J.; Matson, Rachel A.; Everett, Mark E.; Tokovinin, Andrei; Mann, Andrew W.; Dragomir, Diana; Guenther, Maximilian N.; Ting, Eric B.; Fausnaugh, Michael; Glidden, Ana; Quintana, Elisa V.; Manner, Mark; Marshall, Jennifer L.; McLeod, Kim K.; Khakpash, Somayeh
Comments: 24 pages, 18 figures, 8 tables
Submitted: 2019-12-02
We present the discoveries of KELT-25b (TIC 65412605, TOI-626.01) and KELT-26b (TIC 160708862, TOI-1337.01), two transiting companions orbiting relatively bright, early A-stars. The transit signals were initially detected by the KELT survey, and subsequently confirmed by \textit{TESS} photometry. KELT-25b is on a 4.40-day orbit around the V = 9.66 star CD-24 5016 ($T_{\rm eff} = 8280^{+440}_{-180}$ K, $M_{\star}$ = $2.18^{+0.12}_{-0.11}$ $M_{\odot}$), while KELT-26b is on a 3.34-day orbit around the V = 9.95 star HD 134004 ($T_{\rm eff}$ =$8640^{+500}_{-240}$ K, $M_{\star}$ = $1.93^{+0.14}_{-0.16}$ $M_{\odot}$), which is likely an Am star. We have confirmed the sub-stellar nature of both companions through detailed characterization of each system using ground-based and \textit{TESS} photometry, radial velocity measurements, Doppler Tomography, and high-resolution imaging. For KELT-25, we determine a companion radius of $R_{\rm P}$ = $1.64^{+0.039}_{-0.043}$ $R_{\rm J}$, and a 3-sigma upper limit on the companion's mass of $\sim64~M_{\rm J}$. For KELT-26b, we infer a planetary mass and radius of $M_{\rm P}$ = $1.41^{+0.43}_{-0.51}$ $M_{\rm J}$ and $R_{\rm P}$ = $1.940^{+0.060}_{-0.058}$ $R_{\rm J}$. From Doppler Tomographic observations, we find KELT-26b to reside in a highly misaligned orbit. This conclusion is weakly corroborated by a subtle asymmetry in the transit light curve from the \textit{TESS} data. KELT-25b appears to be in a well-aligned, prograde orbit, and the system is likely a member of a cluster or moving group.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.04366  [pdf] - 2026306
MuSCAT2 multicolour validation of TESS candidates: an ultra-short-period substellar object around an M dwarf
Comments: Accepted to A&A
Submitted: 2019-11-11
We report the discovery of TOI 263.01 (TIC 120916706), a transiting substellar object (R = 0.87 RJup) orbiting a faint M3.5~V dwarf (V=18.97) on a 0.56~d orbit. We set out to determine the nature of the TESS planet candidate TOI 263.01 using ground-based multicolour transit photometry. The host star is faint, which makes RV confirmation challenging, but the large transit depth makes the candidate suitable for validation through multicolour photometry. Our analysis combines three transits observed simultaneously in r', i', and z_s bands using the MuSCAT2 multicolour imager, three LCOGT-observed transit light curves in g, r', and i' bands, a TESS light curve from Sector 3, and a low-resolution spectrum for stellar characterisation observed with the ALFOSC spectrograph. We model the light curves with PyTransit using a transit model that includes a physics-based light contamination component that allows us to estimate the contamination from unresolved sources from the multicolour photometry. This allows us to derive the true planet-star radius ratio marginalised over the contamination allowed by the photometry, and, combined with the stellar radius, gives us a reliable estimate of the object's absolute radius. The ground-based photometry excludes contamination from unresolved sources with a significant colour difference to TOI 263. Further, contamination from sources of same stellar type as the host is constrained to levels where the true radius ratio posterior has a median of 0.217. The median radius ratio corresponds to an absolute planet radius of 0.87 RJup, which confirms the substellar nature of the planet candidate. The object is either a giant planet or a brown dwarf (BD) located deep inside the so-called "brown dwarf desert". Both possibilities offer a challenge to current planet/BD formation models and makes 263.01 an object deserving of in-depth follow-up studies.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.07281  [pdf] - 2034320
Full orbital solution for the binary system in the northern Galactic disc microlensing event Gaia16aye
Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Mróz, P.; Rybicki, K. A.; Gromadzki, M.; Kołaczkowski, Z.; Zieliński, M.; Zieliński, P.; Britavskiy, N.; Gomboc, A.; Sokolovsky, K.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Abe, L.; Aldi, G. F.; AlMannaei, A.; Altavilla, G.; Qasim, A. Al; Anupama, G. C.; Awiphan, S.; Bachelet, E.; Bakıs, V.; Baker, S.; Bartlett, S.; Bendjoya, P.; Benson, K.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Birenbaum, G.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boeva, S.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Bruni, I.; Burenin, R. A.; Burgaz, U.; Butterley, T.; Caines, H. E.; Caton, D. B.; Novati, S. Calchi; Carrasco, J. M.; Cassan, A.; Cepas, V.; Cropper, M.; Chruślińska, M.; Clementini, G.; Clerici, A.; Conti, D.; Conti, M.; Cross, S.; Cusano, F.; Damljanovic, G.; Dapergolas, A.; D'Ago, G.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Dennefeld, M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Dominik, M.; Dziedzic, J.; Ereceantalya, O.; Eselevich, M. V.; Esenoglu, H.; Eyer, L.; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Fossey, S. J.; Galeev, A. I.; Grebenev, S. A.; Gupta, A. C.; Gutaev, A. G.; Hallakoun, N.; Hamanowicz, A.; Han, C.; Handzlik, B.; Haislip, J. B.; Hanlon, L.; Hardy, L. K.; Harrison, D. L.; van Heerden, H. J.; Hoette, V. L.; Horne, K.; Hudec, R.; Hundertmark, M.; Ihanec, N.; Irtuganov, E. N.; Itoh, R.; Iwanek, P.; Jovanovic, M. D.; Janulis, R.; Jelínek, M.; Jensen, E.; Kaczmarek, Z.; Katz, D.; Khamitov, I. M.; Kilic, Y.; Klencki, J.; Kolb, U.; Kopacki, G.; Kouprianov, V. V.; Kruszyńska, K.; Kurowski, S.; Latev, G.; Lee, C-H.; Leonini, S.; Leto, G.; Lewis, F.; Li, Z.; Liakos, A.; Littlefair, S. P.; Lu, J.; Manser, C. J.; Mao, S.; Maoz, D.; Martin-Carrillo, A.; Marais, J. P.; Maskoliūnas, M.; Maund, J. R.; Meintjes, P. J.; Melnikov, S. S.; Ment, K.; Mikołajczyk, P.; Morrell, M.; Mowlavi, N.; Moździerski, D.; Murphy, D.; Nazarov, S.; Netzel, H.; Nesci, R.; Ngeow, C. -C.; Norton, A. J.; Ofek, E. O.; Pakstienė, E.; Palaversa, L.; Pandey, A.; Paraskeva, E.; Pawlak, M.; Penny, M. T.; Penprase, B. E.; Piascik, A.; Prieto, J. L.; Qvam, J. K. T.; Ranc, C.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Reichart, D. E.; Reig, P.; Rhodes, L.; Rivet, J. -P.; Rixon, G.; Roberts, D.; Rosi, P.; Russell, D. M.; Sanchez, R. Zanmar; Scarpetta, G.; Seabroke, G.; Shappee, B. J.; Schmidt, R.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Sitek, M.; Skowron, J.; Śniegowska, M.; Snodgrass, C.; Soares, P. S.; van Soelen, B.; Spetsieri, Z. T.; Stankeviciūtė, A.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; Strobl, J.; Strubble, E.; Szegedi, H.; Ramirez, L. M. Tinjaca; Tomasella, L.; Tsapras, Y.; Vernet, D.; Villanueva, S.; Vince, O.; Wambsganss, J.; van der Westhuizen, I. P.; Wiersema, K.; Wium, D.; Wilson, R. W.; Yoldas, A.; Zhuchkov, R. Ya.; Zhukov, D. G.; Zdanavicius, J.; Zoła, S.; Zubareva, A.
Comments: accepted for publication in A&A, 24 pages, 10 figures, tables with the data will be available electronically
Submitted: 2019-01-22, last modified: 2019-10-28
Gaia16aye was a binary microlensing event discovered in the direction towards the northern Galactic disc and was one of the first microlensing events detected and alerted to by the Gaia space mission. Its light curve exhibited five distinct brightening episodes, reaching up to I=12 mag, and it was covered in great detail with almost 25,000 data points gathered by a network of telescopes. We present the photometric and spectroscopic follow-up covering 500 days of the event evolution. We employed a full Keplerian binary orbit microlensing model combined with the motion of Earth and Gaia around the Sun to reproduce the complex light curve. The photometric data allowed us to solve the microlensing event entirely and to derive the complete and unique set of orbital parameters of the binary lensing system. We also report on the detection of the first-ever microlensing space-parallax between the Earth and Gaia located at L2. The properties of the binary system were derived from microlensing parameters, and we found that the system is composed of two main-sequence stars with masses 0.57$\pm$0.05 $M_\odot$ and 0.36$\pm$0.03 $M_\odot$ at 780 pc, with an orbital period of 2.88 years and an eccentricity of 0.30. We also predict the astrometric microlensing signal for this binary lens as it will be seen by Gaia as well as the radial velocity curve for the binary system. Events such as Gaia16aye indicate the potential for the microlensing method of probing the mass function of dark objects, including black holes, in directions other than that of the Galactic bulge. This case also emphasises the importance of long-term time-domain coordinated observations that can be made with a network of heterogeneous telescopes.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.03276  [pdf] - 1994057
KELT-24b: A 5M$_{\rm J}$ Planet on a 5.6 day Well-Aligned Orbit around the Young V=8.3 F-star HD 93148
Comments: 18 pages, 10 Figures, 6 Tables, Accepted to the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2019-06-07, last modified: 2019-09-03
We present the discovery of KELT-24 b, a massive hot Jupiter orbiting a bright (V=8.3 mag, K=7.2 mag) young F-star with a period of 5.6 days. The host star, KELT-24 (HD 93148), has a $T_{\rm eff}$ =$6509^{+50}_{-49}$ K, a mass of $M_{*}$ = $1.460^{+0.055}_{-0.059}$ $M_{\odot}$, radius of $R_{*}$ = $1.506\pm0.022$ $R_{\odot}$, and an age of $0.78^{+0.61}_{-0.42}$ Gyr. Its planetary companion (KELT-24 b) has a radius of $R_{\rm P}$ = $1.272\pm0.021$ $R_{\rm J}$, a mass of $M_{\rm P}$ = $5.18^{+0.21}_{-0.22}$ $M_{\rm J}$, and from Doppler tomographic observations, we find that the planet's orbit is well-aligned to its host star's projected spin axis ($\lambda$ = $2.6^{+5.1}_{-3.6}$). The young age estimated for KELT-24 suggests that it only recently started to evolve from the zero-age main sequence. KELT-24 is the brightest star known to host a transiting giant planet with a period between 5 and 10 days. Although the circularization timescale is much longer than the age of the system, we do not detect a large eccentricity or significant misalignment that is expected from dynamical migration. The brightness of its host star and its moderate surface gravity make KELT-24b an intriguing target for detailed atmospheric characterization through spectroscopic emission measurements since it would bridge the current literature results that have primarily focused on lower mass hot Jupiters and a few brown dwarfs.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.09950  [pdf] - 1910301
An Eccentric Massive Jupiter Orbiting a Sub-Giant on a 9.5 Day Period Discovered in the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite Full Frame Images
Comments: 14 pages, 8 figures, 4 tables, Published in AJ
Submitted: 2019-01-28, last modified: 2019-07-02
We report the discovery of TOI-172 b from the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission, a massive hot Jupiter transiting a slightly evolved G-star with a 9.48-day orbital period. This is the first planet to be confirmed from analysis of only the TESS full frame images, because the host star was not chosen as a two minute cadence target. From a global analysis of the TESS photometry and follow-up observations carried out by the TESS Follow-up Observing Program Working Group, TOI-172 (TIC 29857954) is a slightly evolved star with an effective temperature of $T_{\rm eff}$ =$5645\pm50$ K, a mass of $M_{\star}$ = $1.128^{+0.065}_{-0.061}$ $M_{\odot}$, radius of $R_{\star}$ = $1.777^{+0.047}_{-0.044}$ $R_{\odot}$, a surface gravity of $\log$ $g_{\star}$ = $3.993^{+0.027}_{-0.028}$, and an age of $7.4^{+1.6}_{-1.5}$ Gyr. Its planetary companion (TOI-172 b) has a radius of $R_{\rm P}$ = $0.965^{+0.032}_{-0.029}$ $R_{\rm J}$, a mass of $M_{\rm P}$ = $5.42^{+0.22}_{-0.20}$ $M_{\rm J}$, and is on an eccentric orbit ($e = 0.3806^{+0.0093}_{-0.0090}$). TOI-172 b is one of the few known massive giant planets on a highly eccentric short-period orbit. Future study of the atmosphere of this planet and its system architecture offer opportunities to understand the formation and evolution of similar systems.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.08017  [pdf] - 1912776
The L 98-59 System: Three Transiting, Terrestrial-Sized Planets Orbiting a Nearby M-dwarf
Kostov, Veselin B.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Barclay, Thomas; Quintana, Elisa V.; Colon, Knicole D.; Brande, Jonathan; Collins, Karen A.; Feinstein, Adina D.; Hadden, Samuel; Kane, Stephen R.; Kreidberg, Laura; Kruse, Ethan; Lam, Christopher; Matthews, Elisabeth; Montet, Benjamin T.; Pozuelos, Francisco J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Ricker, George; Vanderspek, Roland; Latham, David; Seager, Sara; Winn, Joshua; Jenkins, Jon M.; Afanasev, Dennis; Armstrong, James J. D.; Arney, Giada; Boyd, Patricia; Barentsen, Geert; Barkaoui, Khalid; Batalha, Natalie E.; Beichman, Charles; Bayliss, Daniel; Burke, Christopher; Burdanov, Artem; Cacciapuoti, Luca; Carson, Andrew; Charbonneau, David; Christiansen, Jessie; Ciardi, David; Clampin, Mark; Collins, Kevin I.; Conti, Dennis M.; Coughlin, Jeffrey; Covone, Giovanni; Crossfield, Ian; Delrez, Laetitia; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Dressing, Courtney; Ducrot, Elsa; Essack, Zahra; Everett, Mark E.; Fauchez, Thomas; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Gan, Tianjun; Gilbert, Emily; Gillon, Michael; Gonzales, Erica; Hamann, Aaron; Hedges, Christina; Hocutt, Hannah; Hoffman, Kelsey; Horch, Elliott P.; Horne, Keith; Howell, Steve; Hynes, Shane; Ireland, Michael; Irwin, Jonathan M.; Isopi, Giovanni; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Jehin, Emmanuel; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kielkopf, John F.; Kopparapu, Ravi; Lewis, Nikole; Lopez, Eric; Lissauer, Jack J.; Mann, Andrew W.; Mallia, Franco; Mandell, Avi; Matson, Rachel A.; Mazeh, Tsevi; Monsue, Teresa; Moran, Sarah E.; Moran, Vickie; Morley, Caroline V.; Morris, Brett; Muirhead, Philip; Mukai, Koji; Mullally, Susan; Mullally, Fergal; Murray, Catriona; Narita, Norio; alle, EnricP; Pidhorodetska, Daria; Quinn, David; Relles, Howard; Rinehart, Stephen; Ritsko, Matthew; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Rowden, Pamela; Rowe, Jason F.; Sebastian, Daniel; Sefako, Ramotholo; Shahaf, Sahar; Shporer, Avi; Reyes, Naylynn Tanon; Tenenbaum, Peter; Ting, Eric B.; Twicken, Joseph D.; van Belle, Gerard T.; Vega, Laura; Volosin, Jeffrey; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Youngblood, Allison
Comments: 27 pages, 22 figures, AJ accepted
Submitted: 2019-03-19, last modified: 2019-05-28
We report the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) discovery of three terrestrial-sized planets transiting L 98-59 (TOI-175, TIC 307210830) -- a bright M dwarf at a distance of 10.6 pc. Using the Gaia-measured distance and broad-band photometry we find that the host star is an M3 dwarf. Combined with the TESS transits from three sectors, the corresponding stellar parameters yield planet radii ranging from 0.8REarth to 1.6REarth. All three planets have short orbital periods, ranging from 2.25 to 7.45 days with the outer pair just wide of a 2:1 period resonance. Diagnostic tests produced by the TESS Data Validation Report and the vetting package DAVE rule out common false positive sources. These analyses, along with dedicated follow-up and the multiplicity of the system, lend confidence that the observed signals are caused by planets transiting L 98-59 and are not associated with other sources in the field. The L 98-59 system is interesting for a number of reasons: the host star is bright (V = 11.7 mag, K = 7.1 mag) and the planets are prime targets for further follow-up observations including precision radial-velocity mass measurements and future transit spectroscopy with the James Webb Space Telescope; the near resonant configuration makes the system a laboratory to study planetary system dynamical evolution; and three planets of relatively similar size in the same system present an opportunity to study terrestrial planets where other variables (age, metallicity, etc.) can be held constant. L 98-59 will be observed in 4 more TESS sectors, which will provide a wealth of information on the three currently known planets and have the potential to reveal additional planets in the system.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.02790  [pdf] - 1885656
A Comparison of the Diffuser Method Versus the Defocus Method for Performing High-Precision Photometry with Small Telescope Systems
Comments: 30 pages, 23 figures, 15 tables, Accepted for publication in the Proceedings of the Society For Astronomical Sciences (SAS) 38th Annual Conference 2019. Minor format changes and typo corrections. Journal reference update
Submitted: 2019-05-07, last modified: 2019-05-18
This paper compares the performance of two different high-precision, photometric measurement techniques for bright (<11 magnitude) stars using the small telescope systems that today's amateur astronomers typically use. One technique is based on recent work using a beam-shaping diffuser method (Stefansson et al., (2017).) The other is based on the widely used "defocusing" method. We also developed and used a statistical photometric performance model to better understand the error components of the measurements to identify and quantify any difference in performance between the two methods. AstroImageJ (Collins et al. (2017)) was used for the exoplanet image analysis to provide the measured values and exoplanet models described in this study. Both methods were used at the Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) to conduct in-transit exoplanet observations of exoplanets HAT-P-30b/WASP-51b, HAT-P-16b, and a partial of WASP-93b. Observations of exoplanets KELT-1b and K2-100b and other stars were also performed at the MSRO to further understand and characterize the performance of the diffuser method under various sky conditions. In addition, both in-transit and out-of-transit observations of exoplanets HAT-P-23b, HAT-P-33b, and HAT-P-34b were performed at the Conti Private Observatory. We found that for observing bright stars, the diffuser method outperformed the defocus method when using small telescopes with poor tracking. We also found the diffuser method noticeably reduced the scintillation noise compared with the defocus method and provided high-precision results in typical, average sky conditions through all lunar phases. For small telescopes using excellent auto-guiding techniques and effective calibration procedures, we found the defocus method was equal to or in some cases better than the diffuser method when observing with good-to-excellent sky conditions.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.11852  [pdf] - 1916880
TOI-216b and TOI-216c: Two warm, large exoplanets in or slightly wide of the 2:1 orbital resonance
Comments: Submitted to AAS journals on March 12; revised in response to referee report
Submitted: 2019-04-26
Warm, large exoplanets with 10-100 day orbital periods pose a major challenge to our understanding of how planetary systems form and evolve. Although high eccentricity tidal migration has been invoked to explain their proximity to their host stars, a handful reside in or near orbital resonance with nearby planets, suggesting a gentler history of in situ formation or disk migration. Here we confirm and characterize a pair of warm, large exoplanets discovered by the TESS Mission orbiting K-dwarf TOI-216. Our analysis includes additional transits and transit exclusion windows observed via ground-based follow-up. We find two families of solutions, one corresponding to a sub-Saturn-mass planet accompanied by a Neptune-mass planet and the other to a Jupiter in resonance with a sub-Saturn-mass planet. We prefer the second solution based on the orbital period ratio, the planet radii, the lower free eccentricities, and libration of the 2:1 resonant argument, but cannot rule out the first. The free eccentricities and mutual inclination are compatible with stirring by other, undetected planets in the system, particularly for the second solution. We discuss prospects for better constraints on the planets' properties and orbits through follow-up, including transits observed from the ground.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.09092  [pdf] - 1979534
Near-resonance in a system of sub-Neptunes from TESS
Comments: Submitted to AAS Journals. 20 pages, 10 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2019-01-25
We report the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite ($TESS$) detection of a multi-planet system orbiting the $V=10.9$ K0 dwarf TOI 125. We find evidence for up to five planets, with varying confidence. Three high signal-to-noise transit signals correspond to sub-Neptune-sized planets ($2.76$, $2.79$, and $2.94\ R_{\oplus}$), and we statistically validate the planetary nature of the two inner planets ($P_b = 4.65$ days, $P_c = 9.15$ days). With only two transits observed, we report the outer object ($P_{.03} = 19.98$ days) as a high signal-to-noise ratio planet candidate. We also detect a candidate transiting super-Earth ($1.4\ R_{\oplus}$) with an orbital period of only $12.7$ hours and a candidate Neptune-sized planet ($4.2\ R_{\oplus}$) with a period of $13.28$ days, both at low signal-to-noise. This system is amenable to mass determination via radial velocities and transit timing variations, and provides an opportunity to study planets of similar size while controlling for age and environment. The ratio of orbital periods between TOI 125 b and c ($P_c/P_b = 1.97$) is slightly smaller than an exact 2:1 commensurability and is atypical of multiple planet systems from $Kepler$, which show a preference for period ratios just $wide$ of first-order period ratios. A dynamical analysis refines the allowed parameter space through stability arguments and suggests that, despite the nearly commensurate periods, the system is unlikely to be in resonance.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.01869  [pdf] - 1779501
The KELT Follow-Up Network and Transit False Positive Catalog: Pre-vetted False Positives for TESS
Collins, Karen A.; Collins, Kevin I.; Pepper, Joshua; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Stassun, Keivan; Gaudi, B. Scott; Bayliss, Daniel; Bento, Joao; Colón, Knicole D.; Feliz, Dax; James, David; Johnson, Marshall C.; Kuhn, Rudolf B.; Lund, Michael B.; Penny, Matthew T.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert J.; Stevens, Daniel J.; Yao, Xinyu; Zhou, George; Akshay, Mundra; Aldi, Giulio F.; Ashcraft, Cliff; Awiphan, Supachai; Baştürk, Özgür; Baker, David; Beatty, Thomas G.; Benni, Paul; Berlind, Perry; Berriman, G. Bruce; Berta-Thompson, Zach; Bieryla, Allyson; Bozza, Valerio; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; Calkins, Michael L.; Cann, Jenna M.; Ciardi, David R.; Clark, Ian R.; Cochran, William D.; Cohen, David H.; Conti, Dennis; Crepp, Justin R.; Curtis, Ivan A.; D'Ago, Giuseppe; Diazeguigure, Kenny A.; Dressing, Courtney D.; Dubois, Franky; Ellingson, Erica; Ellis, Tyler G.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Evans, Phil; Friedli, Alison; Fukui, Akihiko; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Gonzales, Erica J.; Good, John C.; Gregorio, Joao; Gumusayak, Tolga; Hancock, Daniel A.; Harada, Caleb K.; Hart, Rhodes; Hintz, Eric G.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Jeffery, Elizabeth J.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Jofré, Emiliano; Joner, Michael D.; Kar, Aman; Kasper, David H.; Keten, Burak; Kielkopf, John F.; Komonjinda, Siramas; Kotnik, Cliff; Latham, David W.; Leuquire, Jacob; Lewis, Tiffany R.; Logie, Ludwig; Lowther, Simon J.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Martin, Trevor J.; Mawet, Dimitri; McLeod, Kim K.; Murawski, Gabriel; Narita, Norio; Nordhausen, Jim; Oberst, Thomas E.; Odden, Caroline; Panka, Peter A.; Petrucci, Romina; Plavchan, Peter; Quinn, Samuel N.; Rau, Steve; Reed, Phillip A.; Relles, Howard; Renaud, Joe P.; Scarpetta, Gaetano; Sorber, Rebecca L.; Spencer, Alex D.; Spencer, Michelle; Stephens, Denise C.; Stockdale, Chris; Tan, Thiam-Guan; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia; Vanaverbeke, Siegfried; Villanueva, Steven; Warner, Elizabeth M.; West, Mary Lou; Yalçınkaya, Selçuk; Yeigh, Rex; Zambelli, Roberto
Comments: Accepted for publication in AJ, 21 pages, 12 figures, 7 tables
Submitted: 2018-03-05, last modified: 2018-09-19
The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project has been conducting a photometric survey for transiting planets orbiting bright stars for over ten years. The KELT images have a pixel scale of ~23"/pixel---very similar to that of NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)---as well as a large point spread function, and the KELT reduction pipeline uses a weighted photometric aperture with radius 3'. At this angular scale, multiple stars are typically blended in the photometric apertures. In order to identify false positives and confirm transiting exoplanets, we have assembled a follow-up network (KELT-FUN) to conduct imaging with higher spatial resolution, cadence, and photometric precision than the KELT telescopes, as well as spectroscopic observations of the candidate host stars. The KELT-FUN team has followed-up over 1,600 planet candidates since 2011, resulting in more than 20 planet discoveries. Excluding ~450 false alarms of non-astrophysical origin (i.e., instrumental noise or systematics), we present an all-sky catalog of the 1,128 bright stars (6<V<10) that show transit-like features in the KELT light curves, but which were subsequently determined to be astrophysical false positives (FPs) after photometric and/or spectroscopic follow-up observations. The KELT-FUN team continues to pursue KELT and other planet candidates and will eventually follow up certain classes of TESS candidates. The KELT FP catalog will help minimize the duplication of follow-up observations by current and future transit surveys such as TESS.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.03384  [pdf] - 1622385
A comparative study of WASP-67b and HAT-P-38b from WFC3 data
Comments: 16 pages, 17 figures, 8 tables, accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2017-12-09
Atmospheric temperature and planetary gravity are thought to be the main parameters affecting cloud formation in giant exoplanet atmospheres. Recent attempts to understand cloud formation have explored wide regions of the equilibrium temperature-gravity parameter space. In this study, we instead compare the case of two giant planets with nearly identical equilibrium temperature ($T_\mathrm{eq}$ $\sim 1050 \, \mathrm{K}$) and gravity ($g \sim 10 \, \mathrm{m \, s}^{-1})$. During $HST$ Cycle 23, we collected WFC3/G141 observations of the two planets, WASP-67 b and HAT-P-38 b. HAT-P-38 b, with mass 0.42 M$_\mathrm{J}$ and radius 1.4 $R_\mathrm{J}$, exhibits a relatively clear atmosphere with a clear detection of water. We refine the orbital period of this planet with new observations, obtaining $P = 4.6403294 \pm 0.0000055 \, \mathrm{d}$. WASP-67 b, with mass 0.27 M$_\mathrm{J}$ and radius 0.83 $R_\mathrm{J}$, shows a more muted water absorption feature than that of HAT-P-38 b, indicating either a higher cloud deck in the atmosphere or a more metal-rich composition. The difference in the spectra supports the hypothesis that giant exoplanet atmospheres carry traces of their formation history. Future observations in the visible and mid-infrared are needed to probe the aerosol properties and constrain the evolutionary scenario of these planets.