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Chou, Richard C. Y.

Normalized to: Chou, R.

13 article(s) in total. 163 co-authors, from 1 to 7 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 4,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.01075  [pdf] - 1531175
Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) for the Subaru Telescope: Overview, recent progress, and future perspectives
Tamura, Naoyuki; Takato, Naruhisa; Shimono, Atsushi; Moritani, Yuki; Yabe, Kiyoto; Ishizuka, Yuki; Ueda, Akitoshi; Kamata, Yukiko; Aghazarian, Hrand; Arnouts, Stephane; Barban, Gabriel; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Borges, Renato C.; Braun, David F.; Carr, Michael A.; Chabaud, Pierre-Yves; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Chiba, Masashi; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Chu, You-Hua; Cohen, Judith G.; de Almeida, Rodrigo P.; de Oliveira, Antonio C.; de Oliveira, Ligia S.; Dekany, Richard G.; Dohlen, Kjetil; Santos, Jesulino B. dos; Santos, Leandro H. dos; Ellis, Richard S.; Fabricius, Maximilian; Ferrand, Didier; Ferreira, Decio; Golebiowski, Mirek; Greene, Jenny E.; Gross, Johannes; Gunn, James E.; Hammond, Randolph; Harding, Albert; Hart, Murdock; Heckman, Timothy M.; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Paul; Hope, Stephen C.; Hovland, Larry; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Hu, Yen-Shan; Huang, Ping-Jie; Jaquet, Marc; Jing, Yipeng; Karr, Jennifer; Kimura, Masahiko; King, Matthew E.; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Brun, Vincent Le; Fevre, Olivier Le; Fur, Arnaud Le; Mignant, David Le; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Loomis, Craig P.; Lupton, Robert H.; Madec, Fabrice; Mao, Peter; Marrara, Lucas S.; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; Minowa, Yosuke; Morantz, Chaz N.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Murray, Graham J.; Ohyama, Youichi; Orndorff, Joseph; Pascal, Sandrine; Pereira, Jefferson M.; Reiley, Daniel J.; Reinecke, Martin; Ritter, Andreas; Roberts, Mitsuko; Schwochert, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Smee, Stephen A.; Sodre, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Steinkraus, Aaron J.; Strauss, Michael A.; Surace, Christian; Suto, Yasushi; Suzuki, Nao; Swinbank, John; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Tamura, Tomonori; Tanaka, Yoko; Tresse, Laurence; Verducci, Orlando; Vibert, Didier; Vidal, Clement; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Yan, Chi-Hung; Yasuda, Naoki
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures. Proceeding of SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2016
Submitted: 2016-08-03
PFS (Prime Focus Spectrograph), a next generation facility instrument on the 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope, is a very wide-field, massively multiplexed, optical and near-infrared spectrograph. Exploiting the Subaru prime focus, 2394 reconfigurable fibers will be distributed over the 1.3 deg field of view. The spectrograph has been designed with 3 arms of blue, red, and near-infrared cameras to simultaneously observe spectra from 380nm to 1260nm in one exposure at a resolution of ~1.6-2.7A. An international collaboration is developing this instrument under the initiative of Kavli IPMU. The project is now going into the construction phase aiming at undertaking system integration in 2017-2018 and subsequently carrying out engineering operations in 2018-2019. This article gives an overview of the instrument, current project status and future paths forward.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.00675  [pdf] - 1531167
The Current Status of Prime Focus Instrument of Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph
Comments: 9 pages, 8 figures, SPIE proceeding
Submitted: 2016-08-01
The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a new optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph design for the prime focus of the 8.2m Subaru telescope. PFS will cover 1.3 degree diameter field with 2394 fibers to complement the imaging capability of Hyper SuprimeCam (HSC). The prime focus unit of PFS called Prime Focus Instrument (PFI) provides the interface with the top structure of Subaru telescope and also accommodates the optical bench in which Cobra fiber positioners are located. In addition, the acquisition and guiding cameras (AGCs), the optical fiber positioner system, the cable wrapper, the fiducial fibers, illuminator, and viewer, the field element, and the telemetry system are located inside the PFI. The mechanical structure of the PFI was designed with special care such that its deflections sufficiently match those of the HSC's Wide Field Corrector (WFC) so the fibers will stay on targets over the course of the observations within the required accuracy. In this report, the latest status of PFI development will be given including the performance of PFI components, the setup and performance of the integration and testing equipment.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.00676  [pdf] - 1447926
Metrology Camera System of Prime Focus Spectrograph for Subaru Telescope
Comments: 11 pages, 15 figures. SPIE proceeding. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1408.2876
Submitted: 2016-08-01
The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a new optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph designed for the prime focus of the 8.2m Subaru telescope. PFS will cover a 1.3 degree diameter field with 2394 fibers to complement the imaging capabilities of Hyper SuprimeCam. To retain high throughput, the final positioning accuracy between the fibers and observing targets of PFS is required to be less than 10um. The metrology camera system (MCS) serves as the optical encoder of the fiber motors for the configuring of fibers. MCS provides the fiber positions within a 5um error over the 45 cm focal plane. The information from MCS will be fed into the fiber positioner control system for the closed loop control. MCS will be located at the Cassegrain focus of Subaru telescope in order to to cover the whole focal plane with one 50M pixel Canon CMOS camera. It is a 380mm Schmidt type telescope which generates a uniform spot size with a 10 micron FWHM across the field for reasonable sampling of PSF. Carbon fiber tubes are used to provide a stable structure over the operating conditions without focus adjustments. The CMOS sensor can be read in 0.8s to reduce the overhead for the fiber configuration. The positions of all fibers can be obtained within 0.5s after the readout of the frame. This enables the overall fiber configuration to be less than 2 minutes. MCS will be installed inside a standard Subaru Cassgrain Box. All components that generate heat are located inside a glycol cooled cabinet to reduce the possible image motion due to heat. The optics and camera for MCS have been delivered and tested. The mechanical parts and supporting structure are ready as of spring 2016. The integration of MCS will start in the summer of 2016.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.00725  [pdf] - 1241387
Prime Focus Spectrograph for the Subaru telescope: massively multiplexed optical and near-infrared fiber spectrograph
Sugai, Hajime; Tamura, Naoyuki; Karoji, Hiroshi; Shimono, Atsushi; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Ueda, Akitoshi; Aghazarian, Hrand; de Arruda, Marcio Vital; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Bennett, Charles L.; Bickerton, Steve; Bozier, Alexandre; Braun, David F.; Bui, Khanh; Capocasale, Christopher M.; Carr, Michael A.; Castilho, Bruno; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Dawson, Olivia R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ek, Eric M.; Ellis, Richard S.; English, Robin J.; Ferrand, Didier; Ferreira, Décio; Fisher, Charles D.; Golebiowski, Mirek; Gunn, James E.; Hart, Murdock; Heckman, Timothy M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hope, Stephen; Hovland, Larry E.; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Hu, Yen-Shan; Huang, Pin Jie; Jaquet, Marc; Karr, Jennifer E.; Kempenaar, Jason G.; King, Matthew E.; Fèvre, Olivier Le; Mignant, David Le; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Loomis, Craig; Lupton, Robert H.; Madec, Fabrice; Mao, Peter; Marrara, Lucas Souza; Ménard, Brice; Morantz, Chaz; Murayama, Hitoshi; Murray, Graham J.; de Oliveira, Antonio Cesar; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; de Oliveira, Ligia Souza; Orndorff, Joe D.; Vilaça, Rodrigo de Paiva; Partos, Eamon J.; Pascal, Sandrine; Pegot-Ogier, Thomas; Reiley, Daniel J.; Riddle, Reed; Santos, Leandro; Santos, Jesulino Bispo dos; Schwochert, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Smee, Stephen A.; Smith, Roger M.; Steinkraus, Ronald E.; Sodré, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Surace, Christian; Tresse, Laurence; Vidal, Clément; Vives, Sebastien; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Wu, Amy C.; Wyse, Rosie; Yan, Chi-Hung
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2015-07-02
The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is an optical/near-infrared multifiber spectrograph with 2394 science fibers distributed across a 1.3-deg diameter field of view at the Subaru 8.2-m telescope. The wide wavelength coverage from 0.38 {\mu}m to 1.26 {\mu}m, with a resolving power of 3000, simultaneously strengthens its ability to target three main survey programs: cosmology, galactic archaeology and galaxy/AGN evolution. A medium resolution mode with a resolving power of 5000 for 0.71 {\mu}m to 0.89 {\mu}m will also be available by simply exchanging dispersers. We highlight some of the technological aspects of the design. To transform the telescope focal ratio, a broad-band coated microlens is glued to each fiber tip. A higher transmission fiber is selected for the longest part of the cable system, optimizing overall throughput; a fiber with low focal ratio degradation is selected for the fiber-positioner and fiber-slit components, minimizing the effects of fiber movements and fiber bending. Fiber positioning will be performed by a positioner consisting of two stages of piezo-electric rotary motors. The positions of these motors are measured by taking an image of artificially back-illuminated fibers with the metrology camera located in the Cassegrain container; the fibers are placed in the proper location by iteratively measuring and then adjusting the positions of the motors. Target light reaches one of the four identical fast-Schmidt spectrograph modules, each with three arms. The PFS project has passed several project-wide design reviews and is now in the construction phase.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3468  [pdf] - 1216314
Evolution of the Major Merger Galaxy Pair Fraction at z < 1
Comments: Revised to match the version accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2014-08-15, last modified: 2014-10-09
We present a study of the largest available sample of near-infrared selected (i.e., stellar mass selected) dynamically close pairs of galaxies at low redshifts ($z<0.3$). We combine this sample with new estimates of the major-merger pair fraction for stellar mass selected galaxies at $z<0.8$, from the Red Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1). We construct our low-redshift $K-$band selected sample using photometry from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) in the $K-$band ($\sim 2.2~\mu$m). Combined with all available spectroscopy, our $K-$band selected sample contains $\sim 250,000$ galaxies and is $> 90\%$ spectroscopically complete. The depth and large volume of this sample allow us to investigate the low-redshift pair fraction and merger rate of galaxies over a wide range in $K-$band luminosity. We find the major-merger pair fraction to be flat at $\sim 2\%$ as a function of $K-$band luminosity for galaxies in the range $10^8 - 10^{12} L_{\odot}$, in contrast to recent results from studies in the local group that find a substantially higher low-mass pair fraction. This low-redshift major-merger pair fraction is $\sim 40-50\%$ higher than previous estimates drawn from $K-$band samples, which were based on 2MASS photometry alone. Combining with the RCS1 sample we find a much flatter evolution ($m = 0.7 \pm 0.1$), in the relation $f_{\rm{pair}} \propto (1+z)^m$, than indicated in many previous studies. These results indicate that a typical $L\sim L^*$ galaxy has undergone $\sim 0.2-0.8$ major mergers since $z=1$ (depending on the assumptions of merger timescale and percentage of pairs that actually merge).
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.2877  [pdf] - 1216271
Prime Focus Instrument of Prime Focus Spectrograph for Subaru Telescope
Comments: 9 pages, 7 figures, SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014
Submitted: 2014-08-12
The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a new optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph design for the prime focus of the 8.2m Subaru telescope. PFS will cover 1.3 degree diameter field with 2394 fibers to complement the imaging capability of Hyper SuprimeCam (HSC). The prime focus unit of PFS called Prime Focus Instrument (PFI) provides the interface with the top structure of Subaru telescope and also accommodates the optical bench in which Cobra fiber positioners are located. In addition, the acquisition and guiding (A&G) cameras, the optical fiber positioner system, the cable wrapper, the fiducial fibers, illuminator, and viewer, the field element, and the telemetry system are located inside the PFI. The mechanical structure of the PFI was designed with special care such that its deflections sufficiently match those of the HSC Wide Field Corrector (WFC) so the fibers will stay on targets over the course of the observations within the required accuracy.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.2876  [pdf] - 1216270
Metrology Camera System of Prime Focus Spectrograph for Subaru Telescope
Comments: 10 pages, 12 figures, SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014
Submitted: 2014-08-12
The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a new optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph designed for the prime focus of the 8.2m Subaru telescope. The metrology camera system of PFS serves as the optical encoder of the COBRA fiber motors for the configuring of fibers. The 380mm diameter aperture metrology camera will locate at the Cassegrain focus of Subaru telescope to cover the whole focal plane with one 50M pixel Canon CMOS sensor. The metrology camera is designed to provide the fiber position information within 5{\mu}m error over the 45cm focal plane. The positions of all fibers can be obtained within 1s after the exposure is finished. This enables the overall fiber configuration to be less than 2 minutes.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.2825  [pdf] - 1216260
Progress with the Prime Focus Spectrograph for the Subaru Telescope: a massively multiplexed optical and near-infrared fiber spectrograph
Sugai, Hajime; Tamura, Naoyuki; Karoji, Hiroshi; Shimono, Atsushi; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Ueda, Akitoshi; Aghazarian, Hrand; de Arruda, Marcio Vital; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Bennett, Charles L.; Bickerton, Steve; Bozier, Alexandre; Braun, David F.; Bui, Khanh; Capocasale, Christopher M.; Carr, Michael A.; Castilho, Bruno; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Dawson, Olivia R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ek, Eric M.; Ellis, Richard S.; English, Robin J.; Ferrand, Didier; Ferreira, Décio; Fisher, Charles D.; Golebiowski, Mirek; Gunn, James E.; Hart, Murdock; Heckman, Timothy M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hope, Stephen; Hovland, Larry E.; Hsuc, Shu-Fu; Hu, Yen-Shan; Huang, Pin Jie; Jaquet, Marc; Karr, Jennifer E.; Kempenaar, Jason G.; King, Matthew E.; Fèvre, Olivier Le; Mignant, David Le; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Loomis, Craig; Lupton, Robert H.; Madec, Fabrice; Mao, Peter; Marrara, Lucas Souza; Ménard, Brice; Morantz, Chaz; Murayama, Hitoshi; Murray, Graham J.; de Oliveira, Antonio Cesar; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; de Oliveira, Ligia Souza; Orndorff, Joe D.; Vilaça, Rodrigo de Paiva; Partos, Eamon J.; Pascal, Sandrine; Pegot-Ogier, Thomas; Reiley, Daniel J.; Riddle, Reed; Santos, Leandro; Santos, Jesulino Bispo dos; Schwochert, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Smee, Stephen A.; Smith, Roger M.; Steinkraus, Ronald E.; Sodré, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Surace, Christian; Tresse, Laurence; Vidal, Clément; Vives, Sebastien; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Wu, Amy C.; Wyse, Rosie; Yan, Chi-Hung
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, submitted to "Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy V, Suzanne K. Ramsay, Ian S. McLean, Hideki Takami, Editors, Proc. SPIE 9147 (2014)"
Submitted: 2014-08-12
The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is an optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph with 2394 science fibers, which are distributed in 1.3 degree diameter field of view at Subaru 8.2-meter telescope. The simultaneous wide wavelength coverage from 0.38 um to 1.26 um, with the resolving power of 3000, strengthens its ability to target three main survey programs: cosmology, Galactic archaeology, and galaxy/AGN evolution. A medium resolution mode with resolving power of 5000 for 0.71 um to 0.89 um also will be available by simply exchanging dispersers. PFS takes the role for the spectroscopic part of the Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts project, while Hyper Suprime-Cam works on the imaging part. To transform the telescope plus WFC focal ratio, a 3-mm thick broad-band coated glass-molded microlens is glued to each fiber tip. A higher transmission fiber is selected for the longest part of cable system, while one with a better FRD performance is selected for the fiber-positioner and fiber-slit components, given the more frequent fiber movements and tightly curved structure. Each Fiber positioner consists of two stages of piezo-electric rotary motors. Its engineering model has been produced and tested. Fiber positioning will be performed iteratively by taking an image of artificially back-illuminated fibers with the Metrology camera located in the Cassegrain container. The camera is carefully designed so that fiber position measurements are unaffected by small amounts of high special-frequency inaccuracies in WFC lens surface shapes. Target light carried through the fiber system reaches one of four identical fast-Schmidt spectrograph modules, each with three arms. Prototype VPH gratings have been optically tested. CCD production is complete, with standard fully-depleted CCDs for red arms and more-challenging thinner fully-depleted CCDs with blue-optimized coating for blue arms.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.2692  [pdf] - 1151982
A close-pair analysis of damp mergers at intermediate redshifts
Comments: Accepted by ApJ on Oct. 9th
Submitted: 2012-10-09
We have studied the kinematics of ~2800 candidate close pair galaxies at 0.1<z<1.2 identified from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey fields. Spectra of these systems were obtained using spectrometers on the 6.5m Magellan and 5m Hale telescopes. These data allow us to constrain the rate of dry mergers at intermediate redshifts and to test the `hot halo' model for quenching of star formation. Using virial radii estimated from the correlation between dynamical and stellar masses published by Leauthaud et al. (2011), we find that around 1/5 of our candidate pairs are likely to share a common dark matter halo (our metric for close physical association). These pairs are divided into red-red, blue-red and blue-blue systems using the rest-frame colors classification method introduced in Chou et al. (2011). Galaxies classified as red in our sample have very low star-formation rates, but they need not be totally quiescent, and hence we refer to them as `damp', rather than `dry', systems. After correcting for known selection effects, the fraction of blue-blue pairs is significantly greater than that of red-red and blue-red pairs. Red-red pairs are almost entirely absent from our sample, suggesting that damp mergers are rare at z~0.5. Our data supports models with a short merging timescale (<0.5 Gyr) in which star-formation is enhanced in the early phase of mergers, but quenched in the late phase. Hot halo models may explain this behaviour, but only if virial shocks that heat gas are inefficient until major mergers are nearly complete.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.5053  [pdf] - 1125003
The Development of WIFIS: a Wide Integral Field Infrared Spectrograph
Comments: 12 pages, 8 figures. Submitted to proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation conference, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, July 2012
Submitted: 2012-07-20
We present the current results from the development of a wide integral field infrared spectrograph (WIFIS). WIFIS offers an unprecedented combination of etendue and spectral resolving power for seeing-limited, integral field observations in the 0.9-1.8 um range and is most sensitive in the 0.9-1.35 um range. Its optical design consists of front-end re-imaging optics, an all-reflective image slicer-type, integral field unit (IFU) called FISICA, and a long-slit grating spectrograph back-end that is coupled with a HAWAII 2RG focal plane array. The full wavelength range is achieved by selecting between two different gratings. By virtue of its re-imaging optics, the spectrograph is quite versatile and can be used at multiple telescopes. The size of its field-of-view is unrivalled by other similar spectrographs, offering a 4.5" x 12" integral field at a 10-meter class telescope (or 20" x 50" at a 2.3-meter telescope). The use of WIFIS will be crucial in astronomical problems which require wide-field, two-dimensional spectroscopy such as the study of merging galaxies at moderate redshift and nearby star/planet-forming regions and supernova remnants. We discuss the final optical design of WIFIS, and its predicted on-sky performance on two reference telescope platforms: the 2.3-m Steward Bok telescope and the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We also present the results from our laboratory characterization of FISICA. IFU properties such as magnification, field-mapping, and slit width along the entire slit length were measured by our tests. The construction and testing of WIFIS is expected to be completed by early 2013. We plan to commission the instrument at the 2.3-m Steward Bok telescope at Kitt Peak, USA in Spring 2013.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.1590  [pdf] - 1042424
The Space Density Evolution of Wet and Dry Mergers in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures. Accepted by AJ
Submitted: 2010-12-07
We analyze 1298 merging galaxies with redshifts up to z=0.7 from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, taken from the catalog presented in Bridge et al. (2010). By analyzing the internal colors of these systems, we show that so-called wet and dry mergers evolve in different senses, and quantify the space densities of these systems. The local space density of wet mergers is essentially dentical to the local space density of dry mergers. The evolution in the total merger rate is modest out to z ~ 0.7, although the wet and dry populations have different evolutionary trends. At higher redshifts dry mergers make a smaller contribution to the total merging galaxy population, but this is offset by a roughly equivalent increase in the contribution from wet mergers. By comparing the mass density function of early-type galaxies to the corresponding mass density function for merging systems, we show that not all the major mergers with the highest masses (M_stellar > 10^11 M_solar) will end up with the most massive early-type galaxies, unless the merging timescale is dramatically longer than that usually assumed. On the other hand, the usually-assumed merging timescale of ~ 0.5-1 Gyr is quite consistent with the data if we suppose that only less massive early-type galaxies form via mergers. Since low-intermediate mass ellipticals are 10 --100 times more common than their most massive counterparts, the hierarchical explanation for the origin of early-type galaxies may be correct for the vast majority of early-types, even if incorrect for the most massive ones.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.0930  [pdf] - 315287
SMA CO(J=6-5) and 435 micron interferometric imaging of the nuclear region of Arp 220
Comments: 13 pages (emulateapj), 10 figures, Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2008-11-06
We have used the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to make the first interferometric observations (beam size ~1") of the 12CO J=6-5 line and 435 micron (690 GHz) continuum emission toward the central region of the nearby ULIRG Arp 220. These observations resolve the eastern and western nuclei from each other, in both the molecular line and dust continuum emission. At 435 micron, the peak intensity of the western nucleus is stronger than the eastern nucleus, and the difference in peak intensities is less than at longer wavelengths. Fitting a simple model to the dust emission observed between 1.3 mm and 435 micron suggests that dust emissivity power law index in the western nucleus is near unity and steeper in the eastern nucleus, about 2, and that the dust emission is optically thick at the shorter wavelength. Comparison with single dish measurements indicate that the interferometer observations are missing ~60% of the dust emission, most likely from a spatially extended component to which these observations are not sensitive. The 12CO J=6-5 line observations clearly resolve kinematically the two nuclei. The distribution and kinematics of the 12CO J=6-5 line appear to be very similar to lower J CO lies observed at similar resolution. Analysis of multiple 12CO line intensities indicates that the molecular gas in both nuclei have similar excitation conditions, although the western nucleus is warmer and denser. The excitation conditions are similar to those found in other extreme environments, including M82, Mrk 231, and BR 1202-0725. Simultaneous lower resolution observations of the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J=2-1 lines show that the 13CO and C18O lines have similar intensities, which suggests that both of these lines are optically thick, or possibly that extreme high mass star formation has produced in an overabundance of C18O.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:0709.3960  [pdf] - 5323
The Circumnuclear Molecular Gas in the Seyfert Galaxy NGC4945
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures,accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2007-09-25
We have mapped the central region of NGC 4945 in the $J=2\to1$ transition of $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO, and C$^{18}$O, as well as the continuum at 1.3 mm, at an angular resolution of $5\farc \times 3\farc$ with the Submillimeter Array. The relative proximity of NGC 4945 (distance of only 3.8 Mpc) permits a detailed study of the circumnuclear molecular gas and dust in a galaxy exhibiting both an AGN (classified as a Seyfert 2) and a circumnuclear starburst in an inclined ring with radius $\sim$2\farcs5 ($\sim$50 pc). We find that all three molecular lines trace an inclined rotating disk with major axis aligned with that of the starburst ring and large-scale galactic disk, and which exhibits solid-body rotation within a radius of $\sim$5\farc ($\sim$95 pc). We infer an inclination for the nuclear disk of $62^{\circ} \pm 2^{\circ}$, somewhat smaller than the inclination of the large-scale galactic disk of $\sim$$78^{\circ}$. The continuum emission at 1.3 mm also extends beyond the starburst ring, and is dominated by thermal emission from dust. If it traces the same dust emitting in the far-infrared, then the bulk of this dust must be heated by star-formation activity rather than the AGN. We discover a kinematically-decoupled component at the center of the disk with a radius smaller than $1\farcs4$ (27 pc), but which spans approximately the same range of velocities as the surrounding disk. This component has a higher density than its surroundings, and is a promising candidate for the circumnuclear molecular torus invoked by AGN unification models.