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Chen, C. -W.

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520 article(s) in total. 4666 co-authors, from 1 to 68 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 6,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.13616  [pdf] - 2106579
SCUBA-2 Ultra Deep Imaging EAO Survey (STUDIES) IV: Spatial clustering and halo masses of 450-$\mu$m-selected sub-millimeter galaxies
Comments: ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2020-04-28, last modified: 2020-06-02
We analyze an extremely deep 450-$\mu$m image ($1\sigma=0.56$\,mJy\,beam$^{-1}$) of a $\simeq 300$\,arcmin$^{2}$ area in the CANDELS/COSMOS field as part of the SCUBA-2 Ultra Deep Imaging EAO Survey (STUDIES). We select a robust (signal-to-noise ratio $\geqslant 4$) and flux-limited ($\geqslant 4$\,mJy) sample of 164 sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) at 450-$\mu$m that have $K$-band counterparts in the COSMOS2015 catalog identified from radio or mid-infrared imaging. Utilizing this SMG sample and the 4705 $K$-band-selected non-SMGs that reside within the noise level $\leqslant 1$\,mJy\,beam$^{-1}$ region of the 450-$\mu$m image as a training set, we develop a machine-learning classifier using $K$-band magnitude and color-color pairs based on the thirteen-band photometry available in this field. We apply the trained machine-learning classifier to the wider COSMOS field (1.6\,deg$^{2}$) using the same COSMOS2015 catalog and identify a sample of 6182 450-$\mu$m SMG candidates with similar colors. The number density, radio and/or mid-infrared detection rates, redshift and stellar mass distributions, and the stacked 450-$\mu$m fluxes of these SMG candidates, from the S2COSMOS observations of the wide field, agree with the measurements made in the much smaller CANDELS field, supporting the effectiveness of the classifier. Using this 450-$\mu$m SMG candidate sample, we measure the two-point autocorrelation functions from $z=3$ down to $z=0.5$. We find that the 450-$\mu$m SMG candidates reside in halos with masses of $\simeq (2.0\pm0.5) \times10^{13}\,h^{-1}\,\rm M_{\odot}$ across this redshift range. We do not find evidence of downsizing that has been suggested by other recent observational studies.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.03013  [pdf] - 2105542
Application of the independent component analysis to the iKAGRA data
KAGRA Collaboration; Akutsu, T.; Ando, M.; Arai, K.; Arai, Y.; Araki, S.; Araya, A.; Aritomi, N.; Asada, H.; Aso, Y.; Atsuta, S.; Awai, K.; Bae, S.; Bae, Y.; Baiotti, L.; Bajpai, R.; Barton, M. A.; Cannon, K.; Capocasa, E.; Chan, M.; Chen, C.; Chen, K.; Chen, Y.; Chu, H.; Chu, Y-K.; Craig, K.; Creus, W.; Doi, K.; Eda, K.; Eguchi, S.; Enomoto, Y.; Flaminio, R.; Fujii, Y.; Fujimoto, M. -K.; Fukunaga, M.; Fukushima, M.; Furuhata, T.; Ge, G.; Hagiwara, A.; Haino, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Hashino, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Hayama, K.; Himemoto, Y.; Hiranuma, Y.; Hirata, N.; Hirobayashi, S.; Hirose, E.; Hong, Z.; Hsieh, B. H.; Huang, G-Z.; Huang, P.; Huang, Y.; Ikenoue, B.; Imam, S.; Inayoshi, K.; Inoue, Y.; Ioka, K.; Itoh, Y.; Izumi, K.; Jung, K.; Jung, P.; Kaji, T.; Kajita, T.; Kakizaki, M.; Kamiizumi, M.; Kanbara, S.; Kanda, N.; Kanemura, S.; Kaneyama, M.; Kang, G.; Kasuya, J.; Kataoka, Y.; Kawaguchi, K.; Kawai, N.; Kawamura, S.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, C.; Kim, J. C.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y. -M.; Kimura, N.; Kinugawa, T.; Kirii, S.; Kita, N.; Kitaoka, Y.; Kitazawa, H.; Kojima, Y.; Kokeyama, K.; Komori, K.; Kong, A. K. H.; Kotake, K.; Kozakai, C.; Kozu, R.; Kumar, R.; Kume, J.; Kuo, C.; Kuo, H-S.; Kuroyanagi, S.; Kusayanagi, K.; Kwak, K.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, R.; Leonardi, M.; Lin, C.; Lin, C-Y.; Lin, F-L.; Liu, G. C.; Liu, Y.; Luo, L.; Majorana, E.; Mano, S.; Marchio, M.; Matsui, T.; Matsushima, F.; Michimura, Y.; Mio, N.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyamoto, A.; Miyamoto, T.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyo, K.; Miyoki, S.; Morii, W.; Morisaki, S.; Moriwaki, Y.; Morozumi, T.; Musha, M.; Nagano, K.; Nagano, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, H.; Nakano, M.; Nakao, K.; Nakashima, R.; Narikawa, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Negishi, R.; Quynh, L. Nguyen; Ni, W. -T.; Nishizawa, A.; Obuchi, Y.; Ochi, T.; Ogaki, W.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohashi, M.; Ohishi, N.; Ohkawa, M.; Okutomi, K.; Oohara, K.; Ooi, C. P.; Oshino, S.; Pan, K.; Pang, H.; Park, J.; Arellano, F. E. Pena; Pinto, I.; Sago, N.; Saijo, M.; Saito, S.; Saito, Y.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sakai, Y.; Sakuno, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, T.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Seto, N.; Shibagaki, S.; Shibata, M.; Shimizu, R.; Shimoda, T.; Shimode, K.; Shinkai, H.; Shishido, T.; Shoda, A.; Somiya, K.; Son, E. J.; Sotani, H.; Suemasa, A.; Sugimoto, R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, T.; Tagoshi, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, R.; Takamori, A.; Takano, S.; Takeda, H.; Takeda, M.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, T.; Tanaka, T.; Tanioka, S.; Martin, E. N. Tapia San; Tatsumi, D.; Telada, S.; Tomaru, T.; Tomigami, Y.; Tomura, T.; Travasso, F.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, T.; Tsubono, K.; Tsuchida, S.; Tsuzuki, T.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Uchikata, N.; Uchiyama, T.; Ueda, A.; Uehara, T.; Ueki, S.; Ueno, K.; Ueshima, G.; Uraguchi, F.; Ushiba, T.; van Putten, M. H. P. M.; Vocca, H.; Wada, S.; Wakamatsu, T.; Wang, J.; Wu, C.; Wu, H.; Wu, S.; Xu, W-R.; Yamada, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yokogawa, K.; Yokoyama, J.; Yokozawa, T.; Yoon, T. H.; Yoshioka, T.; Yuzurihara, H.; Zeidler, S.; Zhao, Y.; Zhu, Z. -H.
Comments: 27 pages, 12 figures : published in PTEP with added discussion about the relation between ICA and Wiener filtering
Submitted: 2019-08-08, last modified: 2020-06-01
We apply the independent component analysis (ICA) to the real data from a gravitational wave detector for the first time. Specifically we use the iKAGRA data taken in April 2016, and calculate the correlations between the gravitational wave strain channel and 35 physical environmental channels. Using a couple of seismic channels which are found to be strongly correlated with the strain, we perform ICA. Injecting a sinusoidal continuous signal in the strain channel, we find that ICA recovers correct parameters with enhanced signal-to-noise ratio, which demonstrates usefulness of this method. Among the two implementations of ICA used here, we find the correlation method yields the optimal result for the case environmental noises act on the strain channel linearly.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.00776  [pdf] - 2104937
Dust impact voltage signatures on Parker Solar Probe: influence of spacecraft floating potential
Comments: 12 pages, 4 figures, 1 table, submitted to Geophysical Research Letters
Submitted: 2020-06-01
When a fast dust particle hits a spacecraft, it generates a cloud of plasma some of which escapes into space and the momentary charge imbalance perturbs the spacecraft voltage with respect to the plasma. Electrons race ahead of ions, however both respond to the DC electric field of the spacecraft. If the spacecraft potential is positive with respect to the plasma, it should attract the dust cloud electrons and repel the ions, and vice versa. Here we use measurements of impulsive voltage signals from dust impacts on the Parker Solar Probe (PSP) spacecraft to show that the peak voltage amplitude is clearly related to the spacecraft floating potential, consistent with theoretical models and laboratory measurements. In addition, we examine some timescales associated with the voltage waveforms and compare to the timescales of spacecraft charging physics.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.01440  [pdf] - 2101446
Rotating black holes without $\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry and their shadow images
Comments: 22 pages, 9 figures. Updated to match the published version
Submitted: 2020-04-03, last modified: 2020-05-26
The recent detection of gravitational waves from black hole coalescences and the first image of the black hole shadow enhance the possibilities of testing gravitational theories in the strong-field regime. In this paper, we study the physical properties and the shadow image of a class of Kerr-like rotating black holes, whose $\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry is generically broken. Such black hole solutions could arise in effective low-energy theories of a fundamental quantum theory of gravity, such as string theory. Within a theory-agnostic framework, we require that the Kerr-like solutions are asymptotically flat, and assume that a Carter-like constant is preserved, enabling the geodesic equations to be fully separable. Subject to these two requirements, we find that the $\mathbb{Z}_2$ asymmetry of the spacetime is characterized by two arbitrary functions of polar angle. The shadow image turns out to be $\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetric on the celestial coordinates. Furthermore, the shadow is completely blind to one of the arbitrary functions. The other function, although would affect the apparent size of the shadow, it hardly distorts the shadow contour and has merely no degeneracy with the spin parameter. Therefore, the parameters in this function can be constrained with black hole shadows, only when the mass and the distance of the black hole from the earth are measured with great precision.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.12509  [pdf] - 2100293
Velocity independent constraints on spin-dependent DM-nucleon interactions from IceCube and PICO
IceCube Collaboration; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Steinmüller, P.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Collaboration, M. Zöcklein. PICO; :; Amole, C.; Ardid, M.; Arnquist, I. J.; Asner, D. M.; Baxter, D.; Behnke, E.; Bressler, M.; Broerman, B.; Cao, G.; Chen, C. J.; Chowdhury, U.; Clark, K.; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, P. S.; Crisler, M.; Crowder, G.; Cruz-Venegas, N. A.; Dahl, C. E.; Das, M.; Fallows, S.; Farine, J.; Felis, I.; Filgas, R.; Girard, F.; Giroux, G.; Hall, J.; Hardy, C.; Harris, O.; Hoppe, E. W.; Jin, M.; Klopfenstein, L.; Krauss, C. B.; Laurin, M.; Lawson, I.; Leblanc, A.; Levine, I.; Lippincott, W. H.; Mamedov, F.; Maurya, D.; Mitra, P.; Moore, C.; Nania, T.; Neilson, R.; Noble, A. J.; Oedekerk, P.; Ortega, A.; Piro, M. -C.; Plante, A.; Podviyanuk, R.; Priya, S.; Robinson, A. E.; Sahoo, S.; Scallon, O.; Seth, S.; Sonnenschein, A.; Starinski, N.; Štekl, I.; Sullivan, T.; Tardif, F.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.; Walkowski, N.; Wichoski, U.; Yan, Y.; Zacek, V.; Zhang, J.
Comments: 9 pages, 3 figures, 1 table. To appear in Eur.Phys.J. C
Submitted: 2019-07-29, last modified: 2020-05-25
Adopting the Standard Halo Model (SHM) of an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution for dark matter (DM) particles in the Galaxy, the most stringent current constraints on their spin-dependent scattering cross-section with nucleons come from the IceCube neutrino observatory and the PICO-60 C$_3$F$_8$ superheated bubble chamber experiments. The former is sensitive to high energy neutrinos from the self-annihilation of DM particles captured in the Sun, while the latter looks for nuclear recoil events from DM scattering off nucleons. Although slower DM particles are more likely to be captured by the Sun, the faster ones are more likely to be detected by PICO. Recent N-body simulations suggest significant deviations from the SHM for the smooth halo component of the DM, while observations hint at a dominant fraction of the local DM being in substructures. We use the method of Ferrer et al. (2015) to exploit the complementarity between the two approaches and derive conservative constraints on DM-nucleon scattering. Our results constrain $\sigma_{\mathrm{SD}} \lesssim 3 \times 10^{-39} \mathrm{cm}^2$ (6 $ \times 10^{-38} \mathrm{cm}^2$) at $\gtrsim 90\%$ C.L. for a DM particle of mass 1~TeV annihilating into $\tau^+ \tau^-$ ($b\bar{b}$) with a local density of $\rho_{\mathrm{DM}} = 0.3~\mathrm{ GeV/cm}^3$. The constraints scale inversely with $\rho_{\mathrm{DM}}$ and are independent of the DM velocity distribution.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.12509  [pdf] - 2100293
Velocity independent constraints on spin-dependent DM-nucleon interactions from IceCube and PICO
IceCube Collaboration; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Steinmüller, P.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Collaboration, M. Zöcklein. PICO; :; Amole, C.; Ardid, M.; Arnquist, I. J.; Asner, D. M.; Baxter, D.; Behnke, E.; Bressler, M.; Broerman, B.; Cao, G.; Chen, C. J.; Chowdhury, U.; Clark, K.; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, P. S.; Crisler, M.; Crowder, G.; Cruz-Venegas, N. A.; Dahl, C. E.; Das, M.; Fallows, S.; Farine, J.; Felis, I.; Filgas, R.; Girard, F.; Giroux, G.; Hall, J.; Hardy, C.; Harris, O.; Hoppe, E. W.; Jin, M.; Klopfenstein, L.; Krauss, C. B.; Laurin, M.; Lawson, I.; Leblanc, A.; Levine, I.; Lippincott, W. H.; Mamedov, F.; Maurya, D.; Mitra, P.; Moore, C.; Nania, T.; Neilson, R.; Noble, A. J.; Oedekerk, P.; Ortega, A.; Piro, M. -C.; Plante, A.; Podviyanuk, R.; Priya, S.; Robinson, A. E.; Sahoo, S.; Scallon, O.; Seth, S.; Sonnenschein, A.; Starinski, N.; Štekl, I.; Sullivan, T.; Tardif, F.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.; Walkowski, N.; Wichoski, U.; Yan, Y.; Zacek, V.; Zhang, J.
Comments: 9 pages, 3 figures, 1 table. To appear in Eur.Phys.J. C
Submitted: 2019-07-29, last modified: 2020-05-25
Adopting the Standard Halo Model (SHM) of an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution for dark matter (DM) particles in the Galaxy, the most stringent current constraints on their spin-dependent scattering cross-section with nucleons come from the IceCube neutrino observatory and the PICO-60 C$_3$F$_8$ superheated bubble chamber experiments. The former is sensitive to high energy neutrinos from the self-annihilation of DM particles captured in the Sun, while the latter looks for nuclear recoil events from DM scattering off nucleons. Although slower DM particles are more likely to be captured by the Sun, the faster ones are more likely to be detected by PICO. Recent N-body simulations suggest significant deviations from the SHM for the smooth halo component of the DM, while observations hint at a dominant fraction of the local DM being in substructures. We use the method of Ferrer et al. (2015) to exploit the complementarity between the two approaches and derive conservative constraints on DM-nucleon scattering. Our results constrain $\sigma_{\mathrm{SD}} \lesssim 3 \times 10^{-39} \mathrm{cm}^2$ (6 $ \times 10^{-38} \mathrm{cm}^2$) at $\gtrsim 90\%$ C.L. for a DM particle of mass 1~TeV annihilating into $\tau^+ \tau^-$ ($b\bar{b}$) with a local density of $\rho_{\mathrm{DM}} = 0.3~\mathrm{ GeV/cm}^3$. The constraints scale inversely with $\rho_{\mathrm{DM}}$ and are independent of the DM velocity distribution.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.05574  [pdf] - 2093408
Overview of KAGRA: Detector design and construction history
Akutsu, T.; Ando, M.; Arai, K.; Arai, Y.; Araki, S.; Araya, A.; Aritomi, N.; Aso, Y.; Bae, S. -W.; Bae, Y. -B.; Baiotti, L.; Bajpai, R.; Barton, M. A.; Cannon, K.; Capocasa, E.; Chan, M. -L.; Chen, C. -S.; Chen, K. -H.; Chen, Y. -R.; Chu, H. -Y.; Chu, Y-K.; Eguchi, S.; Enomoto, Y.; Flaminio, R.; Fujii, Y.; Fukunaga, M.; Fukushima, M.; Ge, G. -G.; Hagiwara, A.; Haino, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Hayama, K.; Himemoto, Y.; Hiranuma, Y.; Hirata, N.; Hirose, E.; Hong, Z.; Hsieh, B. -H.; Huang, G. -Z.; Huang, P. -W.; Huang, Y. -J.; Ikenoue, B.; Imam, S.; Inayoshi, K.; Inoue, Y.; Ioka, K.; Itoh, Y.; Izumi, K.; Jung, K.; Jung, P.; Kajita, T.; Kamiizumi, M.; Kanda, N.; Kang, G. -W.; Kawaguchi, K.; Kawai, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y. -M.; Kimura, N.; Kita, N.; Kitazawa, H.; Kojima, Y.; Kokeyama, K.; Komori, K.; Kong, A. K. H.; Kotake, K.; Kozakai, C.; Kozu, R.; Kumar, R.; Kume, J.; Kuo, C. -M.; Kuo, H. -S.; Kuroyanagi, S.; Kusayanagi, K.; Kwak, K.; Lee, H. -K.; Lee, H. -W.; Lee, R. -K.; Leonardi, M.; Lin, C. -Y.; Lin, F. -L.; Lin, L. C. -C.; Liu, G. -C.; Luo, L. -W.; Marchio, M.; Michimura, Y.; Mio, N.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyamoto, A.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyo, K.; Miyoki, S.; Morisaki, S.; Moriwaki, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagano, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, H.; Nakano, M.; Nakashima, R.; Narikawa, T.; Negishi, R.; Ni, W. -T.; Nishizawa, A.; Obuchi, Y.; Ogaki, W.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. -H.; Ohashi, M.; Ohishi, N.; Ohkawa, M.; Okutomi, K.; Oohara, K.; Ooi, C. -P.; Oshino, S.; Pan, K. -C.; Pang, H. -F.; Park, J.; Arellano, F. E. Peña; Pinto, I.; Sago, N.; Saito, S.; Saito, Y.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sakuno, Y.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, T.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Shimizu, R.; Shimoda, T.; Shimode, K.; Shinkai, H.; Shishido, T.; Shoda, A.; Somiya, K.; Son, E. J.; Sotani, H.; Sugimoto, R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, T.; Tagoshi, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, R.; Takamori, A.; Takano, S.; Takeda, H.; Takeda, M.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, T.; Tanaka, T.; Tanioka, S.; Martin, E. N. Tapia San; Telada, S.; Tomaru, T.; Tomigami, Y.; Tomura, T.; Travasso, F.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, T. T. L.; Tsubono, K.; Tsuchida, S.; Tsuzuki, T.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Uchikata, N.; Uchiyama, T.; Ueda, A.; Uehara, T.; Ueno, K.; Ueshima, G.; Uraguchi, F.; Ushiba, T.; van Putten, M. H. P. M.; Vocca, H.; Wang, J.; Wu, C. -M.; Wu, H. -C.; Wu, S. -R.; Xu, W. -R.; Yamada, T.; Yamamoto, Ka.; Yamamoto, Ko.; Yamamoto, T.; Yokogawa, K.; Yokoyama, J.; Yokozawa, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Yuzurihara, H.; Zeidler, S.; Zhao, Y.; Zhu, Z. -H.
Comments: 33 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2020-05-12
KAGRA is a newly built gravitational-wave telescope, a laser interferometer comprising arms with a length of 3\,km, located in Kamioka, Gifu, Japan. KAGRA was constructed under the ground and it is operated using cryogenic mirrors that help in reducing the seismic and thermal noise. Both technologies are expected to provide directions for the future of gravitational-wave telescopes. In 2019, KAGRA finished all installations with the designed configuration, which we call the baseline KAGRA. In this occasion, we present an overview of the baseline KAGRA from various viewpoints in a series of of articles. In this article, we introduce the design configurations of KAGRA with its historical background.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.01733  [pdf] - 2097449
ALMACAL VII: First Interferometric Number Counts at 650 $\mu$m
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-05-04, last modified: 2020-05-07
Measurements of the cosmic far-infrared background (CIB) indicate that emission from many extragalactic phenomena, including star formation and black hole accretion, in the Universe can be obscured by dust. Resolving the CIB to study the population of galaxies in which this activity takes place is a major goal of submillimetre astronomy. Here, we present interferometric 650$\mu$m submillimetre number counts. Using the Band 8 data from the ALMACAL survey, we have analysed 81 ALMA calibrator fields together covering a total area of 5.5~arcmin$^2$. The typical central rms in these fields is $\sim 100 \mu$Jy~beam$^{-1}$ with the deepest maps reaching $\sigma = 47 \mu$Jy~beam$^{-1}$ at sub-arcsec resolution. Multi-wavelength coverage from ALMACAL allows us to exclude contamination from jets associated with the calibrators. However, residual contamination by jets and lensing remain a possibility. Using a signal-to-noise threshold of $4.5\sigma$, we find 21 dusty, star-forming galaxies with 650$\mu$m flux densities of $\geq 0.7 $mJy. At the detection limit we resolve $\simeq 100$ per cent of the CIB at 650$\mu$m, a significant improvement compared to low resolution studies at similar wavelength. We have therefore identified all the sources contributing to the EBL at 650 microns and predict that the contribution from objects with flux 0.7<mJy will be small.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.13722  [pdf] - 2086516
Debris Disk Results from the Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey's Polarimetric Imaging Campaign
Comments: Accepted for publication in AJ. 19 figures, 7 tables
Submitted: 2020-04-28
We report the results of a ${\sim}4$-year direct imaging survey of 104 stars to resolve and characterize circumstellar debris disks in scattered light as part of the Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey. We targeted nearby (${\lesssim}150$ pc), young (${\lesssim}500$ Myr) stars with high infrared excesses ($L_{\mathrm{IR}} / L_\star > 10^{-5}$), including 38 with previously resolved disks. Observations were made using the Gemini Planet Imager high-contrast integral field spectrograph in $H$-band (1.6 $\mu$m) coronagraphic polarimetry mode to measure both polarized and total intensities. We resolved 26 debris disks and three protoplanetary/transitional disks. Seven debris disks were resolved in scattered light for the first time, including newly presented HD 117214 and HD 156623, and we quantified basic morphologies of five of them using radiative transfer models. All of our detected debris disks but HD 156623 have dust-poor inner holes, and their scattered-light radii are generally larger than corresponding radii measured from resolved thermal emission and those inferred from spectral energy distributions. To assess sensitivity, we report contrasts and consider causes of non-detections. Detections were strongly correlated with high IR excess and high inclination, although polarimetry outperformed total intensity angular differential imaging for detecting low inclination disks (${\lesssim} 70 \deg$). Based on post-survey statistics, we improved upon our pre-survey target prioritization metric predicting polarimetric disk detectability. We also examined scattered-light disks in the contexts of gas, far-IR, and millimeter detections. Comparing $H$-band and ALMA fluxes for two disks revealed tentative evidence for differing grain properties. Finally, we found no preference for debris disks to be detected in scattered light if wide-separation substellar companions were present.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.13061  [pdf] - 2085295
A consistent model of non-singular Schwarzschild black hole in loop quantum gravity and its quasinormal modes
Comments: 18 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2020-04-27
We investigate the interior structure, perturbations, and the associated quasinormal modes of a quantum black hole model recently proposed by Bodendorfer, Mele, and M\"unch (BMM). Within the framework of loop quantum gravity, the quantum parameters in the BMM model are introduced through polymerization, consequently replacing the Schwarzschild singularity with a spacelike transition surface. By treating the quantum geometry corrections as an `effective' matter contribution, we first prove the violation of energy conditions (in particular the null energy condition) near the transition surface and then investigate the required junction conditions on it. In addition, we study the quasinormal modes of massless scalar field perturbations, electromagnetic perturbations, and axial gravitational perturbations in this effective model. As expected, the quasinormal spectra deviate from their classical counterparts in the presence of quantum corrections. Interestingly, we find that the quasinormal frequencies of perturbations with different spins share the same qualitative tendency with respect to the change of the quantum parameters in this model.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.10690  [pdf] - 2082827
Threshold of primordial black hole formation in modified theories of gravity
Comments: 8 pages, 1 figure, major revision
Submitted: 2019-12-23, last modified: 2020-04-23
It is believed that primordial black holes (PBHs), if they exist, can serve as a powerful tool to probe the early stage of the cosmic history. Essentially, in the radiation dominated universe, PBHs could form by the gravitational collapse of overdense primordial perturbations produced during inflation. In this picture, one important ingredient is the threshold of density contrast, which defines the onset of PBH formation. In the literature, most of the estimations of threshold, no matter numerically or analytically, are implemented in the framework of general relativity. In this paper, by performing analytic estimations, we point out that the threshold for PBH formation depends on the gravitational theory under consideration. In GR, the analytic estimations adopted in this paper give a constant value of the formation threshold, assuming a fixed equation of state. If the theory is characterized by additional mass scales other than the Planck mass, the estimated threshold of density contrast may depend on the energy scale of the universe at the time of PBH formation. In this paper, we consider the Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld gravity as an example. However, this conclusion is expected to be valid for any gravitational theory characterized by additional mass scales, suggesting the possibility of testing gravitational theories with PBHs.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.07230  [pdf] - 2085236
Polar planets around highly eccentric binaries are the most stable
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2020-04-15
We study the orbital stability of a non-zero mass, close-in circular orbit planet around an eccentric orbit binary for various initial values of the binary eccentricity, binary mass fraction, planet mass, planet semi--major axis, and planet inclination by means of numerical simulations that cover $5 \times 10^4$ binary orbits. For small binary eccentricity, the stable orbits that extend closest to the binary (most stable orbits) are nearly retrograde and circulating. For high binary eccentricity, the most stable orbits are highly inclined and librate near the so-called generalised polar orbit which is a stationary orbit that is fixed in the frame of the binary orbit. For more extreme mass ratio binaries, there is a greater variation in the size of the stability region (defined by initial orbital radius and inclination) with planet mass and initial inclination, especially for low binary eccentricity. For low binary eccentricity, inclined planet orbits may be unstable even at large orbital radii (separation $> 5 \,a_{\rm b}$). The escape time for an unstable planet is generally shorter around an equal mass binary compared with an unequal mass binary. Our results have implications for circumbinary planet formation and evolution and will be helpful for understanding future circumbinary planet observations.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.06027  [pdf] - 2093293
The Gemini Planet Imager view of the HD 32297 debris disk
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2020-04-13
We present new $H$-band scattered light images of the HD 32297 edge-on debris disk obtained with the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The disk is detected in total and polarized intensity down to a projected angular separation of 0.15", or 20au. On the other hand, the large scale swept-back halo remains undetected, likely a consequence of its markedly blue color relative to the parent body belt. We analyze the curvature of the disk spine and estimate a radius of $\approx$100au for the parent body belt, smaller than past scattered light studies but consistent with thermal emission maps of the system. We employ three different flux-preserving post-processing methods to suppress the residual starlight and evaluate the surface brightness and polarization profile along the disk spine. Unlike past studies of the system, our high fidelity images reveal the disk to be highly symmetric and devoid of morphological and surface brightness perturbations. We find the dust scattering properties of the system to be consistent with those observed in other debris disks, with the exception of HR 4796. Finally, we find no direct evidence for the presence of a planetary-mass object in the system.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.02910  [pdf] - 2077204
IceCube Search for Neutrinos Coincident with Compact Binary Mergers from LIGO-Virgo's First Gravitational-Wave Transient Catalog
Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Bartos, I.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, B. A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Corley, K. R.; Correa, P.; Countryman, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Dharani, S.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fox, D.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Grégoire, T.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halliday, R.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hauser, S.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Jansson, M.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kellermann, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Koundal, P.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczynska, A.; Li, Y.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Ludwig, A.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Merino, G.; Merz, J.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Nguyen, L. V.; Niederhausen, H.; Nisa, M. U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pieper, S.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Popovych, Y.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Rehman, A.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Cantu, D. Rysewyk; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Scharf, M.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Santen, J.; Verpoest, S.; Veske, D.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Wulff, J.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-04-06, last modified: 2020-04-07
Using the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, we search for high-energy neutrino emission coincident with compact binary mergers observed by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave (GW) detectors during their first and second observing runs. We present results from two searches targeting emission coincident with the sky localization of each gravitational wave event within a 1000 second time window centered around the reported merger time. One search uses a model-independent unbinned maximum likelihood analysis, which uses neutrino data from IceCube to search for point-like neutrino sources consistent with the sky localization of GW events. The other uses the Low-Latency Algorithm for Multi-messenger Astrophysics, which incorporates astrophysical priors through a Bayesian framework and includes LIGO-Virgo detector characteristics to determine the association between the GW source and the neutrinos. No significant neutrino coincidence is seen by either search during the first two observing runs of the LIGO-Virgo detectors. We set upper limits on the time-integrated neutrino emission within the 1000 second window for each of the 11 GW events. These limits range from 0.02-0.7 $\mathrm{GeV~cm^{-2}}$. We also set limits on the total isotropic equivalent energy, $E_{\mathrm{iso}}$, emitted in high-energy neutrinos by each GW event. These limits range from 1.7 $\times$ 10$^{51}$ - 1.8 $\times$ 10$^{55}$ erg. We conclude with an outlook for LIGO-Virgo observing run O3, during which both analyses are running in real time.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.02898  [pdf] - 2081109
Self-gravitating Filament Formation from Shocked Flows: Velocity Gradients across Filaments
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-04-06
In typical environments of star-forming clouds, converging supersonic turbulence generates shock-compressed regions, and can create strongly-magnetized sheet-like layers. Numerical MHD simulations show that within these post-shock layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form via gathering material along the magnetic field lines. As a result of the preferred-direction mass collection, a velocity gradient perpendicular to the filament major axis is a common feature seen in simulations. We show that this prediction is in good agreement with recent observations from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), from which we identified several filaments with prominent velocity gradients perpendicular to their major axes. Highlighting a filament from the northwest part of Serpens South, we provide both qualitative and quantitative comparisons between simulation results and observational data. In particular, we show that the dimensionless ratio $C_v \equiv {\Delta v_h}^2/(GM/L)$, where $\Delta v_h$ is half of the observed perpendicular velocity difference across a filament, and $M/L$ is the filament's mass per unit length, can distinguish between filaments formed purely due to turbulent compression and those formed due to gravity-induced accretion. We conclude that the perpendicular velocity gradient observed in the Serpens South northwest filament can be caused by gravity-induced anisotropic accretion of material from a flattened layer. Using synthetic observations of our simulated filaments, we also propose that a density-selection effect may explain observed subfilaments (one filament breaking into two components in velocity space) as reported in Dhabal et al. (2018).
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.01737  [pdf] - 2074447
A search for IceCube events in the direction of ANITA neutrino candidates
IceCube Collaboration; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fox, D.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Grégoire, T.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halliday, R.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Jansson, M.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nisa, M. U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pieper, S.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Rehman, A.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Santen, J.; Verpoest, S.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-01-06, last modified: 2020-04-02
During the first three flights of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, the collaboration detected several neutrino candidates. Two of these candidate events were consistent with an ultra-high-energy up-going air shower and compatible with a tau neutrino interpretation. A third neutrino candidate event was detected in a search for Askaryan radiation in the Antarctic ice, although it is also consistent with the background expectation. The inferred emergence angle of the first two events is in tension with IceCube and ANITA limits on isotropic cosmogenic neutrino fluxes. Here, we test the hypothesis that these events are astrophysical in origin, possibly caused by a point source in the reconstructed direction. Given that any ultra-high-energy tau neutrino flux traversing the Earth should be accompanied by a secondary flux in the TeV-PeV range, we search for these secondary counterparts in seven years of IceCube data using three complementary approaches. In the absence of any significant detection, we set upper limits on the neutrino flux from potential point sources. We compare these limits to ANITA's sensitivity in the same direction and show that an astrophysical explanation of these anomalous events under standard model assumptions is severely constrained regardless of source spectrum.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.00563  [pdf] - 2072635
Using Data Imputation for Signal Separation in High Contrast Imaging
Comments: 18 pages, 9 figures, ApJ published. Modified AASTeX template at https://github.com/seawander/aastex_pwned
Submitted: 2020-01-02, last modified: 2020-03-31
To characterize circumstellar systems in high contrast imaging, the fundamental step is to construct a best point spread function (PSF) template for the non-circumstellar signals (i.e., star light and speckles) and separate it from the observation. With existing PSF construction methods, the circumstellar signals (e.g., planets, circumstellar disks) are unavoidably altered by over-fitting and/or self-subtraction, making forward modeling a necessity to recover these signals. We present a forward modeling--free solution to these problems with data imputation using sequential non-negative matrix factorization (DI-sNMF). DI-sNMF first converts this signal separation problem to a "missing data" problem in statistics by flagging the regions which host circumstellar signals as missing data, then attributes PSF signals to these regions. We mathematically prove it to have negligible alteration to circumstellar signals when the imputation region is relatively small, which thus enables precise measurement for these circumstellar objects. We apply it to simulated point source and circumstellar disk observations to demonstrate its proper recovery of them. We apply it to Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) K1-band observations of the debris disk surrounding HR 4796A, finding a tentative trend that the dust is more forward scattering as the wavelength increases. We expect DI-sNMF to be applicable to other general scenarios where the separation of signals is needed.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.12071  [pdf] - 2071107
IceCube Search for High-Energy Neutrino Emission from TeV Pulsar Wind Nebulae
Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, B. A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fox, D.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Grégoire, T.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halliday, R.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Jansson, M.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kellermann, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Li, Y.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Ludwig, A.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Nguyen, L. V.; Niederhausen, H.; Nisa, M. U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pieper, S.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Rehman, A.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Cantu, D. Rysewyk; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Santen, J.; Verpoest, S.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Wulff, J.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments: 11 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2020-03-26
Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are main gamma-ray emitters in the Galactic plane. They are diffuse nebulae that emit non-thermal radiation. Pulsar winds, relativistic magnetized outflows from the central star, shocked in the ambient medium produce a multiwavelength emission from the radio through gamma rays. Although the leptonic scenario is able to explain most PWNe emission, a hadronic contribution cannot be excluded. A possible hadronic contribution to the high-energy gamma-ray emission inevitably leads to the production of neutrinos. Using 9.5 years of all-sky IceCube data, we report results from a stacking analysis to search for neutrino emission from 35 PWNe that are high-energy gamma-ray emitters. In the absence of any significant correlation, we set upper limits on the total neutrino emission from those PWNe and constraints on hadronic spectral components.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.02293  [pdf] - 2076578
The [CII]/[NII] ratio in 3 < z < 6 sub-millimetre galaxies from the South Pole Telescope survey
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures, accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-06-05, last modified: 2020-03-25
We present Atacama Compact Array and Atacama Pathfinder Experiment observations of the [N II] 205 $\mu$m fine-structure line in 40 sub-millimetre galaxies lying at redshifts z = 3 to 6, drawn from the 2500 deg$^2$ South Pole Telescope survey. This represents the largest uniformly selected sample of high-redshift [N II] 205 $\mu$m measurements to date. 29 sources also have [C II] 158 $\mu$m line observations allowing a characterization of the distribution of the [C II] to [N II] luminosity ratio for the first time at high-redshift. The sample exhibits a median L$_{[C II]}$ /L$_{[N II]}$ $\approx$ 11 and interquartile range of 5.0 to 24.7. These ratios are similar to those observed in local (U)LIRGs, possibly indicating similarities in their interstellar medium. At the extremes, we find individual sub-millimetre galaxies with L$_{[C II]}$ /L$_{[N II]}$ low enough to suggest a smaller contribution from neutral gas than ionized gas to the [C II] flux and high enough to suggest strongly photon or X-ray region dominated flux. These results highlight a large range in this line luminosity ratio for sub-millimetre galaxies, which may be caused by variations in gas density, the relative abundances of carbon and nitrogen, ionization parameter, metallicity, and a variation in the fractional abundance of ionized and neutral interstellar medium.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.11033  [pdf] - 2077115
Relative Alignment between Dense Molecular Cores and Ambient Magnetic Field: The Synergy of Numerical Models and Observations
Comments: 18 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-03-24
The role played by magnetic field during star formation is an important topic in astrophysics. We investigate the correlation between the orientation of star-forming cores (as defined by the core major axes) and ambient magnetic field directions in 1) a 3D MHD simulation, 2) synthetic observations generated from the simulation at different viewing angles, and 3) observations of nearby molecular clouds. We find that the results on relative alignment between cores and background magnetic field in synthetic observations slightly disagree with those measured in fully 3D simulation data, which is partly because cores identified in projected 2D maps tend to coexist within filamentary structures, while 3D cores are generally more rounded. In addition, we examine the progression of magnetic field from pc- to core-scale in the simulation, which is consistent with the anisotropic core formation model that gas preferably flow along the magnetic field toward dense cores. When comparing the observed cores identified from the GBT Ammonia Survey (GAS) and Planck polarization-inferred magnetic field orientations, we find that the relative core-field alignment has a regional dependence among different clouds. More specifically, we find that dense cores in the Taurus molecular cloud tend to align perpendicular to the background magnetic field, while those in Perseus and Ophiuchus tend to have random (Perseus) or slightly parallel (Ophiuchus) orientations with respect to the field. We argue that this feature of relative core-field orientation could be used to probe the relative significance of the magnetic field within the cloud.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.09997  [pdf] - 2068918
A Search for MeV to TeV Neutrinos from Fast Radio Bursts with IceCube
Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mari{ş}, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Steinmüller, P.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-08-26, last modified: 2020-03-24
We present two searches for IceCube neutrino events coincident with 28 fast radio bursts (FRBs) and one repeating FRB. The first improves upon a previous IceCube analysis -- searching for spatial and temporal correlation of events with FRBs at energies greater than roughly 50 GeV -- by increasing the effective area by an order of magnitude. The second is a search for temporal correlation of MeV neutrino events with FRBs. No significant correlation is found in either search, therefore, we set upper limits on the time-integrated neutrino flux emitted by FRBs for a range of emission timescales less than one day. These are the first limits on FRB neutrino emission at the MeV scale, and the limits set at higher energies are an order-of-magnitude improvement over those set by any neutrino telescope.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.11084  [pdf] - 2070161
Exocomets: A spectroscopic survey
Comments: Accepted in A&A on March 23rd 2020
Submitted: 2020-03-24
While exoplanets are now routinely detected, the detection of small bodies in extrasolar systems remains challenging. Since the discovery of sporadic events interpreted as exocomets (Falling Evaporating Bodies) around $\beta$ Pic in the early 80s, only $\sim$20 stars have been reported to host exocomet-like events. We aim to expand the sample of known exocomet-host stars, as well as to monitor the hot-gas environment around stars with previously known exocometary activity. We have obtained high-resolution optical spectra of a heterogeneous sample of 117 main-sequence stars in the spectral type range from B8 to G8. The data have been collected in 14 observing campaigns expanding over 2 years from both hemispheres. We have analysed the Ca ii K&H and Na i D lines in order to search for non-photospheric absorptions originated in the circumstellar environment, and for variable events that could be caused by outgassing of exocomet-like bodies. We have detected non-photospheric absorptions towards 50% of the sample, attributing a circumstellar origin to half of the detections (i.e. 26% of the sample). Hot circumstellar gas is detected in the metallic lines inspected via narrow stable absorptions, and/or variable blue-/red-shifted absorption events. Such variable events were found in 18 stars in the Ca ii and/or Na i lines; 6 of them are reported in the context of this work for the first time. In some cases the variations we report in the Ca ii K line are similar to those observed in $\beta$ Pic. While we do not find a significant trend with the age or location of the stars, we do find that the probability of finding CS gas in stars with larger vsin i is higher. We also find a weak trend with the presence of near-infrared excess, and with anomalous ($\lambda$ Boo-like) abundances, but this would require confirmation by expanding the sample.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.06870  [pdf] - 2097353
HD 145263: Spectral Observations of Silica Debris Disk Formation via Extreme Space Weathering?
Comments: 41 Pages, 5 Figures, 5 Tables, Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2020-03-15
We report here time domain infrared spectroscopy and optical photometry of the HD145263 silica-rich circumstellar disk system taken from 2003 through 2014. We find an F4V host star surrounded by a stable, massive 1e22 - 1e23 kg (M_Moon to M_Mars) dust disk. No disk gas was detected, and the primary star was seen rotating with a rapid ~1.75 day period. After resolving a problem with previously reported observations, we find the silica, Mg-olivine, and Fe-pyroxene mineralogy of the dust disk to be stable throughout, and very unusual compared to the ferromagnesian silicates typically found in primordial and debris disks. By comparison with mid-infrared spectral features of primitive solar system dust, we explore the possibility that HD 145263's circumstellar dust mineralogy occurred with preferential destruction of Fe-bearing olivines, metal sulfides, and water ice in an initially comet-like mineral mix and their replacement by Fe-bearing pyroxenes, amorphous pyroxene, and silica. We reject models based on vaporizing optical stellar megaflares, aqueous alteration, or giant hypervelocity impacts as unable to produce the observed mineralogy. Scenarios involving unusually high Si abundances are at odds with the normal stellar absorption near-infrared feature strengths for Mg, Fe, and Si. Models involving intense space weathering of a thin surface patina via moderate (T < 1300 K) heating and energetic ion sputtering due to a stellar superflare from the F4V primary are consistent with the observations. The space weathered patina should be reddened, contain copious amounts of nanophase Fe, and should be transient on timescales of decades unless replenished.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.06614  [pdf] - 2064596
Combined search for neutrinos from dark matter self-annihilation in the Galactic Centre with ANTARES and IceCube
ANTARES Collaboration; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J. -J.; Aublin, J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Belhorma, B.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bissinger, M.; Boumaaza, J.; Bouta, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brânzaş, H.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chabab, M.; Chau, T. N.; Moursli, R. Cherkaoui El; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coleiro, A.; Colomer, M.; Coniglione, R.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Díaz, A. F.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Di Palma, I.; Domi, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Khayati, N. El; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ettahiri, A.; Fermani, P.; Ferrara, G.; Filippini, F.; Fusco, L.; Gay, P.; Glotin, H.; Gozzini, R.; Ruiz, R. Gracia; Graf, K.; Guidi, C.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Huang, F.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; de Jong, P.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Khan-Chowdhury, N. R.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Breton, R. Le; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Levi, G.; Lincetto, M.; Lopez-Coto, D.; Loucatos, S.; Maggi, G.; Manczak, J.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Migliozzi, P.; Moser, M.; Moussa, A.; Muller, R.; Nauta, L.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Nielsen, C.; Nuñez-Castiñeyra, A.; O'Fearraigh, B.; Organokov, M.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Piattelli, P.; Poirè, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Randazzo, N.; Reck, S.; Riccobene, G.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schüssler, F.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Strandberg, B.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Thakore, T.; Tingay, S. J.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Versari, F.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Wilms, J.; Zaborov, D.; Zegarelli, A.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Collaboration, IceCube; :; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, B. A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fox, D.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Grégoire, T.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halliday, R.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Jansson, M.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kellermann, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Ludwig, A.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Nguyen, L. V.; Niederhausen, H.; Nisa, M. U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pieper, S.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Rehman, A.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Cantu, D. Rysewyk; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stö\s{s}l, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Santen, J.; Verpoest, S.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Wulff, J.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-03-14
We present the results of the first combined dark matter search targeting the Galactic Centre using the ANTARES and IceCube neutrino telescopes. For dark matter particles with masses from 50 to 1000 GeV, the sensitivities on the self-annihilation cross section set by ANTARES and IceCube are comparable, making this mass range particularly interesting for a joint analysis. Dark matter self-annihilation through the $\tau^+\tau^-$, $\mu^+\mu^-$, $b\bar{b}$ and $W^+W^-$ channels is considered for both the Navarro-Frenk-White and Burkert halo profiles. In the combination of 2,101.6 days of ANTARES data and 1,007 days of IceCube data, no excess over the expected background is observed. Limits on the thermally-averaged dark matter annihilation cross section $\langle\sigma_A\upsilon\rangle$ are set. These limits present an improvement of up to a factor of two in the studied dark matter mass range with respect to the individual limits published by both collaborations. When considering dark matter particles with a mass of 200 GeV annihilating through the $\tau^+\tau^-$ channel, the value obtained for the limit is $7.44 \times 10^{-24} \text{cm}^{3}\text{s}^{-1}$ for the Navarro-Frenk-White halo profile. For the purpose of this joint analysis, the model parameters and the likelihood are unified, providing a benchmark for forthcoming dark matter searches performed by neutrino telescopes.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.05484  [pdf] - 2101416
An ALMA survey of the brightest sub-millimetre sources in the SCUBA-2 COSMOS field
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS, comments welcome. Figures 1, 4, A1 degraded to comply with size limits
Submitted: 2020-03-11
We present an ALMA study of the ~180 brightest sources in the SCUBA-2 map of the COSMOS field from the S2COSMOS survey, as a pilot study for AS2COSMOS - a full survey of the ~1,000 sources in this field. In this pilot we have obtained 870-um continuum maps of an essentially complete sample of the brightest 182 sub-millimetre sources (S_850um=6.2mJy) in COSMOS. Our ALMA maps detect 260 sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) spanning a range in flux density of S_870um=0.7-19.2mJy. We detect more than one SMG counterpart in 34+/-2 per cent of sub-millimetre sources, increasing to 53+/-8 per cent for SCUBA-2 sources brighter than S_850um>12mJy. We estimate that approximately one-third of these SMG-SMG pairs are physically associated (with a higher rate for the brighter secondary SMGs, S_870um>3mJy), and illustrate this with the serendipitous detection of bright [CII] 157.74um line emission in two SMGs, AS2COS0001.1 & 0001.2 at z=4.63, associated with the highest significance single-dish source. Using our source catalogue we construct the interferometric 870um number counts at S_870um>6.2mJy. We use the extensive archival data of this field to construct the multiwavelength spectral energy distribution of each AS2COSMOS SMG, and subsequently model this emission with MAGPHYS to estimate their photometric redshifts. We find a median photometric redshift for the S_870um>6.2mJy AS2COSMOS sample of z=2.87+/-0.08, and clear evidence for an increase in the median redshift with 870-um flux density suggesting strong evolution in the bright-end of the 870um luminosity function.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.04944  [pdf] - 2069111
Potential Vorticity Mixing in a Tangled Magnetic Field
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2020-03-10
A theory of potential vorticity (PV) mixing in a disordered (tangled) magnetic field is presented. The analysis is in the context of $\beta$-plane MHD, with a special focus on the physics of momentum transport in the stably stratified, quasi-2D solar tachocline. A physical picture of mean PV evolution by vorticity advection and tilting of magnetic fields is proposed. In the case of weak-field perturbations, quasi-linear theory predicts that the Reynolds and magnetic stresses balance as turbulence Alfv\'enizes for a larger mean magnetic field. Jet formation is explored quantitatively in the mean field-resistivity parameter space. However, since even a modest mean magnetic field leads to large magnetic perturbations for large magnetic Reynolds number, the physically relevant case is that of a strong but disordered field. We show that numerical calculations indicate that the Reynolds stress is modified well before Alfv\'enization -- i.e. before fluid and magnetic energies balance. To understand these trends, a double-average model of PV mixing in a stochastic magnetic field is developed. Calculations indicate that mean-square fields strongly modify Reynolds stress phase coherence and also induce a magnetic drag on zonal flows. The physics of transport reduction by tangled fields is elucidated and linked to the related quench of turbulent resistivity. We propose a physical picture of the system as a resisto-elastic medium threaded by a tangled magnetic network. Applications of the theory to momentum transport in the tachocline and other systems are discussed in detail.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.03669  [pdf] - 2060725
SCUBA-2 Ultra Deep Imaging Eao Survey (Studies) III: Multi-wavelength properties, luminosity functions and preliminary source catalog of 450-$\mu$m-selected galaxies
Comments: Published in the ApJ
Submitted: 2019-12-08, last modified: 2020-03-08
We construct a SCUBA-2 450-$\mu$m map in the COSMOS field that covers an area of 300 arcmin$^{2}$ and reaches a 1$\sigma$ noise level of 0.65 mJy in the deepest region. We extract 256 sources detected at 450 $\mu$m with signal-to-noise ratio $>$ 4.0 and analyze the physical properties of their multi-wavelength counterparts. We find that most of the sources are at $z\lesssim3$, with a median of $z = 1.79^{+0.03}_{-0.15}$. About $35^{+32}_{-25}$% of our sources are classified as starburst galaxies based on their total star-formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses ($M_{\ast}$). By fitting the far-infrared spectral energy distributions, we find that our 450-$\mu$m-selected sample has a wide range of dust temperatures (20 K $ \lesssim T_{\rm d} \lesssim$ 60 K), with a median of ${T}_{\rm d} = 38.3^{+0.4}_{-0.9}$ K. We do not find a redshift evolution in dust temperature for sources with $L_{\rm IR}$ > $10^{12}$ $\rm L_\odot$ at $z<3$. However, we find a moderate correlation where dust temperature increases with the deviation from the SFR-$M_{\ast}$ relation. The increase in dust temperature also correlates with optical morphology, which is consistent with merger-triggered starbursts in sub-millimeter galaxies. Our galaxies do not show the tight IRX-$\beta_{\rm UV}$ correlation that has been observed in the local Universe. We construct the infrared luminosity functions of our 450-$\mu$m sources and measure their comoving SFR densities. The contribution of the $L_{\rm IR}$ > $10^{12}$ $\rm L_\odot$ population to the SFR density rises dramatically from $z$ = 0 to 2 ($\propto$ ($1+z$)$^{3.9\pm1.1}$) and dominates the total SFR density at $z \gtrsim 2$.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.03821  [pdf] - 2060952
Dirac-Born-Infeld realization of sound speed resonance mechanism for primordial black holes
Comments: 12 pages,9 figures
Submitted: 2020-03-08
We present a concrete realization of the sound speed resonance mechanism for primordial black hole formation within a specific model of Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) inflation. We perform a perturbative approach to phenomenologically construct such a viable DBI inflation model that involves the non-oscillating stage and the oscillating stage, with a type of specific forms of the warp factor and the potential. We show that the continuous but non-smooth conjunction of sound speed between two stages does not yield manifest effects on the phenomenology of SSR, and thus, our model gives rise to the same PBH mass spectrum as the original predictions of SSR. Making use of observational data, we derive various cosmological constraints on the parameter space. Our analyses show that, the predicted tensor-to-scalar ratio is typically small, while the amplitude of primordial non-Gaussianity can meet with CMB bounds, and additionally, the consistency relation for single-field slow-roll inflation is softly violated in our case due to the small sound speed variations.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.01781  [pdf] - 2065464
Formation of the polar debris disc around 99 Herculis
Comments: 13 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-03-03
We investigate the formation mechanism for the observed nearly polar aligned (perpendicular to the binary orbital plane) debris ring around the eccentric orbit binary 99 Herculis. An initially inclined nonpolar debris ring or disc will not remain flat and will not evolve to a polar configuration, due to the effects of differential nodal precession that alter its flat structure. However, a gas disc with embedded well coupled solids around the eccentric binary may evolve to a polar configuration as a result of pressure forces that maintain the disc flatness and as a result of viscous dissipation that allows the disc to increase its tilt. Once the gas disc disperses, the debris disc is in a polar aligned state in which there is little precession. We use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, linear theory, and particle dynamics to study the evolution of a misaligned circumbinary gas disc and explore the effects of the initial disc tilt, mass, and size. We find that for a wide range of parameter space, the polar alignment timescale is shorter than the lifetime of the gas disc. Using the observed level of alignment of 3 deg. from polar, we place an upper limit on the mass of the gas disc of about 0.014 M_sun at the time of gas dispersal. We conclude that the polar debris disc around 99 Her can be explained as the result of an initially moderately inclined gas disc with embedded solids. Such a disc may provide an environment for the formation of polar planets.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.09918  [pdf] - 2056818
Search for PeV Gamma-Ray Emission from the Southern Hemisphere with 5 Years of Data from the IceCube Observatory
Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Steinmüller, P.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments: 22 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2019-08-26, last modified: 2020-03-02
The measurement of diffuse PeV gamma-ray emission from the Galactic plane would provide information about the energy spectrum and propagation of Galactic cosmic rays, and the detection of a point-like source of PeV gamma rays would be strong evidence for a Galactic source capable of accelerating cosmic rays up to at least a few PeV. This paper presents several un-binned maximum likelihood searches for PeV gamma rays in the Southern Hemisphere using 5 years of data from the IceTop air shower surface detector and the in-ice array of the IceCube Observatory. The combination of both detectors takes advantage of the low muon content and deep shower maximum of gamma-ray air showers, and provides excellent sensitivity to gamma rays between $\sim$0.6 PeV and 100 PeV. Our measurements of point-like and diffuse Galactic emission of PeV gamma rays are consistent with background, so we constrain the angle-integrated diffuse gamma-ray flux from the Galactic Plane at 2 PeV to $2.61 \times 10^{-19}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ TeV$^{-1}$ at 90% confidence, assuming an E$^{-3}$ spectrum, and we estimate 90% upper limits on point-like emission at 2 PeV between 10$^{-21}$ - 10$^{-20}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ TeV$^{-1}$ for an E$^{-2}$ spectrum, depending on declination. Furthermore, we exclude unbroken power-law emission up to 2 PeV for several TeV gamma-ray sources observed by H.E.S.S., and calculate upper limits on the energy cutoffs of these sources at 90% confidence. We also find no PeV gamma rays correlated with neutrinos from IceCube's high-energy starting event sample. These are currently the strongest constraints on PeV gamma-ray emission.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.00121  [pdf] - 2081013
Large-scale multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations for astrophysics: n=4 levels in P-like ions from Mn~XI to Ni~XIV
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-02-28
Using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock and the relativistic configuration interaction methods, a consistent set of transition energies and radiative transition data for the lowest 546 (623, 701, 745) states of the $3p^4 3d$, $3s 3p^2 3d^2$, $3s 3p^3 4p$, $3s 3p^4$, $3s^2 3d^3$, $3s^2 3p^2 3d$, $3s^2 3p^2 4d$, $3s^2 3p^2 4s$, $3p^3 3d^2$, $3p^5$, $3s 3p 3d^3$, $3s 3p^3 3d$, $3s 3p^3 4s$, $3s^2 3p 3d^2$, %$3s^2 3p^2 4f$, $3s^2 3p^2 4p$, $3s^2 3p^3$ configurations in Mn~XI (Fe~XII, Co~XIII, Ni~XIV) is provided. The comparison between calculated excitation energies for the $n=4$ states and available experimental values for Fe XII indicate that the calculations are highly accurate, with uncertainties of only a few hundred cm$^{-1}$. Lines from these states are prominent in the soft X-rays. With the present calculations, several recent new identifications are confirmed. Other identifications involving $3p^2 4d$ levels in Fe~XII that were found questionable are discussed and a few new assignments are recommended. As some $n=4$ states of the other ions also show large discrepancies between experimental and calculated energies, we reassess their identification. The present study provides highly accurate atomic data for the $n=4$ states of P-like ions of astrophysical interest, for which experimental data are scarce.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.04751  [pdf] - 2050452
Asteroid belt survival through stellar evolution: dependence on the stellar mass
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2020-02-11
Polluted white dwarfs are generally accreting terrestrial-like material that may originate from a debris belt like the asteroid belt in the solar system. The fraction of white dwarfs that are polluted drops off significantly for white dwarfs with masses $M_{\rm WD}\gtrsim 0.8\,\rm M_\odot$. This implies that asteroid belts and planetary systems around main-sequence stars with mass $M_{\rm MS}\gtrsim 3\,\rm M_\odot$ may not form because of the intense radiation from the star. This is in agreement with current debris disc and exoplanet observations. The fraction of white dwarfs that show pollution also drops off significantly for low mass white dwarfs $(M_{\rm WD}\lesssim 0.55\,\rm M_\odot)$. However, the low-mass white dwarfs that do show pollution are not currently accreting but have accreted in the past. We suggest that asteroid belts around main sequence stars with masses $M_{\rm MS}\lesssim 2\,\rm M_\odot$ are not likely to survive the stellar evolution process. The destruction likely occurs during the AGB phase and could be the result of interactions of the asteroids with the stellar wind, the high radiation or, for the lowest mass stars that have an unusually close-in asteroid belt, scattering during the tidal orbital decay of the inner planetary system.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.03545  [pdf] - 2065419
Extended H$\alpha$ over compact far-infrared continuum in dusty submillimeter galaxies -- Insights into dust distributions and star-formation rates at $z\sim2$
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures, A&A in press
Submitted: 2020-02-09
Using data from ALMA and near-infrared (NIR) integral field spectrographs including both SINFONI and KMOS on the VLT, we investigate the two-dimensional distributions of H$\alpha$ and rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) continuum in six submillimeter galaxies at $z\sim2$. At a similar spatial resolution ($\sim$0.5" FWHM; $\sim$4.5 kpc at $z=2$), we find that the half-light radius of H$\alpha$ is significantly larger than that of the FIR continuum in half of the sample, and on average H$\alpha$ is a median factor of $2.0\pm0.4$ larger. Having explored various ways to correct for the attenuation, we find that the attenuation-corrected H$\alpha$-based SFRs are systematically lower than the IR-based SFRs by at least a median factor of $3\pm1$, which cannot be explained by the difference in half-light radius alone. In addition, we find that in 40% of cases the total $V$-band attenuation ($A_V$) derived from energy balance modeling of the full ultraviolet(UV)-to-FIR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) is significantly higher than that derived from SED modeling using only the UV-to-NIR part of the SEDs, and the discrepancy appears to increase with increasing total infrared luminosity. Finally, considering all our findings along with the studies in the literature, we postulate that the dust distributions in SMGs, and possibly also in less IR luminous $z\sim2$ massive star-forming galaxies, can be decomposed into three main components; the diffuse dust heated by older stellar populations, the more obscured and extended young star-forming HII regions, and the heavily obscured central regions that have a low filling factor but dominate the infrared luminosity in which the majority of attenuation cannot be probed via UV-to-NIR emissions.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.04983  [pdf] - 2047669
In-Flight Performance of the Advanced Radiation Detector for UAV Operations (ARDUO)
Comments: 24 pages, 8 figures, presented at SORMA XVII 2018 and published in NIMA
Submitted: 2020-02-01
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is responsible for the provision of aerial radiometric surveys in the event of a radiological or nuclear emergency in Canada. Manned aerial surveys are an essential element of the planned consequence management operation, as demonstrated by the recovery work following the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, and their effects in Fukushima, Japan. Flying lower and slower than manned aircraft, an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) can provide improved spatial resolution. In particular, hot spot activity can be underestimated in manned survey results as the higher flight altitude and wider line spacing effectively average the hot spot over a larger area. Moreover, a UAV can enter an area which is hazardous for humans. NRCan has been investigating the inclusion of UAV-borne radiation survey spectrometers into its aerial survey response procedures. The Advanced Radiation Detector for UAV Operations (ARDUO) was developed to exploit the flight and lift capabilities available in the under 25kg class of UAVs. The detector features eight 2.8cm x 2.8cm x 5.6cm CsI(Tl) crystals in a self-shielding configuration, read out with silicon photomultipliers and digitized using miniaturized custom electronics. The ARDUO is flown on a main- and tail-rotor UAV called Responder which has a 6kg lift capacity and up to 40min. endurance. The performance of the ARDUO-Responder UAV system was characterized in both lab and outdoor trials. Outdoor trials consisted of aerial surveys over sealed point sources and over a distributed source. Results show how the directional response of the ARDUO can provide an indication in real time of source location for in-flight guidance. As well, the results show how use of the directional information in post-acquisition processing can result in improved spatial resolution of radiation features for both point and distributed sources.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.09520  [pdf] - 2037624
Characteristics of the diffuse astrophysical electron and tau neutrino flux with six years of IceCube high energy cascade data
IceCube Collaboration; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fox, D.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Grégoire, T.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halliday, R.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Jansson, M.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mari{ş}, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nisa, M. U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Rehman, A.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Santen, J.; Verpoest, S.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments: 4 figures, 4 tables, includes supplementary material
Submitted: 2020-01-26
We report on the first measurement of the astrophysical neutrino flux using particle showers (cascades) in IceCube data from 2010 -- 2015. Assuming standard oscillations, the astrophysical neutrinos in this dedicated cascade sample are dominated ($\sim 90 \%$) by electron and tau flavors. The flux, observed in the energy range from $16\,\mathrm{TeV} $ to $2.6\,\mathrm{PeV}$, is consistent with a single power-law as expected from Fermi-type acceleration of high energy particles at astrophysical sources. We find the flux spectral index to be $\gamma=2.53\pm0.07$ and a flux normalization for each neutrino flavor of $\phi_{astro} = 1.66^{+0.25}_{-0.27}$ at $E_{0} = 100\, \mathrm{TeV}$. This flux of electron and tau neutrinos is in agreement with IceCube muon neutrino results and with all-neutrino flavor results. Results from fits assuming more complex neutrino flux models suggest a flux softening at high energies and a flux hardening at low energies (p-value $\ge 0.06$).
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.0670  [pdf] - 2031895
Prospects for Observing and Localizing Gravitational-Wave Transients with Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo and KAGRA
The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; the KAGRA Collaboration; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abraham, S.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Akutsu, T.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Aloy, M. A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Ando, M.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Arai, Koya; Arai, Y.; Araki, S.; Araya, A.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arène, M.; Aritomi, N.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aubin, F.; Aufmuth, P.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avendano, V.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Badaracco, F.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S. W.; Bae, Y. B.; Baiotti, L.; Bajpai, R.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Beniwal, D.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bernuzzi, S.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhandare, R.; Bidler, J.; Bilenko, I. A.; Bilgili, S. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Boetzel, Y.; Bogaert, G.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Booker, P.; Boom, B. A.; Booth, C. D.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bossilkov, V.; Bosveld, J.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Bramley, A.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Briggs, J. H.; Brighenti, F.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderón; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campbell, W. A.; Canepa, M.; Cannon, K.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Carullo, G.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chakravarti, K.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chan, M. L.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E. A.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Chaturvedi, M.; Chatziioannou, K.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, C. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, K. H.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. R.; Cheng, H. -P.; Cheong, C. K.; Chia, H. Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, G.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Christensen, N.; Chu, H. Y.; Chu, Q.; Chu, Y. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciobanu, A. A.; Ciolfi, R.; Cipriano, F.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Cohen, D.; Colgan, R.; Colleoni, M.; Collette, C. G.; Collins, C.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Cotesta, R.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Croquette, M.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Datrier, L. E. H.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Deenadayalan, M.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; DeMarchi, L. M.; Demos, N.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Derby, J.; De Rosa, R.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Dietrich, T.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Ding, B.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Dmitriev, A.; Doctor, Z.; Doi, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducoin, J. -G.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Easter, P. J.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eguchi, S.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenmann, M.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Enomoto, Y.; Essick, R. C.; Estelles, H.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fazio, M.; Fee, C.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Feng, F.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferreira, T. A.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fishner, J. M.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Flynn, E.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujii, Y.; Fukunaga, M.; Fukushima, M.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia, A.; García-Quirós, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Ge, G. G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giacomazzo, B.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Giordano, G.; Glover, L.; Godwin, P.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Goncharov, B.; González, G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Grassia, P.; Gray, C.; Gray, R.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Green, R.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Gulati, H. K.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Haegel, L.; Hagiwara, A.; Haino, S.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hasegawa, K.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Hayama, K.; Hayes, F. J.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Himemoto, Y.; Hinderer, T.; Hiranuma, Y.; Hirata, N.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hochheim, S.; Hofman, D.; Holgado, A. M.; Holland, N. A.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hoy, C. G.; Hreibi, A.; Hsieh, B. H.; Huang, G. Z.; Huang, P. W.; Huang, Y. J.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Hulko, M.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idzkowski, B.; Iess, A.; Ikenoue, B.; Imam, S.; Inayoshi, K.; Ingram, C.; Inoue, Y.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Ioka, K.; Irwin, B.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Itoh, Y.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jadhav, S. J.; Jani, K.; Janthalur, N. N.; Jaranowski, P.; Jenkins, A. C.; Jiang, J.; Johnson, D. S.; Jones, A. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Jung, K.; Jung, P.; Junker, J.; Kajita, T.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kamiizumi, M.; Kanda, N.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G. W.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kashyap, R.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kawaguchi, K.; Kawai, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Keerthana, N. V.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, H.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Khursheed, M.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, C.; Kim, J. C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y. -M.; Kimball, C.; Kimura, N.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kita, N.; Kitazawa, H.; Kleybolte, L.; Klika, J. H.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koekoek, G.; Kojima, Y.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Komori, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kong, A. K. H.; Kontos, A.; Koper, N.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kotake, K.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kozakai, C.; Kozu, R.; Kringel, V.; Krishnendu, N.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, Rahul; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kume, J.; Kuo, C. M.; Kuo, H. S.; Kuo, L.; Kuroyanagi, S.; Kusayanagi, K.; Kutynia, A.; Kwak, K.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Lam, T. L.; Landry, M.; Lane, B. B.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lecoeuche, Y. K.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, R. K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, J.; Li, K. J. L.; Li, T. G. F.; Li, X.; Lin, C. Y.; Lin, F.; Lin, F. L.; Lin, L. C. C.; Linde, F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, G. C.; Liu, J.; Liu, X.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Longo, A.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lower, M. E.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, L. W.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Macquet, A.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magaña; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malik, A.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marchio, M.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Marsat, S.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCann, J. J.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Mehta, A. K.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Mereni, L.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Michimura, Y.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Millhouse, M.; Mills, J. C.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Mio, N.; Mishkin, A.; Mishra, C.; Mistry, T.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyamoto, A.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyo, K.; Miyoki, S.; Mo, G.; Moffa, D.; Mogushi, K.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morisaki, S.; Moriwaki, Y.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muñiz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Nagano, K.; Nagano, S.; Nagar, A.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, H.; Nakano, M.; Nakashima, R.; Nardecchia, I.; Narikawa, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Negishi, R.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Ng, K. Y.; Ng, S.; Nguyen, P.; Ni, W. T.; Nichols, D.; Nishizawa, A.; Nissanke, S.; Nocera, F.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Obergaulinger, M.; Oberling, J.; O'Brien, B. D.; Obuchi, Y.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogaki, W.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohashi, M.; Ohishi, N.; Ohkawa, M.; Ohme, F.; Ohta, H.; Okada, M. A.; Okutomi, K.; Oliver, M.; Oohara, K.; Ooi, C. P.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R. G.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Oshino, S.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Pagano, G.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pan, K. C.; Pang, B.; Pang, H. F.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Park, J.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedersen, C.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pele, A.; Arellano, F. E. Peña; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Phukon, K. S.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Pong, D. Y. T.; Ponrathnam, S.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Powell, J.; Prajapati, A. K.; Prasad, J.; Prasai, K.; Prasanna, R.; Pratten, G.; Prestegard, T.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quinonez, P. J.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Radkins, H.; Radulescu, N.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rana, Javed; Rao, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Ricci, F.; Richardson, C. J.; Richardson, J. W.; Ricker, P. M.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romanelli, M.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rose, K.; Rosińska, D.; Rosofsky, S. G.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sago, N.; Saito, S.; Saito, Y.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakellariadou, M.; Sakuno, Y.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Santiago, K. A.; Sarin, N.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawada, T.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sennett, N.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Sharma, P.; Shawhan, P.; Shen, H.; Shibagaki, S.; Shimizu, R.; Shimoda, T.; Shimode, K.; Shink, R.; Shinkai, H.; Shishido, T.; Shoda, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; ShyamSundar, S.; Siellez, K.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, N.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Sitmukhambetov, S.; Skliris, V.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slaven-Blair, T. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Somiya, K.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Sotani, H.; Souradeep, T.; Sowell, E.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Srivastava, V.; Staats, K.; Stachie, C.; Standke, M.; Steer, D. A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stocks, D.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Sudhir, V.; Sugimoto, R.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Suzuki, Takamasa; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tagoshi, H.; Tait, S. C.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, R.; Takamori, A.; Takano, S.; Takeda, H.; Takeda, M.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Kenta; Tanaka, Taiki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Tanioka, S.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Martin, E. N. Tapia San; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, R.; Telada, S.; Thies, F.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thondapu, S. R.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, Shubhanshu; Tiwari, Srishti; Tiwari, V.; Toland, K.; Tomaru, T.; Tomigami, Y.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tringali, M. C.; Trovato, A.; Trozzo, L.; Trudeau, R.; Tsang, K. W.; Tsang, T. T. L.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsubono, K.; Tsuchida, S.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tsuzuki, T.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Uchikata, N.; Uchiyama, T.; Ueda, A.; Uehara, T.; Ueno, K.; Ueshima, G.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Uraguchi, F.; Urban, A. L.; Ushiba, T.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; Brand, J. F. J. van den; Broeck, C. Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Putten, M. H. P. M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vivanco, Francisco Hernandez; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warden, Z. A.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wellmann, F.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westhouse, J. W.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D. M.; Williams, D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, C. M.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, H. C.; Wu, S. R.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, L.; Xu, W. R.; Yamada, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kohei; Yamamoto, T.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yeeles, D. W.; Yokogawa, K.; Yokoyama, J.; Yokozawa, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yuen, S. H. R.; Yuzurihara, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A. K.; Zanolin, M.; Zeidler, S.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, T.; Zhao, C.; Zhao, Y.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zimmerman, A. B.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.
Comments: 52 pages, 9 figures, 5 tables. We have updated the detector sensitivities (including the A+ and AdV+ upgrade); added expectations for binary black-holes, neutron-star black-holes, and intermediate-mass black holes; and added 3D volume localization expectations. This update is to change some numbers in Table 5 based on refinements to the simulations. Three authors were added
Submitted: 2013-04-02, last modified: 2020-01-14
We present our current best estimate of the plausible observing scenarios for the Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo and KAGRA gravitational-wave detectors over the next several years, with the intention of providing information to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We estimate the sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals for the third (O3), fourth (O4) and fifth observing (O5) runs, including the planned upgrades of the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. We study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source for gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary systems of compact objects, that is BNS, NSBH, and BBH systems. The ability to localize the sources is given as a sky-area probability, luminosity distance, and comoving volume. The median sky localization area (90\% credible region) is expected to be a few hundreds of square degrees for all types of binary systems during O3 with the Advanced LIGO and Virgo (HLV) network. The median sky localization area will improve to a few tens of square degrees during O4 with the Advanced LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA (HLVK) network. We evaluate sensitivity and localization expectations for unmodeled signal searches, including the search for intermediate mass black hole binary mergers.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.02242  [pdf] - 2030731
KASHz: No evidence for ionised outflows instantaneously suppressing star formation in moderate luminosity AGN at $z$$\sim$$1.4$-$2.6$
Comments: Accepted for publication by MNRAS, 24 pages, 12 Figures
Submitted: 2020-01-07, last modified: 2020-01-14
As part of our KMOS AGN Survey at High-redshift (KASHz), we present spatially-resolved VLT/KMOS and VLT/SINFONI spectroscopic data and ALMA 870$\mu$m continuum imaging of eight $z$=1.4--2.6 moderate AGN ($L_{\rm 2-10 \rm kev}$ = $10^{42} - 10^{45}$ ergs s$^{-1}$). We map [OIII], H$\alpha$ and rest-frame FIR emission to search for any spatial anti-correlation between ionised outflows (traced by the [OIII] line) and star formation (SF; traced by H$\alpha$ and FIR), that has previously been claimed for some high-z AGN and used as evidence for negative and/or positive AGN feedback. Firstly, we conclude that H$\alpha$ is unreliable to map SF inside our AGN host galaxies based on: (i) SF rates inferred from attenuation-corrected H$\alpha$ can lie below those inferred from FIR; (ii) the FIR continuum is more compact than the H$\alpha$ emission by a factor of $\sim 2$ on average; (iii) in half of our sample, we observe significant spatial offsets between the FIR and H$\alpha$ emission, with an average offset of $1.4\pm0.6$ kpc. Secondly, for the five targets with outflows we find no evidence for a spatial anti-correlation between outflows and SF using either H$\alpha$ or FIR as a tracer. This holds for our re-analysis of a famous $z$=1.6 X-ray AGN (`XID 2028') where positive and negative feedback has been previously claimed. Based on our results, any impact on SF by ionised outflows must be subtle, either occurring on scales below our resolution, or on long timescales.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.05081  [pdf] - 2032040
Inner-Heliosphere Signatures of Ion-Scale Dissipation and Nonlinear Interaction
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-01-14
We perform a statistical study of the turbulent power spectrum at inertial and kinetic scales observed during the first perihelion encounter of Parker Solar Probe. We find that often there is an extremely steep scaling range of the power spectrum just above the ion-kinetic scales, similar to prior observations at 1 AU, with a power-law index of around $-4$. Based on our measurements, we demonstrate that either a significant ($>50\%$) fraction of the total turbulent energy flux is dissipated in this range of scales, or the characteristic nonlinear interaction time of the turbulence decreases dramatically from the expectation based solely on the dispersive nature of nonlinearly interacting kinetic Alfv\'en waves.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.04412  [pdf] - 2029868
ANTARES and IceCube Combined Search for Neutrino Point-like and Extended Sources in the Southern Sky
ANTARES Collaboration; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J. -J.; Aublin, J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Belhorma, B.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bissinger, M.; Boumaaza, J.; Bourret, S.; Bouta, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brânzaş, H.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chabab, M.; Chau, T. N.; Moursli, R. Cherkaoui El; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coleiro, A.; Colomer, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Díaz, A. F.; de Wasseige, G.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Di Palma, I.; Domi, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Bojaddaini, I. El; Khayati, N. El; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ettahiri, A.; Fassi, F.; Fermani, P.; Ferrara, G.; Filippini, F.; Fusco, L.; Gay, P.; Glotin, H.; Gozzini, R.; Ruiz, R. Gracia; Graf, K.; Guidi, C.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; de Jong, P.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Khan-Chowdhury, N. R.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Breton, R. Le; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Levi, G.; Lincetto, M.; Lopez-Coto, D.; Loucatos, S.; Maggi, G.; Manczak, J.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Migliozzi, P.; Moser, M.; Moussa, A.; Muller, R.; Nauta, L.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Nielsen, C.; Nuñez-Castiñeyra, A.; O'Fearraigh, B.; Organokov, M.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Piattelli, P.; Poirè, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Quinn, L.; Randazzo, N.; Riccobene, G.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Salah-Eddine, A.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schüssler, F.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Strandberg, B.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Thakore, T.; Tingay, S. J.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Versari, F.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Wilms, J.; Zaborov, D.; Zegarelli, A.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Collaboration, IceCube; :; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fox, D.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Grégoire, T.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halliday, R.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Jansson, M.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nisa, M. U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pieper, S.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Santen, J.; Verpoest, S.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-01-13
A search for point-like and extended sources of cosmic neutrinos using data collected by the ANTARES and IceCube neutrino telescopes is presented. The data set consists of all the track-like and shower-like events pointing in the direction of the Southern Sky included in the nine-year ANTARES point-source analysis, combined with the through-going track-like events used in the seven-year IceCube point-source search. The advantageous field of view of ANTARES and the large size of IceCube are exploited to improve the sensitivity in the Southern Sky by a factor $\sim$2 compared to both individual analyses. In this work, the Southern Sky is scanned for possible excesses of spatial clustering, and the positions of preselected candidate sources are investigated. In addition, special focus is given to the region around the Galactic Centre, whereby a dedicated search at the location of SgrA* is performed, and to the location of the supernova remnant RXJ 1713.7-3946. No significant evidence for cosmic neutrino sources is found and upper limits on the flux from the various searches are presented.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.00402  [pdf] - 2038426
An ALMA survey of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey UKIDSS/UDS field: Dust attenuation in high-redshift Lyman break Galaxies
Comments: 17 pages, 12 figures. Resubmitted to MNRAS after referee report
Submitted: 2020-01-02
We analyse 870um Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA) dust continuum detections of 41 canonically-selected z~3 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs), as well as 209 ALMA-undetected LBGs, in follow-up of SCUBA-2 mapping of the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field. We find that our ALMA-bright LBGs lie significantly off the locally calibrated IRX-beta relation and tend to have relatively bluer rest-frame UV slopes (as parametrised by beta), given their high values of the 'infrared excess' (IRX=L_IR/L_UV), relative to the average 'local' IRX-beta relation. We attribute this finding in part to the young ages of the underlying stellar populations but we find that the main reason behind the unusually blue UV slopes are the relatively shallow slopes of the corresponding dust attenuation curves. We show that, when stellar masses are being established via SED fitting, it is absolutely crucial to allow the attenuation curves to vary (rather than fixing it on Calzetti-like law), where we find that the inappropriate curves may underestimate the resulting stellar masses by a factor of ~2-3x on average. In addition, we find these LBGs to have relatively high specific star-formation rates (sSFRs), dominated by the dust component, as quantified via the fraction of obscured star formation ( f_obs = SFR_IR/SFR_(UV+IR)). We conclude that the ALMA-bright LBGs are, by selection, massive galaxies undergoing a burst of a star formation (large sSFRs, driven, for example, by secular or merger processes), with a likely geometrical disconnection of the dust and stars, responsible for producing shallow dust attenuation curves.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.13135  [pdf] - 2021415
Searches for neutrinos from cosmic-ray interactions in the Sun using seven years of IceCube data
IceCube Collaboration; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fox, D.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Grégoire, T.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halliday, R.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Jansson, M.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mari{ş}, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nisa, M. U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pieper, S.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Rehman, A.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Santen, J.; Verpoest, S.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments: 25 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2019-12-30
Cosmic-ray interactions with the solar atmosphere are expected to produce particle showers which in turn produce neutrinos from weak decays of mesons. These solar atmospheric neutrinos (SA$\nu$s) have never been observed experimentally. A detection would be an important step in understanding cosmic-ray propagation in the inner solar system and the dynamics of solar magnetic fields. SA$\nu$s also represent an irreducible background to solar dark matter searches and a detection would allow precise characterization of this background. Here, we present the first experimental search based on seven years of data collected from May 2010 to May 2017 in the austral winter with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. An unbinned likelihood analysis is performed for events reconstructed within 5 degrees of the center of the Sun. No evidence for a SA$\nu$ flux is observed. After inclusion of systematic uncertainties, we set a 90\% upper limit of $1.02^{+0.20}_{-0.18}\cdot10^{-13}$~$\mathrm{GeV^{-1}cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$ at 1 TeV.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.07826  [pdf] - 2021275
Nature and Origins of Rich Complexes of C IV Associated Absorption Lines
Comments: 23 pages, 8 figures, 7 tables. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1809.05433
Submitted: 2019-12-17, last modified: 2019-12-29
Rich complexes of associated absorption lines (AALs) in quasar spectra provide unique information about gaseous infall, outflows, and feedback processes in quasar environments. We study five quasars at redshifts 3.1 to 4.4 with AAL complexes containing from 7 to 18 CIV 1548, 1551 systems in high-resolution spectra. These complexes span velocity ranges $\lesssim$3600 km/s within $\lesssim$8200 km/s of the quasar redshifts. All are highly ionised with no measurable low-ionisation ions like SiII or CII, and all appear to form in the quasar/host galaxy environments based on evidence for line locking, partial covering of the background light source, strong NV absorption, and/or roughly solar metallicities, and on the implausibility of such complexes forming in unrelated intervening galaxies. Most of the lines in all five complexes identify high-speed quasar-driven outflows at velocity shifts $v\lesssim -1000$ km/s. Four of the complexes also have lines at smaller blueshifted velocities that might form in ambient interstellar clouds, low-speed outflows or at feedback interfaces in the host galaxies where high-speed winds impact and shred interstellar clouds. The partial covering we measure in some of the high-speed outflow lines require small absorbing clouds with characteristic sizes $\lesssim$1 pc or $\lesssim$0.01 pc. The short survival times of these clouds require locations very close to the quasars, or cloud creation in situ at larger distances perhaps via feedback/cloud-shredding processes. The AAL complex in one quasar, J1008+3623, includes unusually narrow CIV systems at redshifted velocities $350\lesssim v\lesssim640$ km/s that are excellent candidates for gaseous infall towards the quasar, e.g., ''cold-mode" accretion or a gravitationally-bound galactic fountain.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.11515  [pdf] - 2030713
Structural and Dynamical Analysis of 0.1pc Cores and Filaments in the 30~Doradus-10 Giant Molecular Cloud
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-12-24
High-resolution ($<$0.1pc) ALMA observations of the 30Dor-10 molecular cloud 15pc north of R136 are presented. The $^{12}$CO 2-1 emission morphology contains clumps near the locations of known mid-infrared massive protostars, as well as a series of parsec-long filaments oriented almost directly towards R136. There is elevated kinetic energy (linewidths at a given size scale) in 30Dor-10 compared to other LMC and Galactic star formation regions, consistent with large scale energy injection to the region. Analysis of the cloud substructures is performed by segmenting emission into disjoint approximately round "cores" using clumpfind, by considering the hierarchical structures defined by isointensity contours using dendrograms, and by segmenting into disjoint long thin "filaments" using Filfinder. Identified filaments have widths $\sim$0.1pc. The inferred balance between gravity and kinematic motions depends on the segmentation method: Entire objects identified with clumpfind are consistent with free-fall collapse or virial equilibrium with moderate external pressure, whereas many dendrogram-identified parts of hierarchical structures have higher mass surface densities $\Sigma_{LTE}$ than if gravitational and kinetic energies were in balance. Filaments have line masses that vary widely compared to the critical line mass calculated assuming thermal and nonthermal support. Velocity gradients in the region do not show any strong evidence for accretion of mass along filaments. The upper end of the "core" mass distribution is consistent with a power-law with the same slope as the stellar initial mass function.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.04400  [pdf] - 2018187
An ALMA view of molecular filaments in the Large Magellanic Cloud II: An early stage of high-mass star formation embedded at colliding clouds in N159W-South
Comments: Comments: 15 pages, 6 figures; Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-11-11, last modified: 2019-12-20
We have conducted ALMA CO isotopes and 1.3 mm continuum observations toward filamentary molecular clouds of the N159W-South region in the Large Magellanic Cloud with an angular resolution of $\sim$0"25 ($\sim$0.07 pc). Although the previous lower-resolution ($\sim$1") ALMA observations revealed that there is a high-mass protostellar object at an intersection of two line-shaped filaments in $^{13}$CO with the length scale of $\sim$10 pc, the spatially resolved observations, in particular, toward the highest column density part traced by the 1.3 mm continuum emission, the N159W-South clump, show complicated hub-filamentary structures. We also discovered that there are multiple protostellar sources with bipolar outflows along the massive filament. The redshifted/blueshifted components of the $^{13}$CO emission around the massive filaments/protostars have complementary distributions, which is considered to be a possible piece of evidence for a cloud-cloud collision. We propose a new scenario in which the supersonically colliding gas flow triggers the formation of both the massive filament and protostars. This is a modification of the earlier scenario of cloud-cloud collision, by Fukui et al., that postulated the two filamentary clouds occur prior to the high-mass star formation. A recent theoretical study of the shock compression in colliding molecular flows by Inoue et al. demonstrates that the formation of filaments with hub structure is a usual outcome of the collision, lending support for the present scenario. The theory argues that the filaments are formed as dense parts in a shock compressed sheet-like layer, which resembles $"$an umbrella with pokes.$"$
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.00812  [pdf] - 2018186
An ALMA view of molecular filaments in the Large Magellanic Cloud I: The formation of high-mass stars and pillars in the N159E-Papillon Nebula triggered by a cloud-cloud collision
Comments: 18 pages, 9 figures, Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-11-02, last modified: 2019-12-20
We present the ALMA observations of CO isotopes and 1.3 mm continuum emission toward the N159E-Papillon Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The spatial resolution is 0"25-0"28 (0.06-0.07 pc), which is a factor of 3 higher than the previous ALMA observations in this region. The high resolution allowed us to resolve highly filamentary CO distributions with typical widths of $\sim$0.1 pc (full width half maximum) and line masses of a few 100 $M_{\odot}$ pc$^{-1}$. The filaments (more than ten in number) show an outstanding hub-filament structure emanating from the nebular center toward the north. We identified for the first time two massive protostellar outflows of $\sim$10$^4$ yr dynamical age along one of the most massive filaments. The observations also revealed several pillar-like CO features around the Nebula. The H II region and the pillars have a complementary spatial distribution and the column density of the pillars is an order of magnitude higher than that of the pillars in the Eagle nebula (M16) in the Galaxy, suggesting an early stage of pillar formation with an age younger than $\sim$10$^5$ yr. We suggest that a cloud-cloud collision triggered the formation of the filaments and protostar within the last $\sim$2 Myr. It is possible that the collision is more recent, as part of the kpc-scale H I flows come from the tidal interaction resulting from the close encounter between the LMC and SMC $\sim$200 Myr ago as suggested for R136 by Fukui et al.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.07823  [pdf] - 2050308
Cross Helicity Reversals In Magnetic Switchbacks
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-12-17
We consider 2D joint distributions of normalised residual energy $\sigma_r(s,t)$ and cross helicity $\sigma_c(s,t)$ during one day of Parker Solar Probe's (PSP's) first encounter as a function of wavelet scale $s$. The broad features of the distributions are similar to previous observations made by HELIOS in slow solar wind, namely well correlated and fairly Alfv\'enic, except for a population with negative cross helicity which is seen at shorter wavelet scales. We show that this population is due to the presence of magnetic switchbacks, brief periods where the magnetic field polarity reverses. Such switchbacks have been observed before, both in HELIOS data and in Ulysses data in the polar solar wind. Their abundance and short timescales as seen by PSP in its first encounter is a new observation, and their precise origin is still unknown. By analysing these MHD invariants as a function of wavelet scale we show that MHD waves do indeed follow the local mean magnetic field through switchbacks, with net Elsasser flux propagating inward during the field reversal, and that they therefore must be local kinks in the magnetic field and not due to small regions of opposite polarity on the surface of the Sun. Such observations are important to keep in mind as computing cross helicity without taking into account the effect of switchbacks may result in spurious underestimation of $\sigma_c$ as PSP gets closer to the Sun in later orbits.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.06945  [pdf] - 2050229
Design and Performance of the first IceAct Demonstrator at the South Pole
Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Bartos, I.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Bohmer, M.; Börner, M.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; DuVernois, M. A.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evans, J. J.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Farrag, K.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fox, D.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gartner, A.; Gerhardt, L.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halliday, R.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haugen, J.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, B.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Holzapfel, K.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Huege, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kalekin, O.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katori, T.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krauss, C. B.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; LoSecco, J.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mandalia, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Nakarmi, P.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nisa, M. U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Papp, L.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Petersen, T. C.; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riegel, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sandstrom, P.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Steinmüller, P.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Taketa, A.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Veberic, D.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Wren, S.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.; Bretz, T.; Rädel, L.; Schoenen, S.; Schumacher, J.
Comments: Submitted to JINST
Submitted: 2019-10-15, last modified: 2019-12-11
In this paper we describe the first results of a compact imaging air-Cherenkov telescope, IceAct, operating in coincidence with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory (IceCube) at the geographic South Pole. An array of IceAct telescopes (referred to as the IceAct project) is under consideration as part of the IceCube-Gen2 extension to IceCube. Surface detectors in general will be a powerful tool in IceCube-Gen2 for distinguishing astrophysical neutrinos from the dominant backgrounds of cosmic-ray induced atmospheric muons and neutrinos: the IceTop array is already in place as part of IceCube, but has a high energy threshold. Although the duty cycle will be lower for the IceAct telescopes than the present IceTop tanks, the IceAct telescopes may prove to be more effective at lowering the detection threshold for air showers. Additionally, small imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes in combination with IceTop, the deep IceCube detector or other future detector systems might improve measurements of the composition of the cosmic ray energy spectrum. In this paper we present measurements of a first 7-pixel imaging air Cherenkov telescope demonstrator, proving the capability of this technology to measure air showers at the South Pole in coincidence with IceTop and the deep IceCube detector.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.02653  [pdf] - 2046371
The Enhancement of Proton Stochastic Heating in the near-Sun Solar Wind
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-12-05
Stochastic heating is a non-linear heating mechanism driven by the violation of magnetic moment invariance due to large-amplitude turbulent fluctuations producing diffusion of ions towards higher kinetic energies in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. It is frequently invoked as a mechanism responsible for the heating of ions in the solar wind. Here, we quantify for the first time the proton stochastic heating rate $Q_\perp$ at radial distances from the Sun as close as $0.16$ au, using measurements from the first two Parker Solar Probe encounters. Our results for both the amplitude and radial trend of the heating rate, $Q_\perp \propto r^{-2.5}$, agree with previous results based on the Helios data set at heliocentric distances from 0.3 to 0.9 au. Also in agreement with previous results, $Q_\perp$ is significantly larger in the fast solar wind than in the slow solar wind. We identify the tendency in fast solar wind for cuts of the core proton velocity distribution transverse to the magnetic field to exhibit a flat-top shape. The observed distribution agrees with previous theoretical predictions for fast solar wind where stochastic heating is the dominant heating mechanism.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.02856  [pdf] - 2010702
Switchbacks in the near-Sun magnetic field: long memory and impact on the turbulence cascade
Comments: 10 figures, to appear in The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (2020)
Submitted: 2019-12-05
One of the most striking observations made by Parker Solar Probe during its first solar encounter is the omnipresence of rapid polarity reversals in a magnetic field that is otherwise mostly radial. These so-called switchbacks strongly affect the dynamics of the magnetic field. We concentrate here on their macroscopic properties. First, we find that these structures are self-similar, and have neither a characteristic magnitude, nor a characteristic duration. Their waiting time statistics shows evidence for aggregation. The associated long memory resides in their occurrence rate, and is not inherent to the background fluctuations. Interestingly, the spectral properties of inertial range turbulence differ inside and outside of switchback structures; in the latter the $1/f$ range extends to higher frequencies. These results suggest that outside of these structures we are in the presence of lower amplitude fluctuations with a shorter turbulent inertial range. We conjecture that these correspond to a pristine solar wind.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.02229  [pdf] - 2026503
The East Asian Observatory SCUBA--2 survey of the COSMOS field: unveiling 1147 bright sub-millimeter sources across 2.6 square degrees
Comments: Published in ApJ July 2019
Submitted: 2019-12-04
We present sensitive 850$\mu$m imaging of the COSMOS field using 640hr of new and archival observations taken with SCUBA-2 at the East Asian Observatory's James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The SCUBA-2 COSMOS survey (S2COSMOS) achieves a median noise level of $\sigma_{850\mu{\mathrm{m}}}$=1.2mJy/beam over an area of 1.6 sq. degree (MAIN; HST/ACS footprint), and $\sigma_{850\mu{\mathrm{m}}}$=1.7mJy/beam over an additional 1 sq. degree of supplementary (SUPP) coverage. We present a catalogue of 1020 and 127 sources detected at a significance level of >4$\sigma$ and >4.3$\sigma$ in the MAIN and SUPP regions, respectively, corresponding to a uniform 2% false-detection rate. We construct the single-dish 850$\mu$m number counts at $S_{850}$>2mJy and show that these S2COSMOS counts are in agreement with previous single-dish surveys, demonstrating that degree-scale fields are sufficient to overcome the effects of cosmic variance in the $S_{850}$=2-10mJy population. To investigate the properties of the galaxies identified by S2COSMOS sources we measure the surface density of near-infrared-selected galaxies around their positions and identify an average excess of 2.0$\pm$0.2 galaxies within a 13$''$ radius (~100kpc at $z$~2). The bulk of these galaxies represent near-infrared-selected SMGs and/or spatially-correlated sources and lie at a median photometric redshift of $z$=2.0$\pm$0.1. Finally, we perform a stacking analysis at sub-millimeter and far-infrared wavelengths of stellar-mass-selected galaxies ($M_{\star}$=10$^{10}$-10$^{12}{\rm M_{\odot}}$) from $z$=0-4, obtaining high-significance detections at 850um in all subsets (SNR=4-30), and investigate the relation between far-infrared luminosity, stellar mass, and the peak wavelength of the dust SED. The publication of this survey adds a new deep, uniform sub-millimeter layer to the wavelength coverage of this well-studied COSMOS field.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.02361  [pdf] - 2050283
Ion Scale Electromagnetic Waves in the Inner Heliosphere
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-12-04
Understanding the physical processes in the solar wind and corona which actively contribute to heating, acceleration, and dissipation is a primary objective of NASA's Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission. Observations of coherent electromagnetic waves at ion scales suggests that linear cyclotron resonance and non-linear processes are dynamically relevant in the inner heliosphere. A wavelet-based statistical study of coherent waves in the first perihelion encounter of PSP demonstrates the presence of transverse electromagnetic waves at ion resonant scales which are observed in 30-50\% of radial field intervals. Average wave amplitudes of approximately 4 nT are measured, while the mean duration of wave events is of order 20 seconds; however long duration wave events can exist without interruption on hour-long timescales. Though ion scale waves are preferentially observed during intervals with a radial mean magnetic field, we show that measurement constraints, associated with single spacecraft sampling of quasi-parallel waves superposed with anisotropic turbulence, render the measured quasi-parallel ion-wave spectrum unobservable when the mean magnetic field is oblique to the solar wind flow; these results imply that the occurrence of coherent ion-scale waves is not limited to a radial field configuration. The lack of strong radial scaling of characteristic wave amplitudes and duration suggests that the waves are generated {\em{in-situ}} through plasma instabilities. Additionally, observations of proton distribution functions indicate that temperature anisotropy may drive the observed ion-scale waves.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.02348  [pdf] - 2041370
The Evolution and Role of Solar Wind Turbulence in the Inner Heliosphere
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-12-04
The first two orbits of the Parker Solar Probe (PSP) spacecraft have enabled the first in situ measurements of the solar wind down to a heliocentric distance of 0.17 au (or 36 Rs). Here, we present an analysis of this data to study solar wind turbulence at 0.17 au and its evolution out to 1 au. While many features remain similar, key differences at 0.17 au include: increased turbulence energy levels by more than an order of magnitude, a magnetic field spectral index of -3/2 matching that of the velocity and both Elsasser fields, a lower magnetic compressibility consistent with a smaller slow-mode kinetic energy fraction, and a much smaller outer scale that has had time for substantial nonlinear processing. There is also an overall increase in the dominance of outward-propagating Alfv\'enic fluctuations compared to inward-propagating ones, and the radial variation of the inward component is consistent with its generation by reflection from the large-scale gradient in Alfv\'en speed. The energy flux in this turbulence at 0.17 au was found to be ~10% of that in the bulk solar wind kinetic energy, becoming ~40% when extrapolated to the Alfv\'en point, and both the fraction and rate of increase of this flux towards the Sun is consistent with turbulence-driven models in which the solar wind is powered by this flux.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.00987  [pdf] - 2007458
Constraints on the Diffuse Flux of Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos from Four Years of Askaryan Radio Array Data in Two Stations
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2019-12-02
The Askaryan Radio Array is an ultra-high energy (UHE, $>10^{17}$\,eV) neutrino detector designed to observe neutrinos by searching for the radio waves emitted by the relativistic byproducts of neutrino-nucleon interactions in Antarctic ice. In this paper, we present constraints on the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos between $10^{16}-10^{21}$\,eV resulting from a search for neutrinos in two complementary analyses, both analyzing four years of data (2013-2016) from the two deep stations (A2, A3) operating at that time. We place a 90\% CL upper limit on the diffuse neutrino flux at $10^{18}$ eV of $EF(E)=3.9\times10^{-16}$~$\textrm{cm}^2$$\textrm{s}^{-1}$$\textrm{sr}^{-1}$. The analysis leverages more than quadruple the livetime of the previous ARA limit, and at this energy is the most sensitive reported by an in-ice radio neutrino detector by more than a factor of four. Looking forward, ARA has yet to analyze more than half of its archived data, and expects that dataset to double in size in the next three years as livetime accumulates in the full five-station array. With this additional livetime, we project ARA will have world-leading sensitivity to neutrinos above $10^{17}$ eV by 2022.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.00987  [pdf] - 2007458
Constraints on the Diffuse Flux of Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos from Four Years of Askaryan Radio Array Data in Two Stations
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2019-12-02
The Askaryan Radio Array is an ultra-high energy (UHE, $>10^{17}$\,eV) neutrino detector designed to observe neutrinos by searching for the radio waves emitted by the relativistic byproducts of neutrino-nucleon interactions in Antarctic ice. In this paper, we present constraints on the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos between $10^{16}-10^{21}$\,eV resulting from a search for neutrinos in two complementary analyses, both analyzing four years of data (2013-2016) from the two deep stations (A2, A3) operating at that time. We place a 90\% CL upper limit on the diffuse neutrino flux at $10^{18}$ eV of $EF(E)=3.9\times10^{-16}$~$\textrm{cm}^2$$\textrm{s}^{-1}$$\textrm{sr}^{-1}$. The analysis leverages more than quadruple the livetime of the previous ARA limit, and at this energy is the most sensitive reported by an in-ice radio neutrino detector by more than a factor of four. Looking forward, ARA has yet to analyze more than half of its archived data, and expects that dataset to double in size in the next three years as livetime accumulates in the full five-station array. With this additional livetime, we project ARA will have world-leading sensitivity to neutrinos above $10^{17}$ eV by 2022.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.00955  [pdf] - 2030547
An arm length stabilization system for KAGRA and future gravitational-wave detectors
Akutsu, T.; Ando, M.; Arai, K.; Arai, K.; Arai, Y.; Araki, S.; Araya, A.; Aritomi, N.; Aso, Y.; Bae, S.; Bae, Y.; Baiotti, L.; Bajpai, R.; Barton, M. A.; Cannon, K.; Capocasa, E.; Chan, M.; Chen, C.; Chen, K.; Chen, Y.; Chu, H.; Chu, Y-K.; Doi, K.; Eguchi, S.; Enomoto, Y.; Flaminio, R.; Fujii, Y.; Fukunaga, M.; Fukushima, M.; Ge, G.; Hagiwara, A.; Haino, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Hayama, K.; Himemoto, Y.; Hiranuma, Y.; Hirata, N.; Hirose, E.; Hong, Z.; Hsieh, B. H.; Huang, G-Z.; Huang, P.; Huang, Y.; Ikenoue, B.; Imam, S.; Inayoshi, K.; Inoue, Y.; Ioka, K.; Itoh, Y.; Izumi, K.; Jung, K.; Jung, P.; Kajita, T.; Kamiizumi, M.; Kanbara, S.; Kanda, N.; Kang, G.; Kawaguchi, K.; Kawai, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, C.; Kim, J. C.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y. -M.; Kimura, N.; Kita, N.; Kitazawa, H.; Kojima, Y.; Kokeyama, K.; Komori, K.; Kong, A. K. H.; Kotake, K.; Kozakai, C.; Kozu, R.; Kumar, R.; Kume, J.; Kuo, C.; Kuo, H-S.; Kuroyanagi, S.; Kusayanagi, K.; Kwak, K.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, R.; Leonardi, M.; Lin, L. C. -C.; Lin, C-Y.; Lin, F-L.; Liu, G. C.; Luo, L. -W.; Marchio, M.; Michimura, Y.; Mio, N.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyamoto, A.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyo, K.; Miyoki, S.; Morisaki, S.; Moriwaki, Y.; Musha, M.; Nagano, K.; Nagano, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, H.; Nakano, M.; Nakashima, R.; Narikawa, T.; Negishi, R.; Ni, W. -T.; Nishizawa, A.; Obuchi, Y.; Ogaki, W.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohashi, M.; Ohishi, N.; Ohkawa, M.; Ohmae, N.; Okutomi, K.; Oohara, K.; Ooi, C. P.; Oshino, S.; Pan, K.; Pang, H.; Park, J.; Arellano, F. E. Peña; Pinto, I.; Sago, N.; Saito, S.; Saito, Y.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sakuno, Y.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, T.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Shimizu, R.; Shimoda, T.; Shimode, K.; Shinkai, H.; Shishido, T.; Shoda, A.; Somiya, K.; Son, E. J.; Sotani, H.; Sugimoto, R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, T.; Tagoshi, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, R.; Takamori, A.; Takano, S.; Takeda, H.; Takeda, M.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, T.; Tanaka, T.; Tanioka, S.; Martin, E. N. Tapia San; Tatsumi, D.; Telada, S.; Tomaru, T.; Tomigami, Y.; Tomura, T.; Travasso, F.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, T.; Tsubono, K.; Tsuchida, S.; Tsuzuki, T.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Uchikata, N.; Uchiyama, T.; Ueda, A.; Uehara, T.; Ueno, K.; Ueshima, G.; Uraguchi, F.; Ushiba, T.; van Putten, M. H. P. M.; Vocca, H.; Wang, J.; Wu, C.; Wu, H.; Wu, S.; Xu, W-R.; Yamada, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Yokogawa, K.; Yokoyama, J.; Yokozawa, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Yuzurihara, H.; Zeidler, S.; Zhao, Y.; Zhu, Z. -H.
Comments: 21 pages, 8figures
Submitted: 2019-10-02, last modified: 2019-11-28
Modern ground-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors require a complex interferometer configuration with multiple coupled optical cavities. Since achieving the resonances of the arm cavities is the most challenging among the lock acquisition processes, the scheme called arm length stabilization (ALS) had been employed for lock acquisition of the arm cavities. We designed a new type of the ALS, which is compatible with the interferometers having long arms like the next generation GW detectors. The features of the new ALS are that the control configuration is simpler than those of previous ones and that it is not necessary to lay optical fibers for the ALS along the kilometer-long arms of the detector. Along with simulations of its noise performance, an experimental test of the new ALS was performed utilizing a single arm cavity of KAGRA. This paper presents the first results of the test where we demonstrated that lock acquisition of the arm cavity was achieved using the new ALS and residual noise was measured to be $8.2\,\mathrm{Hz}$ in units of frequency, which is smaller than the linewidth of the arm cavity and thus low enough to lock the full interferometer of KAGRA in a repeatable and reliable manner.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.11809  [pdf] - 2005650
Constraints on Neutrino Emission from Nearby Galaxies Using the 2MASS Redshift Survey and IceCube
IceCube Collaboration; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fox, D.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halliday, R.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nisa, M. U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Santen, J.; Verpoest, S.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-11-26
The distribution of galaxies within the local universe is characterized by anisotropic features. Observatories searching for the production sites of astrophysical neutrinos can take advantage of these features to establish directional correlations between a neutrino dataset and overdensities in the galaxy distribution in the sky. The results of two correlation searches between a seven-year time-integrated neutrino dataset from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, and the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) catalog are presented here. The first analysis searches for neutrinos produced via interactions between diffuse intergalactic Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) and the matter contained within galaxies. The second analysis searches for low-luminosity sources within the local universe, which would produce subthreshold multiplets in the IceCube dataset that directionally correlate with galaxy distribution. No significant correlations were observed in either analyses. Constraints are presented on the flux of neutrinos originating within the local universe through diffuse intergalactic UHECR interactions, as well as on the density of standard candle sources of neutrinos at low luminosities.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.09667  [pdf] - 2076740
First Resolved Scattered-Light Images of Four Debris Disks in Scorpius-Centaurus with the Gemini Planet Imager
Comments: 20 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2019-11-21
We present the first spatially resolved scattered-light images of four debris disks around members of the Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen) OB Association with high-contrast imaging and polarimetry using the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). All four disks are resolved for the first time in polarized light and one disk is also detected in total intensity. The three disks imaged around HD 111161, HD 143675, and HD 145560 are symmetric in both morphology and brightness distribution. The three systems span a range of inclinations and radial extents. The disk imaged around HD 98363 shows indications of asymmetries in morphology and brightness distribution, with some structural similarities to the HD 106906 planet-disk system. Uniquely, HD 98363 has a wide co-moving stellar companion Wray 15-788 with a recently resolved disk with very different morphological properties. HD 98363 A/B is the first binary debris disk system with two spatially resolved disks. All four targets have been observed with ALMA, and their continuum fluxes range from one non-detection to one of the brightest disks in the region. With the new results, a total of 15 A/F-stars in Sco-Cen have resolved scattered light debris disks, and approximately half of these systems exhibit some form of asymmetry. Combining the GPI disk structure results with information from the literature on millimeter fluxes and imaged planets reveals a diversity of disk properties in this young population. Overall, the four newly resolved disks contribute to the census of disk structures measured around A/F-stars at this important stage in the development of planetary systems.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.05792  [pdf] - 1999556
Neutrinos below 100 TeV from the southern sky employing refined veto techniques to IceCube data
IceCube Collaboration; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bretz, H. -P.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Micallef, J.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Moulai, M.; Nagai, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nakarmi, P.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stein, R.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; R.; Ström, R.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.
Comments: 19 pages, 17 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2019-02-15, last modified: 2019-11-18
Many Galactic sources of gamma rays, such as supernova remnants, are expected to produce neutrinos with a typical energy cutoff well below 100 TeV. For the IceCube Neutrino Observatory located at the South Pole, the southern sky, containing the inner part of the Galactic plane and the Galactic Center, is a particularly challenging region at these energies, because of the large background of atmospheric muons. In this paper, we present recent advancements in data selection strategies for track-like muon neutrino events with energies below 100 TeV from the southern sky. The strategies utilize the outer detector regions as veto and features of the signal pattern to reduce the background of atmospheric muons to a level which, for the first time, allows IceCube searching for point-like sources of neutrinos in the southern sky at energies between 100 GeV and several TeV in the muon neutrino charged current channel. No significant clustering of neutrinos above background expectation was observed in four years of data recorded with the completed IceCube detector. Upper limits on the neutrino flux for a number of spectral hypotheses are reported for a list of astrophysical objects in the southern hemisphere.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.03815  [pdf] - 2026289
Large-scale multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations for astrophysics: Cl-like ions from Cr~VIII to Zn~XIV
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-11-09
We use the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method combined with the relativistic configuration interaction (RCI) approach (GRASP2K) to provide a consistent set of transition energies and radiative transition data for the lower $n =3$ states in all Cl-like ions of astrophysical importance, from \ion{Cr}{8} to \ion{Zn}{14}. We also provide excitation energies calculated for \mbox{Fe X} using the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT, implemented within FAC). The comparison of the present MCDHF results with MBPT and with the available experimental energies indicates that the theoretical excitation energies are highly accurate, with uncertainties of only a few hundred cm$^{-1}$. Detailed comparisons for Fe~X and Ni~XII highlight discrepancies in the experimental energies found in the literature. Several new identifications are proposed.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.12522  [pdf] - 1995410
Data-Driven Modeling of Electron Recoil Nucleation in PICO C$_3$F$_8$ Bubble Chambers
Comments: 18 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2019-05-29, last modified: 2019-11-06
The primary advantage of moderately superheated bubble chamber detectors is their simultaneous sensitivity to nuclear recoils from WIMP dark matter and insensitivity to electron recoil backgrounds. A comprehensive analysis of PICO gamma calibration data demonstrates for the first time that electron recoils in C$_3$F$_8$ scale in accordance with a new nucleation mechanism, rather than one driven by a hot-spike as previously supposed. Using this semi-empirical model, bubble chamber nucleation thresholds may be tuned to be sensitive to lower energy nuclear recoils while maintaining excellent electron recoil rejection. The PICO-40L detector will exploit this model to achieve thermodynamic thresholds as low as 2.8 keV while being dominated by single-scatter events from coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering of solar neutrinos. In one year of operation, PICO-40L can improve existing leading limits from PICO on spin-dependent WIMP-proton coupling by nearly an order of magnitude for WIMP masses greater than 3 GeV c$^{-2}$ and will have the ability to surpass all existing non-xenon bounds on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon coupling for WIMP masses from 3 to 40 GeV c$^{-2}$.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.02561  [pdf] - 1995509
Neutrino astronomy with the next generation IceCube Neutrino Observatory
Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Bartos, I.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Bohmer, M.; Börner, M.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Bustamante, M.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Clark, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Connolly, A.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; Deaconu, C.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; DeKockere, S.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; DuVernois, M. A.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evans, J. J.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Farrag, K.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garcia-Fernandez, D.; Garrappa, S.; Gartner, A.; Gerhardt, L.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haugen, J.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, B.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Holzapfel, K.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Huege, T.; Hughes, K.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kalekin, O.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katori, T.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krauss, C. B.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Latif, U.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczynska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; LoSecco, J.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mandalia, S.; Maris, I. C.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Nam, J.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Nelles, A.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Papp, L.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Petersen, T. C.; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pizzuto, A.; Plaisier, I.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riegel, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sandstrom, P.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Smith, D.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, M.; Southall, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Steinmüller, P.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Taketa, A.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Torres, J.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; Vieregg, A.; van Santen, J.; Veberic, D.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Welling, C.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wissel, S.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Wren, S.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments: related submission to Astro2020 decadal survey
Submitted: 2019-11-05
The past decade has welcomed the emergence of cosmic neutrinos as a new messenger to explore the most extreme environments of the universe. The discovery measurement of cosmic neutrinos, announced by IceCube in 2013, has opened a new window of observation that has already resulted in new fundamental information that holds the potential to answer key questions associated with the high-energy universe, including: what are the sources in the PeV sky and how do they drive particle acceleration; where are cosmic rays of extreme energies produced, and on which paths do they propagate through the universe; and are there signatures of new physics at TeV-PeV energies and above? The planned advancements in neutrino telescope arrays in the next decade, in conjunction with continued progress in broad multimessenger astrophysics, promise to elevate the cosmic neutrino field from the discovery to the precision era and to a survey of the sources in the neutrino sky. The planned detector upgrades to the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, culminating in IceCube-Gen2 (an envisaged $400M facility with anticipated operation in the next decade, described in this white paper) are the cornerstone that will drive the evolution of neutrino astrophysics measurements.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.03942  [pdf] - 1989083
Primordial black holes from sound speed resonance in the inflaton-curvaton mixed scenario
Comments: 11 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2019-08-11, last modified: 2019-10-31
We study sound speed resonance (SSR) mechanism for primordial black hole (PBH) formation in an early universe scenario with inflaton and curvaton being mixed. In this scenario, the total primordial density perturbations can be contributed by the fluctuations from both the inflaton and curvaton fields, in which the inflaton fluctuations lead to the standard adiabatic perturbations, while the sound speed of the curvaton fluctuations are assumed to be oscillating during inflation. Due to the narrow resonance effect of SSR mechanism, we acquire the enhanced primordial density perturbations on small scales and it remains nearly scale-invariant on large scales, which is essential for PBH formation. Finally, we find that the PBHs with specific mass spectrum can be produced with a sufficient abundance for dark matter in the mixed scenario.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.01980  [pdf] - 1986268
Herschel spectroscopy of Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Magellanic Clouds
Comments: 38 pages; accepted for publication by MNRAS; full integrated version; journal version will include appendices on-line only
Submitted: 2019-10-04, last modified: 2019-10-25
We present Herschel Space Observatory Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE FTS) spectroscopy of a sample of twenty massive Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC). We analyse the brightest far infrared (far-IR) emission lines, that diagnose the conditions of the heated gas in the YSO envelope and pinpoint their physical origin.We compare the properties of massive Magellanic and Galactic YSOs.We find that [OI] and [CII] emission, that originates from the photodissociation region associated with the YSOs, is enhanced with respect to the dust continuum in the Magellanic sample. Furthermore the photoelectric heating efficiency is systematically higher for Magellanic YSOs, consistent with reduced grain charge in low metallicity environments. The observed CO emission is likely due to multiple shock components. The gas temperatures, derived from the analysis of CO rotational diagrams, are similar to Galactic estimates. This suggests a common origin to the observed CO excitation, from low-luminosity to massive YSOs, both in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. Bright far-IR line emission provides a mechanism to cool the YSO environment. We find that, even though [OI], CO and [CII] are the main line coolants, there is an indication that CO becomes less important at low metallicity, especially for the SMC sources. This is consistent with a reduction in CO abundance in environments where the dust is warmer due to reduced ultraviolet-shielding. Weak H$_2$O and OH emission is detected, consistent with a modest role in the energy balance of wider massive YSO environments.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.08488  [pdf] - 2046288
Time-integrated Neutrino Source Searches with 10 years of IceCube Data
IceCube Collaboration; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fox, D.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halliday, R.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mari{ş}, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nisa, M. U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Steinmüller, P.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Santen, J.; Verpoest, S.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-10-18
This paper presents the results from point-like neutrino source searches using ten years of IceCube data collected between Apr.~6, 2008 and Jul.~10, 2018. We evaluate the significance of an astrophysical signal from a point-like source looking for an excess of clustered neutrino events with energies typically above $\sim1\,$TeV among the background of atmospheric muons and neutrinos. We perform a full-sky scan, a search within a selected source catalog, a catalog population study, and three stacked Galactic catalog searches. The most significant point in the Northern hemisphere from scanning the sky is coincident with the Seyfert II galaxy NGC 1068, which was included in the source catalog search. The excess at the coordinates of NGC 1068 is inconsistent with background expectations at the level of $2.9\,\sigma$ after accounting for statistical trials. The combination of this result along with excesses observed at the coordinates of three other sources, including TXS 0506+056, suggests that, collectively, correlations with sources in the Northern catalog are inconsistent with background at 3.3$\,\sigma$ significance. These results, all based on searches for a cumulative neutrino signal integrated over the ten years of available data, motivate further study of these and similar sources, including time-dependent analyses, multimessenger correlations, and the possibility of stronger evidence with coming upgrades to the detector.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.07524  [pdf] - 2076682
An ALMA survey of the SCUBA-2 CLS UDS field: Physical properties of 707 Sub-millimetre Galaxies
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-10-16
We analyse the physical properties of a large, homogeneously selected sample of ALMA-located sub-mm galaxies (SMGs) detected in the SCUBA-2 CLS 850-$\mu$m map of the UKIDSS/UDS field. This survey, AS2UDS, identified 707 SMGs across the ~1 sq.deg. field, including ~17 per cent which are undetected in the optical/near-infrared to $K$>~25.7 mag. We interpret the UV-to-radio data using a physically motivated model, MAGPHYS and determine a median photometric redshift of z=2.61+-0.08, with a 68th percentile range of z=1.8-3.4 and just ~6 per cent at z>4. The redshift distribution is well fit by a model combining evolution of the gas fraction in halos with the growth of halo mass past a threshold of ~4x10$^{12}$M$_\odot$, thus SMGs may represent the highly efficient collapse of gas-rich massive halos. Our survey provides a sample of the most massive, dusty galaxies at z>~1, with median dust and stellar masses of $M_d$=(6.8+-0.3)x10$^{8}$M$_\odot$ (thus, gas masses of ~10$^{11}$M$_\odot$) and $M_\ast=$(1.26+-0.05)x10$^{11}$M$_\odot$. These galaxies have gas fractions of $f_{gas}=$0.41+-0.02 with depletion timescales of ~150Myr. The gas mass function evolution at high masses is consistent with constraints at lower masses from blind CO-surveys, with an increase to z~2-3 and then a decline at higher redshifts. The space density and masses of SMGs suggests that almost all galaxies with $M_\ast$>~2x10$^{11}$M$_\odot$ have passed through an SMG-like phase. We find no evolution in dust temperature at a constant far-infrared luminosity across z~1.5-4. We show that SMGs appear to behave as simple homologous systems in the far-infrared, having properties consistent with a centrally illuminated starburst. Our study provides strong support for an evolutionary link between the active, gas-rich SMG population at z>1 and the formation of massive, bulge-dominated galaxies across the history of the Universe.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.03596  [pdf] - 2008000
Multi-wavelength properties of radio and machine-learning identified counterparts to submillimeter sources in S2COSMOS
Comments: 24 pages, 14 figures, 3 tables, resubmitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2019-10-08
We identify multi-wavelength counterparts to 1,147 submillimeter sources from the S2COSMOS SCUBA-2 survey of the COSMOS field by employing a recently developed radio$+$machine-learning method trained on a large sample of ALMA-identified submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), including 260 SMGs identified in the AS2COSMOS pilot survey. In total, we identify 1,222 optical/near-infrared(NIR)/radio counterparts to the 897 S2COSMOS submillimeter sources with S$_{850}$>1.6mJy, yielding an overall identification rate of ($78\pm9$)%. We find that ($22\pm5$)% of S2COSMOS sources have multiple identified counterparts. We estimate that roughly 27% of these multiple counterparts within the same SCUBA-2 error circles very likely arise from physically associated galaxies rather than line-of-sight projections by chance. The photometric redshift of our radio$+$machine-learning identified SMGs ranges from z=0.2 to 5.7 and peaks at $z=2.3\pm0.1$. The AGN fraction of our sample is ($19\pm4$)%, which is consistent with that of ALMA SMGs in the literature. Comparing with radio/NIR-detected field galaxy population in the COSMOS field, our radio+machine-learning identified counterparts of SMGs have the highest star-formation rates and stellar masses. These characteristics suggest that our identified counterparts of S2COSMOS sources are a representative sample of SMGs at z<3. We employ our machine-learning technique to the whole COSMOS field and identified 6,877 potential SMGs, most of which are expected to have submillimeter emission fainter than the confusion limit of our S2COSMOS surveys (S$_{850}$<1.5mJy). We study the clustering properties of SMGs based on this statistically large sample, finding that they reside in high-mass dark matter halos ($(1.2\pm0.3)\times10^{13}\,h^{-1}\,\rm M_{\odot}$), which suggests that SMGs may be the progenitors of massive ellipticals we see in the local Universe.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.01121  [pdf] - 1983997
An ALMA survey of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey UKIDSS/UDS field: High-resolution dust continuum morphologies and the link between sub-millimetre galaxies and spheroid formation
Comments: 14 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-10-02, last modified: 2019-10-07
We present an analysis of the morphology and profiles of the dust continuum emission in 153 bright sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) detected with ALMA at S/N ratios of $>8$ in high-resolution $0.18''$ ($\sim1$kpc) 870$\mu$m maps. We measure sizes, shapes and light profiles for the rest-frame far-infrared emission from these luminous star-forming systems and derive a median effective radius ($R_e$) of $0.10''\pm0.04''$ for our sample with a median flux of $S_{870}=5.6\pm0.2$mJy. We find that the apparent axial ratio ($b/a$) distribution of the SMGs peaks at $b/a\sim0.63\pm0.24$ and is best described by triaxial morphologies, while their emission profiles are best fit by a Sersic model with $n\simeq1.0\pm0.1$, similar to exponential discs. This combination of triaxiality and $n\sim1$ Sersic index are characteristic of bars and we suggest that the bulk of the 870$\mu$m dust continuum emission in the central $\sim2$kpc of these galaxies arises from bar-like structures. By stacking our 870$\mu$m maps we recover faint extended dust continuum emission on $\sim4$kpc scales which contributes $13\pm1$% of the total 870$\mu$m emission. The scale of this extended emission is similar to that seen for the molecular gas and rest-frame optical light in these systems, suggesting that it represents an extended dust and gas disc at radii larger than the more active bar component. Including this component in our estimated size of the sources we derive a typical effective radius of $\simeq0.15''\pm0.05''$ or $1.2\pm0.4$kpc. Our results suggest that kpc-scale bars are ubiquitous features of high star-formation rate systems at $z\gg1$, while these systems also contain fainter and more extended gas and stellar envelopes. We suggest that these features, seen some $10-12$Gyrs ago, represent the formation phase of the earliest galactic-scale components: stellar bulges.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.12554  [pdf] - 2000266
A dense, solar metallicity ISM in the z=4.2 dusty star-forming galaxy SPT0418-47
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics. Revised to match language-edited version and adding 1 missing citation
Submitted: 2019-09-27, last modified: 2019-10-01
We present a study of six far-infrared fine structure lines in the z=4.225 lensed dusty star-forming galaxy SPT0418-47 to probe the physical conditions of its InterStellar Medium (ISM). In particular, we report Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) detections of the [OI]145um and [OIII]88um lines and Atacama Compact Array (ACA) detections of the [NII]122 and 205um lines. The [OI]145um / [CII]158um line ratio is ~5x higher compared to the average of local galaxies. We interpret this as evidence that the ISM is dominated by photo-dissociation regions with high gas densities. The line ratios, and in particular those of [OIII]88um and [NII]122um imply that the ISM in SPT0418-47 is already chemically enriched close to solar metallicity. While the strong gravitational amplification was required to detect these lines with APEX, larger samples can be observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and should allow to determine if the observed dense, solar metallicity ISM is common among these highly star-forming galaxies.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.08624  [pdf] - 1971465
ALMACAL VI: Molecular gas mass density across cosmic time via a blind search for intervening molecular absorbers
Comments: 11 pages, 10 figures, 2 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-09-18
We are just starting to understand the physical processes driving the dramatic change in cosmic star-formation rate between $z\sim 2$ and the present day. A quantity directly linked to star formation is the molecular gas density, which should be measured through independent methods to explore variations due to cosmic variance and systematic uncertainties. We use intervening CO absorption lines in the spectra of mm-bright background sources to provide a census of the molecular gas mass density of the Universe. The data used in this work are taken from ALMACAL, a wide and deep survey utilizing the ALMA calibrator archive. While we report multiple Galactic absorption lines and one intrinsic absorber, no extragalactic intervening molecular absorbers are detected. However, thanks to the large redshift path surveyed ($\Delta z=182$), we provide constraints on the molecular column density distribution function beyond $z\sim 0$. In addition, we probe column densities of N(H$_2$) > 10$^{16}$ atoms~cm$^{-2}$, five orders of magnitude lower than in previous studies. We use the cosmological hydrodynamical simulation IllustrisTNG to show that our upper limits of $\rho ({\rm H}_2)\lesssim 10^{8.3} \text{M}_{\odot} \text{Mpc}^{-3}$ at $0 < z \leq 1.7$ already provide new constraints on current theoretical predictions of the cold molecular phase of the gas. These results are in agreement with recent CO emission-line surveys and are complementary to those studies. The combined constraints indicate that the present decrease of the cosmic star-formation rate history is consistent with an increasing depletion of molecular gas in galaxies compared to $z\sim 2$.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.08623  [pdf] - 1964229
A Search for Neutrino Point-Source Populations in 7 Years of IceCube Data with Neutrino-count Statistics
IceCube Collaboration; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rodd, N. L.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Safdi, B. R.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Steinmüller, P.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments: 24 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2019-09-18
The presence of a population of point sources in a dataset modifies the underlying neutrino-count statistics from the Poisson distribution. This deviation can be exactly quantified using the non-Poissonian template fitting technique, and in this work we present the first application this approach to the IceCube high-energy neutrino dataset. Using this method, we search in 7 years of IceCube data for point-source populations correlated with the disk of the Milky Way, the Fermi bubbles, the Schlegel, Finkbeiner, and Davis dust map, or with the isotropic extragalactic sky. No evidence for such a population is found in the data using this technique, and in the absence of a signal we establish constraints on population models with source count distribution functions that can be described by a power-law with a single break. The derived limits can be interpreted in the context of many possible source classes. In order to enhance the flexibility of the results, we publish the full posterior from our analysis, which can be used to establish limits on specific population models that would contribute to the observed IceCube neutrino flux.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.07997  [pdf] - 1967107
Investigating the Complex Velocity Structures within Dense Molecular Cloud Cores with GBT-Argus
Comments: 14 pages, 10 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-09-17
We present the first results of high-spectral resolution (0.023 km/s) N$_2$H$^+$ observations of dense gas dynamics at core scales (~0.01 pc) using the recently commissioned Argus instrument on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). While the fitted linear velocity gradients across the cores measured in our targets nicely agree with the well-known power-law correlation between the specific angular momentum and core size, it is unclear if the observed gradients represent core-scale rotation. In addition, our Argus data reveal detailed and intriguing gas structures in position-velocity (PV) space for all 5 targets studied in this project, which could suggest that the velocity gradients previously observed in many dense cores actually originate from large-scale turbulence or convergent flow compression instead of rigid-body rotation. We also note that there are targets in this study with their star-forming disks nearly perpendicular to the local velocity gradients, which, assuming the velocity gradient represents the direction of rotation, is opposite to what is described by the classical theory of star formation. This provides important insight on the transport of angular momentum within star-forming cores, which is a critical topic on studying protostellar disk formation.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.11827  [pdf] - 2025528
Relations Between Molecular Cloud Structure Sizes and Line Widths in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Comments: 20 pages, to appear in ApJ. Data presented in this paper can be found at https://mmwave.astro.illinois.edu/almalmc/
Submitted: 2019-05-28, last modified: 2019-09-15
We present a comparative study of the size-line width relation for substructures within six molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) mapped with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Our sample extends our previous study, which compared a Planck detected cold cloud in the outskirts of the LMC with the 30 Doradus molecular cloud and found the typical line width for 1 pc radius structures to be 5 times larger in 30 Doradus. By observing clouds with intermediate levels of star formation activity, we find evidence that line width at a given size increases with increasing local and cloud-scale 8${\mu}$m intensity. At the same time, line width at a given size appears to independently correlate with measures of mass surface density. Our results suggest that both virial-like motions due to gravity and local energy injection by star formation feedback play important roles in determining intracloud dynamics.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.06843  [pdf] - 1961756
Complex Organic Molecules in Star-Forming Regions of the Magellanic Clouds
Comments: This document is unedited Author's version of a Submitted Work that was subsequently accepted for publication in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry, copyright American Chemical Society, after peer review. To access the final edited and published work, see https://pubs.acs.org/articlesonrequest/AOR-mPUVfkWhtGmqXI5KbiR7
Submitted: 2019-09-15
The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC), gas-rich dwarf companions of the Milky Way, are the nearest laboratories for detailed studies on the formation and survival of complex organic molecules (COMs) under metal poor conditions. To date, only methanol, methyl formate, and dimethyl ether have been detected in these galaxies - all three toward two hot cores in the N113 star-forming region in the LMC, the only extragalactic sources exhibiting complex hot core chemistry. We describe a small and diverse sample of the LMC and SMC sources associated with COMs or hot core chemistry, and compare the observations to theoretical model predictions. Theoretical models accounting for the physical conditions and metallicity of hot molecular cores in the Magellanic Clouds have been able to broadly account for the existing observations, but fail to reproduce the dimethyl ether abundance by more than an order of magnitude. We discuss future prospects for research in the field of complex chemistry in the low-metallicity environment. The detection of COMs in the Magellanic Clouds has important implications for astrobiology. The metallicity of the Magellanic Clouds is similar to galaxies in the earlier epochs of the Universe, thus the presence of COMs in the LMC and SMC indicates that a similar prebiotic chemistry leading to the emergence of life, as it happened on Earth, is possible in low-metallicity systems in the earlier Universe.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.06382  [pdf] - 1967097
Does black-hole growth depend fundamentally on host-galaxy compactness?
Comments: 21 pages, 20 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-09-13
Possible connections between central black-hole (BH) growth and host-galaxy compactness have been found observationally, which may provide insight into BH-galaxy coevolution: compact galaxies might have large amounts of gas in their centers due to their high mass-to-size ratios, and simulations predict that high central gas density can boost BH accretion. However, it is not yet clear if BH growth is fundamentally related to the compactness of the host galaxy, due to observational degeneracies between compactness, stellar mass ($M_\bigstar$), and star formation rate (SFR). To break these degeneracies, we carry out systematic partial-correlation studies to investigate the dependence of sample-averaged BH accretion rate ($\rm \overline{BHAR}$) on the compactness of host galaxies, represented by the surface-mass density, $\Sigma_\rm e$, or the projected central surface-mass density within 1 kpc, $\Sigma_1$. We utilize 8842 galaxies with H < 24.5 in the five CANDELS fields at z = 0.5-3. We find that $\rm \overline{BHAR}$ does not significantly depend on compactness when controlling for SFR or $M_\bigstar$ among bulge-dominated galaxies and galaxies that are not dominated by bulges, respectively. However, when testing is confined to star-forming galaxies at z = 0.5-1.5, we find that the $\rm \overline{BHAR}$-$\Sigma_1$ relation is not simply a secondary manifestation of a primary $\rm \overline{BHAR}$-$M_\bigstar$ relation, which may indicate a link between BH growth and the gas density within the central 1 kpc of galaxies.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.03079  [pdf] - 1971435
Effects of Grain Alignment Efficiency on Synthetic Dust Polarization Observations of Molecular Clouds
Comments: 21 pages, 14 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-09-06
It is well known that the polarized continuum emission from magnetically aligned dust grains is determined to a large extent by local magnetic field structure. However, the observed significant anticorrelation between polarization fraction and column density may be strongly affected, perhaps even dominated by variations in grain alignment efficiency with local conditions, in contrast to standard assumptions of a spatially homogeneous grain alignment efficiency. Here we introduce a generic way to incorporate heterogeneous grain alignment into synthetic polarization observations of molecular clouds, through a simple model where the grain alignment efficiency depends on the local gas density as a power-law. We justify the model using results derived from radiative torque alignment theory. The effects of power-law heterogeneous alignment models on synthetic observations of simulated molecular clouds are presented. We find that the polarization fraction-column density correlation can be brought into agreement with observationally determined values through heterogeneous alignment, though there remains degeneracy with the relative strength of cloud-scale magnetized turbulence and the mean magnetic field orientation relative to the observer. We also find that the dispersion in polarization angles-polarization fraction correlation remains robustly correlated despite the simultaneous changes to both observables in the presence of heterogeneous alignment.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.02161  [pdf] - 1956011
The Potential of Exozodiacal Disks Observations with the WFIRST Coronagraph Instrument
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2019-09-04
The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Coronagraph Instrument (CGI) will be the first high-performance stellar coronagraph using active wavefront control for deep starlight suppression in space, providing unprecedented levels of contrast, spatial resolution, and sensitivity for astronomical observations in the optical. One science case enabled by the CGI will be taking images and(R~50)spectra of faint interplanetary dust structures present in the habitable zone of nearby sunlike stars (~10 pc) and within the snow-line of more distant ones(~20pc), down to dust density levels commensurate with that of the solar system zodiacal cloud. Reaching contrast levels below~10-7 for the first time, CGI will cross an important threshold in debris disks physics, accessing disks with low enough optical depths that their structure is dominated by transport phenomena than collisions. Hence, CGI results will be crucial for determining how exozodiacal dust grains are produced and transported in low-density disks around mature stars. Additionally, CGI will be able to measure the brightness level and constrain the degree of asymmetry of exozodiacal clouds around individual nearby sunlike stars in the optical, at the ~10x solar zodiacal emission level. This information will be extremely valuable for optimizing the observational strategy of possible future exo-Earth direct imaging missions, especially those planning to operate at optical wavelengths, such as Habitable Exoplanet Observatory (HabEx) and the Large Ultraviolet/Optical/Infrared Surveyor (LUVOIR).
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.01530  [pdf] - 1994169
Efficient propagation of systematic uncertainties from calibration to analysis with the SnowStorm method in IceCube
Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Atoum, B. Al.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; V., A. Balagopal; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Bastian, B.; Baum, V.; Baur, S.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Böttcher, J.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Buscher, J.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Choi, S.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coleman, A.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Engel, R.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fox, D.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Griswold, S.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Haungs, A.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heix, P.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huber, T.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jonske, F.; Joppe, R.; Kang, D.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leszczyńska, A.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Lyu, Y.; Ma, W. Y.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallik, P.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Micallef, J.; Mockler, D.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Morse, R.; Moulai, M.; Muth, P.; Nagai, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nisa, M. U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Oehler, M.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Philippen, S.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renschler, M.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schieler, H.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schröder, F. G.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shefali, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stein, R.; Steinmüller, P.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stürwald, T.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Trettin, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weindl, A.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zöcklein, M.
Comments: Submitted to JCAP
Submitted: 2019-09-03
Efficient treatment of systematic uncertainties that depend on a large number of nuisance parameters is a persistent difficulty in particle physics experiments. Where low-level effects are not amenable to simple parameterization or re-weighting, analyses often rely on discrete simulation sets to quantify the effects of nuisance parameters on key analysis observables. Such methods may become computationally untenable for analyses requiring high statistics Monte Carlo with a large number of nuisance degrees of freedom, especially in cases where these degrees of freedom parameterize the shape of a continuous distribution. In this paper we present a method for treating systematic uncertainties in a computationally efficient and comprehensive manner using a single simulation set with multiple and continuously varied nuisance parameters. This method is demonstrated for the case of the depth-dependent effective dust distribution within the IceCube Neutrino Telescope.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.11806  [pdf] - 1951632
Disk Formation in Magnetized Dense Cores with Turbulence and Ambipolar Diffusion
Comments: 24 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2019-08-30
Disks are essential to the formation of both stars and planets, but how they form in magnetized molecular cloud cores remains debated. This work focuses on how the disk formation is affected by turbulence and ambipolar diffusion (AD), both separately and in combination, with an emphasis on the protostellar mass accretion phase of star formation. We find that a relatively strong, sonic turbulence on the core scale strongly warps but does not completely disrupt the well-known magnetically-induced flattened pseudodisk that dominates the inner protostellar accretion flow in the laminar case, in agreement with previous work. The turbulence enables the formation of a relatively large disk at early times with or without ambipolar diffusion, but such a disk remains strongly magnetized and does not persist to the end of our simulation unless a relatively strong ambipolar diffusion is also present. The AD-enabled disks in laminar simulations tend to fragment gravitationally. The disk fragmentation is suppressed by initial turbulence. The ambipolar diffusion facilitates the disk formation and survival by reducing the field strength in the circumstellar region through magnetic flux redistribution and by making the field lines there less pinched azimuthally, especially at late times. We conclude that turbulence and ambipolar diffusion complement each other in promoting disk formation. The disks formed in our simulations inherit a rather strong magnetic field from its parental core, with a typical plasma-$\beta$ of order a few tens or smaller, which is 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than the values commonly adopted in MHD simulations of protoplanetary disks. To resolve this potential tension, longer-term simulations of disk formation and evolution with increasingly more realistic physics are needed.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.11100  [pdf] - 1994158
Characteristics of a Gradual Filament Eruption and Subsequent CME Propagation in Relation to a Strong Geomagnetic Storm
Comments: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2019-08-29
An unexpected strong geomagnetic storm occurred on 2018 August 26, which was caused by a slow coronal mass ejection (CME) from a gradual eruption of a large quiet-region filament. We investigate the eruption and propagation characteristics of this CME in relation to the strong geomagnetic storm with remote sensing and in situ observations. Coronal magnetic fields around the filament are extrapolated and compared with EUV observations. We determine the propagation direction and tilt angle of the CME flux rope near the Sun using a graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model and the Sun-to-Earth kinematics of the CME with wide-angle imaging observations from STEREO A. We reconstruct the flux-rope structure using a Grad-Shafranov technique based on the in situ measurements at the Earth and compare it with those from solar observations and the GCS results. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) the eruption of the filament was unusually slow and occurred in the regions with relatively low critical heights of the coronal field decay index; (2) the axis of the CME flux rope rotated in the corona as well as in interplanetary space, which tended to be aligned with the local heliospheric current sheet; (3) the CME was bracketed between slow and fast solar winds, which enhanced the magnetic field inside the CME at 1 AU; (4) the geomagnetic storm was caused by the enhanced magnetic field and a southward orientation of the flux rope at 1 AU from the rotation of the flux rope.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.10689  [pdf] - 1950658
Long-baseline horizontal radio-frequency transmission through polar ice
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-08-28
We report on analysis of englacial radio-frequency (RF) pulser data received over horizontal baselines of 1--5 km, based on broadcasts from two sets of transmitters deployed to depths of up to 1500 meters at the South Pole. First, we analyze data collected usingtwo RF bicone transmitters 1400 meters below the ice surface, and frozen into boreholes drilled for the IceCube experiment in 2011. Additionally, in Dec., 2018, a fat-dipole antenna, fed by one of three high-voltage (~1 kV), fast (~(1-5 ns)) signal generators was lowered into the 1700-m deep icehole drilled for the South Pole Ice Core Experiment (SPICE), approximately 3 km from the geographic South Pole. Signals from transmitters were recorded on the five englacial multi-receiver ARA stations, with receiver depths between 60--200 m. We confirm the long, >1 km RF electric field attenuation length, test our observed signal arrival timing distributions against models, and measure birefringent asymmetries at the 0.15% level.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.10689  [pdf] - 1950658
Long-baseline horizontal radio-frequency transmission through polar ice
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-08-28
We report on analysis of englacial radio-frequency (RF) pulser data received over horizontal baselines of 1--5 km, based on broadcasts from two sets of transmitters deployed to depths of up to 1500 meters at the South Pole. First, we analyze data collected usingtwo RF bicone transmitters 1400 meters below the ice surface, and frozen into boreholes drilled for the IceCube experiment in 2011. Additionally, in Dec., 2018, a fat-dipole antenna, fed by one of three high-voltage (~1 kV), fast (~(1-5 ns)) signal generators was lowered into the 1700-m deep icehole drilled for the South Pole Ice Core Experiment (SPICE), approximately 3 km from the geographic South Pole. Signals from transmitters were recorded on the five englacial multi-receiver ARA stations, with receiver depths between 60--200 m. We confirm the long, >1 km RF electric field attenuation length, test our observed signal arrival timing distributions against models, and measure birefringent asymmetries at the 0.15% level.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.08187  [pdf] - 1947593
When Primordial Black Holes from Sound Speed Resonance Meet a Stochastic Background of Gravitational Waves
Comments: 14 pages,5 figures
Submitted: 2019-02-21, last modified: 2019-08-21
As potential candidates of dark matter, primordial black holes (PBHs) are within the core scopes of various astronomical observations. In light of the explosive development of gravitational wave (GW) and radio astronomy, we thoroughly analyze a stochastic background of cosmological GWs, induced by over large primordial density perturbations, with several spikes that was inspired by the sound speed resonance effect and can predict a particular pattern on the mass spectrum of PBHs. With a specific mechanicsm for PBHs formation, we for the first time perform the study of such induced GWs that originate from both the inflationary era and the radiation-dominated phase. We report that, besides the traditional process of generating GWs during the radiation-dominated phase, the contribution of the induced GWs in the sub-Hubble regime during inflation can become significant at critical frequency band because of a narrow resonance effect. All contributions sum together to yield a specific profile of the energy spectrum of GWs that can be of observable interest in forthcoming astronomical experiments. Our study shed light on the possible joint probe of PBHs via various observational windows of multi-messenger astronomy, including the search for electromagnetic effects with astronomical telescopes and the stochastic background of relic GWs with GW instruments.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.06331  [pdf] - 1994132
Orbital dynamics of circumbinary planets
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2019-08-17
We investigate the dynamics of a nonzero mass, circular orbit planet around an eccentric orbit binary for various values of the binary eccentricity, binary mass fraction, planet mass, and planet semi--major axis by means of numerical simulations. Previous studies investigated the secular dynamics mainly by approximate analytic methods. In the stationary inclination state, the planet and binary precess together with no change in relative tilt. For both prograde and retrograde planetary orbits, we explore the conditions for planetary orbital libration versus circulation and the conditions for stationary inclination. As was predicted by analytic models, for sufficiently high initial inclination, a prograde planet's orbit librates about the stationary tilted state. For a fixed binary eccentricity, the stationary angle is a monotonically decreasing function of the ratio of the planet--to--binary angular momentum $j$. The larger $j$, the stronger the evolutionary changes in the binary eccentricity and inclination. We also calculate the critical tilt angle that separates the circulating from the librating orbits for both prograde and retrograde planet orbits. The properties of the librating orbits and stationary angles are quite different for prograde versus retrograde orbits. The results of the numerical simulations are in very good quantitative agreement with the analytic models. Our results have implications for circumbinary planet formation and evolution.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.08944  [pdf] - 1975247
Radio spectra and sizes of ALMA-identified submillimetre galaxies: evidence of age-related spectral curvature and cosmic ray diffusion?
Comments: 25 pages, 10 colour figures, 2 tables; accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-04-18, last modified: 2019-08-16
We analyse the multi-frequency radio spectral properties of $41$ 6GHz-detected ALMA-identified, submillimetre galaxies (SMGs), observed at 610MHz, 1.4GHz, 6GHz with GMRT and the VLA. Combining high-resolution ($\sim0.5''$) 6GHz radio and ALMA $870\,\mu$m imaging (tracing rest-frame $\sim20$GHz, and $\sim250\,\mu$m dust continuum), we study the far-infrared/radio correlation via the logarithmic flux ratio $q_{\rm IR}$, measuring $\langle q_{\rm IR}\rangle=2.20\pm 0.06$ for our sample. We show that the high-frequency radio sizes of SMGs are $\sim1.9\pm 0.4\times$ ($\sim2$-$3$kpc) larger than those of the cool dust emission, and find evidence for a subset of our sources being extended on $\sim 10$kpc scales at 1.4GHz. By combining radio flux densities measured at three frequencies, we can move beyond simple linear fits to the radio spectra of high-redshift star-forming galaxies, and search for spectral curvature, which has been observed in local starburst galaxies. At least a quarter (10/41) of our sample show evidence of a spectral break, with a median $\langle\alpha^{1.4\,{\rm GHz}}_{610\,{\rm GHz}}\rangle=-0.60\pm 0.06$, but $\langle\alpha^{6\,{\rm GHz}}_{1.4\,{\rm GHz}}\rangle=-1.06\pm 0.04$ -- a high-frequency flux deficit relative to simple extrapolations from the low-frequency data. We explore this result within this subset of sources in the context of age-related synchrotron losses, showing that a combination of weak magnetic fields ($B\sim35\,\mu$G) and young ages ($t_{\rm SB}\sim40$--$80\,$Myr) for the central starburst can reproduce the observed spectral break. Assuming these represent evolved (but ongoing) starbursts and we are observing these systems roughly half-way through their current episode of star formation, this implies starburst durations of $\lesssim100$Myr, in reasonable agreement with estimates derived via gas depletion timescales.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.05821  [pdf] - 1944316
Metallic liquid H3O in a thin-shell zone inside Uranus and Neptune
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-08-15
The Solar System harbors deep unresolved mysteries despite centuries-long study. A highly intriguing case concerns anomalous non-dipolar and non-axisymmetric magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune that have long eluded explanation by the prevailing theory. A thin-shell dynamo conjecture captures observed phenomena but leaves unexplained fundamental material basis and underlying mechanism. Here, we report the discovery of trihydrogen oxide (H3O) in metallic liquid state stabilized at extreme pressure and temperature conditions inside these icy planets. Calculated stability pressure field compared to known pressure-radius relation for Uranus and Neptune places metallic liquid H3O in a thin-shell zone near planetary cores. These findings from accurate quantum mechanical calculations rationalize the empirically conjectured thin-shell dynamo model and establish key physical benchmarks that are essential to elucidating the enigmatic magnetic-field anomaly of Uranus and Neptune, resolving a major mystery in planetary science.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.05290  [pdf] - 1943334
A Catalog of Astrophysical Neutrino Candidates for IceCube
Comments: Presented at the 36th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC 2019). See arXiv:1907.11699 for all IceCube contributions
Submitted: 2019-08-14
Multi-messenger astrophysics will enable the discovery of new astrophysical neutrino sources and provide information about the mechanisms that drive these objects. We present a curated online catalog of astrophysical neutrino candidates. Whenever single high energy neutrino events, that are publicly available, get published multiple times from various analyses, the catalog records all these changes and highlights the best information. All studies by IceCube that produce astrophysical candidates will be included in our catalog. All information produced by these searches such as time, type, direction, neutrino energy and signalness will be contained in the catalog. The multi-messenger astrophysical community will be able to select neutrinos with certain characteristics, e.g. within a declination range, visualize data for the selected neutrinos, and finally download data in their preferred form to conduct further studies.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.11043  [pdf] - 1935550
The Simulation of the Sensitivity of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) to Askaryan Radiation from Cosmogenic Neutrinos Interacting in the Antarctic Ice
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-03-26, last modified: 2019-08-12
A Monte Carlo simulation program for the radio detection of Ultra High Energy (UHE) neutrino interactions in the Antarctic ice as viewed by the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) is described in this article. The program, icemc, provides an input spectrum of UHE neutrinos, the parametrization of the Askaryan radiation generated by their interaction in the ice, and the propagation of the radiation through ice and air to a simulated model of the third and fourth ANITA flights. This paper provides an overview of the icemc simulation, descriptions of the physics models used and of the ANITA electronics processing chain, data/simulation comparisons to validate the predicted performance, and a summary of the impact of published results.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.11043  [pdf] - 1935550
The Simulation of the Sensitivity of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) to Askaryan Radiation from Cosmogenic Neutrinos Interacting in the Antarctic Ice
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-03-26, last modified: 2019-08-12
A Monte Carlo simulation program for the radio detection of Ultra High Energy (UHE) neutrino interactions in the Antarctic ice as viewed by the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) is described in this article. The program, icemc, provides an input spectrum of UHE neutrinos, the parametrization of the Askaryan radiation generated by their interaction in the ice, and the propagation of the radiation through ice and air to a simulated model of the third and fourth ANITA flights. This paper provides an overview of the icemc simulation, descriptions of the physics models used and of the ANITA electronics processing chain, data/simulation comparisons to validate the predicted performance, and a summary of the impact of published results.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.05741  [pdf] - 1951383
Kinetic Turbulence in Astrophysical Plasmas: Waves and/or Structures?
Comments: Revised and extended version; accepted for publication in Phys. Rev. X
Submitted: 2018-06-14, last modified: 2019-08-06
The question of the relative importance of coherent structures and waves has for a long time attracted a great deal of interest in astrophysical plasma turbulence research, with a more recent focus on kinetic scale dynamics. Here we utilize high-resolution observational and simulation data to investigate the nature of waves and structures emerging in a weakly collisional, turbulent kinetic plasma. Observational results are based on in situ solar wind measurements from the Cluster and MMS spacecraft, and the simulation results are obtained from an externally driven, three-dimensional fully kinetic simulation. Using a set of novel diagnostic measures we show that both the large-amplitude structures and the lower-amplitude background fluctuations preserve linear features of kinetic Alfven waves to order unity. This quantitative evidence suggests that the kinetic turbulence cannot be described as a mixture of mutually exclusive waves and structures but may instead be pictured as an ensemble of localized, anisotropic wave packets or "eddies" of varying amplitudes, which preserve certain linear wave properties during their nonlinear evolution.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.02206  [pdf] - 1930004
A Case for Electron-Astrophysics
Comments: White Paper for the Voyage 2050 Long-Term Plan in the ESA Science Programme; 27 pages
Submitted: 2019-08-06
A grand-challenge problem at the forefront of physics is to understand how energy is transported and transformed in plasmas. This fundamental research priority encapsulates the conversion of plasma-flow and electromagnetic energies into particle energy, either as heat or some other form of energisation. The smallest characteristic scales, at which electron dynamics determines the plasma behaviour, are the next frontier in space and astrophysical plasma research. The analysis of astrophysical processes at these scales lies at the heart of the field of electron-astrophysics. Electron scales are the ultimate bottleneck for dissipation of plasma turbulence, which is a fundamental process not understood in the electron-kinetic regime. Since electrons are the most numerous and most mobile plasma species in fully ionised plasmas and are strongly guided by the magnetic field, their thermal properties couple very efficiently to global plasma dynamics and thermodynamics.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.10806  [pdf] - 1929711
Investigation of two Fermi-LAT gamma-ray blazars coincident with high-energy neutrinos detected by IceCube
Garrappa, S.; Buson, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Shappee, B. J.; Beacom, J. F.; Dong, S.; Holoien, T. W. -S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K. Z.; Thompson, T. A.; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Alispach, C.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Backes, P.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; Barbano, A.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. -H.; Tjus, J. Becker; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Bretz, H. -P.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Busse, R. S.; Carver, T.; Chen, C.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Coppin, P.; Correa, P.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Dave, P.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; Deoskar, K.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz, A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dujmovic, H.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eller, P.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fritz, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganster, E.; Garrappa, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Günder, M.; Gündüz, M.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halve, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Henningsen, F.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoinka, T.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; Hussain, R.; In, S.; Iovine, N.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Kappesser, D.; Karg, T.; Karl, M.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Krückl, G.; Kulacz, N.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lazar, J. P.; Leonard, K.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lohfink, E.; Mariscal, C. J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucarelli, F.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Makino, Y.; Mallot, K.; Mancina, S.; Mariş, I. C.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Medina, A.; Meier, M.; Meighen-Berger, S.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Micallef, J.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Moulai, M.; Nagai, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nakarmi, P.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; O'Sullivan, E.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Park, N.; Peiffer, P.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Pizzuto, A.; Plum, M.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raissi, A.; Rameez, M.; Rauch, L.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Renzi, G.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Safa, I.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schaufel, M.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, J.; Schumacher, L.; Sclafani, S.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Silva, M.; Snihur, R.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stein, R.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taboada, I.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tilav, S.; Tomankova, L.; Tönnis, C.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turcotte, R.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Elorrieta, M. A. Unland; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijk, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Watson, T. B.; Weaver, C.; Weiss, M. J.; Weldert, J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Wrede, G.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.
Comments: 22 pages, 11 figures, 2 Tables
Submitted: 2019-01-30, last modified: 2019-08-06
After the identification of the gamma-ray blazar TXS 0506+056 as the first compelling IceCube neutrino source candidate, we perform a systematic analysis of all high-energy neutrino events satisfying the IceCube realtime trigger criteria. We find one additional known gamma-ray source, the blazar GB6 J1040+0617, in spatial coincidence with a neutrino in this sample. The chance probability of this coincidence is 30% after trial correction. For the first time, we present a systematic study of the gamma-ray flux, spectral and optical variability, and multi-wavelength behavior of GB6 J1040+0617 and compare it to TXS 0506+056. We find that TXS 0506+056 shows strong flux variability in the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray band, being in an active state around the arrival of IceCube-170922A, but in a low state during the archival IceCube neutrino flare in 2014/15. In both cases the spectral shape is statistically compatible ($\leq 2\sigma$) with the average spectrum showing no indication of a significant relative increase of a high-energy component. While the association of GB6 J1040+0617 with the neutrino is consistent with background expectations, the source appears to be a plausible neutrino source candidate based on its energetics and multi-wavelength features, namely a bright optical flare and modestly increased gamma-ray activity. Finding one or two neutrinos originating from gamma-ray blazars in the given sample of high-energy neutrinos is consistent with previously derived limits of neutrino emission from gamma-ray blazars, indicating the sources of the majority of cosmic high-energy neutrinos remain unknown.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.00006  [pdf] - 1958237
An Exo-Kuiper Belt and An Extended Halo around HD 191089 in Scattered Light
Comments: 29 pages, 18 figures, ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2019-07-31
We have obtained Hubble Space Telescope STIS and NICMOS, and Gemini/GPI scattered light images of the HD 191089 debris disk. We identify two spatial components: a ring resembling Kuiper Belt in radial extent (FWHM: ${\sim}$25 au, centered at ${\sim}$46 au), and a halo extending to ${\sim}$640 au. We find that the halo is significantly bluer than the ring, consistent with the scenario that the ring serves as the "birth ring" for the smaller dust in the halo. We measure the scattering phase functions in the 30{\deg}-150{\deg} scattering angle range and find the halo dust is both more forward- and backward-scattering than the ring dust. We measure a surface density power law index of -0.68${\pm}$0.04 for the halo, which indicates the slow-down of the radial outward motion of the dust. Using radiative transfer modeling, we attempt to simultaneously reproduce the (visible) total and (near-infrared) polarized intensity images of the birth ring. Our modeling leads to mutually inconsistent results, indicating that more complex models, such as the inclusion of more realistic aggregate particles, are needed.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.11108  [pdf] - 1923107
Sign singularity of the local energy transfer in space plasma turbulence
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-07-25
In weakly collisional space plasmas, the turbulent cascade provides most of the energy that is dissipated at small scales by various kinetic processes. Understanding the characteristics of such dissipative mechanisms requires the accurate knowledge of the fluctuations that make energy available for conversion at small scales, as different dissipation processes are triggered by fluctuations of a different nature. The scaling properties of different energy channels are estimated here using a proxy of the local energy transfer, based on the third-order moment scaling law for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. In particular, the sign-singularity analysis was used to explore the scaling properties of the alternating positive-negative energy fluxes, thus providing information on the structure and topology of such fluxes for each of the different type of fluctuations. The results show the highly complex geometrical nature of the flux, and that the local contributions associated with energy and cross-helicity nonlinear transfer have similar scaling properties. Consequently, the fractal properties of current and vorticity structures are similar to those of the Alfv\'enic fluctuations.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.11699  [pdf] - 1923631