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Caldwell, Caroline

Normalized to: Caldwell, C.

12 article(s) in total. 148 co-authors, from 1 to 9 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 10,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.09925  [pdf] - 1983929
Radial Velocity Discovery of an Eccentric Jovian World Orbiting at 18 au
Comments: 23 pages, 12 figures. Accepted to AJ
Submitted: 2019-08-26, last modified: 2019-09-02
Based on two decades of radial velocity (RV) observations using Keck/HIRES and McDonald/Tull, and more recent observations using the Automated Planet Finder, we found that the nearby star HR 5183 (HD 120066) hosts a 3$M_J$ minimum mass planet with an orbital period of $74^{+43}_{-22}$ years. The orbit is highly eccentric (e$\simeq$0.84), shuttling the planet from within the orbit of Jupiter to beyond the orbit of Neptune. Our careful survey design enabled high cadence observations before, during, and after the planet's periastron passage, yielding precise orbital parameter constraints. We searched for stellar or planetary companions that could have excited the planet's eccentricity, but found no candidates, potentially implying that the perturber was ejected from the system. We did identify a bound stellar companion more than 15,000 au from the primary, but reasoned that it is currently too widely separated to have an appreciable effect on HR 5183 b. Because HR 5183 b's wide orbit takes it more than 30 au (1") from its star, we also explored the potential of complimentary studies with direct imaging or stellar astrometry. We found that a Gaia detection is very likely, and that imaging at 10 $\mu$m is a promising avenue. This discovery highlights the value of long-baseline RV surveys for discovering and characterizing long-period, eccentric Jovian planets. This population may offer important insights into the dynamical evolution of planetary systems containing multiple massive planets.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.12089  [pdf] - 1724992
The Kepler Follow-Up Observation Program. II. Stellar Parameters from Medium- and High-Resolution Spectroscopy
Comments: Accepted by ApJ; 43 pages
Submitted: 2018-05-30
We present results from spectroscopic follow-up observations of stars identified in the Kepler field and carried out by teams of the Kepler Follow-Up Observation Program. Two samples of stars were observed over six years (2009-2015): 614 standard stars (divided into "platinum" and "gold" categories) selected based on their asteroseismic detections and 2667 host stars of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), most of them planet candidates. Four data analysis pipelines were used to derive stellar parameters for the observed stars. We compare the $T_{\mathrm{eff}}$, $\log$(g), and [Fe/H] values derived for the same stars by different pipelines; from the average of the standard deviations of the differences in these parameter values, we derive error floors of $\sim$ 100 K, 0.2 dex, and 0.1 dex for $T_{\mathrm{eff}}$, $\log$(g), and [Fe/H], respectively. Noticeable disagreements are seen mostly at the largest and smallest parameter values (e.g., in the giant star regime). Most of the $\log$(g) values derived from spectra for the platinum stars agree on average within 0.025 dex (but with a spread of 0.1-0.2 dex) with the asteroseismic $\log$(g) values. Compared to the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC), the spectroscopically derived stellar parameters agree within the uncertainties of the KIC, but are more precise and are thus an important contribution towards deriving more reliable planetary radii.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.02800  [pdf] - 1451192
The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion -- temperature relation over half a Hubble time
Comments: Accepted to MNRAS (3 August 2016); Paper: 15 pages, 12 figures; Appendix A: 1 table; Appendix B: 34 Tables; Appendix C: 2 Figures
Submitted: 2015-12-09, last modified: 2016-08-03
We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\sigma_{\rm v}$--$T_{\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero ($\sigma_{\rm v} \propto T^{0.86 \pm 0.14} E(z)^{-0.37 \pm 0.33}$). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.00611  [pdf] - 1483255
Cosmology with velocity dispersion counts: an alternative to measuring cluster halo masses
Comments: 15 pages, 13 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS. New section on cosmological forecasts added
Submitted: 2016-02-01, last modified: 2016-07-28
The evolution of galaxy cluster counts is a powerful probe of several fundamental cosmological parameters. A number of recent studies using this probe have claimed tension with the cosmology preferred by the analysis of the Planck primary CMB data, in the sense that there are fewer clusters observed than predicted based on the primary CMB cosmology. One possible resolution to this problem is systematic errors in the absolute halo mass calibration in cluster studies, which is required to convert the standard theoretical prediction (the halo mass function) into counts as a function of the observable (e.g., X-ray luminosity, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux, optical richness). Here we propose an alternative strategy, which is to directly compare predicted and observed cluster counts as a function of the one-dimensional velocity dispersion of the cluster galaxies. We argue that the velocity dispersion of groups/clusters can be theoretically predicted as robustly as mass but, unlike mass, it can also be directly observed, thus circumventing the main systematic bias in traditional cluster counts studies. With the aid of the BAHAMAS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we demonstrate the potential of the velocity dispersion counts for discriminating even similar $\Lambda$CDM models. These predictions can be compared with the results from existing redshift surveys such as the highly-complete Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, and upcoming wide-field spectroscopic surveys such as the Wide Area Vista Extragalactic Survey (WAVES) and the Dark Energy Survey Instrument (DESI).
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.05200  [pdf] - 1579827
A 12-Year Activity Cycle for HD 219134
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ. 11 pages, 7 figures. The full versions of Tables 1 and 2 are included in the arXiv source file
Submitted: 2016-02-16
The nearby (6.5 pc) star HD 219134 was recently shown by Motalebi et al. (2015) and Vogt et al. (2015) to host several planets, the innermost of which is transiting. We present twenty-seven years of radial velocity observations of this star from the McDonald Observatory Planet Search program, and nineteen years of stellar activity data. We detect a long-period activity cycle measured in the Ca II $S_{HK}$ index, with a period of $4230 \pm 100$ days (11.7 years), very similar to the 11-year Solar activity cycle. Although the period of the Saturn-mass planet HD 219134 h is close to half that of the activity cycle, we argue that it is not an artifact due to stellar activity. We also find a significant periodicity in the $S_{HK}$ data due to stellar rotation with a period of 22.8 days. This is identical to the period of planet f identified by Vogt et al. (2015), suggesting that this radial velocity signal might be caused by rotational modulation of stellar activity rather than a planet. Analysis of our radial velocities allows us to detect the long-period planet HD 219134 h and the transiting super-Earth HD 219134 b. Finally, we use our long time baseline to constrain the presence of longer-period planets in the system, excluding to $1\sigma$ objects with $M\sin i>0.36 M_J$ at 12 years (corresponding to the orbital period of Jupiter) and $M\sin i>0.72 M_J$ at a period of 16.4 years (assuming a circular orbit for an outer companion).
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.02965  [pdf] - 1359041
Two New Long-Period Giant Planets from the McDonald Observatory Planet Search and Two Stars with Long-Period Radial Velocity Signals Related to Stellar Activity Cycles
Comments: 31 pages, 27 figures, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2015-12-09
We report the detection of two new long-period giant planets orbiting the stars HD 95872 and HD 162004 (psi1 Draconis B) by the McDonald Observatory planet search. The planet HD 95872b has a minimum mass of 4.6 M_Jup and an orbital semi-major axis of 5.2 AU. The giant planet psi1 Dra Bb has a minimum mass of 1.5 M_Jup and an orbital semi-major axis of 4.4 AU. Both of these planets qualify as Jupiter analogs. These results are based on over one and a half decades of precise radial velocity measurements collected by our program using the McDonald Observatory Tull Coude spectrograph at the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith telescope. In the case of psi1 Draconis B we also detect a long-term non-linear trend in our data that indicates the presence of an additional giant planet, similar to the Jupiter-Saturn pair. The primary of the binary star system, psi1 Dra A, exhibits a very large amplitude radial velocity variation due to another stellar companion. We detect this additional member using speckle imaging. We also report two cases - HD 10086 and HD 102870 (beta Virginis) - of significant radial velocity variation consistent with the presence of a planet, but that are probably caused by stellar activity, rather than reflexive Keplerian motion. These two cases stress the importance of monitoring the magnetic activity level of a target star, as long-term activity cycles can mimic the presence of a Jupiter-analog planet.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.05846  [pdf] - 1273235
The impact from survey depth and resolution on the morphological classification of galaxies
Comments: accepted for publication in MNRAS; 25 pages, 19 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2015-07-21
We consistently analyse for the first time the impact of survey depth and spatial resolution on the most used morphological parameters for classifying galaxies through non-parametric methods: Abraham and Conselice-Bershady concentration indices, Gini, M20 moment of light, asymmetry, and smoothness. Three different non-local datasets are used, ALHAMBRA and SXDS (examples of deep ground-based surveys), and COSMOS (deep space-based survey). We used a sample of 3000 local, visually classified galaxies, measuring their morphological parameters at their real redshifts (z ~ 0). Then we simulated them to match the redshift and magnitude distributions of galaxies in the non-local surveys. The comparisons of the two sets allow to put constraints on the use of each parameter for morphological classification and evaluate the effectiveness of the commonly used morphological diagnostic diagrams. All analysed parameters suffer from biases related to spatial resolution and depth, the impact of the former being much stronger. When including asymmetry and smoothness in classification diagrams, the noise effects must be taken into account carefully, especially for ground-based surveys. M20 is significantly affected, changing both the shape and range of its distribution at all brightness levels.We suggest that diagnostic diagrams based on 2 - 3 parameters should be avoided when classifying galaxies in ground-based surveys, independently of their brightness; for COSMOS they should be avoided for galaxies fainter than F814 = 23.0. These results can be applied directly to surveys similar to ALHAMBRA, SXDS and COSMOS, and also can serve as an upper/lower limit for shallower/deeper ones.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.6147  [pdf] - 1159287
A Search for Exozodiacal Clouds with Kepler
Comments: 22 pages, 6 figures, Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2013-01-25
Planets embedded within dust disks may drive the formation of large scale clumpy dust structures by trapping dust into resonant orbits. Detection and subsequent modeling of the dust structures would help constrain the mass and orbit of the planet and the disk architecture, give clues to the history of the planetary system, and provide a statistical estimate of disk asymmetry for future exoEarth-imaging missions. Here we present the first search for these resonant structures in the inner regions of planetary systems by analyzing the light curves of hot Jupiter planetary candidates identified by the Kepler mission. We detect only one candidate disk structure associated with KOI 838.01 at the 3-sigma confidence level, but subsequent radial velocity measurements reveal that KOI 838.01 is a grazing eclipsing binary and the candidate disk structure is a false positive. Using our null result, we place an upper limit on the frequency of dense exozodi structures created by hot Jupiters. We find that at the 90% confidence level, less than 21% of Kepler hot Jupiters create resonant dust clumps that lead and trail the planet by ~90 degrees with optical depths >~5*10^-6, which corresponds to the resonant structure expected for a lone hot Jupiter perturbing a dynamically cold dust disk 50 times as dense as the zodiacal cloud.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.5709  [pdf] - 1150942
Revisiting rho 1 Cancri e: A New Mass Determination Of The Transiting super-Earth
Comments: 16 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal (the 300+ RV measurements will be published as online tables or can be obtained from the author)
Submitted: 2012-08-28
We present a mass determination for the transiting super-Earth rho 1 Cancri e based on nearly 700 precise radial velocity (RV) measurements. This extensive RV data set consists of data collected by the McDonald Observatory planet search and published data from Lick and Keck observatories (Fischer et al. 2008). We obtained 212 RV measurements with the Tull Coude Spectrograph at the Harlan J. Smith 2.7 m Telescope and combined them with a new Doppler reduction of the 131 spectra that we have taken in 2003-2004 with the High-Resolution-Spectrograph (HRS) at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) for the original discovery of rho 1 Cancri e. Using this large data set we obtain a 5-planet Keplerian orbital solution for the system and measure an RV semi-amplitude of K = 6.29 +/- 0.21 m/s for rho 1 Cnc e and determine a mass of 8.37 +/- 0.38 M_Earth. The uncertainty in mass is thus less than 5%. This planet was previously found to transit its parent star (Winn et al. 2011, Demory et al. 2011), which allowed them to estimate its radius. Combined with the latest radius estimate from Gillon et al. (2012), we obtain a mean density of rho = 4.50 +/- 0.20 g/cm^3. The location of rho 1 Cnc e in the mass-radius diagram suggests that the planet contains a significant amount of volitales, possibly a water-rich envelope surrounding a rocky core.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.3689  [pdf] - 1123440
A Second Giant Planet in 3:2 Mean-Motion Resonance in the HD 204313 System
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-05-16
We present 8 years of high-precision radial velocity (RV) data for HD 204313 from the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. The star is known to have a giant planet (M sin i = 3.5 M_J) on a ~1900-day orbit, and a Neptune-mass planet at 0.2 AU. Using our own data in combination with the published CORALIE RVs of Segransan et al. (2010), we discover an outer Jovian (M sin i = 1.6 M_J) planet with P ~ 2800 days. Our orbital fit suggests the planets are in a 3:2 mean motion resonance, which would potentially affect their stability. We perform a detailed stability analysis, and verify the planets must be in resonance.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.3955  [pdf] - 501954
The Transiting Circumbinary Planets Kepler-34 and Kepler-35
Comments: Accepted and published in Nature (2012 Jan 26). This is the submitted version of paper, merged with the Supplementary Information; 56 pages total with 20 figures
Submitted: 2012-04-17
Most Sun-like stars in the Galaxy reside in gravitationally-bound pairs of stars called "binary stars". While long anticipated, the existence of a "circumbinary planet" orbiting such a pair of normal stars was not definitively established until the discovery of Kepler-16. Incontrovertible evidence was provided by the miniature eclipses ("transits") of the stars by the planet. However, questions remain about the prevalence of circumbinary planets and their range of orbital and physical properties. Here we present two additional transiting circumbinary planets, Kepler-34 and Kepler-35. Each is a low-density gas giant planet on an orbit closely aligned with that of its parent stars. Kepler-34 orbits two Sun-like stars every 289 days, while Kepler-35 orbits a pair of smaller stars (89% and 81% of the Sun's mass) every 131 days. Due to the orbital motion of the stars, the planets experience large multi-periodic variations in incident stellar radiation. The observed rate of circumbinary planets implies > ~1% of close binary stars have giant planets in nearly coplanar orbits, yielding a Galactic population of at least several million.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.0265  [pdf] - 1116321
The McDonald Observatory Planet Search: New Long-Period Giant Planets, and Two Interacting Jupiters in the HD 155358 System
Comments: 38 pages, 10 figures, 6 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-02-01
We present high-precision radial velocity (RV) observations of four solar-type (F7-G5) stars - HD 79498, HD 155358, HD 197037, and HD 220773 - taken as part of the McDonald Observatory Planet Search Program. For each of these stars, we see evidence of Keplerian motion caused by the presence of one or more gas giant planets in long-period orbits. We derive orbital parameters for each system, and note the properties (composition, activity, etc.) of the host stars. While we have previously announced the two-gas-giant HD 155358 system, we now report a shorter period for planet c. This new period is consistent with the planets being trapped in mutual 2:1 mean-motion resonance. We therefore perform an in-depth stability analysis, placing additional constraints on the orbital parameters of the planets. These results demonstrate the excellent long-term RV stability of the spectrometers on both the Harlan J. Smith 2.7 m telescope and the Hobby-Eberly telescope.