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Bressan, A.

Normalized to: Bressan, A.

191 article(s) in total. 1134 co-authors, from 1 to 49 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 3,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.01371  [pdf] - 2066929
Impact of the Rotation and Compactness of Progenitors on the Mass of Black Holes
Comments: 15 pages, 5 figures, 1 table; updated to match the published version (Mapelli et al. 2020, ApJ, 888, 76)
Submitted: 2019-09-03, last modified: 2020-03-19
We investigate the impact of stellar rotation on the formation of black holes (BHs), by means of our population-synthesis code SEVN. Rotation affects the mass function of BHs in several ways. In massive metal-poor stars, fast rotation reduces the minimum zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass for a star to undergo pair instability and pulsational pair instability. Moreover, stellar winds are enhanced by rotation, peeling-off the entire hydrogen envelope. As a consequence of these two effects, the maximum BH mass we expect from the collapse a rotating metal-poor star is only $\sim{}45$ M$_\odot$, while the maximum mass of a BH born from a non-rotating star is $\sim{}60$ M$_\odot$. Furthermore, stellar rotation reduces the minimum ZAMS mass for a star to collapse into a BH from $\sim{}18-25$ M$_\odot$ to $\sim{}13-18$ M$_\odot$. Finally, we have investigated the impact of different core-collapse supernova (CCSN) prescriptions on our results. While the threshold value of compactness for direct collapse and the fallback efficiency strongly affect the minimum ZAMS mass for a star to collapse into a BH, the fraction of hydrogen envelope that can be accreted onto the final BH is the most important ingredient to determine the maximum BH mass. Our results confirm that the interplay between stellar rotation, CCSNe and pair instability plays a major role in shaping the BH mass spectrum.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.02572  [pdf] - 2026266
Impact of AGN feedback on galaxies and their multiphase ISM across cosmic time
Comments: Accepted for publication by MNRAS. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2019-11-06
We present simulations of galaxy formation, based on the GADGET-3 code, in which a sub-resolution model for star formation and stellar feedback is interfaced with a new model for AGN feedback. Our sub-resolution model describes a multiphase ISM, accounting for hot and cold gas within the same resolution element: we exploit this feature to investigate the impact of coupling AGN feedback energy to the different phases of the ISM over cosmic time. Our fiducial model considers that AGN feedback energy coupling is driven by the covering factors of the hot and cold phases. We perform a suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of disc galaxies ($M_{\rm halo, \, DM} \simeq 2 \cdot 10^{12}$ M$_{\odot}$, at $z=0$), to investigate: $(i)$ the effect of different ways of coupling AGN feedback energy to the multiphase ISM; $(ii)$ the impact of different prescriptions for gas accretion (i.e. only cold gas, both cold and hot gas, with the additional possibility of limiting gas accretion from cold gas with high angular momentum); $(iii)$ how different models of gas accretion and coupling of AGN feedback energy affect the coevolution of supermassive BHs and their host galaxy. We find that at least a share of the AGN feedback energy has to couple with the diffuse gas, in order to avoid an excessive growth of the BH mass. When the BH only accretes cold gas, it experiences a growth that is faster than in the case in which both cold and hot gas are accreted. If the accretion of cold gas with high angular momentum is reduced, the BH mass growth is delayed, the BH mass at $z=0$ is reduced by up to an order of magnitude, and the BH is prevented from accreting below $z \lesssim 2$, when the galaxy disc forms.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.09037  [pdf] - 2011958
YBC, a stellar bolometric corrections database with variable extinction coefficients: an application to PARSEC isochrones
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A, 14 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2019-10-20
We present the \texttt{YBC} database of stellar bolometric corrections (BCs), available at \url{http://stev.oapd.inaf.it/YBC}. We homogenize widely-used theoretical stellar spectral libraries and provide BCs for many popular photometric systems, including the Gaia filters. The database can be easily extended to additional photometric systems and stellar spectral libraries. The web interface allows users to transform their catalogue of theoretical stellar parameters into magnitudes and colours of selected filter sets. The BC tables can be downloaded or also be implemented into large simulation projects using the interpolation code provided with the database. We compute extinction coefficients on a star-by-star basis, hence taking into account the effects of spectral type and non-linearity dependency on the total extinction. We illustrate the use of these BCs in \texttt{PARSEC} isochrones. We show that using spectral-type dependent extinction coefficients is quite necessary for Gaia filters whenever $\Av\gtrsim 0.5$\,mag. BC tables for rotating stars and tables of limb-darkening coefficients are also provided.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.01907  [pdf] - 1994172
Multiple stellar populations in NGC 1866. New clues from Cepheids and Colour-Magnitude Diagram
Comments: 12 pages, 12 figures, accepted in A&A
Submitted: 2019-09-04, last modified: 2019-09-24
We perform a comprehensive study of the stellar populations in the young Large Magellanic Cloud cluster NGC 1866, combining the analysis of its best-studied Cepheids with that of a very accurate colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) obtained from the most recent Hubble Space Telescope photometry. We use a Bayesian method based on new PARSEC stellar evolutionary tracks with overshooting and rotation to obtain ages and initial rotation velocities of five well-studied Cepheids of the cluster. We find that four of the five Cepheids belong to an initially slowly rotating young population (of $ 176 \pm 5$ Myr), while the fifth one is significantly older, either $ 288 \pm 20$ Myr for models with high initial rotational velocity ($\omega_\mathrm{i} \sim 0.9$), or $ 202 \pm 5$ Myr for slowly rotating models. The complementary analysis of the CMD rules out the latter solution while strongly supporting the presence of two distinct populations of $\sim$176 Myr and $\sim$288 Myr, respectively. Moreover, the observed multiple main sequences and the turn-offs indicate that the younger population is mainly made of slowly rotating stars, as is the case of the four younger Cepheids, while the older population is made mainly of initially fast rotating stars, as is the case of the fifth Cepheid. Our study not only reinforces the notion that some young clusters like NGC 1866 harbor multiple populations, but gives also hints that the first population, the older, may inherit the angular momentum from the parent cloud while stars of the second one, the younger, do not.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.10025  [pdf] - 2090586
A deeper look at the dust attenuation law of star-forming galaxies at high redshift
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-04-22, last modified: 2019-07-02
A diverse range of dust attenuation laws is found in star-forming galaxies. In particular, Tress et al. (2018) studied the SHARDS survey to constrain the NUV bump strength (B) and the total-to selective ratio (Rv) of 1,753 star-forming galaxies in the GOODS-N field at 1.5<z<3. We revisit here this sample to assess the implications and possible causes of the correlation found between Rv and B. The UVJ bicolour plot and main sequence of star formation are scrutinised to look for clues into the observed trend. The standard boundary between quiescent and star-forming galaxies is preserved when taking into account the wide range of attenuation parameters. However, an additional degeneracy, regarding the effective attenuation law, is added to the standard loci of star-forming galaxies in the UVJ diagram. A simple phenomenological model with an age-dependent extinction (at fixed dust composition) is compatible with the observed trend between Rv and B, whereby the opacity decreases with the age of the populations, resulting in a weaker NUV bump when the overall attenuation is shallower (greyer). In addition, we compare the constraints obtained by the SHARDS sample with dust models from the literature, supporting a scenario where geometry could potentially drive the correlation between Rv and B
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.00688  [pdf] - 1908818
On the photometric signature of fast rotators
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS, 10 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-01
Rapidly rotating stars have been recently recognized as having a major role in the interpretation of colour-magnitude diagrams of young and intermediate-age star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds and in the Milky Way. In this work, we evaluate the distinctive spectra and distributions in colour-colour space that follow from the presence of a substantial range in effective temperatures across the surface of fast rotators. The calculations are inserted in a formalism similar to the one usually adopted for non-rotating stars, which allows us to derive tables of bolometric corrections as a function not only of a reference effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity, but also of the rotational speed with respect to the break-up value, $\omega$, and the inclination angle, $i$. We find that only very fast rotators ($\omega>0.95$) observed nearly equator-on ($i>45^\circ$) present sizable deviations from the colour-colour relations of non-rotating stars. In light of these results, we discuss the photometry of the $\sim$ 200-Myr-old cluster NGC 1866 and its split main sequence, which has been attributed to the simultaneous presence of slow and fast rotators. The small dispersion of its stars in colour-colour diagrams allow us to conclude that fast rotators in this cluster either have rotational velocities $\omega<0.95$, or are all observed nearly pole-on. Such geometric colour-colour effects, although small, might be potentially detectable in the huge, high-quality photometric samples in the post-Gaia era, in addition to the evolutionary effects caused by rotation-induced mixing.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.06702  [pdf] - 1889530
The mass-loss, expansion velocities and dust production rates of carbon stars in the Magellanic Clouds
Comments: 22 pages, 16 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-04-14, last modified: 2019-05-25
The properties of carbon stars in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) and their total dust production rates are predicted by fitting their spectral energy distributions (SED) over pre-computed grids of spectra reprocessed by dust. The grids are calculated as a function of the stellar parameters by consistently following the growth for several dust species in their circumstellar envelopes, coupled with a stationary wind. Dust radiative transfer is computed taking as input the results of the dust growth calculations. The optical constants for amorphous carbon are selected in order to reproduce different observations in the infrared and optical bands of \textit{Gaia} Data Release 2. We find a tail of extreme mass-losing carbon stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with low gas-to-dust ratios that is not present in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Typical gas-to-dust ratios are around $700$ for the extreme stars, but they can be down to $\sim160$--$200$ and $\sim100$ for a few sources in the SMC and in the LMC, respectively. The total dust production rate for the carbon star population is $\sim 1.77\pm 0.45\times10^{-5}$~M$_\odot$~yr$^{-1}$, for the LMC, and $\sim 2.52\pm 0.96 \times 10^{-6}$~M$_\odot$~yr$^{-1}$, for the SMC. The extreme carbon stars observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array and their wind speed are studied in detail. For the most dust-obscured star in this sample the estimated mass-loss rate is $\sim 6.3 \times 10^{-5}$~M$_\odot$~yr$^{-1}$. The grids of spectra are available at: https://ambrananni085.wixsite.com/ambrananni/online-data-1 and included in the SED-fitting python package for fitting evolved stars https://github.com/s-goldman/Dusty-Evolved-Star-Kit .
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.00083  [pdf] - 1890382
Host galaxies of merging compact objects: mass, star formation rate, metallicity and colours
Comments: 14 pages, 10 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS. Comments welcome!
Submitted: 2019-02-28, last modified: 2019-05-16
Characterizing the properties of the host galaxies of merging compact objects provides essential clues to interpret current and future gravitational-wave detections. Here, we investigate the stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), metallicity and colours of the host galaxies of merging compact objects in the local Universe, by combining the results of MOBSE population-synthesis models together with galaxy catalogs from the EAGLE simulation. We predict that the stellar mass of the host galaxy is an excellent tracer of the merger rate per galaxy ${\rm n}_{\rm GW}$ of double neutron stars (DNSs), double black holes (DBHs) and black hole-neutron star binaries (BHNSs). We find a significant correlation also between ${\rm n}_{\rm GW}$ and SFR. As a consequence, ${\rm n}_{\rm GW}$ correlates also with the $r-$band luminosity and with the $g-r$ colour of the host galaxies. Interestingly, $\gtrsim{}60$ %, $\gtrsim{}64$ % and $\gtrsim{}73$ % of all the DNSs, BHNSs and DBHs merging in the local Universe lie in early-type galaxies, such as NGC 4993. We predict a local DNS merger rate density of $\sim{}238~{\rm Gpc}^{-3}~{\rm yr}~^{-1}$ and a DNS merger rate $\sim{}16-121$ Myr$^{-1}$ for Milky Way-like galaxies. Thus, our results are consistent with both the DNS merger rate inferred from GW170817 and the one inferred from Galactic DNSs.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.04605  [pdf] - 1865812
Merging black hole binaries with the SEVN code
Comments: 26 pages, 14 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2018-09-12, last modified: 2019-04-10
Studying the formation and evolution of black hole binaries (BHBs) is essential for the interpretation of current and forthcoming gravitational wave (GW) detections. We investigate the statistics of BHBs that form from isolated binaries, by means of a new version of the SEVN population-synthesis code. SEVN integrates stellar evolution by interpolation over a grid of stellar evolution tracks. We upgraded SEVN to include binary stellar evolution processes and we used it to evolve a sample of $1.5\times{}10^8$ binary systems, with metallicity in the range $\left[10^{-4};4\times 10^{-2}\right]$. From our simulations, we find that the mass distribution of black holes (BHs) in double compact-object binaries is remarkably similar to the one obtained considering only single stellar evolution. The maximum BH mass we obtain is $\sim 30$, $45$ and $55\, \mathrm{M}_\odot$ at metallicity $Z=2\times 10^{-2}$, $6\times 10^{-3}$, and $10^{-4}$, respectively. A few massive single BHs may also form ($\lesssim 0.1\%$ of the total number of BHs), with mass up to $\sim 65$, $90$ and $145\, \mathrm{M}_\odot$ at $Z=2\times 10^{-2}$, $6\times 10^{-3}$, and $10^{-4}$, respectively. These BHs fall in the mass gap predicted from pair-instability supernovae. We also show that the most massive BHBs are unlikely to merge within a Hubble time. In our simulations, merging BHs like GW151226 and GW170608, form at all metallicities, the high-mass systems (like GW150914, GW170814 and GW170104) originate from metal poor ($Z\lesssim{}6\times 10^{-3}$) progenitors, whereas GW170729-like systems are hard to form, even at $Z = 10^{-4}$. The BHB merger rate in the local Universe obtained from our simulations is $\sim 90 \mathrm{Gpc}^{-3}\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$, consistent with the rate inferred from LIGO-Virgo data.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04499  [pdf] - 1855797
Constraining the thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch phase with resolved stellar populations in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Comments: accepted for publication in MNRAS. 29 pages, 24 figures, 2 appendices. One online appendix available as ancillary file on this page
Submitted: 2019-03-11
The thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) experienced by low- and intermediate-mass stars is one of the most uncertain phases of stellar evolution and the models need to be calibrated with the aid of observations. To this purpose, we couple high-quality observations of resolved stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with detailed stellar population synthesis simulations computed with the TRILEGAL code. The strength of our approach relies on the detailed spatially-resolved star formation history of the SMC, derived from the deep near-infrared photometry of the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds, as well as on the capability to quickly and accurately explore a wide variety of parameters and effects with the COLIBRI code for the TP-AGB evolution. Adopting a well-characterized set of observations -- star counts and luminosity functions -- we set up a calibration cycle along which we iteratively change a few key parameters of the TP-AGB models until we eventually reach a good fit to the observations. Our work leads to identify two best-fitting models that mainly differ in the efficiencies of the third dredge-up and mass loss in TP-AGB stars with initial masses larger than about 3 M$_{\odot}$. On the basis of these calibrated models we provide a full characterization of the TP-AGB stellar population in the SMC in terms of stellar parameters (initial masses, C/O ratios, carbon excess, mass-loss rates). Extensive tables of isochrones including these improved models are publicly available.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04368  [pdf] - 1851768
Mixing by overshooting and rotation in intermediate mass stars
Comments: 17 pages, 12 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-03-11
Double-line eclipsing binaries (DLEBs) have been recently used to constrain the amount of central mixing as a function of stellar mass, with contrasting results. In this work, we reanalyze the DLEB sample by Claret & Torres, using a Bayesian method and new PARSEC tracks that account for both convective core overshooting and rotational mixing. Using overshooting alone we obtain that, for masses larger than about 1.9 M$_{\odot}$, the distribution of the overshooting parameter, $\lambda_\mathrm{ov}$, has a wide dispersion between 0.3 and 0.8, with essentially no values below $\lambda_\mathrm{ov}=$ 0.3 - 0.4. While the lower limit supports a mild convective overshooting efficiency, the large dispersion derived is difficult to explain in the framework of current models of that process, which leave little room for large randomness. We suggest that a simple interpretation of our results can be rotational mixing: different initial rotational velocities, in addition to a fixed amount of overshooting, could reproduce the high dispersion derived for intermediate-mass stars. After a reanalysis of the data, we find good agreement with models computed with fixed overshooting parameter, $\lambda_\mathrm{ov}=0.4$, and initial rotational rates, $\omega$, uniformly distributed in a wide range between $0$ and $0.8$ times the break-up value, at varying initial mass. We also find that our best-fitting models for the components of $\alpha$ Aurigae and TZ Fornacis, agree with their observed rotational velocities, thus providing independent support to our hypothesis. We conclude that a constant efficiency of overshooting in concurrence with a star-to-star variation in the rotational mixing, might be crucial in the interpretation of such data.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.05955  [pdf] - 1833369
Chemical evolution of disc galaxies from cosmological simulations
Comments: Accepted for publications in MNRAS. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2019-02-15
We perform a suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of disc galaxies, with zoomed-in initial conditions leading to the formation of a halo of mass $M_{\rm halo, \, DM} \simeq 2 \cdot 10^{12}$ M$_{\odot}$ at redshift $z=0$. These simulations aim at investigating the chemical evolution and the distribution of metals in a disc galaxy, and at quantifying the effect of $(i)$ the assumed IMF, $(ii)$ the adopted stellar yields, and $(iii)$ the impact of binary systems originating SNe Ia on the process of chemical enrichment. We consider either a Kroupa et al. (1993) or a more top-heavy Kroupa (2001) IMF, two sets of stellar yields and different values for the fraction of binary systems suitable to give rise to SNe Ia. We investigate stellar ages, SN rates, stellar and gas metallicity gradients, and stellar $\alpha$-enhancement in simulations, and compare predictions with observations. We find that a Kroupa et al. (1993) IMF has to be preferred when modelling late-type galaxies in the local universe. On the other hand, the comparison of stellar metallicity profiles and $\alpha$-enhancement trends with observations of Milky Way stars shows a better agreement when a Kroupa (2001) IMF is assumed. Comparing the predicted SN rates and stellar $\alpha$-enhancement with observations supports a value for the fraction of binary systems producing SNe Ia of $0.03$, at least for late-type galaxies and for the considered IMFs. Adopted stellar yields are crucial in regulating cooling and star formation, and in determining patterns of chemical enrichment for stars, especially for those located in the galaxy bulge.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.03521  [pdf] - 1767650
The host galaxies of double compact objects merging in the local Universe
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures, 1 table, resubmitted to MNRAS after addressing referee's comments
Submitted: 2018-09-10
We investigate the host galaxies of compact objects merging in the local Universe, by combining the results of binary population-synthesis simulations with the Illustris cosmological box. Double neutron stars (DNSs) merging in the local Universe tend to form in massive galaxies (with stellar mass $>10^{9}$ M$_\odot$) and to merge in the same galaxy where they formed, with a short delay time between the formation of the progenitor stars and the DNS merger. In contrast, double black holes (DBHs) and black hole $-$ neutron star binaries (BHNSs) form preferentially in small galaxies (with stellar mass $<10^{10}$ M$_\odot$) and merge either in small or in larger galaxies, with a long delay time. This result is an effect of metallicity: merging DBHs and BHNSs form preferentially from metal-poor progenitors ($Z\leq{}0.1$ Z$_\odot$), which are more common in high-redshift galaxies and in local dwarf galaxies, whereas merging DNSs are only mildly sensitive to progenitor's metallicity and thus are more abundant in massive galaxies nowadays. The mass range of DNS hosts we predict in this work is consistent with the mass range of short gamma-ray burst hosts.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.04737  [pdf] - 1738400
The Minimum Mass of Rotating Main Sequence Stars and its Impact on the Nature of Extended Main Sequence Turnoffs in Intermediate-Age Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, LaTeX/emulateapj style, published in ApJL
Submitted: 2018-07-12, last modified: 2018-08-24
Extended main sequence turn-offs (eMSTOs) are a common feature in color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of young and intermediate-age star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds. The nature of eMSTOs is still debated. The most popular scenarios are extended star formation and ranges of stellar rotation rates. Here we study implications of a kink feature in the main sequence (MS) of young star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This kink shows up very clearly in new \emph{Hubble Space Telescope} observations of the 700-Myr-old cluster NGC 1831, and is located below the region in the CMD where multiple or wide MSes, which are known to occur in young clusters and thought to be due to varying rotation rates, merge together into a single MS. The kink occurs at an initial stellar mass of $1.45 \pm 0.02\;M_{\odot}$; we posit that it represents a lower limit to the mass below which the effects of rotation on the energy output of stars are rendered negligible at the metallicity of these clusters. Evaluating the positions of stars with this initial mass in CMDs of massive LMC star clusters with ages of $\sim\,$1.7 Gyr that feature wide eMSTOs, we find that such stars are located in a region where the eMSTO is already significantly wider than the MS below it. This strongly suggests that stellar rotation \emph{cannot} fully explain the wide extent of eMSTOs in massive intermediate-age clusters in the Magellanic Clouds. A distribution of stellar ages still seems necessary to explain the eMSTO phenomenon.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09378  [pdf] - 1732652
Gaia Data Release 2: Observational Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams
Gaia Collaboration; Babusiaux, C.; van Leeuwen, F.; Barstow, M. A.; Jordi, C.; Vallenari, A.; Bossini, D.; Bressan, A.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; van Leeuwen, M.; Brown, A. G. A.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Walton, N. A.; Arenou, F.; Bastian, U.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Bakker, J.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; DeAngeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Holl, B.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Teyssier, D.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Audard, M.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Burgess, P.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Clotet, M.; Creevey, O.; Davidson, M.; DeRidder, J.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fouesneau, M.; Frémat, Y.; Galluccio, L.; García-Torres, M.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Gosset, E.; Guy, L. P.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández, J.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Jordan, S.; Korn, A. J.; Krone-Martins, A.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Lebzelter, T.; Löffler, W.; Manteiga, M.; Marrese, P. M.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Moitinho, A.; Mora, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Richards, P. J.; Rimoldini, L.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Sozzetti, A.; Süveges, M.; Torra, J.; vanReeven, W.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aerts, C.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alvarez, R.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Arcay, B.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Balm, P.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbato, D.; Barblan, F.; Barklem, P. S.; Barrado, D.; Barros, M.; Muñoz, S. Bartholomé; Bassilana, J. -L.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; Berihuete, A.; Bertone, S.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Boeche, C.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Bramante, L.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Brugaletta, E.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Butkevich, A. G.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cancelliere, R.; Cannizzaro, G.; Carballo, R.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Casamiquela, L.; Castellani, M.; Castro-Ginard, A.; Charlot, P.; Chemin, L.; Chiavassa, A.; Cocozza, G.; Costigan, G.; Cowell, S.; Crifo, F.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Cuypers, J.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; deLaverny, P.; DeLuise, F.; DeMarch, R.; deMartino, D.; deSouza, R.; deTorres, A.; Debosscher, J.; delPozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Diakite, S.; Diener, C.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Eriksson, K.; Esquej, P.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernique, P.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Frézouls, B.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavel, A.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Giacobbe, P.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Glass, F.; Gomes, M.; Granvik, M.; Gueguen, A.; Guerrier, A.; Guiraud, J.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Hauser, M.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Heu, J.; Hilger, T.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holland, G.; Huckle, H. E.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Janßen, K.; JevardatdeFombelle, G.; Jonker, P. G.; Juhász, Á. L.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kewley, A.; Klar, J.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, M.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Koubsky, P.; Lambert, S.; Lanza, A. F.; Lasne, Y.; Lavigne, J. -B.; LeFustec, Y.; LePoncin-Lafitte, C.; Lebreton, Y.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; López, M.; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martino, M.; Marton, G.; Mary, N.; Massari, D.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molnár, L.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; O'Mullane, W.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Panahi, A.; Pawlak, M.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poggio, E.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Racero, E.; Ragaini, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Riclet, F.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rivard, A.; Rixon, G.; Roegiers, T.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sanna, N.; Santana-Ros, T.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Ségransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Siltala, L.; Silva, A. F.; Smart, R. L.; Smith, K. W.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; SoriaNieto, S.; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Teyssandier, P.; Thuillot, W.; Titarenko, A.; TorraClotet, F.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Uzzi, S.; Vaillant, M.; Valentini, G.; Valette, V.; vanElteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; Vaschetto, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Viala, Y.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; vonEssen, C.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Wertz, O.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zorec, J.; Zschocke, S.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.
Comments: Published in the A&A Gaia Data Release 2 special issue. Tables 2 and A.4 corrected. Tables available at http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/616/A10
Submitted: 2018-04-25, last modified: 2018-08-13
We highlight the power of the Gaia DR2 in studying many fine structures of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD). Gaia allows us to present many different HRDs, depending in particular on stellar population selections. We do not aim here for completeness in terms of types of stars or stellar evolutionary aspects. Instead, we have chosen several illustrative examples. We describe some of the selections that can be made in Gaia DR2 to highlight the main structures of the Gaia HRDs. We select both field and cluster (open and globular) stars, compare the observations with previous classifications and with stellar evolutionary tracks, and we present variations of the Gaia HRD with age, metallicity, and kinematics. Late stages of stellar evolution such as hot subdwarfs, post-AGB stars, planetary nebulae, and white dwarfs are also analysed, as well as low-mass brown dwarf objects. The Gaia HRDs are unprecedented in both precision and coverage of the various Milky Way stellar populations and stellar evolutionary phases. Many fine structures of the HRDs are presented. The clear split of the white dwarf sequence into hydrogen and helium white dwarfs is presented for the first time in an HRD. The relation between kinematics and the HRD is nicely illustrated. Two different populations in a classical kinematic selection of the halo are unambiguously identified in the HRD. Membership and mean parameters for a selected list of open clusters are provided. They allow drawing very detailed cluster sequences, highlighting fine structures, and providing extremely precise empirical isochrones that will lead to more insight in stellar physics. Gaia DR2 demonstrates the potential of combining precise astrometry and photometry for large samples for studies in stellar evolution and stellar population and opens an entire new area for HRD-based studies.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.00028  [pdf] - 1724098
Colour-magnitude diagram in simulations of galaxy formation
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2018-04-30, last modified: 2018-07-28
State-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulations have star particles with typical mass between $\sim 10^8$ and $\sim 10^3$ M$_{\odot}$ according to resolution, and treat them as simple stellar populations. On the other hand, observations in nearby galaxies resolve individual stars and provide us with single star properties. An accurate and fair comparison between predictions from simulations and observations is a crucial task. We introduce a novel approach to consistently populate star particles with stars. We developed a technique to generate a theoretical catalogue of mock stars whose characteristics are derived from the properties of parent star particles from a cosmological simulation. Also, a library of stellar evolutionary tracks and synthetic spectra is used to mimic the photometric properties of mock stars. The aim of this tool is to produce a database of synthetic stars from the properties of parent star particles in simulations: such a database represents the observable stellar content of simulated galaxies and allows a comparison as accurate as possible with observations of resolved stellar populations. With this innovative approach we are able to provide a colour-magnitude diagram from a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. This method is flexible and can be tailored to fit output of different codes used for cosmological simulations. Also, it is of paramount importance with ongoing survey data releases (e.g. GAIA and surveys of resolved stellar populations), and will be useful to predict properties of stars with peculiar chemical features and to compare predictions from hydrodynamical models with data of different tracers of stellar populations.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.04516  [pdf] - 1694157
The VMC survey - XXXI. The spatially resolved star formation history of the main body of the Small Magellanic Cloud
Comments: To appear in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-05-11
We recover the spatially resolved star formation history across the entire main body and Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), using fourteen deep tile images from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds (VMC), in the YJKs filters. The analysis is performed on 168 subregions of size 0.143 deg2, covering a total contiguous area of 23.57 deg2. We apply a colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) reconstruction method that returns the best-fitting star formation rate SFR(t), age--metallicity relation, distance and mean reddening, together with their confidence intervals, for each subregion. With respect to previous analyses, we use a far larger set of VMC data, updated stellar models, and fit the two available CMDs (Y-Ks versus Ks and J-Ks versus Ks) independently. The results allow us to derive a more complete and more reliable picture of how the mean distances, extinction values, star formation rate, and metallicities vary across the SMC, and provide a better description of the populations that form its Bar and Wing. We conclude that the SMC has formed a total mass of (5.31+-0.05)x10^8 Msun in stars over its lifetime. About two thirds of this mass is expected to be still locked in stars and stellar remnants. 50 per cent of the mass was formed prior to an age of 6.3 Gyr, and 80 per cent was formed between 8 and 3.5 Gyr ago. We also illustrate the likely distribution of stellar ages and metallicities in different parts of the CMD, to aid the interpretation of data from future astrometric and spectroscopic surveys of the SMC.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.04734  [pdf] - 1684596
The Dramatic Size and Kinematic Evolution of Massive Early-Type Galaxies
Comments: 28 pages, 10 figures. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2018-03-13
[ABRIDGED] We aim to provide a holistic view on the typical size and kinematic evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs), that encompasses their high-$z$ star-forming progenitors, their high-$z$ quiescent counterparts, and their configurations in the local Universe. Our investigation covers the main processes playing a relevant role in the cosmic evolution of ETGs. Specifically, their early fast evolution comprises: biased collapse of the low angular momentum gaseous baryons located in the inner regions of the host dark matter halo; cooling, fragmentation, and infall of the gas down to the radius set by the centrifugal barrier; further rapid compaction via clump/gas migration toward the galaxy center, where strong heavily dust-enshrouded star-formation takes place and most of the stellar mass is accumulated; ejection of substantial gas amount from the inner regions by feedback processes, which causes a dramatic puffing up of the stellar component. In the late slow evolution, passive aging of stellar populations and mass additions by dry merger events occur. We describe these processes relying on prescriptions inspired by basic physical arguments and by numerical simulations, to derive new analytical estimates of the relevant sizes, timescales, and kinematic properties for individual galaxies along their evolution. Then we obtain quantitative results as a function of galaxy mass and redshift, and compare them to recent observational constraints on half-light size $R_e$, on the ratio $v/\sigma$ between rotation velocity and velocity dispersion (for gas and stars) and on the specific angular momentum $j_\star$ of the stellar component; we find good consistency with the available multi-band data in average values and dispersion, both for local ETGs and for their $z\sim 1-2$ star-forming and quiescent progenitors.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.04829  [pdf] - 1644747
The Gaia -ESO Survey: Lithium enrichment histories of the Galactic thick and thin disc
Comments: 15 pages, 15 figures, published in A&A, data online at CDS
Submitted: 2017-11-13, last modified: 2018-03-06
Lithium abundance in most of the warm metal-poor main sequence stars shows a constant plateau (A(Li)~2.2 dex) and then the upper envelope of the lithium vs. metallicity distribution increases as we approach solar metallicity. Meteorites, which carry information about the chemical composition of the interstellar medium at the solar system formation time, show a lithium abundance A(Li)~3.26 dex. This pattern reflects the Li enrichment history of the interstellar medium during the Galaxy lifetime. After the initial Li production in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, the sources of the enrichment include AGB stars, low-mass red giants, novae, type II supernovae, and Galactic cosmic rays. The total amount of enriched Li is sensitive to the relative contribution of these sources. Thus different Li enrichment histories are expected in the Galactic thick and thin disc. We investigate the main sequence stars observed with UVES in Gaia-ESO Survey iDR4 catalog and find a Li-[alpha/Fe] anticorrelation independent of [Fe/H], Teff, and log(g). Since in stellar evolution different {\alpha} enhancements at the same metallicity do not lead to a measurable Li abundance change, the anticorrelation indicates that more Li is produced during the Galactic thin disc phase than during the Galactic thick disc phase. We also find a correlation between the abundance of Li and s-process elements Ba and Y, and they both decrease above the solar metallicity, which can be explained in the framework of the adopted Galactic chemical evolution models.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.07137  [pdf] - 1634341
New PARSEC database of alpha-enhanced stellar evolutionary tracks and isochrones I. Calibration with 47 Tuc (NGC104) and the improvement on RGB bump
Comments: accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-01-22
Precise studies on the Galactic bulge, globular cluster, Galactic halo and Galactic thick disk require stellar models with alpha enhancement and various values of helium content. These models are also important for extra-Galactic population synthesis studies. For this purpose, we complement the existing PARSEC models, which are based on the solar partition of heavy elements, with alpha-enhanced partitions. We collect detailed measurements on the metal mixture and helium abundance for the two populations of 47 Tuc (NGC 104) from the literature, and calculate stellar tracks and isochrones with these alpha-enhanced compositions. By fitting the precise color-magnitude diagram with HST ACS/WFC data, from low main sequence till horizontal branch, we calibrate some free parameters that are important for the evolution of low mass stars like the mixing at the bottom of the convective envelope. This new calibration significantly improves the prediction of the RGB bump brightness. Comparison with the observed RGB and HB luminosity functions also shows that the evolutionary lifetimes are correctly predicted. As a further result of this calibration process, we derive the age, distance modulus, reddening, and the red giant branch mass loss for 47 Tuc. We apply the new calibration and alpha-enhanced mixtures of the two 47 Tuc populations ( [alpha/Fe] ~0.4 and 0.2) to other metallicities. The new models reproduce the RGB bump observations much better than previous models. This new PARSEC database, with the newly updated alpha-enhanced stellar evolutionary tracks and isochrones, will also be part of the new stellar products for Gaia.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.10325  [pdf] - 1611879
On the effect of galactic outflows in cosmological simulations of disc galaxies
Comments: Published in MNRAS. Figure 18 is a duplicate of Fig. 12 (left-hand panel) in the published version of the paper, due to an error occurred in the proof editing process. The real Fig. 18 is missing in the published version. This problem is not present here in the arxiv submission. Corrected a few typos to match the published version
Submitted: 2017-05-29, last modified: 2017-12-31
We investigate the impact of galactic outflow modelling on the formation and evolution of a disc galaxy, by performing a suite of cosmological simulations with zoomed-in initial conditions of a Milky Way-sized halo. We verify how sensitive the general properties of the simulated galaxy are to the way in which stellar feedback triggered outflows are implemented, keeping initial conditions, simulation code and star formation (SF) model all fixed. We present simulations that are based on a version of the GADGET3 code where our sub-resolution model is coupled with an advanced implementation of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics that ensures a more accurate fluid sampling and an improved description of gas mixing and hydrodynamical instabilities. We quantify the strong interplay between the adopted hydrodynamic scheme and the sub-resolution model describing SF and feedback. We consider four different galactic outflow models, including the one introduced by Dalla Vecchia and Schaye (2012) and a scheme that is inspired by the Springel and Hernquist (2003) model. We find that the sub-resolution prescriptions adopted to generate galactic outflows are the main shaping factor of the stellar disc component at low redshift. The key requirement that a feedback model must have to be successful in producing a disc-dominated galaxy is the ability to regulate the high-redshift SF (responsible for the formation of the bulge component), the cosmological infall of gas from the large-scale environment, and gas fall-back within the galactic radius at low redshift, in order to avoid a too high SF rate at $z=0$.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.02591  [pdf] - 1604970
Estimating the dust production rate of carbon stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Comments: 24 pages, 22 figures, accepted
Submitted: 2017-10-06
We employ newly computed grids of spectra reprocessed by dust for estimating the total dust production rate (DPR) of carbon stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). For the first time, the grids of spectra are computed as a function of the main stellar parameters, i.e. mass-loss rate, luminosity, effective temperature, current stellar mass and element abundances at the photosphere, following a consistent, physically grounded scheme of dust growth coupled with stationary wind outflow. The model accounts for the dust growth of various dust species formed in the circumstellar envelopes of carbon stars, such as carbon dust, silicon carbide and metallic iron. In particular, we employ some selected combinations of optical constants and grain sizes for carbon dust which have been shown to reproduce simultaneously the most relevant color-color diagrams in the SMC. By employing our grids of models, we fit the spectral energy distributions of $\approx$3100 carbon stars in the SMC, consistently deriving some important dust and stellar properties, i.e. luminosities, mass-loss rates, gas-to-dust ratios, expansion velocities and dust chemistry. We discuss these properties and we compare some of them with observations in the Galaxy and LMC. We compute the DPR of carbon stars in the SMC, finding that the estimates provided by our method can be significantly different, between a factor $\approx2-5$, than the ones available in the literature. Our grids of models, including the spectra and other relevant dust and stellar quantities, are publicly available at http://starkey.astro.unipd.it/web/guest/dustymodels
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.07643  [pdf] - 1684549
Stellar Mass Function of Active and Quiescent Galaxies via the Continuity Equation
Comments: 19 pages, 10 figures. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2017-08-25
The continuity equation is developed for the stellar mass content of galaxies, and exploited to derive the stellar mass function of active and quiescent galaxies over the redshift range $z\sim 0-8$. The continuity equation requires two specific inputs gauged on observations: (i) the star formation rate functions determined on the basis of the latest UV+far-IR/sub-mm/radio measurements; (ii) average star-formation histories for individual galaxies, with different prescriptions for discs and spheroids. The continuity equation also includes a source term taking into account (dry) mergers, based on recent numerical simulations and consistent with observations. The stellar mass function derived from the continuity equation is coupled with the halo mass function and with the SFR functions to derive the star formation efficiency and the main sequence of star-forming galaxies via the abundance matching technique. A remarkable agreement of the resulting stellar mass function for active and quiescent galaxies, of the galaxy main sequence and of the star-formation efficiency with current observations is found; the comparison with data also allows to robustly constrain the characteristic timescales for star formation and quiescence of massive galaxies, the star formation history of their progenitors, and the amount of stellar mass added by in-situ star formation vs. that contributed by external merger events. The continuity equation is shown to yield quantitative outcomes that must be complied by detailed physical models, that can provide a basis to improve the (sub-grid) physical recipes implemented in theoretical approaches and numerical simulations, and that can offer a benchmark for forecasts on future observations with multi-band coverage, as it will become routinely achievable in the era of JWST.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.03778  [pdf] - 1584573
PLATO as it is: a legacy mission for Galactic archaeology
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomical Notes
Submitted: 2017-06-12, last modified: 2017-07-07
Deciphering the assembly history of the Milky Way is a formidable task, which becomes possible only if one can produce high-resolution chrono-chemo-kinematical maps of the Galaxy. Data from large-scale astrometric and spectroscopic surveys will soon provide us with a well-defined view of the current chemo-kinematical structure of the Milky Way, but will only enable a blurred view on the temporal sequence that led to the present-day Galaxy. As demonstrated by the (ongoing) exploitation of data from the pioneering photometric missions CoRoT, Kepler, and K2, asteroseismology provides the way forward: solar-like oscillating giants are excellent evolutionary clocks thanks to the availability of seismic constraints on their mass and to the tight age-initial-mass relation they adhere to. In this paper we identify five key outstanding questions relating to the formation and evolution of the Milky Way that will need precise and accurate ages for large samples of stars to be addressed, and we identify the requirements in terms of number of targets and the precision on the stellar properties that are needed to tackle such questions. By quantifying the asteroseismic yields expected from PLATO for red-giant stars, we demonstrate that these requirements are within the capabilities of the current instrument design, provided that observations are sufficiently long to identify the evolutionary state and allow robust and precise determination of acoustic-mode frequencies. This will allow us to harvest data of sufficient quality to reach a 10% precision in age. This is a fundamental pre-requisite to then reach the more ambitious goal of a similar level of accuracy, which will only be possible if we have to hand a careful appraisal of systematic uncertainties on age deriving from our limited understanding of stellar physics, a goal which conveniently falls within the main aims of PLATO's core science.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.06539  [pdf] - 1583584
Galaxy Evolution in the Radio Band: The Role of Starforming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei
Comments: 50 pages, 16 figures, Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2017-05-18
We investigate the astrophysics of radio-emitting star-forming galaxies and ac- tive galactic nuclei (AGNs), and elucidate their statistical properties in the radio band including luminosity functions, redshift distributions, and number counts at sub-mJy flux levels, that will be crucially probed by next-generation radio continuum surveys. Specifically, we exploit the model-independent approach by Mancuso et al. (2016a,b) to compute the star formation rate functions, the AGN duty cycles and the conditional probability of a star-forming galaxy to host an AGN with given bolometric luminosity. Coupling these ingredients with the radio emission properties associated to star formation and nuclear activity, we compute relevant statistics at different radio frequencies, and disentangle the relative con- tribution of star-forming galaxies and AGNs in different radio luminosity, radio flux, and redshift ranges. Finally, we highlight that radio-emitting star-forming galaxies and AGNs are expected to host supermassive black holes accreting with different Eddington ratio distributions, and to occupy different loci in the galaxy main sequence diagrams. These specific predictions are consistent with current datasets, but need to be tested with larger statistics via future radio data with multi-band coverage on wide areas, as it will become routinely achievable with the advent of the SKA and its precursors.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.03077  [pdf] - 1583235
Kepler red-clump stars in the field and in open clusters: constraints on core mixing
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-05-08
Convective mixing in Helium-core-burning (HeCB) stars is one of the outstanding issues in stellar modelling. The precise asteroseismic measurements of gravity-modes period spacing ($\Delta\Pi_1$) has opened the door to detailed studies of the near-core structure of such stars, which had not been possible before. Here we provide stringent tests of various core-mixing scenarios against the largely unbiased population of red-clump stars belonging to the old open clusters monitored by Kepler, and by coupling the updated precise inference on $\Delta\Pi_1$ in thousands field stars with spectroscopic constraints. We find that models with moderate overshooting successfully reproduce the range observed of $\Delta\Pi_1$ in clusters. In particular we show that there is no evidence for the need to extend the size of the adiabatically stratified core, at least at the beginning of the HeCB phase. This conclusion is based primarily on ensemble studies of $\Delta\Pi_1$ as a function of mass and metallicity. While $\Delta\Pi_1$ shows no appreciable dependence on the mass, we have found a clear dependence of $\Delta\Pi_1$ on metallicity, which is also supported by predictions from models.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00688  [pdf] - 1583007
Gaia Data Release 1. Testing the parallaxes with local Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars
Gaia Collaboration; Clementini, G.; Eyer, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Muraveva, T.; Garofalo, A.; Sarro, L. M.; Palmer, M.; Luri, X.; Molinaro, R.; Rimoldini, L.; Szabados, L.; Musella, I.; Anderson, R. I.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Azntoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernánde, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: 29 pages, 25 figures. Accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2017-05-01
Parallaxes for 331 classical Cepheids, 31 Type II Cepheids and 364 RR Lyrae stars in common between Gaia and the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1) as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). In order to test these first parallax measurements of the primary standard candles of the cosmological distance ladder, that involve astrometry collected by Gaia during the initial 14 months of science operation, we compared them with literature estimates and derived new period-luminosity ($PL$), period-Wesenheit ($PW$) relations for classical and Type II Cepheids and infrared $PL$, $PL$-metallicity ($PLZ$) and optical luminosity-metallicity ($M_V$-[Fe/H]) relations for the RR Lyrae stars, with zero points based on TGAS. The new relations were computed using multi-band ($V,I,J,K_{\mathrm{s}},W_{1}$) photometry and spectroscopic metal abundances available in the literature, and applying three alternative approaches: (i) by linear least squares fitting the absolute magnitudes inferred from direct transformation of the TGAS parallaxes, (ii) by adopting astrometric-based luminosities, and (iii) using a Bayesian fitting approach. TGAS parallaxes bring a significant added value to the previous Hipparcos estimates. The relations presented in this paper represent first Gaia-calibrated relations and form a "work-in-progress" milestone report in the wait for Gaia-only parallaxes of which a first solution will become available with Gaia's Data Release 2 (DR2) in 2018.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00618  [pdf] - 1582992
A New Approach to Convective Core Overshooting: Probabilistic Constraints from Color-Magnitude Diagrams of LMC Clusters
Comments: 37 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. For data and code to reproduce the figures see, https://philrosenfield.github.io/core_overshoot_clusters . For the stellar evolution models used to in this paper see, https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.570192
Submitted: 2017-05-01
We present a framework to simultaneously constrain the values and uncertainties of the strength of convective core overshooting, metallicity, extinction, distance, and age in stellar populations. We then apply the framework to archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of six stellar clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud that have reported ages between ~1-2.5 Gyr. Assuming a canonical value of the strength of core convective overshooting, we recover the well-known age-metallicity correlation, and additional correlations between metallicity and extinction and metallicity and distance. If we allow the strength of core overshooting to vary, we find that for intermediate-aged stellar clusters, the measured values of distance and extinction are negligibly effected by uncertainties of core overshooting strength. However, cluster age and metallicity may have disconcertingly large systematic shifts when core overshooting strength is allowed to vary by more than +/- 0.05 Hp. Using the six stellar clusters, we combine their posterior distribution functions to obtain the most probable core overshooting value, 0.500 +0.016 -0.134 Hp, which is in line with canonical values.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.01131  [pdf] - 1567701
Gaia Data Release 1. Open cluster astrometry: performance, limitations, and future prospects
Gaia Collaboration; van Leeuwen, F.; Vallenari, A.; Jordi, C.; Lindegren, L.; Bastian, U.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Martino, D.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffer, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegrio, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Rimoldini, L.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingril, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernsteiny, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclarky, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardio, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Palmer, M.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poelsy, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: Accepted for publication by A&A. 21 pages main text plus 46 pages appendices. 34 figures main text, 38 figures appendices. 8 table in main text, 19 tables in appendices
Submitted: 2017-03-03
Context. The first Gaia Data Release contains the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). This is a subset of about 2 million stars for which, besides the position and photometry, the proper motion and parallax are calculated using Hipparcos and Tycho-2 positions in 1991.25 as prior information. Aims. We investigate the scientific potential and limitations of the TGAS component by means of the astrometric data for open clusters. Methods. Mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are derived taking into account the error correlations within the astrometric solutions for individual stars, an estimate of the internal velocity dispersion in the cluster, and, where relevant, the effects of the depth of the cluster along the line of sight. Internal consistency of the TGAS data is assessed. Results. Values given for standard uncertainties are still inaccurate and may lead to unrealistic unit-weight standard deviations of least squares solutions for cluster parameters. Reconstructed mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are generally in very good agreement with earlier Hipparcos-based determination, although the Gaia mean parallax for the Pleiades is a significant exception. We have no current explanation for that discrepancy. Most clusters are observed to extend to nearly 15 pc from the cluster centre, and it will be up to future Gaia releases to establish whether those potential cluster-member stars are still dynamically bound to the clusters. Conclusions. The Gaia DR1 provides the means to examine open clusters far beyond their more easily visible cores, and can provide membership assessments based on proper motions and parallaxes. A combined HR diagram shows the same features as observed before using the Hipparcos data, with clearly increased luminosities for older A and F dwarfs.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.02230  [pdf] - 1535551
Modelling the UV to radio SEDs of nearby star-forming galaxies: new Parsec SSP for Grasil
Comments: 25 pages, 15 figures
Submitted: 2017-02-07
By means of the updated PARSEC database of evolutionary tracks of massive stars, we compute the integrated stellar light, the ionizing photon budget and the supernova rates of young simple stellar populations (SSPs), for different metallicities and IMF upper mass limits. Using CLOUDY we compute and include in the SSP spectra the neb- ular emission contribution. We also revisit the thermal and non-thermal radio emission contribution from young stars. Using GRASIL we can thus predict the panchromatic spectrum and the main recombination lines of any type of star-forming galaxy, including the effects of dust absorption and re-emission. We check the new models against the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of selected well-observed nearby galaxies. From the best-fit models we obtain a consistent set of star formation rate (SFR) calibrations at wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet (UV) to radio. We also provide analytical calibrations that take into account the dependence on metallcity and IMF upper mass limit of the SSPs. We show that the latter limit can be well constrained by combining information from the observed far infrared, 24 {\mu}m, 33 GHz and H{\alpha} luminosities. Another interesting property derived from the fits is that, while in a normal galaxy the attenuation in the lines is significantly higher than that in the nearby continuum, in individual star bursting regions they are similar, supporting the notion that this effect is due to an age selective extinction. Since in these conditions the Balmer decrement method may not be accurate, we provide relations to estimate the attenuation from the observed 24 {\mu}m or 33 GHz fluxes. These relations can be useful for the analysis of young high redshift galaxies.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.08510  [pdf] - 1564027
A new generation of PARSEC-COLIBRI stellar isochrones including the TP-AGB phase
Comments: 20 pages, 12 figures. This is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article published in The Astrophysical Journal. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The Version of Record is available online at http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/835/1/77/meta
Submitted: 2017-01-30
We introduce a new generation of PARSEC-COLIBRI stellar isochrones that include a detailed treatment of the thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase, and covering a wide range of initial metallicities (0.0001<Zi<0.06). Compared to previous releases, the main novelties and improvements are: use of new TP-AGB tracks and related atmosphere models and spectra for M and C-type stars; inclusion of the surface H+He+CNO abundances in the isochrone tables, accounting for the effects of diffusion, dredge-up episodes and hot-bottom burning; inclusion of complete thermal pulse cycles, with a complete description of the in-cycle changes in the stellar parameters; new pulsation models to describe the long-period variability in the fundamental and first overtone modes; new dust models that follow the growth of the grains during the AGB evolution, in combination with radiative transfer calculations for the reprocessing of the photospheric emission. Overall, these improvements are expected to lead to a more consistent and detailed description of properties of TP-AGB stars expected in resolved stellar populations, especially in regard to their mean photometric properties from optical to mid-infrared wavelengths. We illustrate the expected numbers of TP-AGB stars of different types in stellar populations covering a wide range of ages and initial metallicities, providing further details on the C-star island that appears at intermediate values of age and metallicity, and about the AGB-boosting effect that occurs at ages close to 1.6 Gyr for populations of all metallicities. The isochrones are available through a new dedicated web server.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.07742  [pdf] - 1532788
$^{22}$Ne and $^{23}$Na ejecta from intermediate-mass stars: The impact of the new LUNA rate for $^{22}$Ne(p,$\gamma$)$^{23}$Na
Comments: 21 pages, 14 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-11-23
We investigate the impact of the new LUNA rate for the nuclear reaction $^{22}$Ne$(p,\gamma)^{23}$Na on the chemical ejecta of intermediate-mass stars, with particular focus on the thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars that experience hot-bottom burning. To this aim we use the PARSEC and COLIBRI codes to compute the complete evolution, from the pre-main sequence up to the termination of the TP-AGB phase, of a set of stellar models with initial masses in the range $3.0\,M_{\odot} - 6.0\,M_{\odot}$, and metallicities $Z_{\rm i}=0.0005$, $Z_{\rm i}=0.006$, and $Z_{\rm i} = 0.014$. We find that the new LUNA measures have much reduced the nuclear uncertainties of the $^{22}$Ne and $^{23}$Na AGB ejecta, which drop from factors of $\simeq 10$ to only a factor of few for the lowest metallicity models. Relying on the most recent estimations for the destruction rate of $^{23}$Na, the uncertainties that still affect the $^{22}$Ne and $^{23}$Na AGB ejecta are mainly dominated by evolutionary aspects (efficiency of mass-loss, third dredge-up, convection). Finally, we discuss how the LUNA results impact on the hypothesis that invokes massive AGB stars as the main agents of the observed O-Na anti-correlation in Galactic globular clusters. We derive quantitative indications on the efficiencies of key physical processes (mass loss, third dredge-up, sodium destruction) in order to simultaneously reproduce both the Na-rich, O-poor extreme of the anti-correlation, and the observational constraints on the CNO abundance. Results for the corresponding chemical ejecta are made publicly available.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.07230  [pdf] - 1463059
Dynamics of tidally captured planets in the Galactic Center
Comments: 12 pages, 12 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2016-08-25
Recent observations suggest ongoing planet formation in the innermost parsec of the Galactic center (GC). The super-massive black hole (SMBH) might strip planets or planetary embryos from their parent star, bringing them close enough to be tidally disrupted. Photoevaporation by the ultraviolet field of young stars, combined with ongoing tidal disruption, could enhance the near-infrared luminosity of such starless planets, making their detection possible even with current facilities. In this paper, we investigate the chance of planet tidal captures by means of high-accuracy N-body simulations exploiting Mikkola's algorithmic regularization. We consider both planets lying in the clockwise (CW) disk and planets initially bound to the S-stars. We show that tidally captured planets remain on orbits close to those of their parent star. Moreover, the semi-major axis of the planet orbit can be predicted by simple analytic assumptions in the case of prograde orbits. We find that starless planets that were initially bound to CW disk stars have mild eccentricities and tend to remain in the CW disk. However, we speculate that angular momentum diffusion and scattering with other young stars in the CW disk might bring starless planets on low-angular momentum orbits. In contrast, planets initially bound to S-stars are captured by the SMBH on highly eccentric orbits, matching the orbital properties of the G1 and G2 clouds. Our predictions apply not only to planets but also to low-mass stars initially bound to the S-stars and tidally captured by the SMBH.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.07438  [pdf] - 1444177
Dynamics of tidally captured planets in the Galactic Center
Comments: 2 pages, 2 figures, to appear in: "Cosmic-Lab: Star Clusters as Cosmic Laboratories for Astrophysics, Dynamics and Fundamental Physics", F.R. Ferraro & B. Lanzoni eds, Mem. SAIt, Vol 87
Submitted: 2016-07-25
Recent observations suggest ongoing planet formation in the innermost parsec of our Galaxy. The super-massive black hole (SMBH) might strip planets or planetary embryos from their parent star, bringing them close enough to be tidally disrupted. We investigate the chance of planet tidal captures by running three-body encounters of SMBH-star-planet systems with a high-accuracy regularized code. We show that tidally captured planets have orbits close to those of their parent star. We conclude that the final periapsis distance of the captured planet from the SMBH will be much larger than 200 AU, unless its parent star was already on a highly eccentric orbit.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.09285  [pdf] - 1457451
Constraining dust properties in Circumstellar Envelopes of C-stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud: optical constants and grain size of Carbon dust
Comments: 23 pages, 22 fugures
Submitted: 2016-06-29
We present a new approach aimed at constraining the typical size and optical properties of carbon dust grains in Circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of carbon-rich stars (C-stars) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). To achieve this goal, we apply our recent dust growth description, coupled with a radiative transfer code to the CSEs of C-stars evolving along the TP-AGB, for which we compute spectra and colors. Then we compare our modeled colors in the near- and mid-infrared (NIR and MIR) bands with the observed ones, testing different assumptions in our dust scheme and employing several data sets of optical constants for carbon dust available in the literature. Different assumptions adopted in our dust scheme change the typical size of the carbon grains produced. We constrain carbon dust properties by selecting the combination of grain size and optical constants which best reproduces several colors in the NIR and MIR at the same time. The different choices of optical properties and grain size lead to differences in the NIR and MIR colors greater than two magnitudes in some cases. We conclude that the complete set of observed NIR and MIR colors are best reproduced by small grains, with sizes between $\sim$0.035 and $\sim$0.12~$\mu$m, rather than by large grains between $\sim0.2$ and $0.7$~$\mu$m. The inability of large grains to reproduce NIR and MIR colors seems independent of the adopted optical data set. We also find a possible trend of the grain size with mass-loss and/or carbon excess in the CSEs of these stars.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.05283  [pdf] - 1411414
Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars V: Constraining the Mass Loss and Lifetimes of Intermediate Mass, Low Metallicity AGB Stars
Comments: 32 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-03-16
Thermally-Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) stars are relatively short lived (less than a few Myr), yet their cool effective temperatures, high luminosities, efficient mass-loss and dust production can dramatically effect the chemical enrichment histories and the spectral energy distributions of their host galaxies. The ability to accurately model TP-AGB stars is critical to the interpretation of the integrated light of distant galaxies, especially in redder wavelengths. We continue previous efforts to constrain the evolution and lifetimes of TP-AGB stars by modeling their underlying stellar populations. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and near-infrared photometry taken of 12 fields of 10 nearby galaxies imaged via the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury and the near-infrared HST/SNAP follow-up campaign, we compare the model and observed TP-AGB luminosity functions as well as the number ratio of TP-AGB to red giant branch stars. We confirm the best-fitting mass-loss prescription, introduced by Rosenfield et al. 2014, in which two different wind regimes are active during the TP-AGB, significantly improves models of many galaxies that show evidence of recent star formation. This study extends previous efforts to constrain TP-AGB lifetimes to metallicities ranging -1.59 < [Fe/H] < -0.56 and initial TP-AGB masses up to ~ 4 Msun, which include TP-AGB stars that undergo hot-bottom burning.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.07025  [pdf] - 1347900
Synthetic photometry for M and K giants and stellar evolution: hydrostatic dust-free model atmospheres and chemical abundances
Comments: 21 pages, 1 table, 18 figures
Submitted: 2016-01-26
Based on a grid of hydrostatic spherical COMARCS models for cool stars we have calculated observable properties of these objects, which will be mainly used in combination with stellar evolution tracks and population synthesis tools. The high resolution opacity sampling and low resolution convolved spectra as well as bolometric corrections for a large number of filter systems are made electronically available. We exploit those data to study the effect of mass, C/O ratio and nitrogen abundance on the photometry of K and M giants. Depending on effective temperature, surface gravity and the chosen wavelength ranges variations of the investigated parameters cause very weak to moderate and, in the case of C/O values close to one, even strong shifts of the colours. For the usage with stellar evolution calculations they will be treated as correction factors applied to the results of an interpolation in the main quantities. When we compare the synthetic photometry to observed relations and to data from the Galactic Bulge, we find in general a good agreement. Deviations appear for the coolest giants showing pulsations, mass loss and dust shells, which cannot be described by hydrostatic models.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.02682  [pdf] - 1359037
The influence of dense gas rings on the dynamics of a stellar disk in the Galactic center
Comments: 10 pages, 10 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-12-08
The Galactic center hosts several hundred early-type stars, about 20% of which lie in the so-called clockwise disk, while the remaining 80% do not belong to any disks. The circumnuclear ring (CNR), a ring of molecular gas that orbits the supermassive black hole (SMBH) with a radius of 1.5 pc, has been claimed to induce precession and Kozai-Lidov oscillations onto the orbits of stars in the innermost parsec. We investigate the perturbations exerted by a gas ring on a nearly-Keplerian stellar disk orbiting a SMBH by means of combined direct N-body and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. We simulate the formation of gas rings through the infall and disruption of a molecular gas cloud, adopting different inclinations between the infalling gas cloud and the stellar disk. We find that a CNR-like ring is not efficient in affecting the stellar disk on a timescale of 3 Myr. In contrast, a gas ring in the innermost 0.5 pc induces precession of the longitude of the ascending node Omega, significantly affecting the stellar disk inclination. Furthermore, the combined effect of two-body relaxation and Omega-precession drives the stellar disk dismembering, displacing the stars from the disk. The impact of precession on the star orbits is stronger when the stellar disk and the inner gas ring are nearly coplanar. We speculate that the warm gas in the inner cavity might have played a major role in the evolution of the clockwise disk.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.00017  [pdf] - 1323567
Envelope Overshooting in Low Metallicity Intermediate- and High-mass Stars: a test with the Sagittarius Dwarf Irregular Galaxy
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-10-30
We check the performance of the {\sl\,PARSEC} tracks in reproducing the blue loops of intermediate age and young stellar populations at very low metallicity. We compute new evolutionary {\sl\,PARSEC} tracks of intermediate- and high-mass stars from 2\Msun to 350\Msun with enhanced envelope overshooting (EO), EO=2\HP and 4\HP, for very low metallicity, Z=0.0005. The input physics, including the mass-loss rate, has been described in {\sl\,PARSEC}~V1.2 version. By comparing the synthetic color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) obtained from the different sets of models with envelope overshooting EO=0.7\HP (the standard {\sl\,PARSEC} tracks), 2\HP and 4\HP, with deep observations of the Sagittarius dwarf irregular galaxy (SagDIG), we find an overshooting scale EO=2\HP to best reproduce the observed loops. This result is consistent with that obtained by \citet{Tang_etal14} for Z in the range 0.001-0.004. We also discuss the dependence of the blue loop extension on the adopted instability criterion and find that, contrary to what stated in literature, the Schwarzschild criterion, instead of the Ledoux criterion, favours the development of blue loops. Other factors that could affect the CMD comparisons such as differential internal extinction or the presence of binary systems are found to have negligible effects on the results. We thus confirm that, in presence of core overshooting during the H-burning phase, a large envelope overshooting is needed to reproduce the main features of the central He-burning phase of intermediate- and high-mass stars.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.08346  [pdf] - 1331065
Connecting the evolution of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars to the chemistry in their circumstellar envelopes -- I. The case of hydrogen cyanide
Comments: 27 pages, 22 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-10-28
We investigate the formation of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in the inner circumstellar envelopes of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars. A dynamic model for periodically shocked atmospheres, which includes an extended chemo-kinetic network, is for the first time coupled to detailed evolutionary tracks for the TP-AGB phase computed with the COLIBRI code. We carried out a calibration of the main shock parameters (the shock formation radius and the effective adiabatic index) using the circumstellar HCN abundances recently measured for a populous sample of pulsating TP-AGB stars. Our models recover the range of the observed HCN concentrations as a function of the mass-loss rates, and successfully reproduce the systematic increase of HCN moving along the M-S-C chemical sequence of TP-AGB stars, that traces the increase of the surface C/O ratio. The chemical calibration brings along two important implications: i) the first shock should emerge very close to the photosphere, and ii) shocks are expected to have a dominant isothermal character in the denser region close to the star (within ~ 3-4 R), implying that radiative processes should be quite efficient. Our analysis also suggests that the HCN concentrations in the inner circumstellar envelopes are critically affected by the H-H2 chemistry during the post-shock relaxation stages.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.01681  [pdf] - 1261804
PARSEC evolutionary tracks of massive stars up to $350 M_\odot$ at metallicities 0.0001$\leq Z \leq$0.04
Comments: Published on MNRAS. 14 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2015-06-04, last modified: 2015-08-11
We complement the PARSEC data base of stellar evolutionary tracks with new models of massive stars, from the pre-main sequence phase to the central carbon ignition. We consider a broad range of metallicities, 0.0001$\leq Z \leq$0.04 and initial masses up to $M_{\rm ini}=350\,M_\odot$. The main difference with respect to our previous models of massive stars is the adoption of a recent formalism accounting for the mass-loss enhancement when the ratio of the stellar to the Eddington luminosity, $\Gamma_e$, approaches unity. With this new formalism, the models are able to reproduce the Humphreys-Davidson limit observed in the Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud colour-magnitude diagrams, without an ad hoc mass-loss enhancement. We also follow the predictions of recent wind models indicating that the metallicity dependence of the mass-loss rates becomes shallower when $\Gamma_e$ approaches unity. We thus find that the more massive stars may suffer from substantial mass-loss even at low metallicity. We also predict that the Humphreys-Davidson limit should become brighter at decreasing metallicity. We supplement the evolutionary tracks with new tables of theoretical bolometric corrections, useful to compare tracks and isochrones with the observations. For this purpose, we homogenize existing stellar atmosphere libraries of hot and cool stars (PoWR, ATLAS9 and Phoenix) and we add, where needed, new atmosphere models computed with WM-basic. The mass, age and metallicity grids are fully adequate to perform detailed investigations of the properties of very young stellar systems, both in local and distant galaxies. The new tracks supersede the previous old Padova models of massive stars.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.08411  [pdf] - 1277139
Predictions for Ultra-Deep Radio Counts of Star-Forming Galaxies
Comments: 31 pages, 18 figures, 1 table. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2015-07-30
We have worked out predictions for the radio counts of star-forming galaxies down to nJy levels, along with redshift distributions down to the detection limits of the phase 1 Square Kilometer Array MID telescope (SKA1-MID) and of its precursors. Such predictions were obtained by coupling epoch dependent star formation rate (SFR) functions with relations between SFR and radio (synchrotron and free-free) emission. The SFR functions were derived taking into account both the dust obscured and the unobscured star-formation, by combining far-infrared (FIR), ultra-violet (UV) and H_alpha luminosity functions up to high redshifts. We have also revisited the South Pole Telescope (SPT) counts of dusty galaxies at 95\,GHz performing a detailed analysis of the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). Our results show that the deepest SKA1-MID surveys will detect high-z galaxies with SFRs two orders of magnitude lower compared to Herschel surveys. The highest redshift tails of the distributions at the detection limits of planned SKA1-MID surveys comprise a substantial fraction of strongly lensed galaxies. We predict that a survey down to 0.25 microJy at 1.4 GHz will detect about 1200 strongly lensed galaxies per square degree, at redshifts of up to 10. For about 30% of them the SKA1-MID will detect at least 2 images. The SKA1-MID will thus provide a comprehensive view of the star formation history throughout the re-ionization epoch, unaffected by dust extinction. We have also provided specific predictions for the EMU/ASKAP and MIGHTEE/MeerKAT surveys.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.07797  [pdf] - 1277133
Uncertainties on near-core mixing in red-clump stars: effects on the period spacing and on the luminosity of the AGB bump
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-07-28
Low-mass stars in the He-core-burning phase (HeCB) play a major role in stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astrophysics. The ability to predict accurately the properties of these stars, however, depends on our understanding of convection, which remains one of the key open questions in stellar modelling. We argue that the combination of the luminosity of the AGB bump (AGBb) and the period spacing of gravity modes (DP) during the HeCB phase, provides us with a decisive test to discriminate between competing models of these stars. We use the MESA, BaSTI, and PARSEC stellar evolution codes to model a typical giant star observed by Kepler. We explore how various near-core-mixing scenarios affect the predictions of the above-mentioned constraints, and we find that DP depends strongly on the prescription adopted. Moreover we show that the detailed behaviour of DP shows the signature of sharp variations in the Brunt-Vaisala frequency, which could potentially give additional information about near-core features. We find evidence for the AGBb among Kepler targets, and a first comparison with observations shows that, even if standard models are able to reproduce the luminosity distribution, no standard model can account for satisfactorily the period spacing of HeCB stars. Our analysis allows us to outline a candidate model to describe simultaneously the two observed distributions: a model with a moderate overshooting region characterized by an adiabatic thermal stratification. This prescription will be tested in the future on cluster stars, to limit possible observational biases.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.05993  [pdf] - 1219526
Lithium evolution in metal-poor stars: from Pre-Main Sequence to the Spite plateau
Comments: 11 pages, 10 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-06-19
Lithium abundance derived in metal-poor main sequence stars is about three times lower than the value of primordial Li predicted by the standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis when the baryon density is taken from the CMB or the deuterium measurements. This disagreement is generally referred as the lithium problem. We here reconsider the stellar Li evolution from the pre-main sequence to the end of the main sequence phase by introducing the effects of convective overshooting and residual mass accretion. We show that $^7$Li could be significantly depleted by convective overshooting in the pre-main sequence phase and then partially restored in the stellar atmosphere by a tail of matter accretion which follows the Li depletion phase and that could be regulated by EUV photo-evaporation. By considering the conventional nuclear burning and microscopic diffusion along the main sequence we can reproduce the Spite plateau for stars with initial mass $m_0=0.62 - 0.80 M_{\odot}$, and the Li declining branch for lower mass dwarfs, e.g, $m_0=0.57 - 0.60 M_{\odot}$, for a wide range of metallicities (Z=0.00001 to Z=0.0005), starting from an initial Li abundance $A({\rm Li}) =2.72$. This environmental Li evolution model also offers the possibility to interpret the decrease of Li abundance in extremely metal-poor stars, the Li disparities in spectroscopic binaries and the low Li abundance in planet hosting stars.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.02135  [pdf] - 1245853
Predictions for surveys with the SPICA Mid-infrared Instrument
Comments: 12 pages, 17 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-06-06
We present predictions for number counts and redshift distributions of galaxies detectable in continuum and in emission lines with the Mid-infrared (MIR) Instrument (SMI) proposed for the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA). We have considered 24 MIR fine-structure lines, four Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) bands (at 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3$\mu$m) and two silicate bands (in emission and in absorption) at 9.7$\mu$m and 18.0$\mu$m. Six of these lines are primarily associated with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), the others with star formation. A survey with the SMI spectrometers of 1 hour integration per field-of-view (FoV) over an area of $1\,\hbox{deg}^2$ will yield $5\,\sigma$ detections of $\simeq 140$ AGN lines and of $\simeq 5.2\times10^{4}$ star-forming galaxies, $\simeq 1.6\times10^{4}$ of which will be detected in at least two lines. The combination of a shallow ($20.0\,\hbox{deg}^{2}$, $1.4\times10^{-1}$ h integration per FoV) and a deep survey ($6.9\times10^{-3}\,\hbox{deg}^{2}$, $635$ h integration time), with the SMI camera, for a total of $\sim$1000 h, will accurately determine the MIR number counts of galaxies and of AGNs over five orders of magnitude in flux density, reaching values more than one order of magnitude fainter than the deepest Spitzer $24\,\mu$m surveys. This will allow us to determine the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) function down to SFRs more than 100 times fainter than reached by the Herschel Observatory.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.05201  [pdf] - 1044595
The mass spectrum of compact remnants from the PARSEC stellar evolution tracks
Comments: 20 pages, 24 figures, 6 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-05-19
The mass spectrum of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) is highly uncertain. Dynamical mass measurements are available only for few ($\sim{}10$) BHs in X-ray binaries, while theoretical models strongly depend on the hydrodynamics of supernova (SN) explosions and on the evolution of massive stars. In this paper, we present and discuss the mass spectrum of compact remnants that we obtained with SEVN, a new public population-synthesis code, which couples the PARSEC stellar evolution tracks with up-to-date recipes for SN explosion (depending on the Carbon-Oxygen mass of the progenitor, on the compactness of the stellar core at pre-SN stage, and on a recent two-parameter criterion based on the dimensionless entropy per nucleon at pre-SN stage). SEVN can be used both as a stand-alone code and in combination with direct-summation N-body codes (Starlab, HiGPUs). The PARSEC stellar evolution tracks currently implemented in SEVN predict significantly larger values of the Carbon-Oxygen core mass with respect to previous models. For most of the SN recipes we adopt, this implies substantially larger BH masses at low metallicity ($\leq{}2\times{}10^{-3}$), than other population-synthesis codes. The maximum BH mass found with SEVN is $\sim{}$25, 60 and 130 M$_{\odot}$ at metallicity $Z =2 \times{} 10^{-2}$ , $2 \times{}10^{-3}$ and $2\times{} 10^{-4}$ , respectively. Mass loss by stellar winds plays a major role in determining the mass of BHs for very massive stars ($\geq{}90$ M$_\odot{}$), while the remnant mass spectrum depends mostly on the adopted SN recipe for lower progenitor masses. We discuss the implications of our results for the transition between NS and BH mass, and for the expected number of massive BHs (with mass $>25$ M$_\odot{}$) as a function of metallicity.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.07862  [pdf] - 1232119
On the Interpretation of Sub-Giant Branch Morphologies of Intermediate-Age Star Clusters with Extended Main Sequence Turnoffs
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-03-26, last modified: 2015-03-30
Recent high-quality photometry of many star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds with ages of 1$\,-\,$2 Gyr revealed main sequence turnoffs (MSTOs) that are significantly wider than can be accounted for by a simple stellar population (SSP). Such extended MSTOs (eMSTOs) are often interpreted in terms of an age spread of several $10^8$ yr, challenging the traditional view of star clusters as being formed in a single star formation episode. Li et al. and Bastian & Niederhofer recently investigated the sub-giant branches (SGBs) of NGC 1651, NGC 1806, and NGC 1846, three star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) that exhibit an eMSTO. They argued that the SGB of these star clusters can be explained only by a SSP. We study these and two other similar star clusters in the LMC, using extensive simulations of SSPs including unresolved binaries. We find that the shapes of the cross-SGB profiles of all star clusters in our sample are in fact consistent with their cross-MSTO profiles when the latter are interpreted as age distributions. Conversely, SGB morphologies of star clusters with eMSTOs are found to be inconsistent with those of simulated SSPs. Finally, we create PARSEC isochrones from tracks featuring a grid of convective overshoot levels and a very fine grid of stellar masses. A comparison of the observed photometry with these isochrones shows that the morphology of the red clump (RC) of such star clusters is also consistent with that implied by their MSTO in the age spread scenario. We conclude that the SGB and RC morphologies of star clusters featuring eMSTOs are consistent with the scenario in which the eMSTOs are caused by a distribution of stellar ages.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.03318  [pdf] - 1296114
The AGB bump: a calibrator for the core mixing
Comments: Submitted to EPJ Web of Conferences, to appear in the Proceedings of the 3rd CoRoT Symposium, Kepler KASC7 joint meeting; 2 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2015-02-11
The efficiency of convection in stars affects many aspects of their evolution and remains one of the key-open questions in stellar modelling. In particular, the size of the mixed core in core-He-burning low-mass stars is still uncertain and impacts the lifetime of this evolutionary phase and, e.g., the C/O profile in white dwarfs. One of the known observables related to the Horizontal Branch (HB) and Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) evolution is the AGB bump. Its luminosity depends on the position in mass of the helium-burning shell at its first ignition, that is affected by the extension of the central mixed region. In this preliminary work we show how various assumptions on near-core mixing and on the thermal stratification in the overshooting region affect the luminosity of the AGB bump, as well as the period spacing of gravity modes in core-He-burning models.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.05347  [pdf] - 1224122
The VMC Survey - XIV. First results on the look-back time star-formation rate tomography of the Small Magellanic Cloud
Comments: MNRAS accepted, 24 pages
Submitted: 2015-01-21
We analyse deep images from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds in the YJKs filters, covering 14 sqrdeg (10 tiles), split into 120 subregions, and comprising the main body and Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We apply a colour--magnitude diagram reconstruction method that returns their best-fitting star formation rate SFR(t), age-metallicity relation (AMR), distance and mean reddening, together with 68% confidence intervals. The distance data can be approximated by a plane tilted in the East-West direction with a mean inclination of 39 deg, although deviations of up to 3 kpc suggest a distorted and warped disk. After assigning to every observed star a probability of belonging to a given age-metallicity interval, we build high-resolution population maps. These dramatically reveal the flocculent nature of the young star-forming regions and the nearly smooth features traced by older stellar generations. They document the formation of the SMC Wing at ages <0.2 Gyr and the peak of star formation in the SMC Bar at 40 Myr. We clearly detect periods of enhanced star formation at 1.5 Gyr and 5 Gyr. The former is possibly related to a new feature found in the AMR, which suggests ingestion of metal-poor gas at ages slightly larger than 1 Gyr. The latter constitutes a major period of stellar mass formation. We confirm that the SFR(t) was moderately low at even older ages.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.04718  [pdf] - 1224086
OI and CaII observations in intermediate redshift quasars
Comments: 66 pages, 15 figures. Accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal Supplement
Submitted: 2015-01-20
We present an unprecedented spectroscopic survey of the CaII triplet + OI for a sample of 14 luminous ($-$26 $\gtrsim$ M$_V$ $\gtrsim$ $-$29), intermediate redshift (0.85 $\lesssim$ $z$ $\lesssim$ 1.65) quasars. The ISAAC spectrometer at ESO VLT allowed us to cover the CaII NIR spectral region redshifted into the H and K windows. We describe in detail our data analysis which enabled us to detect CaII triplet emission in all 14 sources (with the possible exception of HE0048-2804) and to retrieve accurate line widths and fluxes of the triplet and OI $\lambda$8446. The new measurements show trends consistent with previous lower $z$ observations, indicating that CaII and optical FeII emission are probably closely related. The ratio between the CaII triplet and the optical FeII blend at $\lambda$4570 $\AA$ is apparently systematically larger in our intermediate redshift sample relative to a low-$z$ control sample. Even if this result needs a larger sample for adequate interpretation, higher CaII/optical FeII should be associated with recent episodes of star formation in the intermediate redshift quasars and, at least in part, explain an apparent correlation of CaII triplet equivalent width with $z$ and $L$. The CaII triplet measures yield significant constraints on the emitting region density and ionization parameter, implying CaII triplet emission from log n$_H$ $\gtrsim$ 11 [cm$^{-3}$] and ionization parameter log $U$ $\lesssim$ 1.5. Line width and intensity ratios suggest properties consistent with emission from the outer part of a high density broad line region (a line emitting accretion disk?).
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.3840  [pdf] - 903865
Extended Main Sequence Turnoffs in Intermediate-Age Star Clusters: A Correlation Between Turnoff Width and Early Escape Velocity
Comments: 21 pages in emulateapj LaTeX style, incl. 12 figures, 5 tables, published in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-10-14, last modified: 2014-11-24
We present color-magnitude diagram analysis of deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a mass-limited sample of 18 intermediate-age (1 - 2 Gyr old) star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds, including 8 clusters for which new data was obtained. We find that ${\it all}$ star clusters in our sample feature extended main sequence turnoff (eMSTO) regions that are wider than can be accounted for by a simple stellar population (including unresolved binary stars). FWHM widths of the MSTOs indicate age spreads of 200-550 Myr. We evaluate dynamical evolution of clusters with and without initial mass segregation. Our main results are: (1) the fraction of red clump (RC) stars in secondary RCs in eMSTO clusters scales with the fraction of MSTO stars having pseudo-ages $\leq 1.35$ Gyr; (2) the width of the pseudo-age distributions of eMSTO clusters is correlated with their central escape velocity $v_{\rm esc}$, both currently and at an age of 10 Myr. We find that these two results are unlikely to be reproduced by the effects of interactive binary stars or a range of stellar rotation velocities. We therefore argue that the eMSTO phenomenon is mainly caused by extended star formation within the clusters; (3) we find that $v_{\rm esc} \geq 15$ km/s out to ages of at least 100 Myr for ${\it all}$ clusters featuring eMSTOs, while $v_{\rm esc} \leq 12$ km/s at all ages for two lower-mass clusters in the same age range that do ${\it not}$ show eMSTOs. We argue that eMSTOs only occur for clusters whose early escape velocities are higher than the wind velocities of stars that provide material from which second-generation stars can form. The threshold of 12-15 km/s is consistent with wind velocities of intermediate-mass AGB stars in the literature.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.3314  [pdf] - 898712
Dust production from sub-solar to super-solar metallicity in Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, conference
Submitted: 2014-11-12, last modified: 2014-11-14
We discuss the dust chemistry and growth in the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) star models computed with the COLIBRI code, at varying initial mass and metallicity (Z=0.001, 0.008, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06). A relevant result of our analysis deals with the silicate production in M-stars. We show that, in order to reproduce the observed trend between terminal velocities and mass-loss rates in Galactic M-giants, one has to significantly reduce the efficiency of chemisputtering by H2 molecules, usually considered as the most effective dust destruction mechanism. This indication is also in agreement with the most recent laboratory results, which show that silicates may condense already at T=1400 K, instead than at Tcond=1000 K, as obtained by models that include chemisputtering. From the analysis of the total dust ejecta, we find that the total dust-to-gas ejecta of intermediate-mass stars are much less dependent on metallicity than usually assumed. In a broader context, our results are suitable to study the dust enrichment of the interstellar medium provided by TP-AGB stars in both nearby and high redshift galaxies.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.3125  [pdf] - 896613
Constraining Mass-Loss & Lifetimes of Low Mass, Low Metallicity AGB Stars
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, proceedings of the conference "Why Galaxies Care About AGB Stars III", Vienna July 28 - August 1, 2014 to appear in an upcoming ASP Conference Series volume
Submitted: 2014-11-12
The evolution and lifetimes of thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars suffer from significant uncertainties. We present a detailed framework for constraining model luminosity functions of TP-AGB stars using resolved stellar populations. We show an example of this method that compares various TP-AGB mass-loss prescriptions that differ in their treatments of mass loss before the onset of dust-driven winds (pre-dust). We find that models with more efficient pre-dust driven mass loss produce results consistent with observations, as opposed to more canonical mass-loss models. Efficient pre-dust driven mass-loss predicts for [Fe/H] < -1.2, lower mass TP-AGB stars (M < 1 Msun) must have lifetimes less than about 1.2 Myr.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.1745  [pdf] - 877030
New PARSEC evolutionary tracks of massive stars at low metallicity: testing canonical stellar evolution in nearby star forming dwarf galaxies
Comments: 19 pages, 14 figures, accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-10-07
We extend the {\sl\,PARSEC} library of stellar evolutionary tracks by computing new models of massive stars, from 14\Msun to 350\Msun. The input physics is the same used in the {\sl\,PARSEC}~V1.1 version, but for the mass-loss rate which is included by considering the most recent updates in literature. We focus on low metallicity, $Z$=0.001 and $Z$=0.004, for which the metal poor dwarf irregular star forming galaxies, Sextans A, WLM and NCG6822, provide simple but powerful workbenches. The models reproduce fairly well the observed CMDs but the stellar colour distributions indicate that the predicted blue loop is not hot enough in models with canonical extent of overshooting. In the framework of a mild extended mixing during central hydrogen burning, the only way to reconcile the discrepancy is to enhance the overshooting at the base of the convective envelope (EO) during the first dredge-UP. The mixing scales required to reproduce the observed loops, EO=2\HP or EO=4\HP, are definitely larger than those derived from, e.g., the observed location of the RGB bump in low mass stars. This effect, if confirmed, would imply a strong dependence of the mixing scale below the formal Schwarzschild border, on the stellar mass or luminosity. Reproducing the features of the observed CMDs with standard values of envelope overshooting would require a metallicity significantly lower than the values measured in these galaxies. Other quantities, such as the star formation rate and the initial mass function, are only slightly sensitive to this effect. Future investigations will consider other metallicities and different mixing schemes.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3234  [pdf] - 1216302
Exploring the relationship between black hole accretion and star formation with blind mid-/far-infrared spectroscopic surveys
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS, minor changes
Submitted: 2014-08-14, last modified: 2014-09-10
We present new estimates of redshift-dependent luminosity functions of IR lines detectable by SPICA/SAFARI and excited both by star formation and by AGN activity. The new estimates improve over previous work by using updated evolutionary models and dealing in a self consistent way with emission of galaxies as a whole, including both the starburst and the AGN component. New relationships between line and AGN bolometric luminosity have been derived and those between line and IR luminosities of the starburst component have been updated. These ingredients were used to work out predictions for the source counts in 11 mid/far-IR emission lines partially or entirely excited by AGN activity. We find that the statistics of the emission line detection of galaxies as a whole is mainly determined by the star formation rate, because of the rarity of bright AGNs. We also find that the slope of the line integral number counts is flatter than 2 implying that the number of detections at fixed observing time increases more by extending the survey area than by going deeper. We thus propose a wide spectroscopic survey of 1 hour integration per field-of-view over an area of 5 deg$^{2}$ to detect (at 5$\sigma$) $\sim$760 AGNs in [OIV]25.89$\mu$m $-$ the brightest AGN mid-infrared line $-$ out to $z\sim2$. Pointed observations of strongly lensed or hyper-luminous galaxies previously detected by large area surveys such as those by Herschel and by the SPT can provide key information on the galaxy-AGN co-evolution out to higher redshifts.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.3006  [pdf] - 1216855
The impact of metallicity-dependent mass loss versus dynamical heating on the early evolution of star clusters
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures, 1 table, MNRAS, accepted
Submitted: 2014-09-10
We have run direct N-body simulations to investigate the impact of stellar evolution and dynamics on the structural properties of young massive (3x10^4 solar masses) star clusters (SCs) with different metallicities (Z=1, 0.1, 0.01 solar metallicity). Metallicity drives the mass loss by stellar winds and supernovae (SNe), with SCs losing more mass at high metallicity. We have simulated three sets of initial conditions, with different initial relaxation timescale. We find that the evolution of the half-mass radius of SCs depends on how fast two-body relaxation is with respect to the lifetime of massive stars. If core collapse is slow in comparison with stellar evolution, then mass loss by stellar winds and SNe is the dominant mechanism driving SC evolution, and metal-rich SCs expand more than metal-poor ones. In contrast, if core collapse occurs on a comparable timescale with respect to the lifetime of massive stars, then SC evolution depends on the interplay between mass loss and three-body encounters: dynamical heating by three-body encounters (mass loss by stellar winds and SNe) is the dominant process driving the expansion of the core in metal-poor (metal-rich) SCs. As a consequence, the half-mass radius of metal-poor SCs expands more than that of metal-rich ones. We also find core radius oscillations, which grow in number and amplitude as metallicity decreases.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.2276  [pdf] - 1216784
The expected stellar populations in the Kepler and CoRoT fields
Comments: Proc. of the workshop "Asteroseismology of stellar populations in the Milky Way" (Sesto, 22-26 July 2013), Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings, (eds. A. Miglio, L. Girardi, P. Eggenberger, J. Montalban)
Submitted: 2014-09-08
Using the stellar population synthesis tool TRILEGAL, we discuss the expected stellar populations in the Kepler and CoRoT fields
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.2268  [pdf] - 1216776
Uncertainties in stellar evolution models: convective overshoot
Comments: Proc. of the workshop "Asteroseismology of stellar populations in the Milky Way" (Sesto, 22-26 July 2013), Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings, (eds. A. Miglio, L. Girardi, P. Eggenberger, J. Montalban)
Submitted: 2014-09-08
In spite of the great effort made in the last decades to improve our understanding of stellar evolution, significant uncertainties remain due to our poor knowledge of some complex physical processes that require an empirical calibration, such as the efficiency of the interior mixing related to convective overshoot. Here we review the impact of convective overshoot on the evolution of stars during the main Hydrogen and Helium burning phases.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.0322  [pdf] - 1216604
Improving PARSEC models for very low mass stars
Comments: Accepted to MNRAS, to be published. 22 pages, 15 figures
Submitted: 2014-09-01
Many stellar models present difficulties in reproducing basic observational relations of very low mass stars (VLMS), including the mass--radius relation and the optical colour--magnitudes of cool dwarfs. Here, we improve PARSEC models on these points. We implement the T--tau relations from PHOENIX BT-Settl model atmospheres as the outer boundary conditions in the PARSEC code, finding that this change alone reduces the discrepancy in the mass--radius relation from 8 to 5 per cent. We compare the models with multi--band photometry of clusters Praesepe and M67, showing that the use of T--tau relations clearly improves the description of the optical colours and magnitudes. But anyway, using both Kurucz and PHOENIX model spectra, model colours are still systematically fainter and bluer than the observations. We then apply a shift to the above T--tau relations, increasing from 0 at T_eff = 4730 K to ~14% at T_eff = 3160 K, to reproduce the observed mass--radius radius relation of dwarf stars. Taking this experiment as a calibration of the T--tau relations, we can reproduce the optical and near infrared CMDs of low mass stars in the old metal--poor globular clusters NGC6397 and 47Tuc, and in the intermediate--age and young solar--metallicity open clusters M67 and Praesepe. Thus, we extend PARSEC models using this calibration, providing VLMS models more suitable for the lower main sequence stars over a wide range of metallicities and wavelengths. Both sets of models are available on PARSEC webpage.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.0676  [pdf] - 1209905
Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars IV. Constraining Mass-Loss & Lifetimes of Low Mass, Low Metallicity AGB Stars
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. Isochrones will be soon available at http://stev.oapd.inaf.it/cmd
Submitted: 2014-06-03, last modified: 2014-06-05
The evolution and lifetimes of thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars suffer from significant uncertainties. In this work, we analyze the numbers and luminosity functions of TP-AGB stars in six quiescent, low metallicity ([Fe/H] $\lesssim -0.86$) galaxies taken from the ANGST sample, using HST photometry in both optical and near-infrared filters. The galaxies contain over 1000 TP-AGB stars (at least 60 per field). We compare the observed TP-AGB luminosity functions and relative numbers of TP-AGB and RGB stars, to models generated from different suites of TP-AGB evolutionary tracks after adopting star formation histories (SFH) derived from the HST deep optical observations. We test various mass-loss prescriptions that differ in their treatments of mass-loss before the onset of dust-driven winds (pre-dust). These comparisons confirm that pre-dust mass-loss is important, since models that neglect pre-dust mass-loss fail to explain the observed TP-AGB/RGB ratio or the luminosity functions. In contrast, models with more efficient pre-dust mass-loss produce results consistent with observations. We find that for [Fe/H]$\lesssim-0.86$, lower mass TP-AGB stars ($M\lesssim1M_\odot$) must have lifetimes of $\sim0.5$ Myr and higher masses ($M\lesssim 3M_\odot$) must have lifetimes $\lesssim 1.2$ Myr. In addition, assuming our best-fitting mass-loss prescription, we show that the third dredge up has no significant effect on TP-AGB lifetimes in this mass and metallicity range.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.0055  [pdf] - 803570
A physical model for the evolving UV luminosity function of high redshift galaxies and their contribution to the cosmic reionization
Comments: 38 pages, 15 figures, Accepted by Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2014-03-01, last modified: 2014-03-27
[Abridged] We present a physical model for the evolution of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function (LF) of high-z galaxies taking into account in a self-consistent way their chemical evolution and the associated evolution of dust extinction. The model yields good fits of the UV and Lyman-alpha LFs at z>~2. The weak evolution of both LFs between z=2 and z=6 is explained as the combined effect of the negative evolution of the halo mass function, of the increase with redshift of the star formation efficiency, and of dust extinction. The slope of the faint end of the UV LF is found to steepen with increasing redshift, implying that low luminosity galaxies increasingly dominate the contribution to the UV background at higher and higher redshifts. The observed range of UV luminosities at high-z implies a minimum halo mass capable of hosting active star formation M_crit <~ 10^9.8 M_odot, consistent with the constraints from hydrodynamical simulations. From fits of Lyman-alpha LFs plus data on the luminosity dependence of extinction and from the measured ratios of non-ionizing UV to Lyman-continuum flux density for samples of z=~3 Lyman break galaxies and Lyman-alpha emitters, we derive a simple relationship between the escape fraction of ionizing photons and the star formation rate, impling larger escape fraction for less massive galaxies. Galaxies already represented in the UV LF (M_UV <~ -18) can keep the universe fully ionized up to z=~6, consistent with (uncertain) data pointing to a rapid drop of the ionization degree above z~6. On the other side, the electron scattering optical depth, tau_es, inferred from CMB experiments favor an ionization degree close to unity up to z=~9-10. Consistency with CMB data can be achieved if M_crit =~ 10^8.5 M_odot, implying that the UV LFs extend to M_UV =~ -13, although the corresponding tau_es is still on the low side of CMB-based estimates.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.4082  [pdf] - 820839
A Spitzer-IRS view of early-type galaxies with cuspy/core nuclei and with fast/slow rotation
Comments: Research Note, 8 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in A&A main Journal
Submitted: 2014-03-17
The recent literature suggests that an evolutionary dichotomy exists for early-type galaxies (Es and S0s, ETGs) whereby their central photometric structure (cuspy versus core central luminosity profiles), and figure of rotation (fast (FR) vs. slow (SR) rotators), are determined by whether they formed by "wet" or "dry" mergers. We consider whether the mid infrared (MIR) properties of ETGs, with their sensitivity to accretion processes in particular in the last few Gyr (on average z < 0.2), can put further constraints on this picture. We investigate a sample of 49 ETGs for which nuclear MIR properties and detailed photometrical and kinematical classifications are available from the recent literature. In the stellar light cuspy/core ETGs show a dichotomy that is mainly driven by their luminosity. However in the MIR, the brightest core ETGs show evidence that accretions have triggered both AGN and star formation activity in the recent past, challenging a "dry" merger scenario. In contrast, we do find, in the Virgo and Fornax clusters, that cuspy ETGs, fainter than M$_{K_s}=-24$, are predominantly passively evolving in the same epoch, while, in low density environments, they tend to be more active. A significant and statistically similar fraction of both FR (38$^{+18}_{-11}$\%) and SR (50$^{+34}_{-21}$\%) shows PAH features in their MIR spectra. Ionized and molecular gas are also frequently detected. Recent star formation episodes are then a common phenomenon in both kinematical classes, even in those dominated by AGN activity, suggesting a similar evolutionary path in the last few Gyr. MIR spectra suggest that the photometric segregation between cuspy and core nuclei and the dynamical segregation between FR and SR must have originated before z~0.2.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.0669  [pdf] - 779693
The impact of metallicity and dynamics on the evolution of young star clusters
Comments: to appear in "Massive Young Star Clusters Near and Far: From the Milky Way to Reionization", 2013 Guillermo Haro Conference, Eds. Y. D. Mayya, D. Rosa-Gonzalez & E. Terlevich, INAOE and AMC. 4 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2014-02-04
The early evolution of a dense young star cluster (YSC) depends on the intricate connection between stellar evolution and dynamical processes. Thus, N-body simulations of YSCs must account for both aspects. We discuss N-body simulations of YSCs with three different metallicities (Z=0.01, 0.1 and 1 Zsun), including metallicity-dependent stellar evolution recipes and metallicity-dependent prescriptions for stellar winds and remnant formation. We show that mass-loss by stellar winds influences the reversal of core collapse. In particular, the post-collapse expansion of the core is faster in metal-rich YSCs than in metal-poor YSCs, because the former lose more mass (through stellar winds) than the latter. As a consequence, the half-mass radius expands more in metal-poor YSCs. We also discuss how these findings depend on the total mass and on the virial radius of the YSC. These results give us a clue to understand the early evolution of YSCs with different metallicity.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.4451  [pdf] - 1202280
Low ionization lines in high luminosity quasars: The calcium triplet
Comments: Accepted for publication in Advances in Space Research
Submitted: 2013-12-16
In order to investigate where and how low ionization lines are emitted in quasars we are studying a new collection of spectra of the CaII triplet at $\lambda$8498, $\lambda$8542, $\lambda$8662 observed with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC). Our sample involves luminous quasars at intermediate redshift for which CaII observations are almost nonexistent. We fit the CaII triplet and the OI $\lambda$8446 line using the H$\beta$ profile as a model. We derive constraints on the line emitting region from the relative strength of the CaII triplet, OI $\lambda$8446 and H$\beta$.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.1891  [pdf] - 1202095
Exploring the early dust-obscured phase of galaxy formation with blind mid-/far-IR spectroscopic surveys
Comments: 20 pages, 14 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-12-06
While continuum imaging data at far-infrared to sub-millimeter wavelengths have provided tight constraints on the population properties of dusty star forming galaxies up to high redshifts, future space missions like the Space Infra-Red Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) and ground based facilities like the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope (CCAT) will allow detailed investigations of their physical properties via their mid-/far-infrared line emission. We present updated predictions for the number counts and the redshift distributions of star forming galaxies spectroscopically detectable by these future missions. These predictions exploit a recent upgrade of evolutionary models, that include the effect of strong gravitational lensing, in the light of the most recent Herschel and South Pole Telescope data. Moreover the relations between line and continuum infrared luminosity are re-assessed, considering also differences among source populations, with the support of extensive simulations that take into account dust obscuration. The derived line luminosity functions are found to be highly sensitive to the spread of the line to continuum luminosity ratios. Estimates of the expected numbers of detections per spectral line by SPICA/SAFARI and by CCAT surveys for different integration times per field of view at fixed total observing time are presented. Comparing with the earlier estimates by Spinoglio et al. (2012) we find, in the case of SPICA/SAFARI, differences within a factor of two in most cases, but occasionally much larger. More substantial differences are found for CCAT.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.0875  [pdf] - 1202006
Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars III. Dust production at supersolar metallicities
Comments: 14 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2013-12-03
We extend the formalism presented in our recent calculations of dust ejecta from the Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) phase, to the case of super-solar metallicity stars. The TP-AGB evolutionary models are computed with the COLIBRI code. We adopt our preferred scheme for dust growth. For M-giants, we neglect chemisputtering by H$_2$ molecules and, for C-stars we assume a homogeneous growth scheme which is primarily controlled by the carbon over oxygen excess. At super-solar metallicities, dust forms more efficiently and silicates tend to condense significantly closer to the photosphere (r~1.5 R$_*$) - and thus at higher temperatures and densities - than at solar and sub-solar metallicities (r~2-3 R$_*$). In such conditions, the hypothesis of thermal decoupling between gas and dust becomes questionable, while dust heating due to collisions plays an important role. The heating mechanism delays dust condensation to slightly outer regions in the circumstellar envelope. We find that the same mechanism is not significant at solar and sub-solar metallicities. The main dust products at super-solar metallicities are silicates. We calculate the total dust ejecta and dust-to-gas ejecta, for various values of the stellar initial masses and initial metallicities Z=0.04, 0.06. Merging these new calculations with those for lower metallicities it turns out that, contrary to what often assumed, the total dust-to-gas ejecta of intermediate-mass stars exhibit only a weak dependence on the initial metal content.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.4809  [pdf] - 1179344
On the nature of the brightest globular cluster in M81
Comments: To appear in MNRAS, 12 pages
Submitted: 2013-09-18
We analyse the photometric, chemical, star formation history and structural properties of the brightest globular cluster (GC) in M81, referred as GC1 in this work, with the intention of establishing its nature and origin. We find that it is a metal-rich ([Fe/H]=-0.60+/-0.10), alpha-enhanced ([Alpha/Fe]=0.20+/0.05), core-collapsed (core radius r_c=1.2 pc, tidal radius r_t = 76r_c), old (>13 Gyr) cluster. It has an ultraviolet excess equivalent of ~2500 blue horizontal branch stars. It is detected in X-rays indicative of the presence of low-mass binaries. With a mass of 10 million solar masses, the cluster is comparable in mass to M31-G1 and is four times more massive than Omega Cen. The values of r_c, absolute magnitude and mean surface brightness of GC1 suggest that it could be, like massive GCs in other giant galaxies, the left-over nucleus of a dissolved dwarf galaxy.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.1571  [pdf] - 1179057
The Star Formation History of Redshift z~2 Galaxies: The Role of The Infrared Prior
Comments: Accepted for publication in Research in Astronomy and Astrophysics (RAA)
Submitted: 2013-09-06
We build a sample of 298 spectroscopically-confirmed galaxies at redshift z~2, selected in the z-band from the GOODS-MUSIC catalog. By exploiting the rest frame 8 um luminosity as a proxy of the star formation rate (SFR) we check the accuracy of the standard SED-fitting technique, finding it is not accurate enough to provide reliable estimates of the galaxy physical parameters. We then develop a new SED-fitting method that includes the IR luminosity as a prior and a generalized Calzetti law with a variable RV . Then we exploit such a new method to re-analyze our galaxy sample, and to robustly determine SFRs, stellar masses and ages. We find that there is a general trend of increasing attenuation with the SFR. Moreover, we find that the SFRs range between a few to 1000 solar mass per year, the masses from one billion to 400 billion solar masses, while the ages from a few tens of Myr to more than 1 Gyr. We discuss how individual age easurements of highly attenuated objects indicate that dust must form within a few tens of Myr and be copious already at ~100 Myr. In addition, we find that low luminous galaxies harbor, on average, significantly older stellar populations and are also less massive than brighter ones; we discuss how these findings and the well known 'downsizing' scenario are consistent in a framework where less massive galaxies form first, but their star formation lasts longer. Finally, we find that the near-IR attenuation is not scarce for luminous objects, contrary to what is customarily assumed; we discuss how this affects the interpretation of the observed mass-to-light ratios.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.6088  [pdf] - 737359
The insidious boosting of TP-AGB stars in intermediate-age Magellanic Cloud clusters
Comments: ApJ accepted, 12 pages
Submitted: 2013-08-28
(Abridged) In the recent controversy about the role of TP-AGB stars in evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models of galaxies, one particular aspect is puzzling: TP-AGB models aimed at reproducing the lifetimes and integrated fluxes of the TP-AGB phase in Magellanic Cloud (MC) clusters, when incorporated into EPS models, are found to overestimate the TP-AGB contribution in resolved star counts and integrated spectra of galaxies. In this paper, we call attention to a particular evolutionary aspect that in all probability is the main cause of this conundrum. As soon as stellar populations intercept the ages at which RGB stars first appear, a sudden change in the lifetime of the core He-burning phase causes a temporary boost in the production rate of subsequent evolutionary phases, including the TP-AGB. For a timespan of about 0.1 Gyr, triple TP-AGB branches develop at slightly different initial masses, causing their frequency and contribution to the integrated luminosity of the stellar population to increase by a factor of 2. The boost occurs just in the proximity of the expected peak in the TP-AGB lifetimes, and for ages of 1.6 Gyr. Coincidently, this relatively narrow age interval happens to contain the few very massive MC clusters that host most of the TP-AGB stars used to constrain stellar evolution and EPS models. This concomitance makes the AGB-boosting particularly insidious in the context of present EPS models. The effect brings about three main consequences. (1) Present estimates of the TP-AGB contribution to the integrated light of galaxies derived from MC clusters, are biased towards too large values. (2) The relative TP-AGB contribution of single-burst populations falling in this critical age range cannot be accurately derived by the fuel consumption theorem. (3) A careful revision of AGB star populations in intermediate-age MC clusters is urgently demanded.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.6183  [pdf] - 1172302
Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars II. Dust production at varying metallicity
Comments:
Submitted: 2013-06-26
We present the dust ejecta of the new stellar models for the Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) phase computed with the COLIBRI code. We use a formalism of dust growth coupled with a stationary wind for both M and C-stars. In the original version of this formalism, the most efficient destruction process of silicate dust in M-giants is chemisputtering by H2 molecules. For these stars we find that dust grains can only form at relatively large radial distances (r~5 R*), where they cannot be efficiently accelerated, in agreement with other investigations. In the light of recent laboratory results, we also consider the alternative case that the condensation temperature of silicates is determined only by the competition between growth and free evaporation processes (i.e. no chemisputtering). With this latter approach we obtain dust condensation temperatures that are significantly higher (up to Tcond~1400 K) than those found when chemisputtering is included (Tcond~900 K), and in better agreement with condensation experiments. As a consequence, silicate grains can remain stable in inner regions of the circumstellar envelopes (r~2 R*), where they can rapidly grow and can be efficiently accelerated. With this modification, our models nicely reproduce the observed trend between terminal velocities and mass loss rates of Galactic M-giants. For C-stars the formalism is based on the homogeneous growth scheme where the key role is played by the carbon over oxygen excess. The models reproduce fairly well the terminal velocities of Galactic stars and there is no need to invoke changes in the standard assumptions. At decreasing metallicity the carbon excess becomes more pronounced and the efficiency of dust formation increases. This trend could be in tension with recent observational evidence in favour of a decreasing efficiency, at decreasing metallicity.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.4485  [pdf] - 1171465
Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars I. The COLIBRI Code
Comments: 42 pages, 59 figures, resubmitted to MNRAS after minor revision requested by the referee
Submitted: 2013-05-20
We present the COLIBRI code for computing the evolution of stars along the TP-AGB phase. Compared to purely synthetic TP-AGB codes, COLIBRI relaxes a significant part of their analytic formalism in favour of a detailed physics applied to a complete envelope model, in which the stellar structure equations are integrated from the atmosphere down to the bottom of the hydrogen-burning shell. This allows to predict self-consistently: (i) the effective temperature, and more generally the convective envelope and atmosphere structures, correctly coupled to the changes in the surface chemical abundances and gas opacities; (ii) sphericity effects in the atmospheres; (iii) the core mass-luminosity relation and its break-down due to hot bottom burning (HBB) in the most massive AGB stars, (iv) the HBB nucleosynthesis via the solution of a complete nuclear network (pp chains, and the CNO, NeNa, MgAl cycles), including also the production of 7Li via the Cameron-Fowler beryllium transport mechanism; (v) the chemical composition of the pulse-driven convective zone; (vi) the onset and quenching of the third dredge-up, with a suitable temperature criterion. At the same time COLIBRI pioneers new techniques in the treatment of the physics of stellar interiors. It is the first evolutionary code ever to use accurate on-the-fly computation of the equation of state for roughly 800 atoms, ions, molecules, and of the Rosseland mean opacities throughout the deep envelope. Another distinguishing aspect of COLIBRI is its high computational speed. This feature is necessary for calibrating the uncertain parameters and processes that characterize the TP-AGB phase, a step of paramount importance for producing reliable stellar population synthesis models of galaxies up to high redshift. (abridged)
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.4584  [pdf] - 1165369
A Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopic atlas of early-type galaxies in the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog
Comments: 33 pages, 8 figure, 11 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-03-19
We produce an atlas of homogeneously reduced and calibrated low resolution IRS spectra of the nuclear regions of nearby early-type galaxies (i.e. Es and S0s, ETGs), in order to build a reference sample in the mid-infrared window. From the Spitzer Heritage Archive we extract ETGs in the "Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog of Bright Galaxies" having an IRS SL and/or LL spectrum. We recover 91 spectra out of 363 galaxies classified as ETGs in the catalog: 56 E (E0-E6), 8 mixed E/S0+S0/E, 27 S0 (both normal and barred - SB0) plus mixed types SB0/Sa+SB0/SBa. For each galaxy, we provide the fully reduced and calibrated spectrum, the intensity of nebular and molecular emission lines as well as of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) after a template spectrum of a passively evolving ETG has been subtracted. Spectra are classified into five mid-infrared classes, ranging from AGN (class-4) and star forming nuclei (class-3), transition class-2 (with PAHs) and class-1 (no-PAHs) to passively evolving nuclei (class-0). A demographic study of mid-infrared spectra shows that Es are significantly more passive than S0s: 46^{+11}_{-10}% of Es and 20^{+11}_{-7}% of S0s have a spectrum of class-0. Emission lines are revealed in 64^{+12}_{-6}% of ETGs. The H_2-S(1) line is found with similar rate in Es (34^{+10}_{-8}%) and in S0s (51^{+15}_{-12}%). PAHs are detected in 47^{+8}_{-7}% of ETGs, but only 9^{+4}_{-3}% have PAHs ratios typical of star forming galaxies. Several indicators, such as peculiar morphologies and kinematics, dust--lane irregular shape, radio and X-ray properties, suggest that mid-infrared spectral classes are connected to phases of accretion/feedback phenomena occurring in the nuclei of ETGs.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.1361  [pdf] - 1165052
An extended main sequence turn-off in the Small Magellanic Cloud star cluster NGC411
Comments: To appear in MNRAS, 10 pages
Submitted: 2013-03-06
Based on new observations with the Wide Field Camera 3 onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, we report the discovery of an extended main sequence turn-off (eMSTO) in the intermediate-age star cluster NGC411. This is the second case of an eMSTO being identified in a star cluster belonging to the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), after NGC419. Despite the present masses of these two SMC clusters differ by a factor of 4, the comparison between their colour--magnitude diagrams (CMD) shows striking similarities, especially regarding the shape of their eMSTOs. The loci of main CMD features are so similar that they can be well described, in a first approximation, by the same mean metallicity, distance and extinction. NGC411, however, presents merely a trace of secondary red clump as opposed to its prominent manifestation in NGC419. This could be due either to the small number statistics in NGC411, or by the star formation in NGC419 having continued for 60 Myr longer than in NGC411. Under the assumption that the eMSTOs are caused by different generations of stars at increasing age, both clusters are nearly coeval in their first episodes of star formation. The initial period of star formation, however, is slightly more marked in NGC419 than in NGC411. We discuss these findings in the context of possible scenarios for the origin of eMSTOs.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.2328  [pdf] - 625299
Young star cluster evolution and metallicity
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure, to appear in Stellar Populations 55 years after the Vatican conference, Proceedings of the Symposium 6 of the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science 2012 (EWASS 2012), held July 2-4, 2012 in Roma, Italy. To be published on Mem. SAIt
Submitted: 2013-02-10
Young star clusters (SCs) are the cradle of stars and the site of important dynamical processes. We present N-body simulations of young SCs including recipes for metal-dependent stellar evolution and mass loss by stellar winds. We show that metallicity affects significantly the collapse and post-core collapse phase, provided that the core collapse timescale is of the same order of magnitude as the lifetime of massive stars. In particular, the reversal of core collapse is faster for metal-rich SCs, where stellar winds are stronger. As a consequence, the half-mass radius of metal-poor SCs expands more than that of metal-rich SCs.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.7687  [pdf] - 1159406
Red Giant evolution and specific problems
Comments: Presented at the 40th Li\`ege International Astrophysical Colloquium "Ageing low mass stars: from red giants to white dwarfs". Li\`ege, July 9-13 2012
Submitted: 2013-01-31
In spite of the great effort made in the last decades to improve our understanding of stellar evolution, significant uncertainties still remain due to our poor knowledge of some complex physical processes that still require an empirical calibration, such as the efficiency of convective heat transport and interior mixing. Here we will review the impact of these uncertainties on the evolution of red giant stars.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.6441  [pdf] - 1158099
Dynamics of stellar black holes in young star clusters with different metallicities - I. Implications for X-ray binaries
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures, 8 tables, MNRAS, in press
Submitted: 2012-11-27, last modified: 2013-01-17
We present N-body simulations of intermediate-mass (3000-4000 Msun) young star clusters (SCs) with three different metallicities (Z=0.01, 0.1 and 1 Zsun), including metal-dependent stellar evolution recipes and binary evolution. Following recent theoretical models of wind mass loss and core collapse supernovae, we assume that the mass of the stellar remnants depends on the metallicity of the progenitor stars. In particular, massive metal-poor stars (Z<=0.3 Zsun) are enabled to form massive stellar black holes (MSBHs, with mass >=25 Msun) through direct collapse. We find that three-body encounters, and especially dynamical exchanges, dominate the evolution of the MSBHs formed in our simulations. In SCs with Z=0.01 and 0.1 Zsun, about 75 per cent of simulated MSBHs form from single stars and become members of binaries through dynamical exchanges in the first 100 Myr of the SC life. This is a factor of >~3 more efficient than in the case of low-mass (<25 Msun) stellar black holes. A small but non-negligible fraction of MSBHs power wind-accreting (10-20 per cent) and Roche lobe overflow (RLO, 5-10 per cent) binary systems. The vast majority of MSBH binaries that undergo wind accretion and/or RLO were born from dynamical exchange. This result indicates that MSBHs can power X-ray binaries in low-metallicity young SCs, and is very promising to explain the association of many ultraluminous X-ray sources with low-metallicity and actively star forming environments.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.4227  [pdf] - 1159123
Impact of metallicity on the evolution of young star clusters
Comments: 9 pages, 9 figures, 2 tables, MNRAS, accepted
Submitted: 2013-01-17
We discuss the results of N-body simulations of intermediate-mass young star clusters (SCs) with three different metallicities (Z=0.01, 0.1 and 1 Zsun), including metallicity-dependent stellar evolution recipes and metallicity-dependent prescriptions for stellar winds and remnant formation. The initial half-mass relaxation time of the simulated young SCs (~10 Myr) is comparable to the lifetime of massive stars. We show that mass-loss by stellar winds influences the reversal of core collapse and the expansion of the half-mass radius. In particular, the post-collapse re-expansion of the core is weaker for metal-poor SCs than for metal-rich SCs, because the former lose less mass (through stellar winds) than the latter. As a consequence, the half-mass radius expands faster in metal-poor SCs. The difference in the half-light radius between metal-poor SCs and metal-rich SCs is (up to a factor of two) larger than the difference in the half-mass radius.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.3381  [pdf] - 1159061
The star formation history of the Large Magellanic Cloud star clusters NGC1846 and NGC1783
Comments: 16 pages, to appear in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-01-15
NGC1846 and NGC1783 are two massive star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud, hosting both an extended main sequence turn-off and a dual clump of red giants. They present similar masses but differ mainly in angular size. Starting from their high-quality ACS data in the F435W, F555W and F814W filters, and updated sets of stellar evolutionary tracks, we derive their star formation rates as a function of age, SFR(t), by means of the classical method of CMD reconstruction which is usually applied to nearby galaxies. The method confirms the extended periods of star formation derived from previous analysis of the same data. When the analysis is performed for a finer resolution in age, we find clear evidence for a 50-Myr long hiatus between the oldest peak in the SFR(t), and a second prolonged period of star formation, in both clusters. For the more compact cluster NGC1846, there seems to be no significant difference between the SFR(t) in the cluster centre and in an annulus with radii between 20 and 60 arcsec (from 4.8 to 15.4 pc). The same does not occur in the more extended NGC1783 cluster, where the outer ring (between 33 and 107 arcsec, from 8.0 to 25.9 pc) is found to be slightly younger than the centre. We also explore the best-fitting slope of the present-day mass function and binary fraction for the different cluster regions, finding hints of a varying mass function between centre and outer ring in NGC1783. These findings are discussed within the present scenarios for the formation of clusters with multiple turn-offs.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.4498  [pdf] - 968444
PARSEC: stellar tracks and isochrones with the PAdova and TRieste Stellar Evolution Code
Comments: To appear on MNRAS. While the full database is still being prepared, the first isochrones can be retrieved via http://stev.oapd.inaf.it/cmd
Submitted: 2012-08-22
We present the updated version of the code used to compute stellar evolutionary tracks in Padova. It is the result of a thorough revision of the major input physics, together with the inclusion of the pre-main sequence phase, not present in our previous releases of stellar models. Another innovative aspect is the possibility of promptly generating accurate opacity tables fully consistent with any selected initial chemical composition, by coupling the OPAL opacity data at high temperatures to the molecular opacities computed with our AESOPUS code (Marigo & Aringer 2009). In this work we present extended sets of stellar evolutionary models for various initial chemical compositions, while other sets with different metallicities and/or different distributions of heavy elements are being computed. For the present release of models we adopt the solar distribution of heavy elements from the recent revision by Caffau et al. (2011), corresponding to a Sun's metallicity Z=0.0152. From all computed sets of stellar tracks, we also derive isochrones in several photometric systems. The aim is to provide the community with the basic tools to model star clusters and galaxies by means of population synthesis techniques.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.4045  [pdf] - 1124199
The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury I: Bright UV Stars in the Bulge of M31
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-06-18
As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) multi-cycle program, we observed a 12' \times 6.5' area of the bulge of M31 with the WFC3/UVIS filters F275W and F336W. From these data we have assembled a sample of \sim4000 UV-bright, old stars, vastly larger than previously available. We use updated Padova stellar evolutionary tracks to classify these hot stars into three classes: Post-AGB stars (P-AGB), Post-Early AGB (PE-AGB) stars and AGB-manqu\'e stars. P-AGB stars are the end result of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and are expected in a wide range of stellar populations, whereas PE-AGB and AGB-manqu\'e (together referred to as the hot post-horizontal branch; HP-HB) stars are the result of insufficient envelope masses to allow a full AGB phase, and are expected to be particularly prominent at high helium or {\alpha} abundances when the mass loss on the RGB is high. Our data support previous claims that most UV-bright sources in the bulge are likely hot (extreme) horizontal branch stars (EHB) and their progeny. We construct the first radial profiles of these stellar populations, and show that they are highly centrally concentrated, even more so than the integrated UV or optical light. However, we find that this UV-bright population does not dominate the total UV luminosity at any radius, as we are detecting only the progeny of the EHB stars that are the likely source of the UVX. We calculate that only a few percent of MS stars in the central bulge can have gone through the HP-HB phase and that this percentage decreases strongly with distance from the center. We also find that the surface density of hot UV-bright stars has the same radial variation as that of low-mass X-ray binaries. We discuss age, metallicity, and abundance variations as possible explanations for the observed radial variation in the UV-bright population.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.1298  [pdf] - 521874
Pre-MS depletion, accretion and primordial 7Li
Comments: To be published in Memorie della Societ\`a Astronomica Italiana Supplementi Vol. 22, Proceedings of Lithium in the cosmos, Iocco F., Bonifacio P., Vangioni E., eds
Submitted: 2012-06-06
We reconsider the role of pre-main sequence (pre-MS) Li depletion on the basis of new observational and theoretical evidence: i) new observations of Halpha emissions in young clusters show that mass accretion could be continuing till the first stages of the MS, ii) theoretical implications from helioseismology suggest large overshooting values below the bottom of the convective envelopes. We argue here that a significant pre-MS 7Li destruction, caused by efficient overshoot mixing, could be followed by a matter accretion after 7Li depletion has ceased on MS thus restoring Li almost to the pristine value. As a test case we show that a halo dwarf of 0.85 Msun with an extended overshooting envelope starting with an initial abundance of A(Li) = 2.74 would burn Li completely, but an accretion rate of the type 1e-8xe^{-t/3e6} Msun yr$^{-1}$ would restore Li to end with an A(Li) = 2.31. A self-regulating process is required to produce similar final values in a range of different stellar masses to explain the PopII Spite plateau. However, this framework could explain why open cluster stars have lower Li abundances than the pre-solar nebula, the absence of Li in the most metal poor dwarfs and a number of other features which lack of a satisfactory explanation.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.2458  [pdf] - 1084795
The VISIR@VLT Mid-IR view of 47Tuc: A further step in solving the puzzle of RGB mass loss
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2011-10-11, last modified: 2011-10-14
There is an ongoing debate regarding the onset luminosity of dusty mass loss in population-II red giant stars. In this paper we present VISIR@VLT MIR 8.6 micron imaging of 47Tuc, centre of attention of a number of space-based Spitzer observations and studies. The VISIR high resolution (diffraction limited) observations allow excellent matching to existing optical Hubble space telescope catalogues. The optical-MIR coverage of the inner 1.15 arcmin of the cluster provide the cleanest possible, blending-free, sampling of the upper 3 magnitudes of the giant branch. Our diagrams show no evidence of faint giants with MIR-excess. A combined NIR-MIR diagram further confirms the near absence of dusty red giants. Dusty red giants and asymptotic giant stars are confined to the 47Tuc long period variables population. In particular, dusty red giants are limited to the upper one 8.6 micron magnitude below the giant branch tip. This particular luminosity level corresponds to ~1000 solar luminosity, suggested in previous determinations to mark the onset of dusty mass-loss. Interestingly, at this luminosity level, we detect a small deviation between the colours of red giants and the theoretical isochrones.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.4376  [pdf] - 1084253
Asteroseismology of old open clusters with Kepler: direct estimate of the integrated RGB mass loss in NGC6791 and NGC6819
Comments: 13 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-09-20
Mass loss of red giant branch (RGB) stars is still poorly determined, despite its crucial role in the chemical enrichment of galaxies. Thanks to the recent detection of solar-like oscillations in G-K giants in open clusters with Kepler, we can now directly determine stellar masses for a statistically significant sample of stars in the old open clusters NGC6791 and NGC6819. The aim of this work is to constrain the integrated RGB mass loss by comparing the average mass of stars in the red clump (RC) with that of stars in the low-luminosity portion of the RGB (i.e. stars with L <~ L(RC)). Stellar masses were determined by combining the available seismic parameters numax and Dnu with additional photometric constraints and with independent distance estimates. We measured the masses of 40 stars on the RGB and 19 in the RC of the old metal-rich cluster NGC6791. We find that the difference between the average mass of RGB and RC stars is small, but significant (Delta M=0.09 +- 0.03 (random) +- 0.04 (systematic) Msun). Interestingly, such a small DeltaM does not support scenarios of an extreme mass loss for this metal-rich cluster. If we describe the mass-loss rate with Reimers' prescription, a first comparison with isochrones suggests that the observed DeltaM is compatible with a mass-loss efficiency parameter in the range 0.1 <~ eta <~ 0.3. Less stringent constraints on the RGB mass-loss rate are set by the analysis of the ~ 2 Gyr-old NGC6819, largely due to the lower mass loss expected for this cluster, and to the lack of an independent and accurate distance determination. In the near future, additional constraints from frequencies of individual pulsation modes and spectroscopic effective temperatures, will allow further stringent tests of the Dnu and numax scaling relations, which provide a novel, and potentially very accurate, means of determining stellar radii and masses.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:1108.3911  [pdf] - 1083488
Herschel-ATLAS Galaxy Counts and High Redshift Luminosity Functions: The Formation of Massive Early Type Galaxies
Comments: 33 pages, 19 figures, 2 tables. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2011-08-19
Exploiting the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Phase (SDP) survey data, we have determined the luminosity functions (LFs) at rest-frame wavelengths of 100 and 250 micron and at several redshifts z>1, for bright sub-mm galaxies with star formation rates (SFR) >100 M_sun/yr. We find that the evolution of the comoving LF is strong up to z~2.5, and slows down at higher redshifts. From the LFs and the information on halo masses inferred from clustering analysis, we derived an average relation between SFR and halo mass (and its scatter). We also infer that the timescale of the main episode of dust-enshrouded star formation in massive halos (M_H>3*10^12 M_sun) amounts to ~7*10^8 yr. Given the SFRs, which are in the range 10^2-10^3 M_sun/yr, this timescale implies final stellar masses of order of 10^11-10^12 M_sun. The corresponding stellar mass function matches the observed mass function of passively evolving galaxies at z>1. The comparison of the statistics for sub-mm and UV selected galaxies suggests that the dust-free, UV bright phase, is >10^2 times shorter than the sub-mm bright phase, implying that the dust must form soon after the onset of star formation. Using a single reference Spectral Energy Distribution (SED; the one of the z~2.3 galaxy SMM J2135-0102), our simple physical model is able to reproduce not only the LFs at different redshifts > 1 but also the counts at wavelengths ranging from 250 micron to ~1 mm. Owing to the steepness of the counts and their relatively broad frequency range, this result suggests that the dispersion of sub-mm SEDs of z>1 galaxies around the reference one is rather small.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.3812  [pdf] - 1076738
Tracing rejuvenation events in nearby S0 galaxies
Comments: 23 pages, 5 figures and 2 tables, Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2011-05-19
With the aim of characterizing rejuvenation processes in early-type galaxies, we analyzed five barred S0 galaxies showing prominent outer ring in ultraviolet (UV) imaging. We analyzed GALEX far- (FUV) and near- (NUV) UV and optical data using stellar population models and estimated the age and the stellar mass of the entire galaxies and of the UV-bright ring structures. Outer rings consist of young (<200 Myr old) stellar populations, accounting for up to 70% of the FUV flux but containing only a few % of the total stellar mass. Integrated photometry of the whole galaxies places four of these objects on the green valley, indicating a globally evolving nature. We suggest such galaxy evolution is likely driven by bar induced instabilities, i.e. inner secular evolution, that conveys gas to the nucleus and to the outer rings. At the same time, HI observations of NGC 1533 and NGC 2962 suggest external gas re-fueling can play a role in the rejuvenation processes of such galaxies.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.2323  [pdf] - 1041238
Nearby early-type galaxies with ionized gas VI. The Spitzer-IRS view
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2010-10-12, last modified: 2011-01-25
We present low resolution Spitzer-IRS spectra of 40 ETGs, selected from a sample of 65 ETGs showing emission lines in their optical spectra. We homogeneously extract the mid-infrared (MIR) spectra, and after the proper subtraction of a "passive" ETG template, we derive the intensity of the ionic and molecular lines and of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission features. We use MIR diagnostic diagrams to investigate the powering mechanisms of the ionized gas. The mid-infrared spectra of early-type galaxies show a variety of spectral characteristics. We empirically sub-divide the sample into five classes of spectra with common characteristics. Class-0, accounting for 20% of the sample, are purely passive ETGs with neither emission lines nor PAH features. Class-1 show emission lines but no PAH features, and account for 17.5% of the sample. Class-2, in which 50% of the ETGs are found, as well as having emission lines, show PAH features with unusual ratios, e.g. 7.7 {\mu}m/11.3 {\mu}m \leq 2.3. Class-3 objects have emission lines and PAH features with ratios typical of star-forming galaxies. 7.5% of objects fall in this class, likely to be objects in a starburst/post-starburst regime. Class-4, containing only 5% of the ETGs, is dominated by a hot dust continuum. The diagnostic diagram [Ne III]15.55{\mu}m/[Ne II]12.8{\mu}m vs. [S III]33.48{\mu}m/[Si II]34.82{\mu}m, is used to investigate the different mechanisms ionizing the gas. If we exclude NGC 3258 where a starburst seems present, most of our ETGs contain gas ionized via either AGN-like or shock phenomena, or both. Most of the spectra in the present sample are classified as LINERs in the optical window. The proposed MIR spectral classes show unambiguously the manifold of the physical processes and ionization mechanisms, from star formation, low level AGN activity, to shocks, present in LINER nuclei.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.0898  [pdf] - 287090
Tracing the evolution of nearby early-type galaxies in low density environments. The Ultraviolet view from GALEX
Comments: Conference "UV Universe 2010" S. Petersburg 31 May - 3 June, 2010 Accepted for publication in Astrophysics & Space Science . The final publication is available at http://www.springerlink.com
Submitted: 2011-01-05
We detected recent star formation in nearby early-type galaxies located in low density environments, with GALEX Ultraviolet (UV) imaging. Signatures of star formation may be present in the nucleus and in outer rings/arm like structures. Our study suggests that such star formation may be induced by different triggering mechanisms, such as the inner secular evolution driven by bars, and minor accretion phenomena. We investigate the nature of the (FUV-NUV) color vs. Mg2 correlation, and suggest that it relates to "downsizing" in galaxy formation.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.0903  [pdf] - 955840
Signatures of recent star formation in ring S0 galaxies
Comments: Conference "UV Universe 2010" S. Petersburg 31 May 3 June 2010, Accepted for publication in Astrophysics & Space Science. The final publication is available at http://www.springerlink.com
Submitted: 2011-01-05
We present a study of the stellar populations of ring and/or arm-like structures in a sample of S0 galaxies using GALEX far- and near-ultraviolet imaging and SDSS optical data. Such structures are prominent in the UV and reveal recent star formation. We quantitatively characterize these rejuvenation events, estimating the average age and stellar mass of the ring structures, as well as of the entire galaxy. The mass fraction of the UV-bright rings is a few percent of the total galaxy mass, although the UV ring luminosity reaches 70% of the galaxy luminosity. The integrated colors of these S0s locates them in the red sequence (NGC 2962) and in the so-called green valley. We suggest that the star formation episodes may be induced by different triggering mechanisms, such as the inner secular evolution driven by bars, and interaction episodes.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:1003.0676  [pdf] - 1025492
First star formation with dark matter annihilation
Comments: 12 pages, 8 figures, 3 tables; replaced with published version after minor changes
Submitted: 2010-03-02, last modified: 2010-11-28
We include an energy term based on Dark Matter (DM) self-annihilation during the cooling and subsequent collapse of the metal-free gas, in halos hosting the formation of the first stars in the Universe. We have found that the feedback induced on the chemistry of the cloud does modify the properties of the gas throughout the collapse. However, the modifications are not dramatic, and the typical Jeans mass within the halo is conserved throughout the collapse, for all the DM parameters we have considered. This result implies that the presence of Dark Matter annihilations does not substantially modify the Initial Mass Function of the First Stars, with respect to the standard case in which such additional energy term is not taken into account. We have also found that when the rate of energy produced by the DM annihilations and absorbed by the gas equals the chemical cooling (at densities yet far from the actual formation of a proto-stellar core) the structure does not halt its collapse, although that proceeds more slowly by a factor smaller than few per cent of the total collapse time.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:1011.5782  [pdf] - 1042205
Mid-infrared colour gradients and the colour-magnitude relation in Virgo early-type galaxies
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2010-11-26
We make use of Spitzer imaging between 4 and 16 micron and near-infrared data at 2.2 micron to investigate the nature and distribution of the mid-infrared emission in a sample of early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster. These data allow us to conclude, with some confidence, that the emission at 16 micron in passive ETGs is stellar in origin, consistent with previous work concluding that the excess mid-infrared emission comes from the dusty envelopes around evolved AGB stars. There is little evidence for the mid-infrared emission of an unresolved central component, as might arise in the presence of a dusty torus associated with a low-luminosity AGN. We nonetheless find that the 16 micron emission is more centrally peaked than the near-infrared emission, implying a radial stellar population gradient. By comparing with independent evidence from studies at optical wavelengths, we conclude that a metallicity that falls with increasing radius is the principal driver of the observed gradient. We also plot the mid-infrared colour-magnitude diagram and combine with similar work on the Coma cluster to define the colour-magnitude relation for absolute K-band magnitudes from -26 to -19. Because a correlation between mass and age would produce a relation with a gradient in the opposite sense to that observed, we conclude that the relation reflects the fact that passive ETGs of lower mass also have a lower average metallicity. The colour-magnitude relation is thus driven by metallicity effects. In contrast to what is found in Coma, we do not find any objects with anomalously bright 16 micron emission relative to the colour-magnitude relation. Although there is little overlap in the mass ranges probed in the two clusters, this may suggest that observable ``rejuvenation'' episodes are limited to intermediate mass objects.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:1011.4852  [pdf] - 1042123
Nature and nurture of early-type dwarf galaxies in low density environments
Comments: 2 pages, 2 figures, to appear in the proceedings of JENAM 2010, Symposium 2 "Environment and the Formation of Galaxies: 30 years later"
Submitted: 2010-11-22
We study stellar population parameters of a sample of 13 dwarf galaxies located in poor groups of galaxies using high resolution spectra observed with VIMOS at the ESO-VLT. LICK-indices were compared with Simple Stellar Population models to derive ages, metallicities and [alpha/Fe]-ratios. Comparing the dwarfs with a sample of giant ETGs residing in comparable environments we find that the dwarfs are on average younger, less metal-rich, and less enhanced in alpha-elements than giants. Age, Z, and [alpha/Fe] ratios are found to correlate both with velocity dispersion and with morphology. We also find possible evidence that low density environment (LDE) dwarfs experienced more prolonged star formation histories than Coma dwarfs, however, larger samples are needed to draw firm conclusions.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:1011.4965  [pdf] - 1042138
Nature vs. nurture in the low-density environment: structure and evolution of early-type dwarf galaxies in poor groups
Comments: Accepted for publication on A&A
Submitted: 2010-11-22
We present the stellar population properties of 13 dwarf galaxies residing in poor groups (low-density environment, LDE) observed with VIMOS@VLT. Ages, metallicities, and [alpha/Fe] ratios were derived from the Lick indices Hbeta, Mgb, Fe5270 and Fe5335 through comparison with our simple stellar population (SSP) models accounting for variable [alpha/Fe] ratios. For a fiducial subsample of 10 early-type dwarfs we derive median values and scatters around the medians of 5.7 \pm 4.4 Gyr, -0.26 \pm 0.28, and -0.04 \pm 0.33 for age, log Z/Zsun, and [alpha/Fe], respectively. For a selection of bright early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the Annibali et al.2007 sample residing in comparable environment we derive median values of 9.8 \pm 4.1 Gyr, 0.06 \pm 0.16, and 0.18 \pm 0.13 for the same stellar population parameters. It follows that dwarfs are on average younger, less metal rich, and less enhanced in the alpha-elements than giants, in agreement with the extrapolation to the low mass regime of the scaling relations derived for giant ETGs. From the total (dwarf + giant) sample we derive that age \propto sigma^{0.39 \pm 0.22}, Z \propto sigma^{0.80 \pm 0.16}, and alpha/Fe \propto sigma^{0.42 \pm 0.22}. We also find correlations with morphology, in the sense that the metallicity and the [alpha/Fe] ratio increase with the Sersic index n or with the bulge-to-total light fraction B/T. The presence of a strong morphology-[alpha/Fe] relation appears to be in contradiction to the possible evolution along the Hubble sequence from low B/T (low n) to high B/T (high n) galaxies. We also investigate the role played by environment comparing the properties of our LDE dwarfs with those of Coma red passive dwarfs from the literature. We find possible evidence that LDE dwarfs experienced more prolonged star formations than Coma dwarfs, however larger data samples are needed to draw more firm conclusions.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.2214  [pdf] - 1041218
WINGS-SPE II: A catalog of stellar ages and star formation histories, stellar masses and dust extinction values for local clusters galaxies
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures. Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2010-10-11
The WIde-field Nearby Galaxy clusters Survey (WINGS) is a project whose primary goal is to study the galaxy populations in clusters in the local universe (z<0.07) and of the influence of environment on their stellar populations. This survey has provided the astronomical community with a high quality set of photometric and spectroscopic data for 77 and 48 nearby galaxy clusters, respectively. In this paper we present the catalog containing the properties of galaxies observed by the WINGS SPEctroscopic (WINGS-SPE) survey, which were derived using stellar populations synthesis modelling approach. We also check the consistency of our results with other data in the literature. Using a spectrophotometric model that reproduces the main features of observed spectra by summing the theoretical spectra of simple stellar populations of different ages, we derive the stellar masses, star formation histories, average age and dust attenuation of galaxies in our sample. ~5300 spectra were analyzed with spectrophotometric techniques, and this allowed us to derive the star formation history, stellar masses and ages, and extinction for the WINGS spectroscopic sample that we present in this paper. The comparison with the total mass values of the same galaxies derived by other authors based on SDSS data, confirms the reliability of the adopted methods and data.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.1931  [pdf] - 1034862
Nearby early-type galaxies with ionized gas. The UV emission from GALEX observations
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS, 33 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2010-09-10
We present GALEX far-ultraviolet (FUV, $\lambda_{eff}$=1538 \AA) and near-ultraviolet (NUV, $\lambda_{eff}$=2316 \AA) surface photometry of 40 early-type galaxies (ETGs) selected from a wider sample of 65 nearby ETGs showing emission lines in their optical spectra. We derive FUV and NUV surface brightness profiles, (FUV-NUV) colour profiles and D$_{25}$ integrated magnitudes. We extend the photometric study to the optical {\it r} band from SDSS imaging for 14 of these ETGs. In general, the (FUV-NUV) radial colour profiles become redder with galactocentric distance in both rejuvenated ($\leq 4$ Gyr) and old ETGs. Colour profiles of NGC 1533, NGC 2962, NGC 2974, NGC 3489, and IC 5063 show rings and/or arm-like structures, bluer than the body of the galaxy, suggesting the presence of recent star formation. Although seven of our ETGs show shell systems in their optical image, only NGC 7135 displays shells in the UV bands. We characterize the UV and optical surface brightness profiles, along the major axis, using a Sersic law. The Sersic law exponent, $n$, varies from 1 to 16 in the UV bands. S0 galaxies tend to have lower values of $n$ ($\leq5$). The Sersic law exponent $n=4$ seems to be a watershed: ETGs with $n>4$ tend to have [$\alpha$/Fe] greater than 0.15, implying a short star-formation time scale. We find a significant correlation between the FUV$-$NUV colour and central velocity dispersions $\sigma$, with the UV colours getting bluer at larger $\sigma$. This trend is likely driven by a combined effect of `downsizing' and of the mass-metallicity relation.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:1008.0009  [pdf] - 1034028
Unusual PAH Emission in Nearby Early-Type Galaxies: A Signature of an Intermediate Age Stellar Population?
Comments: ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2010-07-30
We present the analysis of Spitzer-IRS spectra of four early-type galaxies, NGC 1297, NGC 5044, NGC 6868, and NGC 7079, all classified as LINERs in the optical bands. Their IRS spectra present the full series of H2 rotational emission lines in the range 5--38 microns, atomic lines, and prominent PAH features. We investigate the nature and origin of the PAH emission, characterized by unusually low 6 -- 9/11.3 microns inter-band ratios. After the subtraction of a passive early type galaxy template, we find that the 7 -- 9 microns spectral region requires dust features not normally present in star forming galaxies. Each spectrum is then analyzed with the aim of identifying their components and origin. In contrast to normal star forming galaxies, where cationic PAH emission prevails, our 6--14 microns spectra seem to be dominated by large and neutral PAH emission, responsible for the low 6 -- 9/11.3 microns ratios, plus two broad dust emission features peaking at 8.2 microns and 12 microns. Theses broad components, observed until now mainly in evolved carbon stars and usually attributed to pristine material, contribute approximately 30-50% of the total PAH flux in the 6--14 microns region. We propose that the PAH molecules in our ETGs arise from fresh carbonaceous material which is continuously released by a population of carbon stars, formed in a rejuvenation episode which occurred within the last few Gyr. The analysis of the MIR spectra allows us to infer that, in order to maintain the peculiar size and charge distributions biased to large and neutral PAHs, this material must be shocked, and excited by the weak UV interstellar radiation field of our ETG.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.2303  [pdf] - 1033058
Cosmic Evolution of Size and Velocity Dispersion for Early Type Galaxies
Comments: 18 pages, 6 figures, uses RevTeX4 + emulateapj.cls and apjfonts.sty. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2010-06-11
[abridged] Massive, passively evolving galaxies at redshifts z>1 exhibit on the average physical sizes smaller by factors ~3 than local early type galaxies (ETGs) endowed with the same stellar mass. Small sizes are in fact expected on theoretical grounds, if dissipative collapse occurs. Recent results show that the size evolution at z<1 is limited to less than 40%, while most of the evolution occurs at z>1, where both compact and already extended galaxies are observed and the scatter in size is remarkably larger than locally. The presence at high z of a significant number of ETGs with the same size as their local counterparts as well as of ETGs with quite small size, points to a timescale to reach the new, expanded equilibrium configuration of less than the Hubble time. We demonstrate that the projected mass of compact, high-z galaxies and that of local ETGs within the *same physical radius*, the nominal half-luminosity radius of high-z ETGs, differ substantially, in that the high-z ETGs are on the average significantly denser. We propose that quasar activity, which peaks at z~2, can remove large amounts of gas from central galaxy regions on a timescale shorter than of the dynamical one, triggering a puffing up of the stellar component at constant stellar mass; in this case the size increase goes together with a decrease of the central mass. The size evolution is expected to parallel that of the quasars and the inverse hierarchy, or downsizing, seen in the quasar evolution is mirrored in the size evolution.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.3548  [pdf] - 1032611
Ultra-luminous X-ray sources and remnants of massive metal-poor stars
Comments: 21 pages, 8 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-05-19
Massive metal-poor stars might form massive stellar black holes (BHs), with mass 25<=mBH/Msun<=80, via direct collapse. We derive the number of massive BHs (NBH) that are expected to form per galaxy through this mechanism. Such massive BHs might power most of the observed ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs). We select a sample of 64 galaxies with X-ray coverage, measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and of the metallicity. We find that NBH correlates with the number of observed ULXs per galaxy (NULX) in this sample. We discuss the dependence of our model on the SFR and on the metallicity. The SFR is found to be crucial, consistently with previous studies. The metallicity plays a role in our model, since a lower metallicity enhances the formation of massive BHs. Consistently with our model, the data indicate that there might be an anticorrelation between NULX, normalized to the SFR, and the metallicity. A larger and more homogeneous sample of metallicity measurements is required, in order to confirm our results.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.3056  [pdf] - 1032545
The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey: III. A constraint on dust grain lifetime in early-type galaxies
Comments: Letter accepted for publication in A&A (Herschel special issue)
Submitted: 2010-05-17
Passive early-type galaxies (ETGs) provide an ideal laboratory for studying the interplay between dust formation around evolved stars and its subsequent destruction in a hot gas. Using Spitzer-IRS and Herschel data we compare the dust production rate in the envelopes of evolved AGB stars with a constraint on the total dust mass. Early-type galaxies which appear to be truly passively evolving are not detected by Herschel. We thus derive a distance independent upper limit to the dust grain survival time in the hostile environment of ETGs of < 46 +/- 25 Myr for amorphous silicate grains. This implies that ETGs which are detected at far-infrared wavelengths have acquired a cool dusty medium via interaction. Given likely time-scales for ram-pressure stripping, this also implies that only galaxies with dust in a cool (atomic) medium can release dust into the intra-cluster medium.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:1004.1647  [pdf] - 1026225
Nearby early-type galaxies with ionized gas.IV. Origin and powering mechanism of the ionized gas
Comments: A&A accepted
Submitted: 2010-04-09
[ABRIDGED] With the aim of constraining the source of excitation and the origin of the ionized gas in early-type galaxies (ETGs), we analyzed optical spectra of a sample of 65 ETGs mostly located in low density environments. Optical emission lines are detected in 89% of the sample. The incidence and strength of emission do not correlate either with the E/S0 classification, or with the fast/slow rotator classification. Comparing the nuclear r<r_e/16 line emission with the classical [OIII]/Hb vs [NII]/Ha diagnostic diagram, the galaxy activity is so classified: 72% are LINERs, 9% are Seyferts, 12% are Composite/Transition objects, and 7% are non-classified. Seyferts have young luminosity-weighted ages (<5 Gyr), and are significantly younger than LINERs and Composites. Seyferts excluded, the spread in the ([OIII], Ha or [NII]) emission strength increases with the galaxy central velocity dispersion. The [NII]/Ha ratio decreases with increasing galacto-centric distance, indicating either a decrease of the nebular metallicity, or a progressive "softening" of the ionizing spectrum. The average oxygen abundance of the ionized gas is slightly less than solar, and a comparison with the results obtained in Paper III from Lick indices reveals that it is ~0.2 dex lower than that of stars. Conclusions: the nuclear emission can be explained with photoionization by PAGB stars alone only in ~22% of the LINERs/Composite sample. On the other hand, we can not exclude an important role of PAGB star photoionization at larger radii. For the major fraction of the sample, the nuclear emission is consistent with excitation from a low-accretion rate AGN, fast shocks (200 -500 km/s) in a relatively gas-poor environment (n< 100 cm^-3), or coexistence of the two. The derived nebular metallicities suggest either an external origin of the gas, or an overestimate of the oxygen yields by SN models.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.3334  [pdf] - 1025236
Starburst evolution: free-free absorption in the radio spectra of luminous IRAS galaxies
Comments: 13 pages, 5 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-02-17
We describe radio observations at 244 and 610 MHz of a sample of 20 luminous and ultra-luminous IRAS galaxies. These are a sub-set of a sample of 31 objects that have well-measured radio spectra up to at least 23 GHz. The radio spectra of these objects below 1.4 GHz show a great variety of forms and are rarely a simple power-law extrapolation of the synchrotron spectra at higher frequencies. Most objects of this class have spectral turn-overs or bends in their radio spectra. We interpret these spectra in terms of free-free absorption in the starburst environment. Several objects show radio spectra with two components having free-free turn-overs at different frequencies (including Arp 220 and Arp 299), indicating that synchrotron emission originates from regions with very different emission measures. In these sources, using a simple model for the supernova rate, we estimate the time for which synchrotron emission is subject to strong free-free absorption by ionized gas, and compare this to expected HII region lifetimes. We find that the ionized gas lifetimes are an order of magnitude larger than plausible lifetimes for individual HII regions. We discuss the implications of this result and argue that those sources which have a significant radio component with strong free-free absorption are those in which the star formation rate is still increasing with time. We note that if ionization losses modify the intrinsic synchrotron spectrum so that it steepens toward higher frequencies, the often observed deficit in fluxes higher than ~10 GHz would be much reduced.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.1567  [pdf] - 1017434
Predictions for Herschel from LambdaCDM: unveiling the cosmic star formation history
Comments: 28 pages, 22 figures, 2 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS. Minor changes in response to referee, including new figure comparing to BLAST number counts
Submitted: 2009-09-08, last modified: 2010-02-02
We use a model for the evolution of galaxies in the far-IR based on the LambdaCDM cosmology to make detailed predictions for upcoming cosmological surveys with the Herschel Space Observatory. We use the combined GALFORM semi-analytical galaxy formation model and GRASIL spectrophotometric code to compute galaxy SEDs including the reprocessing of radiation by dust. The model, which is the same as that in Baugh et al. (2005), assumes two different IMFs: a normal solar neighbourhood IMF for quiescent star formation in disks, and a very top-heavy IMF in starbursts triggered by galaxy mergers. We have shown previously that the top-heavy IMF appears necessary to explain the number counts and redshifts of faint sub-mm galaxies. In this paper, we present predictions for galaxy luminosity functions, number counts and redshift distributions in the Herschel imaging bands. We find that source confusion will be a serious problem in the deepest planned surveys. We also show predictions for physical properties such as star formation rates and stellar, gas and halo masses, together with fluxes at other wavelengths (from the far-UV to the radio) relevant for multi-wavelength follow-up observations. We investigate what fraction of the total IR emission from dust and of the high-mass star formation over the history of the Universe should be resolved by planned surveys with Herschel, and find a fraction ~30-50%, depending on confusion. Finally, we show that galaxies in Herschel surveys should be significantly clustered.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.3866  [pdf] - 28621
The nature of ionized gas in early-type galaxies
Comments: Proceeding of the Conference "Galaxies in Isolation", Granada, 12-15 May 2009
Submitted: 2009-09-21
We present a study of the ionized gas in a sample of 65 nearby early-type galaxies, for which we have acquired optical intermediate-resolution spectra. Emission lines are detected in ~89 % of the sample. The incidence of emission appears independent from the E or S0 morphological classes. According to classical diagnostic diagrams, the majority of the galaxies are LINERs. However, the galaxies tend to move toward the "Composites" region (at lower [NII]/Halpha values) as the emission lines are measured at larger galacto-centric distances. This suggests that different ionization mechanisms may be at work in LINERs.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.3379  [pdf] - 901776
The role of the synchrotron component in the mid infrared spectrum of M 87
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ main journal
Submitted: 2009-09-18
We study in detail the mid-infrared Spitzer-IRS spectrum of M 87 in the range 5 to 20 micron. Thanks to the high sensitivity of our Spitzer-IRS spectra we can disentangle the stellar and nuclear components of this active galaxy. To this end we have properly subtracted from the M 87 spectrum, the contribution of the underlying stellar continuum, derived from passive Virgo galaxies in our sample. The residual is a clear power-law, without any additional thermal component, with a zero point consistent with that obtained by high spatial resolution, ground based observations. The residual is independent of the adopted passive template. This indicates that the 10 micron silicate emission shown in spectra of M 87 can be entirely accounted for by the underlying old stellar population, leaving little room for a possible torus contribution. The MIR power-law has a slope alpha ~ 0.77-0.82 (S$_\nu\propto\nu^{-\alpha}$), consistent with optically thin synchrotron emission.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:0906.3522  [pdf] - 1002617
Modelling the dusty universe I: Introducing the artificial neural network and first applications to luminosity and colour distributions
Comments: 24 pages, 18 figures. Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-06-18
We introduce a new technique based on artificial neural networks which allows us to make accurate predictions for the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of large samples of galaxies, at wavelengths ranging from the far-ultra-violet to the sub-millimetre and radio. The neural net is trained to reproduce the SEDs predicted by a hybrid code comprised of the GALFORM semi-analytical model of galaxy formation, which predicts the full star formation and galaxy merger histories, and the GRASIL spectro-photometric code, which carries out a self-consistent calculation of the SED, including absorption and emission of radiation by dust. Using a small number of galaxy properties predicted by GALFORM, the method reproduces the luminosities of galaxies in the majority of cases to within 10% of those computed directly using GRASIL. The method performs best in the sub-mm and reasonably well in the mid-infrared and the far-ultra-violet. The luminosity error introduced by the method has negligible impact on predicted statistical distributions, such as luminosity functions or colour distributions of galaxies. We use the neural net to predict the overlap between galaxies selected in the rest-frame UV and in the observer-frame sub-mm at z=2. We find that around half of the galaxies with a 850um flux above 5 mJy should have optical magnitudes brighter than R_AB < 25 mag. However, only 1% of the galaxies selected in the rest-frame UV down to R_AB < 25 mag should have 850um fluxes brighter than 5 mJy. Our technique will allow the generation of wide-angle mock catalogues of galaxies selected at rest-frame UV or mid- and far-infrared wavelengths.
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.3664  [pdf] - 1002325
PopStar I: Evolutionary synthesis models description
Comments: 21 pages, 29 figures, to be published by MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-05-22
We present new evolutionary synthesis models for Simple Stellar Populations for a wide range of ages and metallicities. The models are based on the Padova isochrones. The core of the spectral library is provided by the medium resolution Lejeune et al. atmosphere models. These spectra are complemented by NLTE atmosphere models for hot stars that have an important impact in the stellar cluster's ionizing spectra: O, B and WR stellar spectra at the early ages, and spectra of post-AGB stars and planetary nebulae, at intermediate and old ages. At young ages, our models compare well with other existing models but we find that, the inclusion of the nebular continuum, not considered in several other models, reddens significantly the integrated colours of very young stellar populations. This is consistent with the results of spectral synthesis codes particularly devised for the study of starburst galaxies. At intermediate and old ages, the agreement with literature model is good and, in particular, we reproduce well the observed colours of star clusters in LMC. Given the ability to produce good integrated spectra from the far-UV to the infrared at any age, we consider that our models are particularly suited for the study of high redshift galaxies. These models are available on the web site {http://www.fractal-es.com/SEDmod.htm} and also through the Virtual Observatory Tools on the PopStar server.
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.3496  [pdf] - 24505
Mid-UV Narrow-Band Indices of Evolved Simple Stellar Populations
Comments: 20 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2009-05-21
We explore the properties of selected mid-ultraviolet (1900-3200 angstrom) spectroscopic indices of simple stellar populations (SSPs). We incorporate the high resolution UVBLUE stellar spectral library into an evolutionary population synthesis code, based on the most recent Padova isochrones. We analyze the trends of UV indices with respect to age and chemical composition. As a first test against observations, we compare our results with the empirical mid-UV spectral indices of Galactic globular clusters, observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). We find that synthetic indices exhibit a variety of properties, the main one being the slight age sensitivity of most of them for ages>2 Gyr. However, for high metallicity, two indices, Fe II 2332 and Fe II 2402, display a remarkably different pattern, with a sharp increase within the first two Gyr and, thereafter, a rapid decline. These indices clearly mark the presence of young (~1 Gyr) metal rich (Z > Z_sun) stellar populations. We complement existing UV indices of Galactic globular clusters with new measurements, and carefully identify a sub-sample of ten indices suitable for comparison with theoretical models. The comparison shows a fair agreement and, in particular, the strong trend of the indices with metallicity is well reproduced. We also discuss the main improvements that should be considered in future modelling concerning, among others, the effects of alpha-enhancement in the spectral energy distributions.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.0346  [pdf] - 120865
WIMP annihilation effects on primordial star formation
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure; refereed proceeding to appear in Proceedings of Science (from the "Identification of Dark Matter 2008" meeting, Stockholm, Sweden - August 18-22, 2008)
Submitted: 2009-03-02
We study the effects of WIMP dark matter (DM) annihilations on the thermal and chemical evolution of the gaseous clouds where the first generation of stars in the Universe is formed. We follow the collapse of the gas inside a typical halo virializing at very high redshift, from well before virialization until a stage where the heating from DM annihilations exceeds the gas cooling rate. The DM energy input is estimated by inserting the energy released by DM annihilations (as predicted by an adiabatic contraction of the original DM profile) in a spherically symmetric radiative transfer scheme. In addition to the heating effects of the energy absorbed, we include its feedback upon the chemical properties of the gas, which is critical to determine the cooling rate in the halo, and hence the fragmentation scale and Jeans mass of the first stars. We find that DM annihilation does alter the free electron and especially the H2 fraction when the gas density is n>~ 10^4 cm^-3, for our fiducial parameter values. However, even if the change in the H2 abundance and the cooling efficiency of the gas is large (sometimes exceeding a factor 100), the effects on the temperature of the collapsing gas are far smaller (a reduction by a factor <~1.5), since the gas cooling rate depends very strongly on temperature: then, the fragmentation mass scale is reduced only slightly, hinting towards no dramatic change in the initial mass function of the first stars.
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.1202  [pdf] - 21129
The energetic environment and the dense interstellar medium in ULIRGs
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, Proceedings of "A Long Walk Through Astronomy: A Celebration of Luis Carrasco's 60th Birthday", Huatulco, Mexico, October 2008, ed. E. Recillas, L. Aguilar, A. Luna, and J.R. Valdes; RevMexAA (Serie de Conferencias)
Submitted: 2009-02-06
We fit the near-infrared to radio spectral energy distributions of a sample of 30 luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies with models that include both starburst and AGN components. The aim of the work was to determine important physical parameters for this kind of objects such as the optical depth towards the luminosity source, the star formation rate, the star formation efficiency and the AGN fraction. We found that although about half of our sample have best-fit models that include an AGN component, only 30 % have an AGN which accounts for more than 10 % of the infrared luminosity whereas all have an energetically dominant starburst. Our models also determine the mass of dense molecular gas. Assuming that this mass is that traced by the HCN molecule, we reproduce the observed linear relation between HCN luminosity and infrared luminosity found by Gao and Solomon (2004). However, our derived conversion factor between HCN luminosity and the mass of dense molecular gas is a factor of 2 smaller than that assumed by these authors. Finally, we find that the star formation efficiency falls as the starburst ages.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.1896  [pdf] - 1634005
Extreme UV QSOs
Comments: Astronomical Journal, in press
Submitted: 2009-01-13
We present a sample of spectroscopically confirmed QSOs with FUV-NUV color (as measured by GALEX photometry) bluer than canonical QSO templates and than the majority of known QSOs. We analyze their FUV to NIR colors, luminosities and optical spectra. The sample includes a group of 150 objects at low redshift (z $<$ 0.5), and a group of 21 objects with redshift 1.7$<$z$<$2.6. For the low redshift objects, the "blue" FUV-NUV color may be caused by enhanced Ly$\alpha$ emission, since Ly$\alpha$ transits the GALEX FUV band from z=0.1 to z=0.47. Synthetic QSO templates constructed with Ly$\alpha$ up to 3 times stronger than in standard templates match the observed UV colors of our low redshift sample. The H$\alpha$ emission increases, and the optical spectra become bluer, with increasing absolute UV luminosity. The UV-blue QSOs at redshift about 2, where the GALEX bands sample restframe about 450-590A (FUV) and about 590-940A(NUV), are fainter than the average of UV-normal QSOs at similar redshift in NUV, while they have comparable luminosities in other bands. Therefore we speculate that their observed FUV-NUV color may be explained by a combination of steep flux rise towards short wavelengths and dust absorption below the Lyman limit, such as from small grains or crystalline carbon. The ratio of Ly$\alpha$ to CIV could be measured in 10 objects; it is higher (30% on average) than for UV-normal QSOs, and close to the value expected for shock or collisional ionization. FULL VERSION AVAILABLE FROM AUTHOR'S WEB SITE: http://dolomiti.pha.jhu.edu/papers/2009_AJ_Extreme_UV_QSOs.pdf
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.2899  [pdf] - 15562
The mid-infrared colour-magnitude relation of early-type galaxies in the Coma cluster as measured by Spitzer-IRS
Comments: 11 pages, 8 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS. This replacement has mainly cosmetic textual changes but the model in figure 6 has been modified
Submitted: 2008-08-21, last modified: 2008-10-15
We use 16 micron, Spitzer-IRS, blue peakup photometry of 50 early-type galaxies in the Coma cluster to define the mid-infrared colour-magnitude relation. We compare with recent simple stellar population models that include the mid-infrared emission from the extended, dusty envelopes of evolved stars. The Ks-[16] colour in these models is very sensitive to the relative population of dusty Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. We find that the passively evolving early-type galaxies define a sequence of approximately constant age (~10 Gyr) with varying metallicity. Several galaxies that lie on the optical/near-infrared colour-magnitude relation do not lie on the mid-infrared relation. This illustrates the sensitivity of the Ks-[16] colour to age. The fact that a colour-magnitude relation is seen in the mid-infrared underlines the extremely passive nature of the majority (68%) of early-type galaxies in the Coma cluster. The corollary of this is that 32% of the early-type galaxies in our sample are not `passive', insofar as they are either significantly younger than 10 Gyr or they have had some rejuvenation episode within the last few Gyr.
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.2417  [pdf] - 16303
Effects of dark matter annihilation on the first stars
Comments: Proceedings of the IAU Symposium 255, "Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies"; L.K. Hunt, S. Madden and R. Schneider eds
Submitted: 2008-09-14
We study the evolution of the first stars in the universe (Population III) from the early pre-Main Sequence until the end of helium burning in the presence of WIMP dark matter annihilation inside the stellar structure. The two different mechanisms that can provide this energy source are the contemporary contraction of baryons and dark matter, and the capture of WIMPs by scattering off the gas with subsequent accumulation inside the star. We find that the first mechanism can generate an equilibrium phase, previously known as a "dark star", which is transient and present in the very early stages of pre-MS evolution. The mechanism of scattering and capture acts later, and can support the star virtually forever, depending on environmental characteristic of the dark matter halo and on the specific WIMP model.
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.1189  [pdf] - 16058
The history of star formation and mass assembly in early-type galaxies
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures. Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2008-09-06
We define a volume limited sample of over 14,000 early-type galaxies (ETGs) selected from data release six of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The density of environment of each galaxy is robustly measured. By comparing narrow band spectral line indices with recent models of simple stellar populations (SSPs) we investigate trends in the star formation history as a function of galaxy mass (velocity dispersion), density of environment and galactic radius. We find that age, metallicity and alpha-enhancement all increase with galaxy mass and that field ETGs are younger than their cluster counterparts by ~2 Gyr. We find negative radial metallicity gradients for all masses and environments, and positive radial age gradients for ETGs with velocity dispersion over 180 km/s. Our results are qualitatively consistent with a relatively simple picture for ETG evolution in which the low-mass halos accreted by a proto-ETG contained not only gas but also a stellar population. This fossil population is preferentially found at large radii in massive ETGs because the stellar accretions were dissipationless. We estimate that the typical, massive ETG should have been assembled at z < 3.5. The process is similar in the cluster and the field but occurred earlier in dense environments.
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.4016  [pdf] - 314940
Dark matter annihilation effects on the first stars
Comments: Comments welcome
Submitted: 2008-05-26, last modified: 2008-06-17
We study the effects of WIMP dark matter (DM) on the collapse and evolution of the first stars in the Universe. Using a stellar evolution code, we follow the pre-Main Sequence (MS) phase of a grid of metal-free stars with masses in the range 5-600 solar mass forming in the centre of a 1e6 solar mass halo at redhisft z=20. DM particles of the parent halo are accreted in the proto-stellar interior by adiabatic contraction and scattering/capture processes, reaching central densities of order 1e12 GeV/cm3 at radii of the order of 10 AU. Energy release from annihilation reactions can effectively counteract the gravitational collapse, in agreement with results from other groups. We find this stalling phase (known as "dark" star) is transients and lasts from 2.1e3 yr (M=600 solar mass) to 1.8e4 yr (M=9 solar mass). Later in the evolution, DM scattering/capture rate becomes high enough that energy deposition from annihilations significantly alters the pre-MS evolution of the star in a way that depends on DM (i) velocity dispersion, (ii) density, (iii) elastic scattering cross section with baryons. For our fiducial set of parameters (10 km/s, 1e11 GeV/cm3, 1e-38 cm2) we find that the evolution of stars of mass lower than 40 solar masses "freezes" on the HR diagram before reaching the ZAMS. Stars with bigger masses manage to ignite nuclear reactions; however, DM "burning" prolonges their lifetimes by a factor 2 (5) for a 600 (40) solar mass star.
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.3109  [pdf] - 12805
The Molecular Hydrogen Explorer H2EX
Comments: Accepted for publication in Experimental Astronomy special issue on Cosmic Vision Proposals, 19 pages and 9 figures
Submitted: 2008-05-20
The Molecular Hydrogen Explorer, H2EX, was proposed in response to the ESA 2015 - 2025 Cosmic Vision Call as a medium class space mission with NASA and CSA participations. The mission, conceived to understand the formation of galaxies, stars and planets from molecular hydrogen, is designed to observe the first rotational lines of the H2 molecule (28.2, 17.0, 12.3 and 9.7 micron) over a wide field, and at high spectral resolution. H2EX can provide an inventory of warm (> 100 K) molecular gas in a broad variety of objects, including nearby young star clusters, galactic molecular clouds, active galactic nuclei, local and distant galaxies. The rich array of molecular, atomic and ionic lines, as well as solid state features available in the 8 to 29 micron spectral range brings additional science dimensions to H2EX. We present the optical and mechanical design of the H2EX payload based on an innovative Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) fed by a 1.2m telescope. The 20'x20' field of view is imaged on two 1024x1024 Si:As detectors. The maximum resolution of 0.032 cm^-1 (FWHM) means a velocity resolution of 10 km s^-1 for the 0-0 S(3) line at 9.7 micron. This instrument offers the large field of view necessary to survey extended emission in the Galaxy and local Universe galaxies as well as to perform unbiased extragalactic and circumstellar disks surveys. The high spectral resolution makes H2EX uniquely suited to study the dynamics of H2 in all these environments. The mission plan is made of seven wide-field spectro-imaging legacy programs, from the cosmic web to galactic young star clusters, within a nominal two years mission. The payload has been designed to re-use the Planck platform and passive cooling design.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.0787  [pdf] - 9811
Long Gamma-Ray Bursts and Their Host Galaxies at High Redshift
Comments: 11 pages, 8 figures, uses mn2e.cls. Minor changes. In press on MNRAS
Submitted: 2008-02-06, last modified: 2008-04-01
Motivated by the recent observational and theoretical evidence that long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are likely associated with low metallicity, rapidly rotating massive stars, we examine the cosmological star formation rate (SFR) below a critical metallicity Z_crit Z_sun/10 - Z_sun/5, to estimate the event rate of high-redshift long GRB progenitors. To this purpose, we exploit a galaxy formation scenario already successfully tested on a wealth of observational data on (proto)spheroids, Lyman break galaxies, Lyman alpha emitters, submm galaxies, quasars, and local early-type galaxies. We find that the predicted rate of long GRBs amounts to about 300 events/yr/sr, of which about 30 per cent occur at z>~6. Correspondingly, the GRB number counts well agree with the bright SWIFT data, without the need for an intrinsic luminosity evolution. Moreover, the above framework enables us to predict properties of the GRB host galaxies. Most GRBs are associated with low mass galaxy halos M_H<~10^11 M_sun, and effectively trace the formation of small galaxies in such halos. The hosts are young, with age smaller than 5*10^7 yr, gas rich, but poorly extincted (A_V<~0.1) because of their chemical immaturity; this also implies high specific SFR and quite extreme alpha-enhancement. Only the minority of hosts residing in large halos with M_H>~10^12 M_sun have larger extinction (A_V~0.7-1), SFRs exceeding 100 M_sun/yr and can be detected at submm wavelengths. Most of the hosts have UV magnitudes in the range -20 <~M_1350<~ -16, and Lyman alpha luminosity in the range 2*10^40 <~L_Lya<~2*10^42 erg/s. GRB hosts are thus tracing the faint end of the luminosity function of Lyman break galaxies and Lyman alpha emitters.
[116]  oai:arXiv.org:0711.4922  [pdf] - 142141
Evolution of asymptotic giant branch stars II. Optical to far-infrared isochrones with improved TP-AGB models
Comments: 25 pages, accepted for publication in A&A, revised according to the latest referee's indications, isochrones are available at http://stev.oapd.inaf.it/cmd
Submitted: 2007-11-30, last modified: 2008-02-11
We present a large set of theoretical isochrones, whose distinctive features mostly reside on the greatly improved treatment of the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase. Essentially, we have coupled the TP-AGB tracks described in Paper I, at their stages of pre-flash quiescent H-shell burning, with the evolutionary tracks for the previous evolutionary phases from Girardi et al. (2000). Theoretical isochrones for any intermediate value of age and metallicity are then derived by interpolation in the grids. We take care that the isochrones keep, to a good level of detail, the several peculiarities present in these TP-AGB tracks. Theoretical isochrones are then converted to about 20 different photometric systems -- including traditional ground-based systems, and those of recent major wide-field surveys such as SDSS, OGLE, DENIS, 2MASS, UKIDSS, etc., -- by means of synthetic photometry applied to an updated library of stellar spectra, suitably extended to include C-type stars. Finally, we correct the predicted photometry by the effect of circumstellar dust during the mass-losing stages of the AGB evolution, which allows us to improve the results for the optical-to-infrared systems, and to simulate mid- and far-IR systems such as those of Spitzer and AKARI. Access to the data is provided both via a web repository of static tables (http://stev.oapd.inaf.it/dustyAGB07 and CDS), and via an interactive web interface (http://stev.oapd.inaf.it/cmd) that provides tables for any intermediate value of age and metallicity, for several photometric systems, and for different choices of dust properties.
[117]  oai:arXiv.org:0704.1562  [pdf] - 344
Galaxy evolution in the infra-red: comparison of a hierarchical galaxy formation model with SPITZER data
Comments: LaTeX, 26 pages, 19 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS. Minor changes from original version in response to referee's report
Submitted: 2007-04-12, last modified: 2008-01-18
We present predictions for the evolution of the galaxy luminosity function, number counts and redshift distributions in the IR based on the Lambda-CDM cosmological model. We use the combined GALFORM semi-analytical galaxy formation model and GRASIL spectrophotometric code to compute galaxy SEDs including the reprocessing of radiation by dust. The model, which is the same as that in Baugh et al (2005), assumes two different IMFs: a normal solar neighbourhood IMF for quiescent star formation in disks, and a very top-heavy IMF in starbursts triggered by galaxy mergers. We have shown previously that the top-heavy IMF seems to be necessary to explain the number counts of faint sub-mm galaxies. We compare the model with observational data from the SPITZER Space Telescope, with the model parameters fixed at values chosen before SPITZER data became available. We find that the model matches the observed evolution in the IR remarkably well over the whole range of wavelengths probed by SPITZER. In particular, the SPITZER data show that there is strong evolution in the mid-IR galaxy luminosity function over the redshift range z ~ 0-2, and this is reproduced by our model without requiring any adjustment of parameters. On the other hand, a model with a normal IMF in starbursts predicts far too little evolution in the mid-IR luminosity function, and is therefore excluded.
[118]  oai:arXiv.org:0712.1202  [pdf] - 7875
Modelling the spectral energy distribution of ULIRGs II: The energetic environment and the dense interstellar medium
Comments: Re-submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2007-12-07
We fit the near-infrared to radio spectral energy distributions of 30 luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies with pure starburst models or models that include both starburst and AGN components to determine important physical parameters for this population of objects. In particular we constrain the optical depth towards the luminosity source, the star formation rate, the star formation efficiency and the AGN fraction. We find that although about half of our sample have best-fit models that include an AGN component, only 30% have an AGN which accounts for more than 10% of the infrared luminosity, whereas all have an energetically dominant starburst. Our derived AGN fractions are generally in good agreement other measurements based in the mid-infrared line ratios measured by Spitzer IRS, but lower than those derived from PAH equivalent widths or the mid-infrared spectral slope. Our models determine the mass of dense molecular gas via the extinction required to reproduce the SED. Assuming that this mass is that traced by HCN, we reproduce the observed linear relation between HCN and infrared luminosities found by Gao & Solomon. We also find that the star formation efficiency, defined as the current star formation rate per unit of dense molecular gas mass, is enhanced in the ULIRGs phase. If the evolution of ULIRGs includes a phase in which an AGN contributes an important fraction to the infrared luminosity, this phase should last an order of magnitude less time than the starburst phase. Because the mass of dense molecular gas which we derive is consistent with observations of the HCN molecule,it should be possible to estimate the mass of dense, star-forming molecular gas in such objects when molecular line data are not available.
[119]  oai:arXiv.org:0711.3373  [pdf] - 7266
PopStar: A new grid of Evolutionary Synthesis Models in the Virtual Observatory
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure, proceeding of Astronomical Spectroscopy and Virtual Observatory workshop, Villafranca del Castillo, Madrid
Submitted: 2007-11-21
We present a new set of theoretical evolutionary synthesis models, PopStar. This grid of Single Stellar Populations covers a wide range in both, age and metallicity. The models use the most recent evolutionary tracks together with the use of new NLTE atmosphere models for the hot stars (O, B, WR, post-AGB stars, planetary nebulae) that dominate the stellar cluster's ionizing spectra. The results of the models in VO format can be used through VOSpec.
[120]  oai:arXiv.org:0711.3141  [pdf] - 7233
A new grid of evolutionary synthesis models
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure, proceedings of the conference Pathways Through an Eclectic Universe, Eds. T.Mahoney, A. Vazdekis & J. Knapen, Tenerife 2007
Submitted: 2007-11-20
We present new evolutionary synthesis models for Single Stellar Populations covering a wide range in age and metallicity. The most important difference with existing models is the use of NLTE atmosphere models for the hot stars (O, B, WR, post-AGB stars, and planetary nebulae) that have an important impact in the stellar cluster's ionizing spectra.
[121]  oai:arXiv.org:0708.0149  [pdf] - 3625
Modeling the spectral energy distribution of ULIRGs I: the radio spectra
Comments: 16 pages. Submitted to A&A Re-submitted, with aesthetic improvements to the text and figures
Submitted: 2007-08-01, last modified: 2007-10-04
As a constraint for new starburst/AGN models of IRAS bright galaxies we determine the radio spectra of 31 luminous and ultraluminous IRAS galaxies (LIRGs/ULIRGs). We construct the radio spectra using both new and archival data. From our sample of radio spectra we find that very few have a straight power-law slope. Although some sources show a flattening of the radio spectral slope at high frequencies the average spectrum shows a steepening of the radio spectrum from 1.4 to 22.5 GHz. This is unexpected because in sources with high rates of star formation we expect flat spectrum, free-free emission to make a significant contribution to the radio flux at higher radio frequencies. Despite this trend the radio spectral indices between 8.4 and 22.5 GHz are flatter for sources with higher values of the FIR-radio flux density ratio q, when this is calculated at 8.4 GHz. Therefore, sources that are deficient in radio emission relative to FIR emission (presumably younger sources) have a larger thermal component to their radio emission. However, we find no correlation between the radio spectral index between 1.4 and 4.8 GHz and q at 8.4 GHz. Because the low frequency spectral index is affected by free-free absorption, and this is a function of source size for a given mass of ionized gas, this is evidence that the ionized gas in ULIRGs shows a range of densities. The youngest LIRGs and ULIRGs are characterized by a larger contribution to their high-frequency radio spectra from free-free emission. However, the youngest sources are not those that have the greatest free-free absorption at low radio frequencies. The sources in which the effects of free-free absorption are strongest are instead the most compact sources. Although these have the warmest FIR colours, they are not necessarily the youngest sources.
[122]  oai:arXiv.org:0707.0260  [pdf] - 1944092
Near UV properties of Early-Type Galaxies at z~1
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures. To be published in the Proceedings of the Conference on "Ultraviolet Properties of Evolved Stellar Populations", M. Chavez & E. Bertone, eds
Submitted: 2007-07-02
We have used spectral fits to SSP-based atmosphere models to derive an estimate of the average stellar age for an almost complete sample of 15 Early-Type Galaxies (ETG) at 0.88<z<1.3. The results are in only partial agreement with the age estimates previously obtained for the same objects from an analysis of the M/L_B ratio, derived from the Fundamental Plane (FP) parameters. In particular spectral fits seem to underestimate the age of the most luminous ETG, and therefore do not reproduce the downsizing effect, which is clear for the FP ages. We also analyse the relationship between the spectral-fit ages and various near-UV spectral indices.
[123]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0609175  [pdf] - 249234
Nearby early-type galaxies with ionized gas. III. Analysis of line-strength indices with new stellar population models
Comments: Final version as it will appear in A&A. Typos in the Abstract and Conclusions have been corrected
Submitted: 2006-09-06, last modified: 2007-02-19
In this paper we study the underlying stellar population of a sample of 65 nearby early-type galaxies predominantly located in low density environments. Ages, metallicities and [alpha/Fe] ratios have been derived through the comparison of Lick indices measured at different galacto-centric distances with new SSP models which account for the presence of alpha/Fe enhancement. The SSPs cover a wide range of ages, metallicities and [alpha/Fe] ratios. To derive the stellar population parameters we have devised an algorithm based on the probability density function. We derive a large spread in age ((1-15) Gyrs). Age does not show any significant trend with central velocity dispersion sigma_c but E galaxies appear on average older than S0. On the contrary, an increasing trend of metallicity and [alpha/Fe] with sigma_c is observed, testifying that the chemical enrichment was more efficient and the duration of the star formation shorter in more massive galaxies. We have also sought for possible correlations with the local galaxy density but neither metallicity nor alpha-enhancement show clear trends. However we find that while low density environments (LDE) contain very young objects (from 1 to 4 Gyr), none of the galaxies in the higher density environments (HDE) is younger than 5 Gyrs. Considering the lack of environmental effect on the [alpha/Fe] ratio and the high value of [alpha/Fe] in some young massive objects, we argue that young galaxies in LDE are more likely due to recent rejuvenation episodes. By comparing the number of rejuvenated objects with the total number of galaxies in our sample, and by means of simple two-SSP component models, we estimate that, on average, the rejuvenation episodes do not involve more than 25 % of the total galaxy mass.
[124]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0702451  [pdf] - 89505
Stellar Populations in Field Early-Type Galaxies
Comments: 6 pages, to appear in the Proceedings of the Conf. "From Stars to Galaxies: Building the Pieces to Build Up the Universe", Vallenari et al. eds., ASP Conf. Series
Submitted: 2007-02-16
We have acquired intermediate resolution spectra in the 3700-7000 A wavelength range for a sample of 65 early-type galaxies predominantly located in low density environments, a large fraction of which show emission lines. The spectral coverage and the high quality of the spectra allowed us to derive Lick line-strength indices and to study their behavior at different galacto-centric distances. Ages, metallicities and element abundance ratios have been derived for the galaxy sample by comparison of the line-strength index data set with our new developed Simple Stellar Population (SSP) models. We have analyzed the behavior of the derived stellar population parameters with the central galaxy velocity dispersion and the local galaxy density in order to understand the role played by mass and environment on the evolution of early-type galaxies. We find that the chemical path is mainly driven by the halo mass, more massive galaxies exhibiting the more efficient chemical enrichment and shorter star formation timescales. Galaxies in denser environments are on average older than galaxies in less dense environments. The last ones show a large age spread which is likely to be due to rejuvenation episodes.
[125]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0702057  [pdf] - 89111
Early Type Galaxies in the Mid Infrared: a new flavor to their stellar populations
Comments: 4 pages; proceedings of IAU Symposium No. 241, "Stellar Populations as Building Blocks of Galaxies", editors A. Vazdekis and R. Peletier
Submitted: 2007-02-02
The mid infrared emission of early type galaxies traces the presence of intermediate age stellar populations as well as even tiny amounts of ongoing star formation. Here we discuss high S/N Spitzer IRS spectra of a sample of Virgo early type galaxies, with particular reference to NGC 4435. We show that, by combining mid infrared spectroscopic observations with existing broad band fluxes, it is possible to obtain a very clean picture of the nuclear activity in this galaxy.
[126]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0701620  [pdf] - 88749
Early Type Galaxies in the Mid Infrared
Comments: Comments: 8 pages, to appear in the Proceedings of the Conf. "From Stars to Galaxies: Building the Pieces to Build Up the Universe", Vallenari et al. eds., ASP Conf. Series
Submitted: 2007-01-22
We are performing a systematic study of the properties of early-type galaxies in the mid infrared spectral region with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present here high S/N Spitzer IRS spectra of 17 Virgo early-type galaxies. Thirteen objects of the sample (76%) show a pronounced broad feature (above 10 microns) which is spatially extended and likely of stellar origin. We argue that this feature is (mostly) due to silicate emission from circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. The remaining 4 objects, namely NGC 4486, NGC 4636, NGC 4550 and NGC 4435, are characterized by various levels and type of activity.
[127]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0612047  [pdf] - 87385
The Ages of Early-Type Galaxies at z~1
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, to appear in the Proceedings of the Conf. "From Stars to Galaxies: Building the Pieces to Build Up the Universe", Vallenari et al. eds., ASP Conf. Series
Submitted: 2006-12-04
The study of the ages of early-type galaxies and their dependence on galaxy mass and environment is crucial for understanding the formation and early evolution of galaxies. We review recent works on the M/L ratio evolution, as derived from an analysis of the Fundamental Plane of early-type galaxies at z~1 both in the field and in the clusters environment. We use the M/L ratio to derive an estimate of the galaxy age. We also use a set of high-S/N intermediate-resolution VLT spectra of a sample of early-type galaxies with 0.88<z<1.3 from the K20 survey to derive an independent estimate of their age by fitting SSP model spectra. Taking advantage of the good leverage provided by the high sample redshift, we analyse the results in comparison with the ages obtained for the same sample from the analysis of the M/L ratio, and with the predictions of the current hierarchical models of galaxy formation.
[128]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0612087  [pdf] - 87425
UV dust attenuation in spiral galaxies: the role of age-dependent extinction and of the IMF
Comments: 10 pages, accepted for publication on MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-12-04
We analyse the attenuation properties of a sample of UV selected galaxies, with the use of the spectrophotometric model Grasil. In particular, we focus on the relation between dust attenuation and the reddening in the UV spectral region. We show that a realistic modelling of geometrical distribution of dust and of the different population of stars can explain the UV reddening of normal spiral galaxies also with a standard Milky Way dust. Our results clearly underline that it is fundamental to take into account that younger stars suffer a higher attenuation than older stars (the age-dependent extinction) because stars are born in more-than-average dusty environments. In this work we also find that the concentration of young stars on the galactic plane of spirals has a relevant impact on the expected UV colours, impact that has not been explored before this paper. Finally, we discuss the role of IMF in shaping the relation between UV reddening and dust attenuation, and we show that a Kroupa IMF is more consistent with observed data than the classical Salpeter IMF.
[129]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610316  [pdf] - 85740
The Star Formation History of the Virgo early-type galaxy NGC4435: the Spitzer Mid Infrared view
Comments: 12 pages, accepted for publication on ApJ
Submitted: 2006-10-11
We present a population synthesis study of NGC4435, an early-type Virgo galaxy interacting with NGC4438. We combine new spectroscopic observations obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope IRS instrument with IRAC archival data and broad band data from the literature. The IRS spectrum shows prominent PAH features, low ionization emission lines and H_2 rotational lines arising from the dusty circumnuclear disk characterizing this galaxy. The central SED, from X-ray to radio, is well fitted by a model of an exponential burst superimposed on an old simple stellar population. From the lack of high excitation nebular lines, the [NeIII]15.5/[NeII]12.8 ratio, the temperature of molecular hydrogen, and the fit to the full X-ray to radio SED we argue that the present activity of the galaxy is driven by star formation alone. The AGN contribution to the ionizing flux is constrained to be less than 2%. The age of the burst is found to be around 190 Myr and it is fully consistent with the notion that the star formation process has been triggered by the interaction with NGC4438. The mass involved in the rejuvenation episode turns out to be less than 1.5% of the stellar galaxy mass sampled in a 5" central aperture. This is enough to render NGC4435 closely similar to a typical interacting early-type galaxy with inverted CaII[H+K] lines that will later turn into a typical cluster E+A galaxy and enforces the notion that these objects are the result of a recent rejuvenation episode rather than a genuine delayed formation.
[130]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606020  [pdf] - 82460
Ongoing Star Formation in the BL Lacertae object PKS 2005-489
Comments: Accepted for publication by ApJL
Submitted: 2006-06-01
We present VLT long slit optical spectroscopy of the luminous BL Lacertae object PKS 2005-489. The high signal-to-noise ratio and the good spatial resolution of the data allow us to detect the signatures of ongoing star formation in an extended rotating ring, at ~4 kpc from the nucleus. We find that the ring is almost perpendicular to the radio axis and its total star formation rate is ~1 MSol/yr. We briefly discuss the concomitant presence of recent star formation and nuclear activity.
[131]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605669  [pdf] - 82356
The Star Formation History of the Disk of the Starburst galaxy M82
Comments: 7 pages, Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2006-05-26
Spectroscopic, photometric and dynamical data of the inner 3 kpc part of the starburst galaxy M82 are analyzed in order to investigate the star formation history of the stellar disk. The long-slit spectra along the major axis are dominated by Balmer absorption lines in the region outside the nuclear starburst all the way up to ~3.5 scalelengths (mu_B=22 mag/arcsec**2). Single Stellar Population (SSP) spectra of age 0.4-1.0 Gyr match well the observed spectra in the 1-3 kpc zone, with a mean age of the stellar population marginally higher in the outer parts. The mass in these populations, along with that in the gas component, make up for the inferred dynamical mass in the same annular zone for a Kroupa initial mass function, with a low mass cut-off m_l=0.4 Msun. The observed ratio of the abundances of alpha elements with respect to Fe, is also consistent with the idea that almost all the stars in M82 disk formed in a burst of short duration (0.3 Gyr) around 0.8 Gyr ago. We find that the optical/near infrared colors and their gradients in the disk are determined by the reddening with visual extinction exceeding 1 mag even in the outer parts of the disk, where there is apparently no current star formation. The disk-wide starburst activity was most likely triggered by the interaction of M82 with its massive neighbor M81 around 1~Gyr ago. The properties of the disk of M82 very much resemble the properties of the disks of luminous compact blue galaxies seen at 0.2-1.0 redshift.
[132]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603714  [pdf] - 80923
The star formation history of early-type galaxies as a function of mass and environment
Comments: 19 pages, 15 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS. Version with full resolution figures at: http://www.gb.nrao.edu/~bnikolic/publications/2006/MF1210rv4.pdf Replaced 17/5/2006 to include 2 impotrant references
Submitted: 2006-03-27, last modified: 2006-05-17
Using the third data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) we have rigorously defined a volume limited sample of early-type galaxies in the redshift range z < 0.1. We have defined the density of the local environment for each galaxy using a method which takes account of the redshift bias introduced by survey boundaries if traditional methods are used. At luminosities greater than our absolute r-band magnitude cutoff of -20.45 the mean density of environment shows no trend with redshift. We calculate the Lick indices for the entire sample and correct for aperture effects and velocity dispersion in a model independent way. Although we find no dependence of redshift or luminosity with environment we do find that the mean velocity dispersion, sigma, of early-type galaxies in dense environments tends to be higher than in low density environments. Taking account of this effect we find that several indices show small but very significant trends with environment that are not the result of the correlation between indices and velocity dispersion. The statistical significance of the data is sufficiently high to reveal that models accounting only for alpha-enhancement struggle to produce a consistent picture of age and metallicity of the sample galaxies, whereas a model that also includes carbon enhancement fares much better. We find that early-type galaxies in the field are younger than those in environments typical of clusters but that neither metallicity, alpha-enhancement nor carbon enhancement are influenced by the environment. The youngest early-type galaxies in both field and cluster environments are those with the lowest sigma. However, there is some evidence that the objects with the largest sigma are slightly younger, especially in denser environments.
[133]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0604068  [pdf] - 81137
The SPITZER IRS view of stellar populations in Virgo early type galaxies
Comments: To appear in the proceedings of "The Spitzer Science Center 2005 Conference: Infrared Diagnostics of Galaxy Evolution", held in Pasadena, November 2005
Submitted: 2006-04-04
We have obtained high S/N Spitzer IRS spectra of 17 Virgo early-type galaxies that lie on the colour-magnitude relation of passively evolving galaxies in the cluster. To flux calibrate these extended sources we have devised a new procedure that allows us to obtain the intrinsic spectral energy distribution and to disentangle resolved and unresolved emission within the same object. Thirteen objects of the sample (76%) show a pronounced broad silicate feature (above 10micron) which is spatially extended and likely of stellar origin, in agreement with model predictions. The other 4 objects (24%) are characterized by different levels of activity. In NGC 4486 (M87) the line emission and the broad silicate emission are evidently unresolved and, given also the typical shape of the continuum, they likely originate in the nuclear torus. NGC 4636 show emission lines superimposed to extended silicate emission (i.e. likely of stellar origin, pushing the percentage of galaxies with silicate emission to 82%). Finally NGC 4550 and NGC 4435 are characterized by PAH and line emission, arising from a central unresolved region.
[134]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603679  [pdf] - 80888
The nature of (sub)-mm galaxies in hierarchical models
Comments: 10 pages. To appear in ``From Z-Machines to ALMA: (Sub)millimeter Spectroscopy of Galaxies'', ASP Conference Series, eds. A. J. Baker, J. Glenn, A. I. Harris, J. G. Mangum, M. S. Yun
Submitted: 2006-03-24
We present a hierarchical galaxy formation model which can account for the number counts of sources detected through their emission at sub-millimetre wavelengths. The first stage in our approach is an ab initio calculation of the star formation histories for a representative sample of galaxies, which is carried out using the semi-analytical galaxy formation model GALFORM. These star formation histories are then input into the spectro-photometric code GRASIL, to produce a spectral energy distribution for each galaxy. Dust extinction and emission are treated self consistently in our model, without having to resort to ad-hoc assumptions about the amount of attenuation by dust or the temperature at which the dust radiates. We argue that it is necessary to modify the form of the stellar initial mass function in starbursts in order to match the observed number of sub-mm sources, if we are to retain the previous good matches enjoyed between observations and model predictions in the local universe. We also list some other observational tests that have been passed by our model.
[135]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0602014  [pdf] - 79590
SPITZER IRS spectra of Virgo early type galaxies: detection of stellar silicate emission
Comments: 6 pages; ApJ Letters, accepted
Submitted: 2006-02-01
We present high signal to noise ratio Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of 17 Virgo early-type galaxies. The galaxies were selected from those that define the colour-magnitude relation of the cluster, with the aim of detecting the silicate emission of their dusty, mass-losing evolved stars. To flux calibrate these extended sources we have devised a new procedure that allows us to obtain the intrinsic spectral energy distribution and to disentangle resolved and unresolved emission within the same object. We have found that thirteen objects of the sample (76%) are passively evolving galaxies with a pronounced broad silicate feature which is spatially extended and likely of stellar origin, in agreement with model predictions. The other 4 objects (24%) are characterized by different levels of activity. In NGC 4486 (M 87) the line emission and the broad silicate emission are evidently unresolved and, given also the typical shape of the continuum, they likely originate in the nuclear torus. NGC 4636 shows emission lines superimposed on extended (i.e. stellar) silicate emission, thus pushing the percentage of galaxies with silicate emission to 82%. Finally, NGC 4550 and NGC 4435 are characterized by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and line emission, arising from a central unresolved region. A more detailed analysis of our sample, with updated models, will be presented in a forthcoming paper.
[136]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510080  [pdf] - 1468957
The evolution of actively star forming galaxies in the mid infrared
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2005-10-04
In this paper we analyze the evolution of actively star forming galaxies in the mid-infrared (MIR). This spectral region, characterized by continuum emission by hot dust and by the presence of strong emission features generally ascribed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, is the most strongly affected by the heating processes associated with star formation and/or active galactic nuclei (AGN). Following the detailed observational characterization of galaxies in the MIR by ISO, we have updated the modelling of this spectral region in our spectro-photometric model GRASIL (Silva et al. 1998). In the diffuse component we have updated the treatment of PAHs according to the model by Li & Draine (2001). As for the dense phase of the ISM associated with the star forming regions, the molecular clouds, we strongly decrease the abundance of PAHs as compared to that in the cirrus, basing on the observational evidences of the lack or weakness of PAH bands close to the newly formed stars, possibly due to the destruction of the molecules in strong UV fields. The robustness of the model is checked by fitting near infrared to radio broad band spectra and the corresponding detailed MIR spectra of a large sample of galaxies (Lu et al. 2003), at once. With this model, we have analyzed the larger sample of actively star forming galaxies by Dale et al. (2000). We show that the observed trends of galaxies in the ISO-IRAS-Radio color-color plots can be interpreted in terms of different evolutionary phases of star formation activity, and the consequent different dominance in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the diffuse or dense phase of the ISM.
[137]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0509715  [pdf] - 76296
A multi-wavelength model of galaxy formation
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, to appear in proceedings of the conference "The fabulous destiny of galaxies: bridging past and present", 20-24 June 2005, Marseille, France
Submitted: 2005-09-23
We present new results from a multi-wavelength model of galaxy formation, which combines a semi-analytical treatment of the formation of galaxies within the CDM framework with a sophisticated treatment of absorption and emission of radiation by dust. We find that the model, which incorporates a top-heavy IMF in bursts, agrees well with the evolution of the rest-frame far-UV luminosity function over the range z=0-6, with the IR number counts in all bands measured by SPITZER, and with the observed evolution of the mid-IR luminosity function for z=0-2.
[138]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0509056  [pdf] - 75638
Optical properties of the NGC 5328 group of galaxies
Comments: 18 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2005-09-02
We present the results of a photometric and spectroscopic study of seven members of the NGC 5328 group of galaxies, a chain of galaxies spanning over 200 kpc (H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc). We analyze the galaxy structure and study the emission line properties of the group members looking for signatures of star formation and AGN activity. We finally attempt to infer, from the modeling of line-strength indices, the stellar population ages of the early-type members. We investigate also the presence of a dwarf galaxy population associated with the bright members. The group is composed of a large fraction of early-type galaxies including NGC 5328 and NGC 5330, two bona fide ellipticals at the center of the group. In both galaxies no recent star formation episodes are detected by the H_beta vs. MgFe indices of these galaxies. 2MASX J13524838-2829584 has extremely boxy isophotes which are believed to be connected to a merging event: line strength indices suggest that this object probably had a recent star formation episode. A warped disc component emerges from the model subtracted image of 2MASX J13530016-2827061 which is interpreted as a signature of an ongoing interaction with the rest of the group. Ongoing star formation and nuclear activity is present in the projected outskirts of the group. The two early-type galaxies 2MASX J13523852-2830444 and 2MASX J13525393-2831421 show spectral signatures of star formation, while a Seyfert 2 type nuclear activity is detected in MCG -5-33-29.
[139]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0508520  [pdf] - 75409
Nearby early-type galaxies with ionized gas.II. Line-strength indices for 18 additional galaxies
Comments: 18 pages, A&A in press
Submitted: 2005-08-24
Rampazzo et al. 2005 (Paper I) presented a data-set of line-strength indices for 50 early-type galaxies in the nearby Universe. The galaxy sample is biased toward galaxies showing emission lines, located in environments corresponding to a broad range of local galaxy densities, although predominantly in low density environments. The present addendum to Paper I enlarges the above data-set of line-strength indices by analyzing 18 additional early-type galaxies (three galaxies, namely NGC 3607, NGC 5077 and NGC 5898 have been already presented in the previous set). As in Paper I, we measured 25 line-strength indices, defined by the Lick IDS "standard" system (Trager et al. 1998; Worthey & Ottaviani 1997), for 7 luminosity weighted apertures and 4 gradients of each galaxy. This paper presents the line-strength data-set and compares it with the available data in the literature.
[140]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0504473  [pdf] - 72570
A Physical Model for the joint evolution of high-z QSOs and Spheroids
Comments: 6 Pages, 5 figures, Invited talk at "Multiwavelength AGN surveys", Cozumel, Mexico, December 2003, eds. R. Mujica & R. Maiolino, Singapore: World Scientific, 2004
Submitted: 2005-04-21
We summarize our physical model for the early co-evolution of spheroidal galaxies and of active nuclei at their centers. Our predictions are in excellent agreement with a number of observables which proved to be extremely challenging for all the current semi-analytic models, including the sub-mm counts and the corresponding redshift distributions, and the epoch-dependent K-band luminosity function of spheroidal galaxies. Also, the black hole mass function and the relationship between the black hole mass and the velocity dispersion in the galaxy are nicely reproduced. The mild AGN activity revealed by X-ray observations of SCUBA sources is in keeping with our scenario, and testify the build up of SMBH triggered by intense star formation.
[141]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0501464  [pdf] - 70576
Panchromatic models of galaxies: GRASIL
Comments: 10 pages, 4 figures, invited talk, to appear in the proceedings of: "The Spectral Energy Distribution of Gas-Rich Galaxies: Confronting Models with Data", Heidelberg, 4-8 Oct. 2004, eds. C.C. Popescu and R.J. Tuffs, AIP Conf. Ser., in press
Submitted: 2005-01-21
We present here a model for simulating the panchromatic spectral energy distribution of galaxies, which aims to be a complete tool to study the complex multi-wavelength picture of the universe. The model take into account all important components that concur to the SED of galaxies at wavelengths from X-rays to the radio. We review the modeling of each component and provide several applications, interpreting observations of galaxy of different types at all the wavelengths.
[142]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0501302  [pdf] - 70414
Nearby early-type galaxies with ionized gas. Characterization of the underlying stellar population
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures, to appear in Proceedings of "Baryons in Dark Matter Halos", 5-9 October 2004, Novigrad, Croatia, Eds R-J., Dettmar, U. Klein, P. Salucci, PoS, SISSA, http://pos.sissa.it
Submitted: 2005-01-14
We present a preliminary analysis of the sample of early type galaxies of Rampazzo et al. (2005), selected to build a data-set of spectral properties of well studied early-type galaxies showing emission lines. Because of the presence of emission lines, the sample is biased toward objects that might be expected to have ongoing and recent star formation. We have compared the line-strength indices presented in Rampazzo et al. (2005) with Simple Stellar Populations (SSPs) in order to characterize the underlying stellar population of the galaxies. We have derived ages, metallicities and [alpha/Fe] ratios. The positive trend of the sigma-metallicity and sigma-[alpha/Fe] relations is reproduced. The bulk of the galaxies span a range in metallicity from ~ solar to ~ twice solar and a range in [alpha/Fe] from ~0.2 to ~0.4. Furthermore the comparison of the derived parameters at different galactocentric distances shows the presence of negative metallicity gradients from the center outwards.
[143]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0406069  [pdf] - 392201
Can the faint sub-mm galaxies be explained in the Lambda-CDM model?
Comments: Minor revisions to match version published in MNRAS. Colour versions of selected plots are available at http://star-www.dur.ac.uk/~cmb/SCUBAPLOTS/
Submitted: 2004-06-02, last modified: 2005-01-10
We present predictions for the abundance of sub-mm galaxies (SMGs) and Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) in the $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. A key feature of our model is the self-consistent calculation of the absorption and emission of radiation by dust. The new model successfully matches the LBG luminosity function, as well reproducing the properties of the local galaxy population in the optical and IR. The model can also explain the observed galaxy number counts at $850\mum$, but only if we assume a top-heavy IMF for the stars formed in bursts. The predicted redshift distribution of SMGs depends relatively little on their flux over the range 1-$10\mjy$, with a median value of $z\approx 2.0$ at a flux of $5\mjy$, in very good agreement with the recent measurement by Chapman et al The counts of SMGs are predicted to be dominated by ongoing starbursts. However, in the model these bursts are responsible for making only a few per cent of the stellar mass locked up in massive ellipticals at the present day.
[144]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0412706  [pdf] - 70110
NIR Spectroscopy of Luminous Infrared Galaxies and the Hydrogen Recombination Photon Deficit
Comments: 14 pages, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2004-12-31
We report on near-infrared medium-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of luminous and ultra luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs-ULIRGs), carried out with SOFI at the ESO 3.5m New Technology Telescope. Because of wavelength dependence of the attenuation, the detection of the Pa_alfa or Br_gamma line in the Ks band should provide relevant constraints on SFR and the contribution of an AGN. We find, however, that the intensities of the Pa_alfa and Br_gamma lines, even corrected for slit losses, are on average only 10% and 40%, respectively, of that expected from a normal starburst of similar bolometric luminosity. The corresponding star formation rates, after correcting for the attenuation derived from the NIR-optical emission line ratios, are 14% and 60% of that expected if the far infrared luminosity were entirely powered by the starburst. This confirms the existence of a recombination photon deficit, particularly in the case of the Pa_alfa line, already found in the Br_gamma line in other infrared galaxies of similar luminosity. In discussing the possible causes of the discrepancy, we find unlikely that it is due to the presence of an AGN, though two objects show evidence of broadening of the Pa_alfa line and of the presence of coronal line emission. In fact, from our own observations and data collected from the literature we argue that the studied galaxies appear to be predominantly powered by a nuclear starburst. Two scenarios compatible with the present data are that either there exists a highly attenuated nuclear star forming region, and/or that a significant fraction of the ionizing photons are absorbed by dust within the HII regions. We suggest that observations in the Br_alpha spectral region could constitute a powerful tool to disentangle these two possibilities.
[145]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0411802  [pdf] - 69401
Nearby early-type galaxies with ionized gas.I. Line-strength indices of the underlying stellar population
Comments: A&A accepted. Electronic tables will be available at the CDS when the printed version will appear
Submitted: 2004-11-30
With the aim of building a data-set of spectral properties of well studied early-type galaxies showing emission lines, we present intermediate resolution spectra of 50 galaxies in the nearby Universe. The sample, which covers several of the E and S0 morphological sub-classes, is biased toward objects that might be expected to have ongoing and recent star formation, at least in small amounts, because of the presence of the emission lines. The emission are expected to come from the combination of active galactic nuclei and star formation regions within the galaxies. Sample galaxies are located in environments corresponding to a broad range of local galaxy densities, although predominantly in low density environments. Our long-slit spectra cover the 3700 - 7250 A wavelength range with a spectral resolution of about 7.6 A at 5550 A. The specific aim of this paper, and our first step on the investigation, is to map the underlying galaxy stellar population by measuring, along the slit, positioned along the galaxy major axis, line--strength indices at several, homogeneous galacto-centric distances. For each object we extracted 7 luminosity weighted apertures corrected for the galaxy ellipticity and 4 gradients and we measured 25 line-strength indices. The paper introduces the sample, presents the observations, describes the data reduction procedures, the extraction of apertures and gradients, the determination and correction of the line--strength indices, the procedure adopted to transform them into the Lick-IDS System and the procedures adopted for the emission correction. We finally discuss the comparisons between our dataset and line-strength indices available in the literature.
[146]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0409585  [pdf] - 67666
From First Galaxies to QSOs: feeding the baby monsters
Comments: 6 pages, contributed paper to Proceedings of the Conference on "Growing Black Holes" held in Garching, Germany, on June 21-25, 2004, edited by A. Merloni, S. Nayakshin and R. Sunyaev, Springer-Verlag series of "ESO Astrophysics Symposia"
Submitted: 2004-09-24
We present a physical model for the coevolution of massive spheroidal galaxies and active nuclei at their centers. Supernova heating is increasingly effective in slowing down the star formation and in driving gas outflows in smaller and smaller dark matter halos. Thus the more massive protogalaxies virializing at early times are the sites of faster star formation. The correspondingly higher radiation drag causes a faster angular momentum loss by the gas and induces a larger accretion rate onto the central black hole. In turn, the kinetic energy of the outflows powered by the active nuclei can unbind the residual gas in a time shorter for larger halos. The model accounts for a broad variety of dynamical, photometric and metallicity properties of early-type galaxies, for the M_BH -- \sigma relation and for the local supermassive black-hole mass function.
[147]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0406506  [pdf] - 65663
Is the Giant Elliptical Galaxy NGC5018 a Post-Merger Remnant?
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, LaTeX. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2004-06-23
NGC5018, one of the weakest UV emitters among giant ellipticals (gE) observed with IUE, appears to consist of an optical stellar population very similar to that of the compact, dwarf elliptical M32, which is several magnitudes fainter in luminosity than NGC5018 and whose stellar population is know to be ~3 Gyr old. Here we show that the mid-UV spectra of these two galaxies are also very similar down to an angular scale hundreds times smaller than the IUE large aperture (as probed by HST/FOS UV spectra obtained through 0.86 arcsec apertures). This implies a reasonably close match of the populations dominating their mid-UV light (namely, their main-sequence turnoff stars). These data indicate that NGC5018 has, in its inner regions, a rather uniform dominance of a ~3 Gyr-old stellar population, probably a bit different in metallicity from M32. Combined with the various structures that indicate that NGC5018 is the result of a recent major merger, it appears that almost all of stars we see in its center regions were formed about 3 Gyr ago, in that merger event. NGC5018 is likely the older brother of NGC7252, the canonical gE-in-formation merger. As such, NGC5018 is perhaps the best galaxy which can tell us how a merger works, after the fireworks subside, to form a gE galaxy today. For this reason alone, the stellar populations in NGC5018 at all radii are worth studying in detail.
[148]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0403581  [pdf] - 63772
Modelling the Spectral Energy Distribution of Compact Luminous Infrared Galaxies: Constraints from High Frequency Radio Data
Comments: 14 pages, accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2004-03-24
We have performed 23 GHz VLA observations of 7 compact, luminous infrared galaxies, selected to have evidence of starburst activity. New and published multi-frequency data are combined to obtain the spectral energy distributions of all 7 galaxies from the near-infrared to the radio (at 1.4 GHz). These SEDs are compared with new models, for dust enshrouded galaxies, which account for both starburst and AGN components. In all 7 galaxies the starburst provides the dominant contribution to the infrared luminosity; in 4 sources no contribution from an AGN is required. Although AGN may contribute up to 50 percent of the total far--infrared emission, the starbursts always dominate in the radio. The SEDs of most of our sources are best fit with a very high optical depth of (>=50) at 1 micron. The scatter in the far-infrared/radio correlation, found among luminous IRAS sources, is due mainly to the different evolutionary status of their starburst components. The short time-scale of the star formation process amplifies the delay between the far-infrared and radio emission. This becomes more evident at low radio frequencies (below about 1 GHz) where synchrotron radiation is the dominant process. In the far-infrared (at wavelengths shorter than 100 micron) an additional source of scatter is provided by AGN, where present. AGN may be detected in the near-infrared by the absence of the knee, typical of stellar photospheres. However, near-infrared data alone cannot constrain the level at which AGN contribute because the interpretation of their observed properties, in this wave-band, depends strongly on model parameters.
[149]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0402211  [pdf] - 62725
Photometric Estimates of Stellar Masses in High-Redshift Galaxies
Comments: 14 pages; 3 jpg figures; A&A, in press
Submitted: 2004-02-10
We present a new tool for the photometric estimate of stellar masses in distant galaxies. The observed SEDs are fitted by combining single stellar populations, with different SFRs and amounts of dust extinction. This approach gives us the best flexibility when dealing with the widest variety of physical situation for the target galaxies. In particular we tested the code on three classes of sources: dusty ISO-selected starbursts, K-band selected ellipticals/S0s and z=2-3 Lyman-break galaxies. We pay particular attention in evaluating the uncertainties in the stellar mass estimate, due to degeneracies in the physical parameters, different SFHs or metallicities. Based on optical-NIR photometric data, the stellar masses are found to have overall uncertainties of a factor of ~2 for E/S0s, ~2-5 for the starbursts population, and up to 10 for Ly-break galaxies. In any case the latter appear to correspond to a galaxy population significantly less massive than those observed at lower redshifts, possibly indicating substantial stellar build-up at z~1-2 in the field galaxy population. Using simulated deep SIRTF/IRAC observations of starbursts and Lyman-break galaxies, we investigate how an extension of the wavelength dynamic range will decrease the uncertainties in the stellar mass estimate, and find that they will reduce for both classes to factors of 2-3, good enough for statistically reliable determinations of the galaxy evolutionary mass functions.
[150]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0307202  [pdf] - 57915
A Physical Model for the Co-evolution of QSOs and of their Spheroidal Hosts
Comments: 23 pages, 15 figures, revised after ApJ referee report
Submitted: 2003-07-10, last modified: 2003-09-16
We present a physically motivated model for the early co-evolution of massive spheroidal galaxies and active nuclei at their centers. Within dark matter halos, forming at the rate predicted by the canonical hierarchical clustering scenario, the gas evolution is controlled by gravity, radiative cooling, and heating by feedback from supernovae and from the growing active nucleus. Supernova heating is increasingly effective with decreasing binding energy in slowing down the star formation and in driving gas outflows. The more massive proto-galaxies virializing at earlier times are thus the sites of the faster star-formation. The correspondingly higher radiation drag fastens the angular momentum loss by the gas, resulting in a larger accretion rate onto the central black-hole. In turn, the kinetic energy carried by outflows driven by active nuclei can unbind the residual gas, thus halting both the star formation and the black-hole growth, in a time again shorter for larger halos. For the most massive galaxies the gas unbinding time is short enough for the bulk of the star-formation to be completed before type Ia supernovae can substantially increase the $Fe$ abundance of the interstellar medium, thus accounting for the $\alpha$-enhancement seen in the largest galaxies. The feedback from supernovae and from the active nucleus also determines the relationship between the black-hole mass and the mass, or the velocity dispersion, of the host galaxy, as well as the black-hole mass function. These and other model predictions are in excellent agreement with observations for a number of observables which proved to be extremely challenging for all the current semi-analytic models, including the sub-mm counts and the corresponding redshift distributions, and the epoch-dependent K-band luminosity function of spheroidal galaxies.
[151]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0309420  [pdf] - 1554313
A Physical Model for the joint evolution of QSOs and Spheroids
Comments: 4 pages, 5 figures, to appear in Proceeding of the "Multi-Wavelength Cosmology" Conference held in Mykonos, Greece, June 2003, ed. M. Plionis (Kluwer)
Submitted: 2003-09-16
We summarize our detailed, physically grounded, model for the early co-evolution of spheroidal galaxies and of active nuclei at their centers (astro-ph/0307202). Our predictions are excellent agreement with observations for a number of observables which proved to be extremely challenging for all the current semi-analytic models, including the sub-mm counts and the corresponding redshift distributions, and the epoch-dependent K-band luminosity function of spheroidal galaxies. Also, the black hole mass function and the relationship between the black hole mass and the velocity dispersion in the galaxy are nicely reproduced.
[152]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0309339  [pdf] - 59166
Star Formation History and Extinction in the central kpc of M82-like Starbursts
Comments: 20 pages, uses emulateapj.cls. Scheduled to appear in ApJ Jan 1, 2004
Submitted: 2003-09-11
We report on the star formation histories and extinction in the central kpc region of a sample of starburst galaxies that have similar far infrared (FIR), 10 micron and K-band luminosities as those of the archetype starburst M82. Our study is based on new optical spectra and previously published K-band photometric data, both sampling the same area around the nucleus. Model starburst spectra were synthesized as a combination of stellar populations of distinct ages formed over the Hubble time, and were fitted to the observed optical spectra and K-band flux. The model is able to reproduce simultaneously the equivalent widths of emission and absorption lines, the continuum fluxes between 3500-7000 Ang, the K-band and the FIR flux. We require a minimum of 3 populations -- (1) a young population of age < 8 Myr, with its corresponding nebular emission, (2) an intermediate-age population (age < 500 Myr), and (3) an old population that forms part of the underlying disk or/and bulge population. The contribution of the old population to the K-band luminosity depends on the birthrate parameter and remains above 60% in the majority of the sample galaxies. Even in the blue band, the intermediate age and old populations contribute more than 40% of the total flux in all the cases. A relatively high contribution from the old stars to the K-band nuclear flux is also apparent from the strength of the 4000 Ang break and the CaII K line. The extinction of the old population is found to be around half of that of the young population. The contribution to the continuum from the relatively old stars has the effect of diluting the emission equivalent widths below the values expected for young bursts. The mean dilution factors are found to be 5 and 3 for the Halpha and Hbeta lines respectively.
[153]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0307096  [pdf] - 57809
Dust and Nebular Emission. I. Models for Normal Galaxies
Comments: Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2003-07-04
We present a model for nebular emission in star forming galaxies, which takes into account the effects of dust reprocessing. The nebular emissions have been computed with CLOUDY and then included into GRASIL, our spectrophotometric code specifically developed for dusty galaxies. The interface between nebular emission and population synthesis is based on a set of pre-computed HII region emission models covering a wide range of physical quantities. Concerning the extinction properties of normal star forming galaxies, we are able to interpret the observed lack of correlation between the attenuation measured at Halpha and in the UV band as a consequence of age selective extinction. We also find that, for these galaxies with modest SFR, the ratio FIR/UV provides the best constraints on the UV attenuation. Our model also allows to deal with different SFR estimators in a consistent way, from the UV to radio wavelengths, and to discuss the uncertainties arising from the different physical conditions encountered in star forming galaxies. We provide our best estimates of SFR/luminosity calibrations, together with their expected range of variation. It results that SFR derived through Halpha, even when corrected for extinction using the Balmer decrement, is affected by important uncertainties due to age selective extinction. Another remarkable result is that SFR from UV luminosity corrected by means of the ratio FIR/UV has a small uncertainty. Finally, our model provides a calibration of SFR from radio luminosity; we are also able to reproduce the observed FIR/radio ratio.
[154]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0303259  [pdf] - 55498
Spatially-resolved spectrophotometric analysis and modelling of the Superantennae
Comments: 18 pages. Accepted for publication on A&A
Submitted: 2003-03-12
We have performed spatially-resolved spectroscopy of the double-nucleated Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 19254-7245, ``the Superantennae'', along the line connecting the two nuclei. These data are analysed with a spectral synthesis code, to derive the star formation and extinction properties of the galaxy. The star formation history (SFH) of the two nuclei is similarly characterized by two different main episodes: a recent burst, responsible of the observed emission lines, and an older one, occurred roughly 1 Gyr ago. We tentatively associate this bimodal SFH with a double encounter in the dynamical history of the merger. We have complemented our study with a detailed analysis of the broad band spectral energy distribution of the Superantennae, built from published photometry, providing the separate optical-to-mm SEDs of the two nuclei. Our analysis shows that: a) the southern nucleus is responsible for about 80% of the total infrared luminosity of the system, b) the L-band luminosity in the southern nucleus is dominated by the emission from an obscured AGN, providing about 40 to 50% of the bolometric flux between 8 and 1000 microns; c) the northern nucleus does not show evidence for AGN emission and appears to be in a post-starburst phase. As for the relative strengths of the AGN and starburst components, we find that, while they are comparable at FIR and sub-mm wavelengths, in the radio the Sy2 emission dominates by an order of magnitude the starburst.
[155]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0210690  [pdf] - 52728
Spectro-Polarimetric search for hidden AGNs in four southern Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publications on MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2002-10-31
We report on a spectro-polarimetric analysis of four southern Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs), aimed at constraining the presence of hidden broad AGN lines. For IRAS 19254--7245 ({\sl The Superantennae}) we find evidence for a significant level of polarized light in the H$\alpha$ line with FWHM$>$2300 km/s. Some degree of polarization is also detected in IRAS 20551-4250, though with lower significance. In the two other sources (IRAS 20100--4156 and IRAS 22491--1808) no polarized signals are detected. Although it is unclear from the present data if the origin of polarization is due to reflected light from an AGN or more simply to dichroic transmission by a dust slab, we find interesting correlation between the presence of polarized components in the optical spectra and independent evidence for AGN emissions in hard X-rays and the far-IR.
[156]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0208329  [pdf] - 1348070
Modeling the Radio to X-ray SED of Galaxies
Comments: For the Proceedings of "Galaxy Evolution: Theory and Observations", Cozumel, April 2002, Eds. V. Avila-Reese, C. Firmani, C. Frenk, & C. Allen, RevMexAA SC (2002)
Submitted: 2002-08-17
Our multi-wavelength model GRASIL for the SED of galaxies is described, in particular the recent extension to the radio and X-ray range. With our model we can study different aspects of galaxy evolution by exploiting all available spectral observations, where different emission components dominate.
[157]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0206029  [pdf] - 49660
Far infrared and Radio emission in dusty starburst galaxies
Comments: accepted by A&A, 16 pages
Submitted: 2002-06-03
We revisit the nature of the FIR/Radio correlation by means of the most recent models for star forming galaxies. We model the IR emission with our population synthesis code, GRASIL (Silva et al. 1998). As for the radio emission, we revisit the simple model of Condon & Yin (1990). We find that a tightFIR/Radio correlation is natural when the synchrotron mechanism dominates over the inverse Compton, and the electrons cooling time is shorter than the fading time of the supernova rate. Observations indicate that both these conditions are met in star forming galaxies. However since the radio non thermal emission is delayed, deviations are expected both in the early phases of a starburst, when the radio thermal component dominates, and in the post-starburst phase, when the bulk of the NT component originates from less massive stars. This delay allows the analysis of obscured starbursts with a time resolution of a few tens of Myrs, unreachable with other star formation indicators. We suggest to complement the analysis of the deviations from the FIR/Radio correlation with the radio slope to obtain characteristic parameters of the burst. The analysis of a sample of compact ULIRGs shows that they are intense but transient starbursts, to which one should not apply usual SF indicators devised for constant SF rates. We also discuss the possibility of using the q- radio slope diagram to asses the presence of obscured AGN. A firm prediction of the models is an apparent radio excess during the post-starburst phase, which seems to be typical of a class of star forming galaxies in rich cluster cores. We discuss how deviations from the correlation, due to the evolutionary status of the starburst, affect the technique of photometric redshift determination widely used for high-z sources.
[158]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0205080  [pdf] - 49154
Theoretical isochrones in several photometric systems I. Johnson-Cousins-Glass, HST/WFPC2, HST/NICMOS, Washington, and ESO Imaging Survey filter sets
Comments: 20 pages, to appear in A&A. The electronic data files are in http://pleiadi.pd.astro.it
Submitted: 2002-05-06
We provide tables of theoretical isochrones in several photometric systems. To this aim, the following steps are followed: (1) First, we re-write the formalism for converting synthetic stellar spectra into tables of bolometric corrections. The resulting formulas can be applied to any photometric system, provided that the zero-points are specified by means of either ABmag, STmag, VEGAmag, or a standard star system that includes well-known spectrophotometric standards. Interstellar absorption can be considered in a self-consistent way. (2) We assemble an extended and updated library of stellar intrinsic spectra. It is mostly based on non-overshooting ATLAS9 models, suitably extended to both low and high effective temperatures. This offers an excellent coverage of the parameter space of Teff, logg, and [M/H]. We briefly discuss the main uncertainties and points still deserving more improvement. (3) From the spectral library, we derive tables of bolometric corrections for Johnson-Cousins-Glass, HST/WFPC2, HST/NICMOS, Washington, and ESO Imaging Survey systems (this latter consisting on the WFI, EMMI, and SOFI filter sets). (4) These tables are used to convert several sets of Padova isochrones into the corresponding absolute magnitudes and colours, thus providing a useful database for several astrophysical applications. All data files are made available in electronic form.
[159]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0201085  [pdf] - 47029
On Core Collapse Supernovae in Normal and in Seyfert Galaxies
Comments: Accepted for Publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2002-01-07
This paper estimates the relative frequency of different types of core-collapse supernovae, in terms of the ratio f between the number of type Ib--Ic and of type II supernovae. We estimate f independently for all normal and Seyfert galaxies whose radial velocity is <=14000 km/s, and which had at least one supernova event recorded in the Asiago catalogue from January 1986 to August 2000. We find that the ratio f is approx. 0.23+/-0.05 in normal galaxies. This value is consistent with constant star formation rate and with a Salpeter Initial Mass Function and average binary rate approx. 50 %. On the contrary, Seyfert galaxies exceed the ratio f in normal galaxies by a factor approx. 4 at a confidence level >= 2 sigma. A caveat is that the numbers for Seyferts are still small (6 type Ib-Ic and 6 type II supernovae discovered as yet). Assumed real, this excess of type Ib and Ic with respect to type II supernovae, may indicate a burst of star formation of young age (<= 20 Myr), a high incidence of binary systems in the inner regions (r <= 0.4 R25) of Seyfert galaxies, or a top-loaded mass function.
[160]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0106128  [pdf] - 42924
Modelling the radio to X-ray SED of galaxies
Comments: 4 pages, to be published in "The link between stars and cosmology", 26-30 March, 2001, Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, by Kluwer, eds. M. Chavez, A. Bressan, A. Buzzoni, and D. Mayya
Submitted: 2001-06-07
We present our model to interpret the SED of galaxies. The model for the UV to sub-mm SED is already well established (Silva et al 1998). We remind here its main features and show some applications. Recently we have extended the model to the radio range (Bressan et al 2001), and we have started to include the X-ray emission from the stellar component.
[161]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0105495  [pdf] - 1348046
Dust and Nebular Emission in Star Forming Galaxies
Comments: 8 pages, to be published in "The link between stars and cosmology", 26-30 March, 2001, Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, by Kluwer, eds. M. Chavez, A. Bressan, A. Buzzoni, and D. Mayya
Submitted: 2001-05-29
Star forming galaxies exhibit a variety of physical conditions, from quiescent normal spirals to the most powerful dusty starbursts. In order to study these complex systems, we need a suitable tool to analyze the information coming from observations at all wavelengths. We present a new spectro-photometric model which considers in a consistent way starlight as reprocessed by gas and dust. We discuss preliminary results to interpret some observed properties of VLIRGs.
[162]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0103167  [pdf] - 41384
Recent star formation in very luminous infrared galaxies
Comments: 6 pages, presented at the Workshop on "QSO Hosts And Their Environments", 10-12 Jan 2001, Granada, Spain
Submitted: 2001-03-12
Among star forming galaxies, a spectral combination of a strong Hdelta line in absorption and a moderate [OII] emission has been suggested to be a useful method to identify dusty starburst galaxies at any redshift, on the basis of optical data alone. On one side it has been shown that such a spectral particularity is indeed suggestive of obscured starburst galaxies but, on the other, the degeneracy of the optical spectrum has hindered any quantitative estimate of the star formation and extinction during the burst. The optical spectrum by itself, even complemented with the information on the far-IR flux, is not enough to identify univocal evolutionary patterns. We discuss in the following whether it is possible to reduce these uncertainties by extending the spectral analyses to the near infrared spectral region.
[163]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0103148  [pdf] - 41365
FIR and Radio emission in star forming galaxies
Comments: 3 pages; poster presented at the Workshop on "QSO Hosts And Their Environments", 10-12 Jan 2001, Granada, Spain
Submitted: 2001-03-09
We examine the tight correlation observed between the far infrared (FIR) and radio emission in normal and star burst galaxies. We show that significant deviations from the average relation are to be expected in young star burst or post star burst galaxies, due to the different fading times of FIR and Radio power.
[164]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0011160  [pdf] - 39167
Star Formation and Selective Dust Extinction in Luminous Starburst Galaxies
Comments: 17 pages, 4 Postscript figures, ApJ in press
Submitted: 2000-11-08
We investigate the star formation and dust extinction properties of very luminous infrared galaxies whose spectra display a strong Hdelta line in absorption and a moderate [OII] emission (e[a] spectrum). This spectral combination has been suggested to be a useful method to identify dusty starburst galaxies at any redshift on the basis of optical data alone. We compare the average e(a) optical spectrum with synthetic spectra that include both the stellar and the nebular contribution, allowing dust extinction to affect differentially the stellar populations of different ages. We find that reproducing the e(a) spectrum requires the youngest stellar generations to be significantly more extinguished by dust than older stellar populations, and implies a strong ongoing star formation activity at a level higher than in quiescent spirals. A model fitting the optical spectrum does not necessarily produce the observed FIR luminosity and this can be explained by the existence of stellar populations which are practically obscured at optical wavelengths. Models in which dust and stars are uniformly mixed yield a reddening of the emerging emission lines which is too low compared to observations: additional foreground reddening is required.
[165]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0008216  [pdf] - 37532
Modelling the Extinction Properties of Galaxies
Comments: 4 pages with 1 figures in Latex-Kluwer style. To be published in the proceedings of the Granada Euroconference "The Evolution of Galaxies.I-Observational Clues"
Submitted: 2000-08-15
Recently (Granato, Lacey, Silva et al. 2000, astro-ph/0001308) we have combined our spectrophotometric galaxy evolution code which includes dust reprocessing (GRASIL, Silva et al. 1998) with semi-analytical galaxy formation models (GALFORM, Cole et al. 1999). One of the most characteristic features of the former is that the dust is divided in two main phases: molecular cloud complexes, where stars are assumed to be born, and the diffuse interstellar medium. As a consequence, stellar populations of different ages have different geometrical relationships with the two phases, which is essential in understanding several observed properties of galaxies, in particular those undergoing major episodes of star formation at any redshift. Indeed, our merged GRASIL+GALFORM model reproduces fairly well the SEDs of normal spirals and starbursts from the far-UV to the sub-mm and their internal extinction properties. In particular in the model the observed starburst attenuation law (Calzetti 1999) is accounted for as an effect of geometry of stars and dust, and has nothing to do with the optical properties of dust grains.
[166]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0001308  [pdf] - 34105
The infrared side of galaxy formation. I. The local universe in the semi-analytical framework
Comments: 31 pages, 17 figures, revised version to appear on 20 October 2000 issue of ApJ
Submitted: 2000-01-18, last modified: 2000-05-29
We present a new evolutionary model for the far-UV to sub-mm properties of the galaxy population. This combines a semi-analytic galaxy formation model based on hierarchical clustering (GALFORM) with a spectro-photometric code which includes dust reprocessing (GRASIL). The former provides the star formation and metal enrichment histories, together with the gas mass and various geometrical parameters, for a representative sample of galaxies formed in different density environments. These quantities allow us to model the SEDs of galaxies, taking into account stellar emission and also dust extinction and re-emission. Two phases are considered for the dust: molecular cloud complexes, where stars are assumed to be born, and the diffuse interstellar medium. The model includes both galaxies forming stars quiescently in disks, and starbursts triggered by galaxy mergers. We test our models against the observed spectro-photometric properties of galaxies in the local Universe. The models reproduce fairly well the SEDs of normal spirals and starbursts, and their internal extinction properties. The starbursts follow the observed relationship between the FIR to UV luminosity ratio and the slope of the UV continuum. They also reproduce the observed starburst attenuation law (Calzetti et al 99). This result is remarkable, because we use a dust mixture which reproduces the Milky Way extinction law. It suggests that the observed attenuation law is related to the geometry of the stars and dust. We compute galaxy luminosity functions over our wide range of wavelengths, which turn out to be in good agreement with observational data. The UV continuum turns out to be a poor star formation indicator for our models, whilst the infrared luminosity is much more reliable.
[167]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9908030  [pdf] - 107702
Zero metallicity stellar sources and the reionization epoch
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures. Version accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 1999-08-04, last modified: 2000-02-25
We reconsider the problem of the cosmological reionization due to stellar sources. Using a method similar to that developed by Haiman & Loeb (1997), we investigate the effect of changing the stellar models and the stellar spectra adopted for deriving the ionizing photon production rate. In particular, we study the consequences of adopting zero metallicity stars, which is the natural choice for the first stellar populations. We construct young isochrones representative of Population III stars from existing sets of evolutionary models (Forieri 1982; Cassisi & Castellani 1993) and calculate a suitable library of zero metallicity model atmospheres. The number of ionizing photons emitted by such a zero metal population is about 40% higher than that produced by standard metal poor isochrones. We find that adopting suitable zero metallicity models modifies the reionization epoch. However the latter is still largely affected by current uncertainties in other important physical processes such as the efficiency of the star formation and the fraction of escaping UV photons.
[168]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9910164  [pdf] - 108718
Evolutionary tracks and isochrones for low- and intermediate-mass stars: from 0.15 to 7 M_sun, and from Z=0.0004 to 0.03
Comments: 13 pages, submitted to A&A Supplement Series. The data tables can be found in electronic form in http://pleiadi.pd.astro.it
Submitted: 1999-10-08
We present a large grid of stellar evolutionary tracks, which are suitable to modelling star clusters and galaxies by means of population synthesis. The tracks are presented for the initial chemical compositions [Z=0.0004, Y=0.23], [Z=0.001, Y=0.23], [Z=0.004, Y=0.24], [Z=0.008, Y=0.25], [Z=0.019, Y=0.273] (solar composition), and [Z=0.03, Y=0.30]. They are computed with updated opacities and equation of state, and a moderate amount of convective overshoot. The range of initial masses goes from 0.15 M_sun to 7 M_sun, and the evolutionary phases extend from the zero age main sequence (ZAMS) till either the thermally pulsing AGB regime or carbon ignition. We also present an additional set of models with solar composition, computed using the classical Schwarzschild's criterion for convective boundaries. From all these tracks, we derive the theoretical isochrones in the Johnson-Cousins UBVRIJHK broad-band photometric system.
[169]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9910032  [pdf] - 1469831
Star formation history of early-type galaxies in low density environments
Comments: 14 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 1999-10-02
In this paper we analyze the line-strength indices in the Lick-system measured by Longhetti et al. (1998a, b) for a sample of 51 early-type galaxies located in low density environments (LDE) and showing signatures of fine structures and/or interactions. The sample contains 21 shell-galaxies and 30 members of interacting pairs. Firstly we perform a preliminary comparison between three different sources of calibrations of the line strength indices, namely Buzzoni et al. (1992, 1994), Worthey (1992), Worthey et al. (1994) and Idiart et al. (1995), derived from stars with different effective temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Secondly, we discuss the properties of the galaxies in our sample by comparing them both with theoretical Single Stellar Populations (SSPs) and the {\sl normal} galaxies of the Gonz\'alez (1993: G93) sample. The analysis is performed by means of several diagnostic planes. In the H$\beta$ vs. [MgFe] plane, which is perhaps best suited to infer the age of the stellar populations, the peculiar galaxies in our sample show nearly the same distribution of the {\sl normal} galaxies in the G93 sample. There is however a number of peculiar galaxies with much stronger H$\beta$. Does this mean that the scatter in the H$\beta$ vs. [MgFe] plane, of normal, shell- and pair-galaxies has a common origin, perhaps a secondary episode of star formation? We suggest that, owing to their apparent {\sl youth}, shell- and pair-galaxies should have experienced at least one interaction event after their formation. The explanation comes natural for shell- and pair-galaxies where the signatures of interactions are evident. It is more intrigued in {\sl normal} galaxies (perhaps other causes may concur).
[170]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9903350  [pdf] - 105754
Modeling Dust on Galactic SED: Application to Semi-Analytical Galaxy Formation Models
Comments: 8 pages+ 4 figures. To appear in "The Evolution of Galaxies on Cosmological Timescales" Nov 30-Dec 5 1998, Puerto de la Cruz, Spain
Submitted: 1999-03-23
We present the basic features and preliminary results of the interface between our spectro-photometric model GRASIL (that calculates galactic SED from the UV to the sub-mm with a detailed computation of dust extinction and thermal reemission) with the semi-analytical galaxy formation model GALFORM (that computes galaxy formation and evolution in the hierarchical scenario, providing the star formation history as an input to our model). With these two models we are able to synthetize simulated samples of a few thousands galaxies suited for statistical studies of galaxy properties to investigate on galaxy formation and evolution. We find good agreement with the available data of SED and luminosity functions.
[171]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9903349  [pdf] - 105753
New photometric models of galactic evolution applied to the HDF
Comments: 8 pages+6figures. To appear in "The Evolution of Galaxies on Cosmological Timescales" Nov 30-Dec 5 1998, Puerto de la Cruz, Spain
Submitted: 1999-03-23
We summarize our modelling of galaxy photometric evolution (GRASIL code). By including the effects of dust grains and PAHs molecules in a two phases clumpy medium, where clumps are associated to star forming regions, we reproduce the observed UV to radio SEDs of galaxies with star formation rates from zero to several hundreds $M_\odot/yr$. GRASIL is a powerful tool to investigate the star formation, the initial mass function and the supernovae rate in nearby starbursts and normal galaxies, as well as to predict the evolution of luminosity functions of different types of galaxies at wavelengths covering six decades. It may be interfaced with any device providing the star formation and metallicity histories of a galaxy. As an application, we have investigated the properties of early-type galaxies in the HDF, tracking the contribution of this population to the cosmic star-formation history, which has a broad peak between z=1.5 and 4. To explain the absence of objects at z $\gsim$ 1.3, we suggest a sequence of dust-enshrouded merging-driven starbursts in the first few Gyrs of galaxies lifetime. We are at present working on a complementary sample of late type objects selected in a similar way.
[172]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9903315  [pdf] - 105719
Star Formation History of Early-Type Galaxies in Low Density Environments V. Blue line-strength indices for the nuclear region
Comments: 12 pages, including 7 figures - Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 1999-03-22
We analyze the star formation properties of a sample of 21 shell galaxies and 30 early-type galaxies members of interacting pairs, located in low density environments (Longhetti et al 1998a, 1998b). The study is based on new models developed to interpret the information coming from `blue' H$\delta$/FeI, H+K(CaII) and \D4000 line-strength indices proposed by Rose (1984; 1985) and Hamilton (1985). We find that the last star forming event that occurred in the nuclear region of shell galaxies is statistically old (from 0.1 up to several Gyr) with respect to the corresponding one in the sub-sample of pair galaxies (<0.1 Gyr or even ongoing star formation). If the stellar activity is somehow related to the formation of shells, as predicted by several dynamical models of galaxy interaction, shells have to be considered long lasting structures. Since pair members show evidence of very recent star formation, we suggest that either large reservoirs of gas have to be present to maintain active star formation, if these galaxies are on periodic orbits, or most of the pair members in the present sample are experiencing unbound encounters.
[173]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9901235  [pdf] - 363247
The third dredge-up and the carbon star luminosity functions in the Magellanic Clouds
Comments: 22 pages with 15 figures, to appear in A&A
Submitted: 1999-01-18
We investigate the formation of carbon stars as a function of the stellar mass and parent metallicity. Theoretical modelling is based on an improved scheme for treating the third dredge-up in synthetic calculations of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars. In this approach, the usual criterion (based on a constant minimum core mass for the occurrence of dredge-up, M_c^min) is replaced by one on the minimum temperature at the base of the convective envelope, T_b^dred, at the stage of the post-flash luminosity maximum. Envelope integrations then allow determination of M_c^min as a function of stellar mass, metallicity, and pulse strength (see Wood 1981), thus inferring if and when dredge-up first occurs. Moreover, the final possible shut down of the process is predicted. Extensive grids of TP-AGB models were computed using this scheme. We present and discuss the calibration of the two dredge-up parameters (lambda and T_b^dred) aimed at reproducing the carbon star luminosity function (CSLF) in the LMC. It turns out that the faint tail is almost insensitive to the history of star formation rate (SFR) in the parent galaxy (it is essentially determined by T_b^dred), in contrast to the bright wing which may be more affected by the details of the recent SFR. Once the faint end is reproduced, the peak location is a stringent calibrator of lambda. The best fit to the observed CSLF in the LMC is obtained with Z=0.008, lambda=0.50, log(T_b^dred)=6.4, and a constant SFR up to 5x10^8 yr ago. A good fit to the CSLF in the SMC is then easily derived from the Z=0.004 models, with a single choice of parameters, and a constant SFR over the entire significant age interval. The results are consistent with the theoretical expectation that the third dredge-up is more efficient at lower Zs.
[174]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9806314  [pdf] - 101907
Modelling the effects of dust on galactic SEDs from the UV to the millimeter band
Comments: 25 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication on ApJ main journal
Submitted: 1998-06-23
We present models of photometric evolution of galaxies in which the effects of a dusty interstellar medium have been included with particular care. A chemical evolution code follows the star formation rate, the gas fraction and the metallicity, basic ingredients for the stellar population synthesis. The latter is performed with a grid of integrated spectra of simple stellar populations (SSP) of different ages and metallicities, in which the effects of dusty envelopes around asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are included. The residual fraction of gas in the galaxy is divided into two phases: the star forming molecular clouds and the cirrus. The relative amount is a model parameter. The molecular gas is sub--divided into clouds of given mass and radius: it is supposed that each SSP is born within the cloud and progressively escapes it. The emitted spectrum of the star forming molecular clouds is computed with a radiative transfer code. The cirrus emission is derived by describing the galaxy as an axially symmetric system, in which the local dust emissivity is consistently calculated as a function of the local field intensity due to the stellar component. Effects of very small grains, subject to temperature fluctuations, as well as PAHs are included. The model is compared and calibrated with available data of normal and starburst galaxies in the local universe, in particular new broad--band and spectroscopic ISO observations. It will be a powerful tool to investigate the star formation, the IMF, supernovae rate in nearby starbursts and normal galaxies, as well as to predict the evolution of luminosity functions of different types of galaxies at wavelengths covering four decades.
[175]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9806077  [pdf] - 101670
Early-Type Galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field: The Star Formation History
Comments: 54 pages, Latex, 25 figures, to appear in "The Astrophysical Journal" October 20, 1998, Vol. 506 #2
Submitted: 1998-06-04
We have investigated the properties of a complete K-band selected sample of 35 elliptical and S0 galaxies brighter than K=20.15 in the Hubble Deep Field, as representative of the field galaxy population. This sample has been derived from deep K-band image by the KPNO-IRIM camera, by applying a rigorous morphological classification scheme based on quantitative analyses of the surface brightness profiles. The broad-band spectra of the sample galaxies allow us to date their dominant stellar populations. The majority of bright early-types in this field are found at redshifts z<1.3 to display colors indicative of a fairly wide range of ages (typically 1.5 to 3 Gyrs). We find that the major episodes of star-formation building up typical M_star galaxies have taken place during a wide redshift interval 1<z<4 for q_0=0.5, which becomes 1<z<3 for q_0=0.15. Our estimated galactic masses, for a Salpeter IMF, are found in the range from a few billion to a few 10^{11} solar masses already at z=1. So the bright end of the E/S0 population is mostly in place by that cosmic epoch, with space densities, masses and luminosities consistent with those of the local field E/S0 population. What distinguishes the present sample is a remarkable absence of objects at z>1.3, which should be detectable during the luminous star-formation phase expected to happen at these redshifts. Obvious solutions are a) that the merging events imply perturbed morphologies which prevent selecting them by our morphological classification filter, or b) that a dust-polluted ISM obscures the (either continuous or episodic) events of star-formation. We conclude that the likely solution is a combination thereof, i.e. a set of dust-enshrouded merging-driven starbursts occurring during the first few Gyrs of the galaxy's lifetime.
[176]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9710079  [pdf] - 98838
Spectro-Photometric Evolution of Elliptical Galaxies. III. Infall models with gradients in mass and star formation
Comments: 25 pages, LaTeX file with 21 figures using l-aa.sty, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 1997-10-08, last modified: 1998-04-21
In this study we present a simple model of elliptical galaxies aimed at interpreting the gradients in colours and narrow band indices observed across these systems. Salient features of the model are the gradients in mass density and star formation and infall of primordial gas aimed at simulating the collapse of a galaxy into the potential well of dark matter. Adopting a multi-zone model we follow in detail the history of star formation, gas consumption, and chemical enrichment of the galaxy and also allow for the occurrence of galactic winds according to the classical supernova (and stellar winds) energy deposit. The outline of the model, the time scale of gas accretion and rate of star formation as a function of the galacto-centric distance in particular, seek to closely mimic the results from Tree-SPH dynamical models. Although same specific ingredients of the model can be questioned from many points of view (of which we are well aware) the model predictions have to be considered as a gross tool for exploring the consequences of different receipts of gas accretion and star formation in which the simple one-zone scheme is abandoned. With the aid of this model we discuss the observational data on the gradients in metallicity, colour, and narrow band indices across elliptical galaxies.
[177]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9710246  [pdf] - 99005
Ages and Metallicities in Elliptical Galaxies from the H_beta, <Fe>, and Mg2 Diagnostics
Comments: 15 pages, LaTeX file with 10 figures using l-aa-dipastro.sty. Will appear in A&A, Vol. 333
Submitted: 1997-10-22, last modified: 1998-03-16
Systematic variations in the line strength indices H_beta, Mg2, and <Fe> are observed across elliptical galaxies and from one object to another. Furthermore arguments are given for an enhancement of Mg (\alfa in general) with respect to Fe toward the center of these galaxies. In this study we have investigated the ability of the H_beta, Mg2 and <Fe> diagnostics to assess the metallicity, [Mg/Fe] ratios, and ages of elliptical galaxies. To this aim, first we derive basic calibrations for the variations dH_beta, dMg2 and d<Fe> as a function of Dlog(t), Dlog(Z/Zo), and D[Mg/Fe]. Second, we analyze how the difference dH_beta, dMg2, and d<Fe> between the external and central values translates into D[Mg/Fe], Dlog(Z/Zo), and Dlog(t). Third, we explore the variation from galaxy to galaxy of the nuclear values of H_beta, Mg2, and <Fe> limited to a sub-sample of the Gonzales (1993) list. The differences dH_beta, dMg2, and d<Fe> are converted into the differences Dlog(t), Dlog(Z/Zo), and D[Mg/Fe]. Various correlations among the age, metallicity, and enhancement variations are explored. In particular we thoroughly examine the relationship Dlog(t)-Mv. It is found that a sort of age limit is likely to exist in this plane, traced by galaxies with mild or no sign of rejuvenation. In these objects, the duration of the star forming activity is likely to have increased at decreasing galactic mass. The results are discussed in the context of current theories of galaxy formation and evolution. i.e. merger and isolation. Finally, the suggestion is advanced that models with time and space dependent IMF might be able to alleviate some of the difficulties encountered by the standard SN-driven galactic wind model.
[178]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9802143  [pdf] - 100314
Calcium Triplet Synthesis
Comments: 17 pages, 7 figures, to be published in A&A
Submitted: 1998-02-11
We present theoretical equivalent widths for the sum of the two strongest lines of the Calcium Triplet, CaT index, in the near-IR, using evolutionary techniques and the most recent models and observational data for this feature in individual stars. We compute the CaT index for Single Stellar Populations (instantaneous burst, standard Salpeter-type IMF) at four metallicities, Z=0.004, 0.008, 0.02 (solar) and 0.05, and ranging in age from very young bursts of star formation (few Myr) to old stellar populations, up to 17 gyr, representative of globular clusters, elliptical galaxies and bulges of spirals. The interpretation of the observed equivalent widths of CaT in different stellar systems is discussed. Composite-population models are also computed as a tool to interpret the CaT detections in star-forming regions, in order to disantangle between the component due to Red Supergiants stars, RSG, and the underlying, older, population. CaT is found to be an excellent metallicity-indicator for populations older than 1 Gyr, practically independent of the age. We discuss its application to remove the age- metallicity degeneracy, characteristic of all studies of galaxy evolution based on the usual integrated indices (both broad band colors and narrow band indices). The application of the models computed here to the analysis of a sample of elliptical galaxies will be discussed in a forthcoming paper (Gorgas et al. 1998).
[179]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9711337  [pdf] - 99470
Galactic chemical enrichment with new metallicity dependent yields
Comments: 38 pages, 24 figures, submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 1997-11-27
New detailed stellar yields of several elemental species are derived for massive stars in a wide range of masses (from 6 to 120 Msol) and metallicities (Z= 0.0004, 0.004, 0.008, 0.02, 0.05). Our calculations are based on the Padova evolutionary tracks and take into account recent results on stellar evolution, such as overshooting and quiescent mass-loss, paying major attention to the effects of the initial chemical composition of the star. We finally include modern results on explosive nucleosynthesis in SNae by Woosley & Weaver 1995. The issue of the chemical yields of Very Massive Objects (from 120 to 1000 Msol) is also addressed. Our grid of stellar yields for massive stars is complementary to the results by Marigo et al. (1996, 1997) on the evolution and nucleosynthesis of low and intermediate mass stars, also based on the Padova evolutionary tracks. Altogether, they represent a complete set of stellar yields of unprecedented homogeneity and self-consistency. Our new stellar yields are inserted in a code for the chemical evolution of the Galactic disc with infall of primordial gas, according to the formulation first suggested by Talbot & Arnett (1971, 1973, 1975) and Chiosi (1980). As a first application, the code is used to develop a model of the chemical evolution of the Solar Vicinity, with a detailed comparison to the available observational constraints.
[180]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9711141  [pdf] - 99274
Evolution of Massive Stars under New Mass-Loss Rates for RSG: Is the mystery of the missing blue gap solved ?
Comments: 22 pages LaTeX, 17 postscript figures, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 1997-11-12
In this paper we present new models of massive stars based on recent advancements in the theory of diffusive mixing and a new empirical formulation of the mass-loss rates of red supergiant stars. We compute two sets of stellar models of massive stars with initial chemical composition [Z=0.008, Y=0.25] and [Z=0.020, Y=0.28]. Mass loss by stellar wind is also taken into account according to the empirical relationship by de Jager et al. (1988). Despite the new mixing prescription, these models share the same problems of older models in literature as far as the interpretation of the observational distribution of stars across the HRD is concerned. Examining possible causes of the failure, we find that the adopted rate of mass loss for the red supergiant stages under-estimates the observational values by a large factor. Revising the whole problem, first we adopt the recent formulation by Feast (1991), and secondly we take also into account the possibility that the dust to gas ratio varies with the stellar luminosity. Stellar models are then calculated with the new prescription for the mass-loss rates. The models now possess very extended loops in the HRD and are able to match the distribution of stars across the HRD from the earliest to the latest spectral types both in the Milky Way, LMC and SMC. Finally, because the surface H-abundance is close to the limit adopted to start the Wolf-Rayet phase (WNL type), we suggest that a new channel is possible for the formation of low luminosity WNL stars, i.e. by progenitors whose mass can be as low as 20 \msol, that have evolved horizontally across the HRD following the blue-red-blue scheme and suffering large mass loss during the red supergiant stages.
[181]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9710093  [pdf] - 98852
TP-AGB stars with envelope burning
Comments: 18 pages LaTeX, including 13 figures and 5 tables: accepted for publication in A&A; minor revisions in text and three figures
Submitted: 1997-10-09, last modified: 1997-11-10
In this paper we focus on the TP-AGB evolution of intermediate-mass stars experiencing envelope burning (M=4-5Mo). The approach we have adopted is a semi-analytical one as it combines analytical relationships derived from complete models of TP-AGB stars with sole envelope models in which the physical structure is calculated from the photosphere down to the core. Our efforts are directed to analyse the effects produced by envelope burning, such as: i) the energy contribution which may drive significant deviations from the standard core mass-luminosity relationship; and ii) the changes in the surface chemical composition due to nuclear burning via the CNO cycle. Evolutionary models for stars with initial mass of 4.0, 4.5, 5.0 Mo and two choices of the initial chemical composition ([Y=0.28,Z=0.02] and [Y=0.25,Z=0.008]) are calculated from the first thermal pulse till the complete ejection of the envelope. We find that massive TP-AGB stars can rapidly reach high luminosities (-6>Mbol>-7), without exceeding, however, the classical limit to the AGB luminosity of Mbol~-7.1 corresponding to the Chandrasekhar value of the core mass. No carbon stars brighter than Mbol~-6.5 are predicted to form (the alternative of a possible transition from M-star to C-star during the final pulses is also explored), in agreement with observations which indicate that most of the very luminous AGB stars are oxygen-rich. Finally, new chemical yields from stars in the mass range 4-5 Mo are presented, so as to extend the sets of stellar yields from low-mass stars already calculated by Marigo et al. (1996). For each CNO element we give both the secondary and the primary components.
[182]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9710101  [pdf] - 98860
To what Extent are Mg2 and <Fe> indicators of Mg and Fe Abundances?
Comments: 14 pages, LaTeX file with 12 figures using l-aa-dipastro.sty, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 1997-10-10
The gradients in line strength indices such as Mg2 and <Fe> (Carollo & Danziger 1994a,b; Carollo et al. 1993), and their increase toward massive system (Worthey et al. 1992, Faber et al. 1992, Davies et al. 1993, Weiss et al. 1995) observed in elliptical galaxies are customarily considered as indicators of gradients in the chemical abundances of Mg and Fe and arguments are given for an enhancement of Mg ($\alpha$-elements in general) with respect to Fe toward the center of these galaxies or going from dwarf to massive ellipticals. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the whole problem aimed at understanding how the indices Mg2 and <Fe> depend on the the chemical abundances and age of the stellar mix of a galaxy. We find that Mg2 and <Fe> do not simply correlate with the abundances of Mg and Fe and the ratio Mg/Fe, but depend also on the underlaying distribution of stars in different metallicity bins N(Z), or equivalently on the past history of star formation. In practice, inferring the abundance of Mg and Fe and their ratio is hampered by the need of some information about N(Z). Finally, the observational gradients in Mg2 and <Fe> do not automatically imply gradients in chemical abundances.
[183]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9709084  [pdf] - 98537
Modelling Intermediate Age and Old Stellar Populations in the Infrared
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, to appear in A&A
Submitted: 1997-09-10, last modified: 1997-09-16
We have investigated the spectro-photometric properties of the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars and their contribution to the integrated infrared emission in simple stellar populations (SSP). Adopting analytical relations describing the evolution of these stars in the HR diagram and empirical relations for the mass-loss rate and the wind terminal velocity, we were able to model the effects of the dusty envelope around these stars, with a minimal number of parameters. We computed isochrones at different age and initial metal content. We compare our models with existing infrared colors of M giants and Mira stars and with IRAS PSC data. Contrary to previous models, in the new isochrones the mass-loss rate, which establishes the duration of the AGB phase, also determines the spectral properties of the stars. The contribution of these stars to the integrated light of the population is thus obtained in a consistent way. We find that the emission in the mid infrared is about one order of magnitude larger when dust is taken into account in an intermediate age population, irrespective of the particular mixture adopted. The dependence of the integrated colors on the metallicity and age is discussed, with particular emphasis on the problem of age-metallicity degeneracy. We show that, contrary to the case of optical or near infrared colors, the adoption of a suitable pass-band in the mid infrared allows a fair separation of the two effects. We suggest intermediate redshift elliptical galaxies as possible targets of this method of solving the age-metallicity dilemma. The new SSP models constitute a first step in a more extended study aimed at modelling the spectral properties of the galaxies from the ultraviolet to the far infrared.
[184]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9708123  [pdf] - 98301
A new scenario of galaxy evolution under a universal IMF
Comments:
Submitted: 1997-08-13
In this paper, basic observational properties of elliptical galaxies such as the integrated spectra, the chemical abundances and the enhancement of $\alpha$-elements inferred from broad-band colors and line strength indices $Mg_2$ and $< Fe >$ (and their gradients), the color-magnitude relation, the UV fluxes, and the mass-luminosity ratios, are examined in the light of current theoretical interpretations, and attention is called on several points of internal contradiction. Indeed existing models for the formation and evolution of elliptical galaxies are not able to simultaneously account for all of the above observational features. We suggest that the new initial mass function (IMF) by Padoan et al. (1997), which depends on the temperature, density, and velocity dispersion of the medium in which stars are formed, may constitute a break-through in the difficulties in question. Models of elliptical galaxies incorporating the new IMF (varying with time and position inside a galaxy) are presented and discussed at some extent. As a result of the changing IMF, the enhancement of $\alpha$-elements and tilt of the Fundamental Plane are easily explained leaving unaltered the interpretation of the remaining properties under examination. Finally, some implications concerning the relative proportions of visible stars, collapsed remnants (baryonic dark matter), and gas left over by the star forming process are examined.
[185]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9707080  [pdf] - 97904
Source Counts and Background Radiation
Comments: 9 pages, 10 figures, review in ESA FIRST symposium (ESA SP 401)
Submitted: 1997-07-07
Our present understanding of the extragalactic source counts and background radiation at infrared and sub-mm wavelengths is reviewed. Available count data are used to constrain evolutionary models of galaxies and Active Nuclei. The CIRB, on the other hand, provides crucial information on the integrated past IR emissivity, including sources so faint to be never accessible. The near-IR and sub-mm are suited to search for the CIRB. These cosmological windows are ideal to detect redshifted photons from the two most prominent broad emission features in galaxy spectra: the stellar photospheric 1 micron peak and the one at 100 micron due to dust re-radiation. The recently claimed detection of an isotropic diffuse component at 100-200 microns would support the evidence for strong cosmic evolution from $z=0$ to $z\sim 2$ of faint gas-rich late-type galaxies, as inferred from direct long-$\lambda$ counts. Furthermore, an equally intense CIRB flux measured in the wavelength range 200 to 500 $\mu m$ may be in support of models envisaging a dust-enshrouded phase during formation of spheroidal galaxies (e.g. Franceschini et al., 1994): the background spectrum at such long wavelengths would indicate an high redshift ($z>2-3$) for this active phase of star formation, implying a relevant constraint on structure formation scenarios. We argue that, given the difficulties for sky surveys in this spectral domain, only sporadic tests of these ideas will be achieved in the next several years. Only a mission like FIRST, in combination with large mm arrays and optical telescopes, will allow to thoroughly investigate, via photometric and spectroscopic surveys, these IR-bright early phases in the evolution of galaxies and AGNs.
[186]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9707077  [pdf] - 97901
Models of Galaxy Evolution from the UV to the Sub-Millimeter
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure, in ESA FIRST symposium (ESA SP 401)
Submitted: 1997-07-07
We present the first results of a detailed modeling of chemical and photometric evolution of galaxies including the effects of a dusty interstellar medium. A chemical evolution code follows the SF rate, the gas fraction and the metallicity, basic ingredients for the stellar population synthesis. The latter is performed with a grid of integrated spectra for SSP of different ages and metallicities, in which the effects of dusty envelopes around AGB stellar are included. The residual fraction of gas in the galaxy is divided into two phases: the star forming molecular clouds and the diffuse medium. The molecular gas is sub-divided into clouds of given mass and radius: it is supposed that any SSP is borne within the cloud and progressively escapes it. The emitted spectrum of the star forming molecular clouds is computed with a radiative transfer code. The diffuse dust emission (cirrus) is derived by describing the galaxy as an axially symmetric system, in which the local dust emissivity is consistently calculated as a function of the local field intensity due to the stellar component. Effects of very small grains, subject to temperature fluctuations, as well as PAH are included. The model is compared and calibrated with available data of starburst galaxies in the local universe, in particular new broad-band and spectroscopic ISO observations. It will be a fundamental tool to extract information on global evolution of the stellar component and of ISM of galaxies from observations covering four decades in $\lambda$. The combination of observations from HST, Keck, ISO and ground-based optical, IR and sub-mm telescopes already provided several objects at relevant $z$ with spectral information on this large $\lambda$ range. Their number will increase after the completion of ISO surveys, and will burst when SIRFT, FIRST, Planck
[187]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9707064  [pdf] - 97888
Old Massive Ellipticals and S0 in the Hubble Deep Field Vanish from View at $z>1.3$: Possible Solutions of the Enigma
Comments: 9 pages, 5 Postscript figures, Submitted to ApJ Letters
Submitted: 1997-07-04
We have investigated the properties of a bright K-band selected sample of early-type galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field, as representative of the field galaxy population. This dataset is unique as for the morphological information on faint high-z sources, and for complete photometric and spectroscopic coverage. The majority of bright early-type galaxies in this field are found at redshifts $z \leq 1.3$ to share common properties with those of high-z cluster samples, as for the age and mass of the dominant stellar population -- which are found to be as old as 3-5 Gyr and as massive as $10^{11} M_\odot$ already at $z\simeq 1$. There is no evidence of a steepening of the mass function from $z$=0 to $z$=1, as inferred by some authors from analyses of optically-selected samples and favoured by hierarchical clustering models forming most of the E/S0s at $z<1$. What distinguishes this sample is a remarkable absence of objects at $z>1.3$, which would be expected as clearly detectable above the flux limits, given the aged properties of the lower redshift counterparts. So, something hide them at high redshifts. Merging could be an explanation, but it would require that already formed and old stellar systems would assemble on short timescales of 1 Gyr or less. Only a negligible fraction of the galactic mass in young stars has to be added, a rather contrived situation from the dynamical point of view. An alternative interpretation could be that a dust-polluted ISM obscures the first 3 to 4 Gyr of the evolution of these massive systems, after which a galactic wind and gas consumption makes them transparent. The presence of dust would have relevant (and testable) implications for the evaluation of the global energetics from galaxy formation and for the visibility of the early phases by current and future infrared
[188]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9705060  [pdf] - 97322
Diagnostic of chemical abundances and ages from the line strength indices Hb, <Fe>, and Mg2: what do they really imply ?
Comments: Submitted to A&A. Pages 19, figures 19. Psfig.tex, l-aa.sty
Submitted: 1997-05-09
The line strength indices Hb, Mg2, and <Fe>, together with their gradients and dependence on the galaxy luminosity (mass), observed in elliptical galaxies are customarily considered as reliable indicators of systematic differences in age and abundances of Mg and Fe. In this paper, we address the question whether or not the indices Mg2 and <Fe> (and their gradients) are real indicators of chemical abundances and enhancement of these or other effects must be taken into account. We show that this is not the case because the above indices are severely affected by the unknown relative percentage of stars as function of the metallicity. In order to cast the problem, first we provide basic calibrations for the variations dHb, dMg2, and d<Fe> as a function of the age Dlog(t) (in Gyr), metallicity Dlog(Z/Z_o), and D[Mg/Fe]. Second, we analyze the implications of the gradients in Mg2 and <Fe> observed across these systems. Finally, the above calibration is used to explore the variations from galaxy to galaxy of the nuclear values of Hb, Mg2, and <Fe>. The differences dHb, dMg2, and d<Fe> are converted to differences Dlog(t), Dlog(Z/Z_o), and D[Mg/Fe]. We thoroughly examine the relationship Dlog(t)-Mv, Dlog(Z/Z_o)-Mv, and D[Mg/Fe]-Mv, and advance the suggestion that the duration of the star forming period gets longer or the age of the last episode of stellar activity gets closer to the present at decreasing galaxy mass. This result is discussed in the context of current theories of galaxy formation and evolution. i.e. merger and isolation. In brief, we conclude that none of these can explain the results of our analysis, and suggest that the kind of time and space dependent IMF proposed by Padoan et al. (1997) and the associated models of elliptical galaxies elaborated by Chiosi et al. (1997) should be at work.
[189]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9702120  [pdf] - 96639
Probing the Galaxy I. The galactic structure towards the galactic pole
Comments: 11 pages TeX, 4 separate pages with additional figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 1997-02-13, last modified: 1997-02-14
Observations of (B-V) colour distributions towards the galactic poles are compared with those obtained from synthetic colour-magnitude diagrams to determine the major constituents in the disc and spheroid. The disc is described with four stellar sub-populations: the young, intermediate, old, and thick disc populations, which have respectively scale heights of 100 pc, 250 pc, 0.5 kpc, and 1.0 kpc. The spheroid is described with stellar contributions from the bulge and halo. The bulge is not well constrained with the data analyzed in this study. A non-flattened power-law describes the observed distributions at fainter magnitudes better than a deprojected R^{1/4}-law. Details about the age, metallicity, and normalizations are listed in Table 1. The star counts and the colour distributions from the stars in the intermediate fields towards the galactic anti-centre are well described with the stellar populations mentioned above. Arguments are given that the actual solar offset is about 15 pc north from the galactic plane.
[190]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9602032  [pdf] - 94084
Probing the Age of Elliptical Galaxies
Comments: pages 22, 16 postscript figures, 1 external table (table 4)
Submitted: 1996-02-07
In this paper we address the question whether age and metallicity effects can be disentangled with the aid of the broad-band colours and spectral indices from absorption feature strengths, so that the age of elliptical galaxies can be inferred. The observational data under examination are the indices Hbeta and [MgFe], and the velocity dispersion Sigma for the sample of galaxies of Gonzales (1993), supplemented by the ultra-violet data, i.e. the colour (1550-V), of Burstein et al. (1988). The analysis is performed with the aid of chemo-spectro-photometric models of elliptical galaxies with infall of primordial gas (aimed at simulating the collapse phase of galaxy formation) and the occurrence of galactic winds. The galaxy models are from Tantalo et al. (1995).
[191]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9602003  [pdf] - 94055
Spectro-photometric Evolution of Elliptical Galaxies. II. Models with infall
Comments: pages 22, 20 postscript figures, 2 external table (tab2_infall using supertabular.sty and tab5_infall using supertabular1.sty)
Submitted: 1996-02-01
In this paper we present new chemo-spectro-photometric models of elliptical galaxies in which infall of primordial gas is allowed to occur. They aim to simulate the collapse of a galaxy made of two components, i.e. luminous material and dark matter. The mass of the dark component is assumed to be constant in time, whereas that of the luminous material is supposed to accrete at a suitable rate. They also include the effect of galactic winds powered by supernova explosions and stellar winds from massive, early-type stars. The models are constrained to match a number of properties of elliptical galaxies, i.e. the slope and mean colours of the colour-magnitude relation (CMR), V versus (V--K), the UV excess as measured by the colour (1550--V) together with the overall shape of the integrated spectral energy distribution (ISED) in the ultraviolet, the relation between the Mg2 index and (1550--V), the mass to blue luminosity ratio M/Lb as a function of the B luminosity, and finally the broad-band colours (U--B), (B--V), (V--I), (V--K), etc.