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Calcutt, S.

Normalized to: Calcutt, S.

4 article(s) in total. 105 co-authors, from 1 to 2 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 18,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.05383  [pdf] - 1800056
Analysis of gaseous ammonia (NH$_3$) absorption in the visible spectrum of Jupiter - Update
Comments: 12 Figures
Submitted: 2018-12-13
An analysis of currently available ammonia (NH$_3$) visible-to-near-infrared gas absorption data was recently undertaken by Irwin et al. (Icarus, 302 (2018) 426) to help interpret Very Large Telescope (VLT) MUSE observations of Jupiter from 0.48 - 0.93 $\mu$m, made in support of the NASA/Juno mission. Since this analysis a newly revised set of ammonia line data, covering the previously poorly constrained range 0.5 - 0.833 $\mu$m, has been released by the ExoMol project, "C2018" (Coles et al., JQSRT 219, 199 - 122, 2018), which demonstrates significant advantages over previously available data sets, and providing for the first time complete line data for the previously poorly constrained 5520- and 6475-\AA\ bands of NH$_3$. In this paper we compare spectra calculated using the ExoMol-C2018 data set (Coles et al., JQSRT 219, 199 - 122, 2018) with spectra calculated from previous sources to demonstrate its advantages. We conclude that at the present time the ExoMol-C2018 dataset provides the most reliable ammonia absorption source for analysing low- to medium-resolution spectra of Jupiter in the visible/near-IR spectral range, but note that the data are less able to model high-resolution spectra owing to small, but significant inaccuracies in the line wavenumber estimates. This work is of significance not only for solar system planetary physics, but for future proposed observations of Jupiter-like planets orbiting other stars, such as with NASA's planned Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST).
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.00572  [pdf] - 1743987
A Hexagon in Saturn's Northern Stratosphere Surrounding the Emerging Summertime Polar Vortex
Comments: 51 pages, 12 figures, published in Nature Communications
Submitted: 2018-09-03
Saturn's polar stratosphere exhibits the seasonal growth and dissipation of broad, warm, vortices poleward of $\sim75^\circ$ latitude, which are strongest in the summer and absent in winter. The longevity of the exploration of the Saturn system by Cassini allows the use of infrared spectroscopy to trace the formation of the North Polar Stratospheric Vortex (NPSV), a region of enhanced temperatures and elevated hydrocarbon abundances at millibar pressures. We constrain the timescales of stratospheric vortex formation and dissipation in both hemispheres. Although the NPSV formed during late northern spring, by the end of Cassini's reconnaissance (shortly after northern summer solstice), it still did not display the contrasts in temperature and composition that were evident at the south pole during southern summer. The newly-formed NPSV was bounded by a strengthening stratospheric thermal gradient near $78^\circ$N. The emergent boundary was hexagonal, suggesting that the Rossby wave responsible for Saturn's long-lived polar hexagon - which was previously expected to be trapped in the troposphere - can influence the stratospheric temperatures some 300 km above Saturn's clouds.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.10191  [pdf] - 1762889
CASTAway: An Asteroid Main Belt Tour and Survey
Comments: 40 pages, accepted by Advances in Space Research October 2017
Submitted: 2017-10-27
CASTAway is a mission concept to explore our Solar System's main asteroid belt. Asteroids and comets provide a window into the formation and evolution of our Solar System and the composition of these objects can be inferred from space-based remote sensing using spectroscopic techniques. Variations in composition across the asteroid populations provide a tracer for the dynamical evolution of the Solar System. The mission combines a long-range (point source) telescopic survey of over 10,000 objects, targeted close encounters with 10 to 20 asteroids and serendipitous searches to constrain the distribution of smaller (e.g. 10 m) size objects into a single concept. With a carefully targeted trajectory that loops through the asteroid belt, CASTAway would provide a comprehensive survey of the main belt at multiple scales. The scientific payload comprises a 50 cm diameter telescope that includes an integrated low-resolution (R = 30 to 100) spectrometer and visible context imager, a thermal (e.g. 6 to 16 microns) imager for use during the flybys, and modified star tracker cameras to detect small (approx. 10 m) asteroids. The CASTAway spacecraft and payload have high levels of technology readiness and are designed to fit within the programmatic and cost caps for a European Space Agency medium class mission, whilst delivering a significant increase in knowledge of our Solar System.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.07685  [pdf] - 1470556
The Hera Saturn Entry Probe Mission
Comments: Accepted for publication in Planetary and Space Science
Submitted: 2015-10-26
The Hera Saturn entry probe mission is proposed as an M--class mission led by ESA with a contribution from NASA. It consists of one atmospheric probe to be sent into the atmosphere of Saturn, and a Carrier-Relay spacecraft. In this concept, the Hera probe is composed of ESA and NASA elements, and the Carrier-Relay Spacecraft is delivered by ESA. The probe is powered by batteries, and the Carrier-Relay Spacecraft is powered by solar panels and batteries. We anticipate two major subsystems to be supplied by the United States, either by direct procurement by ESA or by contribution from NASA: the solar electric power system (including solar arrays and the power management and distribution system), and the probe entry system (including the thermal protection shield and aeroshell). Hera is designed to perform in situ measurements of the chemical and isotopic compositions as well as the dynamics of Saturn's atmosphere using a single probe, with the goal of improving our understanding of the origin, formation, and evolution of Saturn, the giant planets and their satellite systems, with extrapolation to extrasolar planets. Hera's aim is to probe well into the cloud-forming region of the troposphere, below the region accessible to remote sensing, to the locations where certain cosmogenically abundant species are expected to be well mixed. By leading to an improved understanding of the processes by which giant planets formed, including the composition and properties of the local solar nebula at the time and location of giant planet formation, Hera will extend the legacy of the Galileo and Cassini missions by further addressing the creation, formation, and chemical, dynamical, and thermal evolution of the giant planets, the entire solar system including Earth and the other terrestrial planets, and formation of other planetary systems.