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Bramich, D. M.

Normalized to: Bramich, D.

156 article(s) in total. 915 co-authors, from 1 to 90 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 8,5.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.09613  [pdf] - 2042338
OGLE-2013-BLG-0911Lb: A Secondary on the Brown-Dwarf Planet Boundary around an M-dwarf
Comments: 22 pages, 10 figures, Accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2019-12-19
We present the analysis of the binary-lens microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0911. The best-fit solutions indicate the binary mass ratio of q~0.03 which differs from that reported in Shvartzvald+2016. The event suffers from the well-known close/wide degeneracy, resulting in two groups of solutions for the projected separation normalized by the Einstein radius of s~0.15 or s~7. The finite source and the parallax observations allow us to measure the lens physical parameters. The lens system is an M-dwarf orbited by a massive Jupiter companion at very close (M_{host}=0.30^{+0.08}_{-0.06} M_{Sun}, M_{comp}=10.1^{+2.9}_{-2.2} M_{Jup}, a_{exp}=0.40^{+0.05}_{-0.04} au) or wide (M_{host}=0.28^{+0.10}_{-0.08} M_{Sun}, M_{comp}=9.9^{+3.8}_{-3.5}M_{Jup}, a_{exp}=18.0^{+3.2}_{-3.2} au) separation. Although the mass ratio is slightly above the planet-brown dwarf (BD) mass-ratio boundary of q=0.03 which is generally used, the median physical mass of the companion is slightly below the planet-BD mass boundary of 13M_{Jup}. It is likely that the formation mechanisms for BDs and planets are different and the objects near the boundaries could have been formed by either mechanism. It is important to probe the distribution of such companions with masses of ~13M_{Jup} in order to statistically constrain the formation theories for both BDs and massive planets. In particular, the microlensing method is able to probe the distribution around low-mass M-dwarfs and even BDs which is challenging for other exoplanet detection methods.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.08520  [pdf] - 1988589
Spitzer Microlensing Program as a Probe for Globular Cluster Planets. Analysis of OGLE-2015-BLG-0448
Comments: ApJ submitted, 12 pages, 8 figures, 2 tabels
Submitted: 2015-12-28, last modified: 2019-10-29
The microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0448 was observed by Spitzer and lay within the tidal radius of the globular cluster NGC 6558. The event had moderate magnification and was intensively observed, hence it had the potential to probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters. We measure the proper motion of NGC 6558 ($\mu_{\rm cl}$(N,E) = (+0.36+-0.10, +1.42+-0.10) mas/yr) as well as the source and show that the lens is not a cluster member. Even though this particular event does not probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters, other potential cluster lens events can be verified using our methodology. Additionally, we find that microlens parallax measured using OGLE photometry is consistent with the value found based on the light curve displacement between Earth and Spitzer.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.07281  [pdf] - 2034320
Full orbital solution for the binary system in the northern Galactic disc microlensing event Gaia16aye
Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Mróz, P.; Rybicki, K. A.; Gromadzki, M.; Kołaczkowski, Z.; Zieliński, M.; Zieliński, P.; Britavskiy, N.; Gomboc, A.; Sokolovsky, K.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Abe, L.; Aldi, G. F.; AlMannaei, A.; Altavilla, G.; Qasim, A. Al; Anupama, G. C.; Awiphan, S.; Bachelet, E.; Bakıs, V.; Baker, S.; Bartlett, S.; Bendjoya, P.; Benson, K.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Birenbaum, G.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boeva, S.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Bruni, I.; Burenin, R. A.; Burgaz, U.; Butterley, T.; Caines, H. E.; Caton, D. B.; Novati, S. Calchi; Carrasco, J. M.; Cassan, A.; Cepas, V.; Cropper, M.; Chruślińska, M.; Clementini, G.; Clerici, A.; Conti, D.; Conti, M.; Cross, S.; Cusano, F.; Damljanovic, G.; Dapergolas, A.; D'Ago, G.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Dennefeld, M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Dominik, M.; Dziedzic, J.; Ereceantalya, O.; Eselevich, M. V.; Esenoglu, H.; Eyer, L.; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Fossey, S. J.; Galeev, A. I.; Grebenev, S. A.; Gupta, A. C.; Gutaev, A. G.; Hallakoun, N.; Hamanowicz, A.; Han, C.; Handzlik, B.; Haislip, J. B.; Hanlon, L.; Hardy, L. K.; Harrison, D. L.; van Heerden, H. J.; Hoette, V. L.; Horne, K.; Hudec, R.; Hundertmark, M.; Ihanec, N.; Irtuganov, E. N.; Itoh, R.; Iwanek, P.; Jovanovic, M. D.; Janulis, R.; Jelínek, M.; Jensen, E.; Kaczmarek, Z.; Katz, D.; Khamitov, I. M.; Kilic, Y.; Klencki, J.; Kolb, U.; Kopacki, G.; Kouprianov, V. V.; Kruszyńska, K.; Kurowski, S.; Latev, G.; Lee, C-H.; Leonini, S.; Leto, G.; Lewis, F.; Li, Z.; Liakos, A.; Littlefair, S. P.; Lu, J.; Manser, C. J.; Mao, S.; Maoz, D.; Martin-Carrillo, A.; Marais, J. P.; Maskoliūnas, M.; Maund, J. R.; Meintjes, P. J.; Melnikov, S. S.; Ment, K.; Mikołajczyk, P.; Morrell, M.; Mowlavi, N.; Moździerski, D.; Murphy, D.; Nazarov, S.; Netzel, H.; Nesci, R.; Ngeow, C. -C.; Norton, A. J.; Ofek, E. O.; Pakstienė, E.; Palaversa, L.; Pandey, A.; Paraskeva, E.; Pawlak, M.; Penny, M. T.; Penprase, B. E.; Piascik, A.; Prieto, J. L.; Qvam, J. K. T.; Ranc, C.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Reichart, D. E.; Reig, P.; Rhodes, L.; Rivet, J. -P.; Rixon, G.; Roberts, D.; Rosi, P.; Russell, D. M.; Sanchez, R. Zanmar; Scarpetta, G.; Seabroke, G.; Shappee, B. J.; Schmidt, R.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Sitek, M.; Skowron, J.; Śniegowska, M.; Snodgrass, C.; Soares, P. S.; van Soelen, B.; Spetsieri, Z. T.; Stankeviciūtė, A.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; Strobl, J.; Strubble, E.; Szegedi, H.; Ramirez, L. M. Tinjaca; Tomasella, L.; Tsapras, Y.; Vernet, D.; Villanueva, S.; Vince, O.; Wambsganss, J.; van der Westhuizen, I. P.; Wiersema, K.; Wium, D.; Wilson, R. W.; Yoldas, A.; Zhuchkov, R. Ya.; Zhukov, D. G.; Zdanavicius, J.; Zoła, S.; Zubareva, A.
Comments: accepted for publication in A&A, 24 pages, 10 figures, tables with the data will be available electronically
Submitted: 2019-01-22, last modified: 2019-10-28
Gaia16aye was a binary microlensing event discovered in the direction towards the northern Galactic disc and was one of the first microlensing events detected and alerted to by the Gaia space mission. Its light curve exhibited five distinct brightening episodes, reaching up to I=12 mag, and it was covered in great detail with almost 25,000 data points gathered by a network of telescopes. We present the photometric and spectroscopic follow-up covering 500 days of the event evolution. We employed a full Keplerian binary orbit microlensing model combined with the motion of Earth and Gaia around the Sun to reproduce the complex light curve. The photometric data allowed us to solve the microlensing event entirely and to derive the complete and unique set of orbital parameters of the binary lensing system. We also report on the detection of the first-ever microlensing space-parallax between the Earth and Gaia located at L2. The properties of the binary system were derived from microlensing parameters, and we found that the system is composed of two main-sequence stars with masses 0.57$\pm$0.05 $M_\odot$ and 0.36$\pm$0.03 $M_\odot$ at 780 pc, with an orbital period of 2.88 years and an eccentricity of 0.30. We also predict the astrometric microlensing signal for this binary lens as it will be seen by Gaia as well as the radial velocity curve for the binary system. Events such as Gaia16aye indicate the potential for the microlensing method of probing the mass function of dark objects, including black holes, in directions other than that of the Galactic bulge. This case also emphasises the importance of long-term time-domain coordinated observations that can be made with a network of heterogeneous telescopes.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.05156  [pdf] - 1978107
ROME/REA: A gravitational microlensing search for exo-planets beyond the snow-line on a global network of robotic telescopes
Comments: 15 pages, 6 figures, published (Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 131:124401 (12pp), 2019 December)
Submitted: 2019-10-11
Planet population synthesis models predict an abundance of planets with semi-major axes between 1-10 au, yet they lie at the edge of the detection limits of most planet finding techniques. Discovering these planets and studying their distribution is critical to understanding the physical processes that drive planet formation. ROME/REA is a gravitational microlensing project whose main science driver is to discover exoplanets in the cold outer regions of planetary systems. To achieve this, it uses a novel approach combining a multi-band survey with reactive follow-up observations, exploiting the unique capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory (LCO) global network of robotic telescopes combined with a Target and Observation Manager (TOM) system. We present the main science objectives and a technical overview of the project, including initial results.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.11536  [pdf] - 2025645
OGLE-2015-BLG-1649Lb: A gas giant planet around a low-mass dwarf
Comments: 24 pages, 5 figures, 3 tables. Accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2019-07-25, last modified: 2019-10-02
We report the discovery of an exoplanet in microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1649. The planet/host-star mass ratio is $q =7.2 \times 10^{-3}$ and the projected separation normalized by the Einstein radius is $s = 0.9$. The upper limit of the lens flux is obtained from adaptive optics observations by IRCS/Subaru, which excludes the probability of a G-dwarf or more massive host star and helps to put a tighter constraint on the lens mass as well as commenting on the formation scenarios of giant planets orbiting low-mass stars. We conduct a Bayesian analysis including constraints on the lens flux to derive the probability distribution of the physical parameters of the lens system. We thereby find that the masses of the host star and planet are $M_{L} = 0.34 \pm 0.19 M_{\odot}$ and $M_{p} = 2.5^{+1.5}_{-1.4} M_{Jup}$, respectively. The distance to the system is $D_{L} = 4.23^{+1.51}_{-1.64}$kpc. The projected star-planet separation is $a_{\perp} = 2.07^{+0.65}_{-0.77}$AU. The lens-source relative proper motion of the event is quite high, at $\sim 7.1 \, {\rm mas/yr}$. Therefore, we may be able to determine the lens physical parameters uniquely or place much stronger constraints on them by measuring the color-dependent centroid shift and/or the image elongation with additional high resolution imaging already a few years from now.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.01151  [pdf] - 2025925
Lorentz Factors of compact jets in Black hole X-ray binaries
Comments: 23 pages, 10 figures; Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-10-02
Compact, continuously launched jets in black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) produce radio to optical-infrared synchrotron emission. In most BHXBs, an infrared (IR) excess (above the disc component) is observed when the jet is present in the hard spectral state. We investigate why some BHXBs have prominent IR excesses and some do not, quantified by the amplitude of the IR quenching or recovery over the transition from/to the hard state. We find that the amplitude of the IR excess can be explained by inclination dependent beaming of the jet synchrotron emission, and the projected area of the accretion disc. Furthermore, we see no correlation between the expected and the observed IR excess for Lorentz factor 1, which is strongly supportive of relativistic beaming of the IR emission, confirming that the IR excess is produced by synchrotron emission in a relativistic outflow. Using the amplitude of the jet fade and recovery over state transitions and the known orbital parameters, we constrain for the first time the bulk Lorentz factor range of compact jets in several BHXBs (with all the well-constrained Lorentz factors lying in the range of $\Gamma$ = 1.3 - 3.5). Under the assumption that the Lorentz factor distribution of BHXB jets is a power-law, we find that N($\Gamma$) $\propto \Gamma^{ -1.88^{+0.27}_{-0.34}}$. We also find that the very high amplitude IR fade/recovery seen repeatedly in the BHXB GX 339-4 favors a low inclination angle ($< 15^\circ$) of the jet.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.02630  [pdf] - 1896102
An analysis of binary microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0060
Comments: 13 pages, 5 figures, Published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-06-06
We present the analysis of stellar binary microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0060 based on observations obtained from 13 different telescopes. Intensive coverage of the anomalous parts of the light curve was achieved by automated follow-up observations from the robotic telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory. We show that, for the first time, all main features of an anomalous microlensing event are well covered by follow-up data, allowing us to estimate the physical parameters of the lens. The strong detection of second-order effects in the event light curve necessitates the inclusion of longer-baseline survey data in order to constrain the parallax vector. We find that the event was most likely caused by a stellar binary-lens with masses $M_{\star1} = 0.87 \pm 0.12 M_{\odot}$ and $M_{\star2} = 0.77 \pm 0.11 M_{\odot}$. The distance to the lensing system is 6.41 $\pm 0.14$ kpc and the projected separation between the two components is 13.85 $\pm 0.16$ AU. Alternative interpretations are also considered.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.08733  [pdf] - 1882582
OGLE-2018-BLG-0022: A Nearby M-dwarf Binary
Comments: Accepted by AJ. 23 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2019-03-20
We report observations of the binary microlensing event OGLE-2018-BLG-0022, provided by the ROME/REA Survey, which indicate that the lens is a low-mass binary star consisting of M3 (0.375+/-0.020 Msun) and M7 (0.098+/-0.005 Msun) components. The lens is unusually close, at 0.998+/-0.047 kpc, compared with the majority of microlensing events, and despite its intrinsically low luminosity, it is likely that AO observations in the near future will be able to provide an independent confirmation of the lens masses.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04519  [pdf] - 1882567
Optical precursors to X-ray binary outbursts
Comments: Accepted to Astronomische Nachrichten/Astronomical Notes (proceedings of XMM-Newton workshop 'Time-Domain Astronomy: A High Energy View', ESAC, Madrid, Spain, 13-15 June 2018)
Submitted: 2019-03-11
Disc instability models predict that for X-ray binaries in quiescence, there should be a brightening of the optical flux prior to an X-ray outburst. Tracking the X-ray variations of X-ray binaries in quiescence is generally not possible, so optical monitoring provides the best means to measure the mass accretion rate variability between outbursts, and to identify the beginning stages of new outbursts. With our regular Faulkes Telescope/Las Cumbres Observatory (LCO) monitoring we are routinely detecting the optical rise of new X-ray binary outbursts before they are detected by X-ray all-sky monitors. We present examples of detections of an optical rise in X-ray binaries prior to X-ray detection. We also present initial optical monitoring of the new black hole transient MAXI J1820+070 (ASASSN-18ey) with the Faulkes, LCO telescopes and Al Sadeem Observatory in Abu Dhabi, UAE. Finally, we introduce our new real-time data analysis pipeline, the 'X-ray Binary New Early Warning System (XB-NEWS)' which aims to detect and announce new X-ray binary outbursts within a day of first optical detection. This will allow us to trigger X-ray and multi-wavelength campaigns during the very early stages of outbursts, to constrain the outburst triggering mechanism.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.02800  [pdf] - 1963654
Physical properties and transmission spectrum of the WASP-74 planetary system from multi-band photometry
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Submitted: 2019-03-07
We present broad-band photometry of eleven planetary transits of the hot Jupiter WASP-74b, using three medium-class telescopes and employing the telescope-defocussing technique. Most of the transits were monitored through I filters and one was simultaneously observed in five optical (U, g', r', i', z') and three near infrared (J, H, K) passbands, for a total of 18 light curves. We also obtained new high-resolution spectra of the host star. We used these new data to review the orbital and physical properties of the WASP-74 planetary system. We were able to better constrain the main system characteristics, measuring smaller radius and mass for both the hot Jupiter and its host star than previously reported in the literature. Joining our optical data with those taken with the HST in the near infrared, we built up an observational transmission spectrum of the planet, which suggests the presence of strong optical absorbers, as TiO and VO gases, in its atmosphere.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.03421  [pdf] - 1781699
Predicted microlensing events by nearby very-low-mass objects: Pan-STARRS DR1 vs. Gaia DR2
Comments: 25 pages, 6 PNG figures. Accepted for publication in Acta Astronomica
Submitted: 2018-11-08
Microlensing events can be used to directly measure the masses of single field stars to a precision of $\sim$1-10\%. The majority of direct mass measurements for stellar and sub-stellar objects typically only come from observations of binary systems. Hence microlensing provides an important channel for direct mass measurements of single stars. The Gaia satellite has observed $\sim$1.7 billion objects, and analysis of the second data release has recently yielded numerous event predictions for the next few decades. However, the Gaia catalog is incomplete for nearby very-low-mass objects such as brown dwarfs for which mass measurements are most crucial. We employ a catalog of very-low-mass objects from Pan-STARRS data release 1 (PDR1) as potential lens stars, and we use the objects from Gaia data release 2 (GDR2) as potential source stars. We then search for future microlensing events up to the year 2070. The Pan-STARRS1 objects are first cross-matched with GDR2 to remove any that are present in both catalogs. This leaves a sample of 1,718 possible lenses. We fit MIST isochrones to the Pan-STARRS1, AllWISE and 2MASS photometry to estimate their masses. We then compute their paths on the sky, along with the paths of the GDR2 source objects, until the year 2070, and search for potential microlensing events. Source-lens pairs that will produce a microlensing signal with an astrometric amplitude of greater than 0.131 mas, or a photometric amplitude of greater than 0.4 mmag, are retained.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02715  [pdf] - 1811185
First assessment of the binary lens OGLE-2015_BLG-0232
Comments: Accepted in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-11-06
We present an analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0232. This event is challenging to characterize for two reasons. First, the light curve is not well sampled during the caustic crossing due to the proximity of the full Moon impacting the photometry quality. Moreover, the source brightness is difficult to estimate because this event is blended with a nearby K dwarf star. We found that the light curve deviations are likely due to a close brown dwarf companion (i.e., s = 0.55 and q = 0.06), but the exact nature of the lens is still unknown. We finally discuss the potential of follow-up observations to estimate the lens mass and distance in the future.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.10003  [pdf] - 1771578
An almanac of predicted microlensing events for the 21st century
Comments: Accepted AcA. Almanac available on request. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1805.10630
Submitted: 2018-06-25, last modified: 2018-10-16
Using Gaia data release 2 (GDR2), we present an almanac of 2,509 predicted microlensing events, caused by 2,130 unique lens stars, that will peak between 25th July 2026 and the end of the century. This work extends and completes a thorough search for future microlensing events initiated by Bramich (2018) and Nielsen & Bramich (2018) using GDR2. The almanac includes 161 lenses that will cause at least two microlensing events each. A few highlights are presented and discussed, including: (i) an astrometric microlensing event with a peak amplitude of ~9.7 mas, (ii) an event that will probe the planetary system of a lens with three known planets, and (iii) an event (resolvable from space) where the blend of the lens and the minor source image will brighten by a detectable amount (~2 mmag) due to the appearance of the minor source image. All of the predicted microlensing events in the almanac will exhibit astrometric signals that are detectable by observing facilities with an angular resolution and astrometric precision similar to, or better than, that of the Hubble Space Telescope (e.g. NIRCam on the James Webb Space Telescope), although the events with the most extreme source-to-lens contrast ratios may be challenging. Ground-based telescopes of at least 1 m in diameter can be used to observe many of the events that are also expected to exhibit a photometric signal.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.01417  [pdf] - 1779689
A search for black hole microlensing signatures in globular cluster NGC 6656 (M 22)
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-10-02
We report the results of a study aiming to detect signs of astrometric microlensing caused by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) in the center of globular cluster M 22 (NGC 6656). We used archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) taken between 1995 and 2014, to derive long-baseline astrometric time series for stars near the center of the cluster, using state-of-the-art software to extract high-precision astrometry from images. We then modelled these time-series data, and compared microlensing model fits to simple linear proper-motion fits for each selected star. We find no evidence for astrometric microlensing in M 22, in particular for Bulge stars, which are much more likely to be lensed than cluster stars, due to the geometry of microlensing events. Although it is in principle possible to derive mass limits from such non-detections, we find that no useful mass limits can be derived for M 22 with available data, mostly due to a 10-year gap in coverage. This is a result from difficulties with deriving precise enough astrometry from Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) observations, for stars that do not fall on the PC chip. However, this study shows that, for other HST instruments, we are able to reach precisions at which astrometric microlensing signals caused by IMBH in globular clusters could be detected, and that this technique is a promising tool to make a first unambiguous detection of an IMBH.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.03149  [pdf] - 1838164
OGLE-2014-BLG-1186: gravitational microlensing providing evidence for a planet orbiting the foreground star or for a close binary source?
Comments: 26 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-09
(abridged) Using the particularly long gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-1186 with a time-scale $t_\mathrm{E}$ ~ 300 d, we present a methodology for identifying the nature of localised deviations from single-lens point-source light curves, which ensures that 1) the claimed signal is substantially above the noise floor, 2) the inferred properties are robustly determined and their estimation not subject to confusion with systematic noise in the photometry, 3) there are no alternative viable solutions within the model framework that might have been missed. Annual parallax and binarity could be separated and robustly measured from the wing and the peak data, respectively. We find matching model light curves that involve either a binary lens or a binary source. Our binary-lens models indicate a planet of mass $M_2$ = (45 $\pm$ 9) $M_\oplus$, orbiting a star of mass $M_1$ = (0.35 $\pm$ 0.06) $M_\odot$, located at a distance $D_\mathrm{L}$ = (1.7 $\pm$ 0.3) kpc from Earth, whereas our binary-source models suggest a brown-dwarf lens of $M$ = (0.046 $\pm$ 0.007) $M_\odot$, located at a distance $D_\mathrm{L}$ = (5.7 $\pm$ 0.9) kpc, with the source potentially being a (partially) eclipsing binary involving stars predicted to be of similar colour given the ratios between the luminosities and radii. The ambiguity in the interpretation would be resolved in favour of a lens binary by observing the luminous lens star separating from the source at the predicted proper motion of $\mu$ = (1.6 $\pm$ 0.3) mas yr$^{-1}$, whereas it would be resolved in favour of a source binary if the source could be shown to be a (partially) eclipsing binary matching the obtained model parameters. We experienced that close binary source stars pose a challenge for claiming the detection of planets by microlensing in events where the source passes very close to the lens star hosting the planet.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.10630  [pdf] - 1767445
Predicted microlensing events from analysis of Gaia Data Release 2
Comments: Accepted A&A
Submitted: 2018-05-27, last modified: 2018-07-05
Astrometric microlensing can be used to make precise measurements of the masses of lens stars that are independent of their assumed internal physics. Such direct mass measurements, obtained purely by observing the gravitational effects of the stars on external objects, are crucial for validating theoretical stellar models. Specifically, astrometric microlensing provides a channel to direct mass measurements of single stars for which so few measurements exist. To use the astrometric solutions and photometric measurements of ~1.7 billion stars from Gaia Data Release 2 to predict microlensing events during the nominal Gaia mission and beyond. This will enable astronomers to observe the entirety of each event with appropriate observing resources. The data will allow precise lens mass measurements for white dwarfs and low-mass main sequence stars helping to constrain stellar evolutionary models. I search for source-lens pairs in GDR2 that could lead to events between 25/07/2014 and 25/07/2026. I estimate lens masses using GDR2 photometry and parallaxes, and appropriate model isochrones. Combined with source and lens parallax measurements from GDR2, this allows the Einstein radius to be computed for each pair. By considering the paths on the sky, I calculate the microlensing signals that are to be expected. I present a list of 76 predicted microlensing events. 9 and 5 astrometric events will be caused by LAWD37 and Stein2051B. 9 events will exhibit detectable photometric and astrometric signatures. Of the remaining events, ten will exhibit astrometric signals with amplitudes above 0.5 mas, while the rest are low-amplitude astrometric events with amplitudes between 0.131 and 0.5 mas. 5 and 2 events will reach their peaks during 2018 and 2019. 5 of the photometric events have the potential to evolve into high-magnification events, which may also probe for planetary companions to the lenses.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.05084  [pdf] - 1630360
OGLE-2014-BLG-0289: Precise Characterization of a Quintuple-Peak Gravitational Microlensing Event
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-01-15
We present the analysis of the binary-microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-0289. The event light curve exhibits very unusual five peaks where four peaks were produced by caustic crossings and the other peak was produced by a cusp approach. It is found that the quintuple-peak features of the light curve provide tight constraints on the source trajectory, enabling us to precisely and accurately measure the microlensing parallax $\pi_{\rm E}$. Furthermore, the three resolved caustics allow us to measure the angular Einstein radius $\thetae$. From the combination of $\pi_{\rm E}$ and $\thetae$, the physical lens parameters are uniquely determined. It is found that the lens is a binary composed of two M dwarfs with masses $M_1 = 0.52 \pm 0.04\ M_\odot$ and $M_2=0.42 \pm 0.03\ M_\odot$ separated in projection by $a_\perp = 6.4 \pm 0.5$ au. The lens is located in the disk with a distance of $D_{\rm L} = 3.3 \pm 0.3$~kpc. It turns out that the reason for the absence of a lensing signal in the {\it Spitzer} data is that the time of observation corresponds to the flat region of the light curve.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.07476  [pdf] - 1648634
High-resolution Imaging of Transiting Extrasolar Planetary systems (HITEP). II. Lucky Imaging results from 2015 and 2016
Comments: 32 pages, 14 figures, 12 tables. The contents of tables 2, 3, 4, 9 and 10 are included in the arXiv source. Updated to correct typos and include tables in final format
Submitted: 2017-09-21, last modified: 2017-10-13
The formation and dynamical history of hot Jupiters is currently debated, with wide stellar binaries having been suggested as a potential formation pathway. Additionally, contaminating light from both binary companions and unassociated stars can significantly bias the results of planet characterisation studies, but can be corrected for if the properties of the contaminating star are known. We search for binary companions to known transiting exoplanet host stars, in order to determine the multiplicity properties of hot Jupiter host stars. We also characterise unassociated stars along the line of sight, allowing photometric and spectroscopic observations of the planetary system to be corrected for contaminating light. We analyse lucky imaging observations of 97 Southern hemisphere exoplanet host stars, using the Two Colour Instrument on the Danish 1.54m telescope. For each detected companion star, we determine flux ratios relative to the planet host star in two passbands, and measure the relative position of the companion. The probability of each companion being physically associated was determined using our two-colour photometry. A catalogue of close companion stars is presented, including flux ratios, position measurements, and estimated companion star temperature. For companions that are potential binary companions, we review archival and catalogue data for further evidence. For WASP-77AB and WASP-85AB, we combine our data with historical measurements to determine the binary orbits, showing them to be moderately eccentric and inclined to the line of sight and planetary orbital axis. Combining our survey with the similar Friends of Hot Jupiters survey, we conclude that known hot Jupiter host stars show a deficit of high mass stellar companions compared to the field star population; however, this may be a result of the biases in detection and target selection by ground-based surveys.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.00523  [pdf] - 1614835
RoboTAP - target priorities for robotic microlensing observations
Comments: 13 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2017-10-02
Context. The ability to automatically select scientifically-important transient events from an alert stream of many such events, and to conduct follow-up observations in response, will become increasingly important in astronomy. With wide-angle time domain surveys pushing to fainter limiting magnitudes, the capability to follow-up on transient alerts far exceeds our follow-up telescope resources, and effective target prioritization becomes essential. The RoboNet-II microlensing program is a pathfinder project which has developed an automated target selection process (RoboTAP) for gravitational microlensing events which are observed in real-time using the Las Cumbres Observatory telescope network. Aims. Follow-up telescopes typically have a much smaller field-of-view compared to surveys, therefore the most promising microlens- ing events must be automatically selected at any given time from an annual sample exceeding 2000 events. The main challenge is to select between events with a high planet detection sensitivity, aiming at the detection of many planets and characterizing planetary anomalies. Methods. Our target selection algorithm is a hybrid system based on estimates of the planet detection zones around a microlens. It follows automatic anomaly alerts and respects the expected survey coverage of specific events. Results. We introduce the RoboTAP algorithm, whose purpose is to select and prioritize microlensing events with high sensitivity to planetary companions. In this work, we determine the planet sensitivity of the RoboNet follow-up program and provide a working example of how a broker can be designed for a real-life transient science program conducting follow-up observations in response to alerts, exploring the issues that will confront similar programs being developed for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other time domain surveys.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.07737  [pdf] - 1586329
Ground-based parallax confirmed by Spitzer: binary microlensing event MOA-2015-BLG-020
Comments: 16 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2017-07-24, last modified: 2017-07-26
We present the analysis of the binary gravitational microlensing event MOA-2015-BLG-020. The event has a fairly long timescale (about 63 days) and thus the light curve deviates significantly from the lensing model that is based on the rectilinear lens-source relative motion. This enables us to measure the microlensing parallax through the annual parallax effect. The microlensing parallax parameters constrained by the ground-based data are confirmed by the Spitzer observations through the satellite parallax method. By additionally measuring the angular Einstein radius from the analysis of the resolved caustic crossing, the physical parameters of the lens are determined. It is found that the binary lens is composed of two dwarf stars with masses $M_1 = 0.606 \pm 0.028M_\odot$ and $M_2 = 0.125 \pm 0.006M_\odot$ in the Galactic disk. Assuming the source star is at the same distance as the bulge red clump stars, we find the lens is at a distance $D_L = 2.44 \pm 0.10 kpc$. In the end, we provide a summary and short discussion of all published microlensing events in which the annual parallax effect is confirmed by other independent observations.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.01724  [pdf] - 1582387
MOA-2016-BLG-227Lb: A Massive Planet Characterized by Combining Lightcurve Analysis and Keck AO Imaging
Comments: 35 pages, 7 figures, 6 tables, Accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2017-04-06, last modified: 2017-05-11
We report the discovery of a microlensing planet --- MOA-2016-BLG-227Lb --- with a large planet/host mass ratio of $q \simeq 9 \times 10^{-3}$. This event was located near the $K2$ Campaign 9 field that was observed by a large number of telescopes. As a result, the event was in the microlensing survey area of a number of these telescopes, and this enabled good coverage of the planetary light curve signal. High angular resolution adaptive optics images from the Keck telescope reveal excess flux at the position of the source above the flux of the source star, as indicated by the light curve model. This excess flux could be due to the lens star, but it could also be due to a companion to the source or lens star, or even an unrelated star. We consider all these possibilities in a Bayesian analysis in the context of a standard Galactic model. Our analysis indicates that it is unlikely that a large fraction of the excess flux comes from the lens, unless solar type stars are much more likely to host planets of this mass ratio than lower mass stars. We recommend that a method similar to the one developed in this paper be used for other events with high angular resolution follow-up observations when the follow-up observations are insufficient to measure the lens-source relative proper motion.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.06882  [pdf] - 1568856
Qatar Exoplanet Survey : Qatar-3b, Qatar-4b and Qatar-5b
Comments: 13Pages, 8Figures
Submitted: 2016-06-22, last modified: 2017-04-26
We report the discovery of Qatar-3b, Qatar-4b, and Qatar-5b, three new transiting planets identified by the Qatar Exoplanet Survey (QES). The three planets belong to the hot Jupiter family, with orbital periods of $P_{Q3b}$=2.50792 days, $P_{Q4b}$=1.80539 days, and $P_{Q5b}$=2.87923 days. Follow-up spectroscopic observations reveal the masses of the planets to be $M_{Q3b}$=4.31$\pm0.47$ $M_{\rm J}$, $M_{Q4b}$=6.10$ \pm0.54$ $M_{\rm J}$, and $M_{Q5b}$ = 4.32$ \pm0.18$ $M_{\rm J}$, while model fits to the transit light curves yield radii of $R_{Q3b}$ = 1.096$ \pm0.14$ $R_{\rm J}$, $R_{Q4b}$ = 1.135$ \pm0.11$ $R_{\rm J}$, and $R_{Q5b}$ = 1.107$ \pm0.064$ $R_{\rm J}$. The host stars are low-mass main sequence stars with masses and radii $M_{Q3}$ = 1.145$ \pm0.064$ $M_{\odot}$, $M_{Q4}$ = 0.896$ \pm0.048$ $M_{\odot}$, $M_{Q5}$ = 1.128$ \pm0.056$ $M_{\odot}$ and $R_{Q3}$ = 1.272$ \pm0.14$ $R_{\odot}$, $R_{Q4}$ = 0.849$\pm0.063$ $R_{\odot}$ and $R_{Q5}$ = 1.076$\pm0.051$ $R_{\odot}$ for Qatar-3, 4 and 5 respectively. The V magnitudes of the three host stars are $V_{Q3}$=12.88, $V_{Q4}$=13.60, and $V_{Q5}$=12.82. All three new planets can be classified as heavy hot Jupiters (M > 4 $M_{J}$).
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.02719  [pdf] - 1534371
CCD time-series photometry of variable stars in globular clusters and the metallicity dependence of the horizontal branch luminosity
Comments: 12 pages, 2 figures, 3 tables. Accepted for publication in the Revista Mexicana de Astronom\'ia y Astrof\'isica
Submitted: 2017-01-10
We describe and summarize the findings from our CCD time-series photometry of globular clusters (GCs) program and the use of difference image analysis (DIA) in the extraction of very precise light curves even in the crowded central regions down to $V\sim 19$ mag. We have discovered approximately 250 variable stars in a sample of 23 selected GCs and have, therefore, updated the census of variables in each system and in some cases we have actually completed it down to a certain magnitude. The absolute magnitude and [Fe/H] for each individual RR Lyrae is obtained via the Fourier decomposition of the light curve. An average of these parameters leads to the distance and metallicity of the host GCs. We have also calibrated the P-L relation for SX Phe stars which enables an independent calculation of the cluster distance. We present the mean [Fe/H], $M_V$ and distance for a group of selected GCs based exclusively on the RR Lyrae light curve Fourier decomposition technique and set on a rather unprecedented homogeneous scale. We also discuss the luminosity dependence of the horizontal branch (HB) via the $M_V$-[Fe/H] relation. We find that this relation should be considered separately for the RRab and RRc stars.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.03511  [pdf] - 1533244
Faint source star planetary microlensing: the discovery of the cold gas giant planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2016-12-11
We report the discovery of a planet --- OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb --- via gravitational microlensing. Observations for the lensing event were made by the MOA, OGLE, Wise, RoboNET/LCOGT, MiNDSTEp and $\mu$FUN groups. All analyses of the light curve data favour a lens system comprising a planetary mass orbiting a host star. The most favoured binary lens model has a mass ratio between the two lens masses of $(4.78 \pm 0.13)\times 10^{-3}$. Subject to some important assumptions, a Bayesian probability density analysis suggests the lens system comprises a $3.09_{-1.12}^{+1.02}$ M_jup planet orbiting a $0.62_{-0.22}^{+0.20}$ M_sun host star at a deprojected orbital separation of $4.40_{-1.46}^{+2.16}$ AU. The distance to the lens system is $2.22_{-0.83}^{+0.96}$ kpc. Planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb provides additional data to the growing number of cool planets discovered using gravitational microlensing against which planetary formation theories may be tested. Most of the light in the baseline of this event is expected to come from the lens and thus high-resolution imaging observations could confirm our planetary model interpretation.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.06720  [pdf] - 1508226
The First Circumbinary Planet Found by Microlensing: OGLE-2007-BLG-349L(AB)c
Comments: 34 pages, with 9 figures. Published in the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2016-09-21, last modified: 2016-11-03
We present the analysis of the first circumbinary planet microlensing event, OGLE-2007-BLG-349. This event has a strong planetary signal that is best fit with a mass ratio of $q \approx 3.4\times10^{-4}$, but there is an additional signal due to an additional lens mass, either another planet or another star. We find acceptable light curve fits with two classes of models: 2-planet models (with a single host star) and circumbinary planet models. The light curve also reveals a significant microlensing parallax effect, which constrains the mass of the lens system to be $M_L \approx 0.7 M_\odot$. Hubble Space Telescope images resolve the lens and source stars from their neighbors and indicate excess flux due to the star(s) in the lens system. This is consistent with the predicted flux from the circumbinary models, where the lens mass is shared between two stars, but there is not enough flux to be consistent with the 2-planet, 1-star models. So, only the circumbinary models are consistent with the HST data. They indicate a planet of mass $m_c = 80\pm 13\,M_\oplus$, orbiting a pair of M-dwarfs with masses of $M_A = 0.41\pm 0.07 M_\odot$ and $M_B = 0.30\pm 0.07 M_\oplus$, which makes this the lowest mass circumbinary planet system known. The ratio of the separation between the planet and the center-of-mass to the separations of the two stars is $\sim 40$, so unlike most of the circumbinary planets found by Kepler, the planet does not orbit near the stability limit.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.09911  [pdf] - 1505151
Variable stars in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6401
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2016-10-31
We present a study of variable stars in globular cluster NGC 6401. The cluster is only $5.3\degr$ away from the Galactic centre and suffers from strong differential reddening. The photometric precision afforded us by difference image analysis resulted in improved sensitivity to variability in formerly inaccessible interior regions of the cluster. We find 23 RRab and 11 RRc stars within one cluster radius (2.4$\arcmin$), for which we provide coordinates, finder-charts and time-series photometry. Through Fourier decomposition of the RR Lyrae star light curves we derive a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]$_{\mathrm{UVES}} = -1.13 \pm 0.06$ (${\rm [Fe/H]}_{\mathrm{ZW}} = -1.25 \pm 0.06$), and a distance of $d\approx 6.35 \pm 0.81$ kpc. Using the RR Lyrae population, we also determine that NGC 6401 is an Oosterhoff type I cluster.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.03732  [pdf] - 1532020
MiNDSTEp differential photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756: Microlensing and a new time delay
Comments: 16 pages, 15 figures, 10 tables. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2016-10-12
We present V and R photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756. The data were taken by the MiNDSTEp collaboration with the 1.54 m Danish telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory from 2008 to 2012. Differential photometry has been carried out using the image subtraction method as implemented in the HOTPAnTS package, additionally using GALFIT for quasar photometry. The quasar WFI2033-4723 showed brightness variations of order 0.5 mag in V and R during the campaign. The two lensed components of quasar HE0047-1756 varied by 0.2-0.3 mag within five years. We provide, for the first time, an estimate of the time delay of component B with respect to A of $\Delta t= 7.6\pm1.8$ days for this object. We also find evidence for a secular evolution of the magnitude difference between components A and B in both filters, which we explain as due to a long-duration microlensing event. Finally we find that both quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756 become bluer when brighter, which is consistent with previous studies.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.09357  [pdf] - 1475398
OGLE-2015-BLG-0479LA,B: Binary Gravitational Microlens Characterized by Simultaneous Ground-based and Space-based Observation
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2016-06-30
We present a combined analysis of the observations of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 taken both from the ground and by the {\it Spitzer Space Telescope}. The light curves seen from the ground and from space exhibit a time offset of $\sim 13$ days between the caustic spikes, indicating that the relative lens-source positions seen from the two places are displaced by parallax effects. From modeling the light curves, we measure the space-based microlens parallax. Combined with the angular Einstein radius measured by analyzing the caustic crossings, we determine the mass and distance of the lens. We find that the lens is a binary composed of two G-type stars with masses $\sim 1.0\ M_\odot$ and $\sim 0.9\ M_\odot$ located at a distance $\sim 3$ kpc. In addition, we are able to constrain the complete orbital parameters of the lens thanks to the precise measurement of the microlens parallax derived from the joint analysis. In contrast to the binary event OGLE-2014-BLG-1050, which was also observed by {\it Spitzer}, we find that the interpretation of OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 does not suffer from the degeneracy between $(\pm,\pm)$ and $(\pm,\mp)$ solutions, confirming that the four-fold parallax degeneracy in single-lens events collapses into the two-fold degeneracy for the general case of binary-lens events. The location of the blend in the color-magnitude diagram is consistent with the lens properties, suggesting that the blend is the lens itself. The blend is bright enough for spectroscopy and thus this possibility can be checked from future follow-up observations.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.02292  [pdf] - 1513546
First simultaneous microlensing observations by two space telescopes: $Spitzer$ & $Swift$ reveal a brown dwarf in event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319
Comments: 28 pages, 6 figures, 2 tables. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2016-06-07
Simultaneous observations of microlensing events from multiple locations allow for the breaking of degeneracies between the physical properties of the lensing system, specifically by exploring different regions of the lens plane and by directly measuring the "microlens parallax". We report the discovery of a 30-55$M_J$ brown dwarf orbiting a K dwarf in microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319. The system is located at a distance of $\sim$5 kpc toward the Galactic bulge. The event was observed by several ground-based groups as well as by $Spitzer$ and $Swift$, allowing the measurement of the physical properties. However, the event is still subject to an 8-fold degeneracy, in particular the well-known close-wide degeneracy, and thus the projected separation between the two lens components is either $\sim$0.25 AU or $\sim$45 AU. This is the first microlensing event observed by $Swift$, with the UVOT camera. We study the region of microlensing parameter space to which $Swift$ is sensitive, finding that while for this event $Swift$ could not measure the microlens parallax with respect to ground-based observations, it can be important for other events. Specifically, for detecting nearby brown dwarfs and free-floating planets in high magnification events.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.06141  [pdf] - 1451904
Many new variable stars discovered in the core of the globular cluster NGC 6715 (M54) with EMCCD observations
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics, 18 pages, 7 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2016-05-19
We show the benefits of using Electron-Multiplying CCDs and the shift-and-add technique as a tool to minimise the effects of the atmospheric turbulence such as blending between stars in crowded fields and to avoid saturated stars in the fields observed. We intend to complete, or improve, the census of the variable star population in globular cluster NGC~6715. Our aim is to obtain high-precision time-series photometry of the very crowded central region of this stellar system via the collection of better angular resolution images than has been previously achieved with conventional CCDs on ground-based telescopes. Observations were carried out using the Danish 1.54-m Telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory in Chile. The telescope is equipped with an Electron-Multiplying CCD that allowed to obtain short-exposure-time images (ten images per second) that were stacked using the shift-and-add technique to produce the normal-exposure-time images (minutes). The high precision photometry was performed via difference image analysis employing the DanDIA pipeline. We attempted automatic detection of variable stars in the field. We statistically analysed the light curves of 1405 stars in the crowded central region of NGC~6715 to automatically identify the variable stars present in this cluster. We found light curves for 17 previously known variable stars near the edges of our reference image (16 RR Lyrae and 1 semi-regular) and we discovered 67 new variables (30 RR Lyrae, 21 long-period irregular, 3 semi-regular, 1 W Virginis, 1 eclipsing binary, and 11 unclassified). Photometric measurements for these stars are available in electronic form through the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Centre.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.03580  [pdf] - 1422347
Searching for intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters with gravitational microlensing
Comments: 13 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-05-11
We discuss the potential of the gravitational microlensing method as a unique tool to detect unambiguous signals caused by intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters. We select clusters near the line of sight to the Galactic Bulge and the Small Magellanic Cloud, estimate the density of background stars for each of them, and carry out simulations in order to estimate the probabilities of detecting the astrometric signatures caused by black hole lensing. We find that for several clusters, the probability of detecting such an event is significant with available archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope. Specifically, we find that M 22 is the cluster with the best chances of yielding an IMBH detection via astrometric microlensing. If M 22 hosts an IMBH of mass $10^5M_\odot$, then the probability that at least one star will yield a detectable signal over an observational baseline of 20 years is $\sim 86\%$, while the probability of a null result is around $14\%$. For an IMBH of mass $10^6M_\odot$, the detection probability rises to $>99\%$. Future observing facilities will also extend the available time baseline, improving the chance of detections for the clusters we consider.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.02097  [pdf] - 1432906
Mass Measurements of Isolated Objects from Space-based Microlensing
Comments: 10 papers, 4 figures, 2 tables; ApJ in press
Submitted: 2015-10-07, last modified: 2016-04-21
We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 \emph{Spitzer} microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is very likely a brown dwarf. Assuming that the source star lies behind the same amount of dust as the Bulge red clump, we find the lens is a $45\pm7$ $M_{\rm J}$ brown dwarf at $5.9\pm1.0$ kpc. The lens of of the second event, OGLE-2015-BLG-0763, is a $0.50\pm0.04$ $M_\odot$ star at $6.9\pm1.0$ kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.03981  [pdf] - 1411500
RR Lyrae stars and the horizontal branch of NGC 5904 (M5)
Comments: 29, pages, 13 figures, 5 tables. Accepted in Astrophysics and Space Science. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1506.03145
Submitted: 2016-04-13
We report the distance and [Fe/H] value for the globular cluster NGC 5904 (M5) derived from the Fourier decomposition of the light curves of selected RRab and RRc stars. The aim in doing this was to bring these parameters into the homogeneous scales established by our previous work on numerous other globular clusters, allowing a direct comparison of the horizontal branch luminosity in clusters with a wide range of metallicities. Our CCD photometry of the large variable star population of this cluster is used to discuss light curve peculiarities, like Blazhko modulations, on an individual basis. New Blazhko variables are reported. From the RRab stars we found [Fe/H]$_{\rm UVES} = -1.335 \pm 0.003{\rm(statistical)} \pm 0.110{\rm(systematic)}$, and a distance of $7.6\pm 0.2$ kpc, and from the RRc stars we found [Fe/H]$_{\rm UVES}$ = $-1.39 \pm 0.03{\rm(statistical)} \pm 0.12{\rm(systematic)}$ and a distance of $7.5 \pm 0.3$ kpc. The results for RRab and RRc stars should be considered independent since they come from different calibrations and zero points. Absolute magnitudes, radii and masses are also reported for individual RR Lyrae stars. The distance to the cluster was calculated by alternative methods like the P-L relation of SX Phe and the luminosity of the stars at the tip of the red giant branch; we obtained $7.7 \pm 0.4$ and $7.2-7.5$ kpc respectively. The distribution of RR Lyrae stars in the instability strip is discussed and compared with other clusters in connection with the Oosterhoff and horizontal branch type. The Oosterhoff type II clusters systematically show a RRab-RRc segregation about the instability strip first-overtone red edge, while the Oosterhoff type I clusters may or may not display this feature. A group of RR Lyrae stars is identified in an advanced evolutionary stage, and two of them are likely binaries with unseen companions.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.05677  [pdf] - 1510229
Discovery of a Gas giant Planet in Microlensing Event OGLE-2014-BLG-1760
Comments: Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2016-03-17, last modified: 2016-03-22
We present the analysis of the planetary microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-1760, which shows a strong light curve signal due to the presence of a Jupiter mass-ratio planet. One unusual feature of this event is that the source star is quite blue, with $V-I = 1.48\pm 0.08$. This is marginally consistent with source star in the Galactic bulge, but it could possibly indicate a young source star in the far side of the disk. Assuming a bulge source, we perform a Bayesian analysis assuming a standard Galactic model, and this indicates that the planetary system resides in or near the Galactic bulge at $D_L = 6.9 \pm 1.1 $ kpc. It also indicates a host star mass of $M_* = 0.51 \pm 0.44 M_\odot$, a planet mass of $m_p = 180 \pm 110 M_\oplus$, and a projected star-planet separation of $a_\perp = 1.7\pm 0.3\,$AU. The lens-source relative proper motion is $\mu_{\rm rel} = 6.5\pm 1.1$ mas/yr. The lens (and stellar host star) is predicted to be very faint, so it is most likely that it can detected only when the lens and source stars are partially resolved. Due to the relatively high relative proper motion, the lens and source will be resolved to about $\sim46\,$mas in 6-8 years after the peak magnification. So, by 2020 - 2022, we can hope to detect the lens star with deep, high resolution images.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.03274  [pdf] - 1388986
High-resolution Imaging of Transiting Extrasolar Planetary systems (HITEP). I. Lucky imaging observations of 101 systems in the southern hemisphere
Comments: 19 pages, 9 figures. Accepted in A&A. Minor correction
Submitted: 2016-03-10, last modified: 2016-03-15
(abridged) Context. Wide binaries are a potential pathway for the formation of hot Jupiters. The binary fraction among host stars is an important discriminator between competing formation theories, but has not been well characterised. Additionally, contaminating light from unresolved stars can significantly affect the accuracy of photometric and spectroscopic measurements in studies of transiting exoplanets. Aims. We observed 101 transiting exoplanet host systems in the Southern hemisphere in order to create a homogeneous catalogue of both bound companion stars and contaminating background stars. We investigate the binary fraction among the host stars in order to test theories for the formation of hot Jupiters, in an area of the sky where transiting exoplanetary systems have not been systematically searched for stellar companions. Methods. Lucky imaging observations from the Two Colour Instrument on the Danish 1.54m telescope at La Silla were used to search for previously unresolved stars at small angular separations. The separations and relative magnitudes of all detected stars were measured. For 12 candidate companions to 10 host stars, previous astrometric measurements were used to evaluate how likely the companions are to be physically associated. Results. We provide measurements of 499 candidate companions within 20 arcseconds of our sample of 101 planet host stars. 51 candidates are located within 5 arcseconds of a host star, and we provide the first published measurements for 27 of these. Calibrations for the plate scale and colour performance of the Two Colour Instrument are presented. Conclusions. We find that the overall multiplicity rate of the host stars is 38 +17 -13%, consistent with the rate among solar-type stars in our sensitivity range, suggesting that planet formation does not preferentially occur in long period binaries compared to a random sample of field stars.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.05549  [pdf] - 1373185
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. VIII. WASP-22, WASP-41, WASP-42 and WASP-55
Comments: 13 pages, 8 tables, 11 figures. Version 2 is the final accepted version of the paper
Submitted: 2015-12-17, last modified: 2016-03-14
We present 13 high-precision and four additional light curves of four bright southern-hemisphere transiting planetary systems: WASP-22, WASP-41, WASP-42 and WASP-55. In the cases of WASP-42 and WASP-55, these are the first follow-up observations since their discovery papers. We present refined measurements of the physical properties and orbital ephemerides of all four systems. No indications of transit timing variations were seen. All four planets have radii inflated above those expected from theoretical models of gas-giant planets; WASP-55b is the most discrepant with a mass of 0.63 Mjup and a radius of 1.34 Rjup. WASP-41 shows brightness anomalies during transit due to the planet occulting spots on the stellar surface. Two anomalies observed 3.1 d apart are very likely due to the same spot. We measure its change in position and determine a rotation period for the host star of 18.6 +/- 1.5 d, in good agreement with a published measurement from spot-induced brightness modulation, and a sky-projected orbital obliquity of lambda = 6 +/- 11 degrees. We conclude with a compilation of obliquity measurements from spot-tracking analyses and a discussion of this technique in the study of the orbital configurations of hot Jupiters.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.09142  [pdf] - 1521160
Campaign 9 of the $K2$ Mission: Observational Parameters, Scientific Drivers, and Community Involvement for a Simultaneous Space- and Ground-based Microlensing Survey
Henderson, Calen B.; Poleski, Radosław; Penny, Matthew; Street, Rachel A.; Bennett, David P.; Hogg, David W.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Zhu, W.; Barclay, T.; Barentsen, G.; Howell, S. B.; Mullally, F.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Mao, S.; Ranc, C.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Wambsganss, J.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Novati, S. Calchi; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Husser, T. -O.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Bryson, S. T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Haas, M. R.; Larson, K.; McCalmont, K.; Packard, M.; Peterson, C.; Putnam, D.; Reedy, L.; Ross, S.; Van Cleve, J. E.; Akeson, R.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Beichman, C. A.; Bryden, G.; Ciardi, D.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Foreman-Mackey, D.; Fouqué, P.; Friedmann, M.; Gelino, C.; Kaspi, S.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Lang, D.; Lee, C. -H.; Lineweaver, C. H.; Maoz, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Mogavero, F.; Morales, J. C.; Nataf, D.; Pogge, R. W.; Santerne, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Suzuki, D.; Tamura, M.; Tisserand, P.; Wang, D.
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures, 3 tables; submitted to PASP
Submitted: 2015-12-30, last modified: 2016-03-07
$K2$'s Campaign 9 ($K2$C9) will conduct a $\sim$3.7 deg$^{2}$ survey toward the Galactic bulge from 7/April through 1/July of 2016 that will leverage the spatial separation between $K2$ and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax $\pi_{\rm E}$ for $\gtrsim$127 microlensing events. These will include several that are planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this white paper we provide an overview of the $K2$C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of $K2$C9, and the array of resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues through which the larger community can become involved, and generally encourage participation in $K2$C9, which constitutes an important pathfinding mission and community exercise in anticipation of $WFIRST$.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.01699  [pdf] - 1385444
Spitzer Observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 Reveal a New Path to Breaking Strong Microlens Degeneracies
Comments: 27 pages, 6 figures, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2016-01-07, last modified: 2016-02-10
Spitzer microlensing parallax observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 decisively breaks a degeneracy between planetary and binary solutions that is somewhat ambiguous when only ground-based data are considered. Only eight viable models survive out of an initial set of 32 local minima in the parameter space. These models clearly indicate that the lens is a stellar binary system possibly located within the bulge of our Galaxy, ruling out the planetary alternative. We argue that several types of discrete degeneracies can be broken via such space-based parallax observations.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.02519  [pdf] - 1354347
The OGLE-III planet detection efficiency from six years of microlensing observations (2003 to 2008)
Comments: 14 Pages, 10 Figures, Accepted 2016 January 1
Submitted: 2016-02-08
We use six years (2003 to 2008) of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment III microlensing observations to derive the survey detection efficiency for a range of planetary masses and projected distances from the host star. We perform an independent analysis of the microlensing light curves to extract the event parameters and compute the planet detection probability given the data. 2433 light curves satisfy our quality selection criteria and are retained for further processing. The aggregate of the detection probabilities over the range explored yields the expected number of microlensing planet detections. We employ a Galactic model to convert this distribution from dimensionless to physical units, \alpha/au and M_E. The survey sensitivity to small planets is highest in the range 1 to 4 au, shifting to slightly larger separations for more massive ones.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.01493  [pdf] - 1378887
Distant activity of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014: Ground-based results during the Rosetta pre-landing phase
Comments: 12 pages, accepted in A&A
Submitted: 2016-02-03
As the ESA Rosetta mission approached, orbited, and sent a lander to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014, a large campaign of ground-based observations also followed the comet. We constrain the total activity level of the comet by photometry and spectroscopy to place Rosetta results in context and to understand the large-scale structure of the comet's coma pre-perihelion. We performed observations using a number of telescopes, but concentrate on results from the 8m VLT and Gemini South telescopes in Chile. We use R-band imaging to measure the dust coma contribution to the comet's brightness and UV-visible spectroscopy to search for gas emissions, primarily using VLT/FORS. In addition we imaged the comet in near-infrared wavelengths (JHK) in late 2014 with Gemini-S/Flamingos 2. We find that the comet was already active in early 2014 at heliocentric distances beyond 4 au. The evolution of the total activity (measured by dust) followed previous predictions. No gas emissions were detected despite sensitive searches. The comet maintains a similar level of activity from orbit to orbit, and is in that sense predictable, meaning that Rosetta results correspond to typical behaviour for this comet. The gas production (for CN at least) is highly asymmetric with respect to perihelion, as our upper limits are below the measured production rates for similar distances post-perihelion in previous orbits.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.07913  [pdf] - 1382100
Exploring the crowded central region of 10 Galactic globular clusters using EMCCDs. Variable star searches and new discoveries
Comments: 23 pages, 39 figures and 13 tables. Accepted for publication in the Astronomy & Astrophysics Journal (A&A)
Submitted: 2015-12-24
Obtain time-series photometry of the very crowded central regions of Galactic globular clusters with better angular resolution than previously achieved with conventional CCDs on ground-based telescopes to complete, or improve, the census of the variable star population in those stellar systems. Images were taken using the Danish 1.54-m Telescope at the ESO observatory at La Silla in Chile. The telescope was equipped with an electron-multiplying CCD and the short-exposure-time images obtained (10 images per second) were stacked using the shift-and-add technique to produce the normal-exposure-time images (minutes). Photometry was performed via difference image analysis. Automatic detection of variable stars in the field was attempted. The light curves of 12541 stars in the cores of 10 globular clusters were statistically analysed in order to automatically extract the variable stars. We obtained light curves for 31 previously known variable stars (3 L, 2 SR, 20 RR Lyrae, 1 SX Phe, 3 cataclysmic variables, 1 EW and 1 NC) and we discovered 30 new variables (16 L, 7 SR, 4 RR Lyrae, 1 SX Phe and 2 NC).
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.06636  [pdf] - 1330228
Spitzer Microlens Measurement of a Massive Remnant in a Well-Separated Binary
Comments: ApJ. accepted, 34 pages, 7 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2015-08-26, last modified: 2015-12-18
We report the detection and mass measurement of a binary lens OGLE-2015-BLG-1285La,b, with the more massive component having $M_1>1.35\,M_\odot$ (80% probability). A main-sequence star in this mass range is ruled out by limits on blue light, meaning that a primary in this mass range must be a neutron star or black hole. The system has a projected separation $r_\perp= 6.1\pm 0.4\,{\rm AU}$ and lies in the Galactic bulge. These measurements are based on the "microlens parallax" effect, i.e., comparing the microlensing light curve as seen from $Spitzer$, which lay at $1.25\,{\rm AU}$ projected from Earth, to the light curves from four ground-based surveys, three in the optical and one in the near infrared. Future adaptive optics imaging of the companion by 30m class telescopes will yield a much more accurate measurement of the primary mass. This discovery both opens the path and defines the challenges to detecting and characterizing black holes and neutron stars in wide binaries, with either dark or luminous companions. In particular, we discuss lessons that can be applied to future $Spitzer$ and $Kepler$ K2 microlensing parallax observations.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.04655  [pdf] - 1347800
Difference image analysis: Automatic kernel design using information criteria
Comments: MNRAS Accepted 9th Dec 2015, 34 pages, 20 figures
Submitted: 2015-12-15
We present a selection of methods for automatically constructing an optimal kernel model for difference image analysis which require very few external parameters to control the kernel design. Each method consists of two components; namely, a kernel design algorithm to generate a set of candidate kernel models, and a model selection criterion to select the simplest kernel model from the candidate models that provides a sufficiently good fit to the target image. We restricted our attention to the case of solving for a spatially-invariant convolution kernel composed of delta basis functions, and we considered 19 different kernel solution methods including six employing kernel regularisation. We tested these kernel solution methods by performing a comprehensive set of image simulations and investigating how their performance in terms of model error, fit quality, and photometric accuracy depends on the properties of the reference and target images. We find that the irregular kernel design algorithm employing unregularised delta basis functions, combined with either the Akaike or Takeuchi information criterion, is the best kernel solution method in terms of photometric accuracy. Our results are validated by tests performed on two independent sets of real data. Finally, we provide some important recommendations for software implementations of difference image analysis.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.05171  [pdf] - 1339029
Physical properties of the planetary systems WASP-45 and WASP-46 from simultaneous multi-band photometry
Comments: 14 pages, 10 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-11-16
Accurate measurements of the physical characteristics of a large number of exoplanets are useful to strongly constrain theoretical models of planet formation and evolution, which lead to the large variety of exoplanets and planetary-system configurations that have been observed. We present a study of the planetary systems WASP-45 and WASP-46, both composed of a main-sequence star and a close-in hot Jupiter, based on 29 new high-quality light curves of transits events. In particular, one transit of WASP-45 b and four of WASP-46 b were simultaneously observed in four optical filters, while one transit of WASP-46 b was observed with the NTT obtaining precision of 0.30 mmag with a cadence of roughly three minutes. We also obtained five new spectra of WASP-45 with the FEROS spectrograph. We improved by a factor of four the measurement of the radius of the planet WASP-45 b, and found that WASP-46 b is slightly less massive and smaller than previously reported. Both planets now have a more accurate measurement of the density (0.959 +\- 0.077 \rho Jup instead of 0.64 +\- 0.30 \rho Jup for WASP-45 b, and 1.103 +\- 0.052 \rho Jup instead of 0.94 +\- 0.11 \rho Jup for WASP-46 b). We tentatively detected radius variations with wavelength for both planets, in particular in the case of WASP-45 b we found a slightly larger absorption in the redder bands than in the bluer ones. No hints for the presence of an additional planetary companion in the two systems were found either from the photometric or radial velocity measurements.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.03456  [pdf] - 1309647
SIDRA: a blind algorithm for signal detection in photometric surveys
Comments: 8 pages, 9 figures, 2 Tables
Submitted: 2015-11-11
We present the Signal Detection using Random-Forest Algorithm (SIDRA). SIDRA is a detection and classification algorithm based on the Machine Learning technique (Random Forest). The goal of this paper is to show the power of SIDRA for quick and accurate signal detection and classification. We first diagnose the power of the method with simulated light curves and try it on a subset of the Kepler space mission catalogue. We use five classes of simulated light curves (CONSTANT, TRANSIT, VARIABLE, MLENS and EB for constant light curves, transiting exoplanet, variable, microlensing events and eclipsing binaries, respectively) to analyse the power of the method. The algorithm uses four features in order to classify the light curves. The training sample contains 5000 light curves (1000 from each class) and 50000 random light curves for testing. The total SIDRA success ratio is $\geq 90\%$. Furthermore, the success ratio reaches 95 - 100$\%$ for the CONSTANT, VARIABLE, EB, and MLENS classes and 92$\%$ for the TRANSIT class with a decision probability of 60$\%$. Because the TRANSIT class is the one which fails the most, we run a simultaneous fit using SIDRA and a Box Least Square (BLS) based algorithm for searching for transiting exoplanets. As a result, our algorithm detects 7.5$\%$ more planets than a classic BLS algorithm, with better results for lower signal-to-noise light curves. SIDRA succeeds to catch 98$\%$ of the planet candidates in the Kepler sample and fails for 7$\%$ of the false alarms subset. SIDRA promises to be useful for developing a detection algorithm and/or classifier for large photometric surveys such as TESS and PLATO exoplanet future space missions.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.02724  [pdf] - 1301609
Red noise versus planetary interpretations in the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-446
Comments: accepted ApJ 2015
Submitted: 2015-10-09, last modified: 2015-10-28
For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing datasets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (A_{max} \sim 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (\sim 3M_\oplus ) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favour the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.08099  [pdf] - 1319719
Rotation periods and astrometric motions of the Luhman 16AB brown dwarfs by high-resolution lucky-imaging monitoring
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication by Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2015-10-27
Context. Photometric monitoring of the variability of brown dwarfs can provide useful information about the structure of clouds in their cold atmospheres. The brown-dwarf binary system Luhman 16AB is an interesting target for such a study, as its components stand at the L/T transition and show high levels of variability. Luhman 16AB is also the third closest system to the Solar system, allowing precise astrometric investigations with ground-based facilities. Aims. The aim of the work is to estimate the rotation period and study the astrometric motion of both components. Methods. We have monitored Luhman 16AB over a period of two years with the lucky-imaging camera mounted on the Danish 1.54m telescope at La Silla, through a special i+z long-pass filter, which allowed us to clearly resolve the two brown dwarfs into single objects. An intense monitoring of the target was also performed over 16 nights, in which we observed a peak-to-peak variability of 0.20 \pm 0.02 mag and 0.34 \pm 0.02 mag for Luhman 16A and 16B, respectively. Results. We used the 16-night time-series data to estimate the rotation period of the two components. We found that Luhman 16B rotates with a period of 5.1 \pm 0.1 hr, in very good agreement with previous measurements. For Luhman 16A, we report that it rotates slower than its companion and, even though we were not able to get a robust determination, our data indicate a rotation period of roughly 8 hr. This implies that the rotation axes of the two components are well aligned and suggests a scenario in which the two objects underwent the same accretion process. The 2-year complete dataset was used to study the astrometric motion of Luhman 16AB. We predict a motion of the system that is not consistent with a previous estimate based on two months of monitoring, but cannot confirm or refute the presence of additional planetary-mass bodies in the system.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.05609  [pdf] - 1300327
Larger and faster: revised properties and a shorter orbital period for the WASP-57 planetary system from a pro-am collaboration
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 13 pages, 8 figures, 7 tables. The data will be available at the first author's website and the system will be added to the TEPCat catalogue at http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/jkt/tepcat/
Submitted: 2015-09-18
Transits in the WASP-57 planetary system have been found to occur half an hour earlier than expected. We present ten transit light curves from amateur telescopes, on which this discovery was based, thirteen transit light curves from professional facilities which confirm and refine this finding, and high-resolution imaging which show no evidence for nearby companions. We use these data to determine a new and precise orbital ephemeris, and measure the physical properties of the system. Our revised orbital period is 4.5s shorter than found from the discovery data alone, which explains the early occurrence of the transits. We also find both the star and planet to be larger and less massive than previously thought. The measured mass and radius of the planet are now consistent with theoretical models of gas giants containing no heavy-element core, as expected for the sub-solar metallicity of the host star. Two transits were observed simultaneously in four passbands. We use the resulting light curves to measure the planet's radius as a function of wavelength, finding that our data are sufficient in principle but not in practise to constrain its atmospheric properties. We conclude with a discussion of the current and future status of transmission photometry studies for probing the atmospheres of gas-giant transiting planets.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.00006  [pdf] - 1300280
RR Lyrae mode switching in globular cluster M 68 (NGC 4590)
Comments: 6 pages, 5 figures; accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2015-08-31
We build on our detailed analysis of time-series observations of the globular cluster M 68 to investigate the irregular pulsational behaviour of four of the RR Lyrae stars in this cluster. M 68 is one of only two globular clusters in which mode-switching of RR Lyrae stars has previously been reported, and we discuss one additional case, as well as a case of irregular behaviour, and we briefly revisit the two previously reported cases with a homogeneous analysis. We find that in 2013, V45 was pulsating in the first-overtone mode only, despite being previously reported as a double-mode (fundamental and first overtone) pulsator in 1994, and that the amplitude of the fundamental mode in V7 is increasing with time. We also suggest that V21 might not have switched pulsation modes as previously reported, although the first overtone seems to be becoming less dominant. Finally, our analysis of available archival data confirms that V33 lost a pulsation mode between 1950 and 1986.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.07027  [pdf] - 1374092
Spitzer Parallax of OGLE-2015-BLG-0966: A Cold Neptune in the Galactic Disk
Street, R. A.; Udalski, A.; Novati, S. Calchi; Hundertmark, M. P. G.; Zhu, W.; Gould, A.; Yee, J.; Tsapras, Y.; Bennett, D. P.; Project, The RoboNet; Consortium, MiNDSTEp; Jorgensen, U. G.; Dominik, M.; Andersen, M. I.; Bachelet, E.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Cassan, A.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Dong, Subo; Evans, D. F.; Gu, Sheng-hong; Harkonnen, H.; Hinse, T. C.; Horne, Keith; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Menzies, J.; Mao, S.; Peixinho, N.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ranc, C.; Rasmussen, R. Tronsgaard; Scarpetta, G.; Schmidt, R.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Steele, I. A.; Surdej, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Verma, P.; von Essen, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Wang, Yi-Bo.; Wertz, O.; Project, The OGLE; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mroz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Beichman, The Spitzer Team C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Collaboration, The MOA; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Inayama, K.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Nishioka, T.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; P.; Tristram, J.; Wakiyama, Y.; Yonehara, A.; Han, KMTNet Modeling Team C.; Choi, J. -Y.; Park, H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I. -G.
Comments: 28 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2015-08-27
We report the detection of a Cold Neptune m_planet=21+/-2MEarth orbiting a 0.38MSol M dwarf lying 2.5-3.3 kpc toward the Galactic center as part of a campaign combining ground-based and Spitzer observations to measure the Galactic distribution of planets. This is the first time that the complex real-time protocols described by Yee et al. (2015), which aim to maximize planet sensitivity while maintaining sample integrity, have been carried out in practice. Multiple survey and follow-up teams successfully combined their efforts within the framework of these protocols to detect this planet. This is the second planet in the Spitzer Galactic distribution sample. Both are in the near-to-mid disk and clearly not in the Galactic bulge.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.03145  [pdf] - 1245860
Revisiting the variable star population in NGC~6229 and the structure of the Horizontal Branch
Comments: Accepted by MNRAS June 9, 2015, 20 pages, 16 figures,
Submitted: 2015-06-09
We report an analysis of new $V$ and $I$ CCD time-series photometry of the distant globular cluster NGC 6229. The principal aims were to explore the field of the cluster in search of new variables, and to Fourier decompose the RR Lyrae light curves in pursuit of physical parameters.We found 25 new variables: 10 RRab, 5 RRc, 6 SR, 1 CW, 1 SX Phe, and two that we were unable to classify. Secular period changes were detected and measured in some favourable cases. The classifications of some of the known variables were rectified. The Fourier decomposition of RRab and RRc light curves was used to independently estimate the mean cluster value of [Fe/H] and distance. From the RRab stars we found [Fe/H]$_{\rm UVES}$=$-1.31 \pm 0.01{\rm(statistical)} \pm 0.12{\rm(systematic)}$ ([Fe/H]$_{\rm ZW}=-1.42$),and a distance of $30.0\pm 1.5$ kpc, and from the RRc stars we found [Fe/H]$_{\rm UVES}$=$-1.29\pm 0.12$ and a distance of $30.7\pm 1.1$ kpc, respectively. Absolute magnitudes, radii and masses are also reported for individual RR Lyrae stars. Also discussed are the independent estimates of the cluster distance from the tip of the RGB, 34.9$\pm$2.4 kpc and from the P-L relation of SX Phe stars, 28.9$\pm$2.2 kpc. The distribution of RR Lyrae stars in the horizontal branch shows a clear empirical border between stable fundamental and first overtone pulsators which has been noted in several other clusters; we interpret it as the red edge of the first overtone instability strip.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.03760  [pdf] - 980300
New variables in M5 (NGC 5904) and some identification corrections
Comments: 10 pages, 4 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2015-04-14
We report twelve variables not previously detected in the globular cluster M5 (NGC 5904); one SX Phe and eleven semi-regular variables (SR). Their identifications, equatorial coordinates, ephemerides, and light curves are given. Furthermore, we have explored the light curves of a group of stars whose variability has not been confirmed and that are marked as probable non- variables in the CVSGC. Finally, we offer detailed identifications for some of the known variables in crowded regions that were misidentified in previous studies. We shall also address the cases of the cataclysmic variable or U Gem type V101 and of the variable blue straggler V159.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.01832  [pdf] - 1055922
Difference image analysis: The interplay between the photometric scale factor and systematic photometric errors
Comments: Accepted A&A
Submitted: 2015-04-08
Context: Understanding the source of systematic errors in photometry is essential for their calibration. Aims: We investigate how photometry performed on difference images can be influenced by errors in the photometric scale factor. Methods: We explore the equations for difference image analysis (DIA) and we derive an expression describing how errors in the difference flux, the photometric scale factor and the reference flux are propagated to the object photometry. Results: We find that the error in the photometric scale factor is important, and while a few studies have shown that it can be at a significant level, it is currently neglected by the vast majority of photometric surveys employing DIA. Conclusions: Minimising the error in the photometric scale factor, or compensating for it in a post-calibration model, is crucial for reducing the systematic errors in DIA photometry.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.02246  [pdf] - 1231976
High-precision multi-band time-series photometry of exoplanets Qatar-1b and TrES-5b
Comments: 7 pages, 7 figures, 5 Tables
Submitted: 2015-03-08
We present an analysis of the Qatar-1 and TrES-5 transiting exoplanetary systems, which contain Jupiter-like planets on short-period orbits around K-dwarf stars. Our data comprise a total of 20 transit light curves obtained using five medium-class telescopes, operated using the defocussing technique. The average precision we reach in all our data is $RMS_{Q} = 1.1$ mmag for Qatar-1 ($V = 12.8$) and $RMS_{T} = 1.0$ mmag for TrES-5 ($V = 13.7$). We use these data to refine the orbital ephemeris, photometric parameters, and measured physical properties of the two systems. One transit event for each object was observed simultaneously in three passbands ($gri$) using the BUSCA imager. The QES survey light curve of Qatar-1 has a clear sinusoidal variation on a period of $P_{\star} = 23.697 \pm 0.123$\,d, implying significant starspot activity. We searched for starspot crossing events in our light curves, but did not find clear evidence in any of the new datasets. The planet in the Qatar-1 system did not transit the active latitudes on the surfaces of its host star. Under the assumption that $P_{\star}$ corresponds to the rotation period of Qatar-1\,A, the rotational velocity of this star is very close to the $v \sin i_\star$ value found from observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. The low projected orbital obliquity found in this system thus implies a low absolute orbital obliquity, which is also a necessary condition for the transit chord of the planet to avoid active latitudes on the stellar surface.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.06663  [pdf] - 1231850
Reanalyses of Anomalous Gravitational Microlensing Events in the OGLE-III Early Warning System Database with Combined Data
Comments: 10 pages, 4 tables, 9 figures. Accepted in ApJ, Author list updated
Submitted: 2015-02-23, last modified: 2015-03-02
We reanalyze microlensing events in the published list of anomalous events that were observed from the OGLE lensing survey conducted during 2004-2008 period. In order to check the existence of possible degenerate solutions and extract extra information, we conduct analyses based on combined data from other survey and follow-up observation and consider higher-order effects. Among the analyzed events, we present analyses of 8 events for which either new solutions are identified or additional information is obtained. We find that the previous binary-source interpretations of 5 events are better interpreted by binary-lens models. These events include OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2007-BLG-159, OGLE-2007-BLG-491, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, and OGLE-2008-BLG-210. With additional data covering caustic crossings, we detect finite-source effects for 6 events including OGLE-2006-BLG-215, OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2006-BLG-450, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. Among them, we are able to measure the Einstein radii of 3 events for which multi-band data are available. These events are OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. For OGLE-2008-BLG-143, we detect higher-order effect induced by the changes of the observer's position caused by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we present degenerate solutions resulting from the known close/wide or ecliptic degeneracy. Finally, we note that the masses of the binary companions of the lenses of OGLE-2006-BLG-450 and OGLE-2008-BLG-210 are in the brown-dwarf regime.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.07345  [pdf] - 1182884
A Census of Variability in Globular Cluster M68 (NGC 4590)
Comments: 25 pages, 18 figures, A&A in press
Submitted: 2015-02-25
We analyse 20 nights of CCD observations in the V and I bands of the globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590), using these to detect variable objects. We also obtained electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) observations for this cluster in order to explore its core with unprecedented spatial resolution from the ground. We reduced our data using difference image analysis, in order to achieve the best possible photometry in the crowded field of the cluster. In doing so, we showed that when dealing with identical networked telescopes, a reference image from any telescope may be used to reduce data from any other telescope, which facilitates the analysis significantly. We then used our light curves to estimate the properties of the RR Lyrae (RRL) stars in M68 through Fourier decomposition and empirical relations. The variable star properties then allowed us to derive the cluster's metallicity and distance. We determine new periods for the variable stars, and search for new variables, especially in the core of the cluster where our method performs particularly well. We detect an additional 4 SX Phe stars, and confirm the variability of another star, bringing the total number of confirmed variable stars in this cluster to 50. We also used archival data stretching back to 1951 in order to derive period changes for some of the single-mode RRL stars, and analyse the significant number of double-mode RRL stars in M68. Furthermore, we find evidence for double-mode pulsation in one of the SX Phe stars in this cluster. Using the different types of variables, we derived an estimate of the metallicity, [Fe/H]=$-2.07 \pm 0.06$ on the ZW scale, and 4 independent estimates of the distance modulus ($\mu_0 \sim$ 15.00 mag) for this cluster. Thanks to the first use of difference image analysis on time-series observations of M68, we are now confident that we have a complete census of the RRL stars in this cluster.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.7378  [pdf] - 1223360
Pathway to the Galactic Distribution of Planets: Combined Spitzer and Ground-Based Microlens Parallax Measurements of 21 Single-Lens Events
Comments: accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-11-26, last modified: 2015-02-24
We present microlens parallax measurements for 21 (apparently) isolated lenses observed toward the Galactic bulge that were imaged simultaneously from Earth and Spitzer, which was ~1 AU West of Earth in projection. We combine these measurements with a kinematic model of the Galaxy to derive distance estimates for each lens, with error bars that are small compared to the Sun's Galactocentric distance. The ensemble therefore yields a well-defined cumulative distribution of lens distances. In principle it is possible to compare this distribution against a set of planets detected in the same experiment in order to measure the Galactic distribution of planets. Since these Spitzer observations yielded only one planet, this is not yet possible in practice. However, it will become possible as larger samples are accumulated.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.8252  [pdf] - 1222886
OGLE-2011-BLG-0265Lb: a Jovian Microlensing Planet Orbiting an M Dwarf
Skowron, J.; Shin, I. -G.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Sumi, T.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Gould, A.; Dominis-Prester, D.; Street, R. A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Bennett, D. P.; Bozza, V.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Koshimoto, N.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Philpott, L. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, T.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Friedman, M.; Almeida, L. A.; Batista, V.; Christie, G.; Choi, J. -Y.; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Hwang, K. -H.; Jablonski, F.; Jung, Y. K.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Yee, J.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kains, N.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Ranc, C.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis; Harpsøe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lundkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wertz, O.
Comments: 10 pages, 2 tables, 5 figures. Accepted in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-10-30, last modified: 2015-02-23
We report the discovery of a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting an M-dwarf star that gave rise to the microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0265. Such a system is very rare among known planetary systems and thus the discovery is important for theoretical studies of planetary formation and evolution. High-cadence temporal coverage of the planetary signal combined with extended observations throughout the event allows us to accurately model the observed light curve. The final microlensing solution remains, however, degenerate yielding two possible configurations of the planet and the host star. In the case of the preferred solution, the mass of the planet is $M_{\rm p} = 0.9\pm 0.3\ M_{\rm J}$, and the planet is orbiting a star with a mass $M = 0.22\pm 0.06\ M_\odot$. The second possible configuration (2$\sigma$ away) consists of a planet with $M_{\rm p}=0.6\pm 0.3\ M_{\rm J}$ and host star with $M=0.14\pm 0.06\ M_\odot$. The system is located in the Galactic disk 3 -- 4 kpc towards the Galactic bulge. In both cases, with an orbit size of 1.5 -- 2.0 AU, the planet is a "cold Jupiter" -- located well beyond the "snow line" of the host star. Currently available data make the secure selection of the correct solution difficult, but there are prospects for lifting the degeneracy with additional follow-up observations in the future, when the lens and source star separate.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.8827  [pdf] - 919927
Searching for variable stars in the cores of five metal rich globular clusters using EMCCD observations
Comments: Accepted to A&A, 24 pages, 23 figures, 11 tables. Updated to match version published in A&A
Submitted: 2014-10-31, last modified: 2015-01-12
In this paper, we present the analysis of time-series observations from 2013 and 2014 of five metal rich ([Fe/H] $>$ -1) globular clusters: NGC~6388, NGC~6441, NGC~6528, NGC~6638, and NGC~6652. The data have been used to perform a census of the variable stars in the central parts of these clusters. The observations were made with the electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera at the Danish 1.54m Telescope at La Silla, Chile, and they were analysed using difference image analysis (DIA) to obtain high-precision light curves of the variable stars. It was possible to identify and classify all of the previously known or suspected variable stars in the central regions of the five clusters. Furthermore, we were able to identify, and in most cases classify 48, 49, 7, 8, and 2 previously unknown variables in NGC~6388, NGC~6441, NGC~6528, NGC~6638, and NGC~6652, respectively. Especially interesting is the case of NGC~6441, for which the variable star population of about 150 stars has been thoroughly examined by previous studies, including a Hubble Space Telescope study. In this paper we are able to present 49 new variable stars for this cluster, of which one (possibly two) are RR Lyrae stars, two are W Virginis stars, and the rest are long period semi-regular/irregular variables on the red giant branch. We have also detected the first double mode RR Lyrae in the cluster.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.7401  [pdf] - 926663
The Two-Colour EMCCD Instrument for the Danish 1.54m Telescope and SONG
Comments: Accepted to A&A, 17 pages, 15 figures
Submitted: 2014-11-26
We report on the implemented design of a two-colour instrument based on electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) detectors. This instrument is currently installed at the Danish 1.54m telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, and will be available at the SONG (Stellar Observations Network Group) 1m telescope node at Tenerife and at other SONG nodes as well. We present the software system for controlling the two-colour instrument and calibrating the high frame-rate imaging data delivered by the EMCCD cameras. An analysis of the performance of the Two-Colour Instrument at the Danish telescope shows an improvement in spatial resolution of up to a factor of two when doing shift-and-add compared with conventional imaging, and that it is possible to do high-precision photometry of EMCCD data in crowded fields. The Danish telescope, which was commissioned in 1979, is limited by a triangular coma at spatial resolutions below 0.5" and better results will thus be achieved at the near diffraction limited optical system on the SONG telescopes, where spatial resolutions close to 0.2" have been achieved. Regular EMCCD operations have been running at the Danish telescope for several years and have produced a number of scientific discoveries, including microlensing detected exoplanets, the detection of previously unknown variable stars in dense globular clusters and the discovery of two rings around the small asteroid-like object (10199) Chariklo.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.2767  [pdf] - 1223110
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. VII. The ultra-short period planet WASP-103
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 12 pages, 8 tables, 7 figures. The reduced data will be available at http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/~jkt/data-teps.html
Submitted: 2014-11-11
We present 17 transit light curves of the ultra-short period planetary system WASP-103, a strong candidate for the detection of tidally-induced orbital decay. We use these to establish a high-precision reference epoch for transit timing studies. The time of the reference transit midpoint is now measured to an accuracy of 4.8s, versus 67.4s in the discovery paper, aiding future searches for orbital decay. With the help of published spectroscopic measurements and theoretical stellar models, we determine the physical properties of the system to high precision and present a detailed error budget for these calculations. The planet has a Roche lobe filling factor of 0.58, leading to a significant asphericity; we correct its measured mass and mean density for this phenomenon. A high-resolution Lucky Imaging observation shows no evidence for faint stars close enough to contaminate the point spread function of WASP-103. Our data were obtained in the Bessell $RI$ and the SDSS $griz$ passbands and yield a larger planet radius at bluer optical wavelengths, to a confidence level of 7.3 sigma. Interpreting this as an effect of Rayleigh scattering in the planetary atmosphere leads to a measurement of the planetary mass which is too small by a factor of five, implying that Rayleigh scattering is not the main cause of the variation of radius with wavelength.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.6253  [pdf] - 1215864
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. VI. WASP-24, WASP-25 and WASP-26
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 14 pages, 10 figures, 8 tables. Data and supplementary information are available on request
Submitted: 2014-07-23
We present time-series photometric observations of thirteen transits in the planetary systems WASP-24, WASP-25 and WASP-26. All three systems have orbital obliquity measurements, WASP-24 and WASP-26 have been observed with Spitzer, and WASP-25 was previously comparatively neglected. Our light curves were obtained using the telescope-defocussing method and have scatters of 0.5 to 1.2 mmag relative to their best-fitting geometric models. We used these data to measure the physical properties and orbital ephemerides of the systems to high precision, finding that our improved measurements are in good agreement with previous studies. High-resolution Lucky Imaging observations of all three targets show no evidence for faint stars close enough to contaminate our photometry. We confirm the eclipsing nature of the star closest to WASP-24 and present the detection of a detached eclipsing binary within 4.25 arcmin of WASP-26.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.7448  [pdf] - 863023
Physical properties of the WASP-67 planetary system from multi-colour photometry
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, 5 tables, to appear in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2014-06-28
The extrasolar planet WASP-67 b is the first hot Jupiter definitively known to undergo only partial eclipses. The lack of the second and third contact point in this planetary system makes it difficult to obtain accurate measurements of its physical parameters. Aims. By using new high-precision photometric data, we confirm that WASP-67 b shows grazing eclipses and compute accurate estimates of the physical properties of the planet and its parent star. Methods. We present high-quality, multi-colour, broad-band photometric observations comprising five light curves covering two transit events, obtained using two medium-class telescopes and the telescope-defocussing technique. One transit was observed through a Bessel-R filter and the other simultaneously through filters similar to Sloan griz. We modelled these data using jktebop. The physical parameters of the system were obtained from the analysis of these light curves and from published spectroscopic measurements. Results. All five of our light curves satisfy the criterion for being grazing eclipses. We revise the physical parameters of the whole WASP-67 system and, in particular, significantly improve the measurements of the planet's radius and density as compared to the values in the discovery paper. The transit ephemeris was also substantially refined. We investigated the variation of the planet's radius as a function of the wavelength, using the simultaneous multi-band data, finding that our measurements are consistent with a flat spectrum to within the experimental uncertainties.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.1195  [pdf] - 835352
OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893: The discovery of a long-period eclipsing binary with a circumstellar disk
Comments:
Submitted: 2014-01-06, last modified: 2014-06-11
We report the serendipitous discovery of a disk-eclipse system OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893. The eclipse occurs with a period of 468 days, a duration of about 15 days and a deep (up to \Delta I ~1.5), peculiar and asymmetric profile. A possible origin of such an eclipse profile involves a circumstellar disk. The presence of the disk is confirmed by the H-alpha line profile from the follow-up spectroscopic observations, and the star is identified as Be/Ae type. Unlike the previously known disk-eclipse candidates (Epsilon Aurigae, EE Cephei, OGLE-LMC-ECL-17782, KH 15D), the eclipses of OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893 retain the same shape throughout the span of ~17 years (13 orbital periods), indicating no measurable orbital precession of the disk.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.2134  [pdf] - 1208276
MOA-2013-BLG-220Lb: Massive Planetary Companion to Galactic-Disk Host
Comments: 2 tables, 2 figures
Submitted: 2014-03-09, last modified: 2014-05-29
We report the discovery of MOA-2013-BLG-220Lb, which has a super-Jupiter mass ratio $q=3.01\pm 0.02\times 10^{-3}$ relative to its host. The proper motion, $\mu=12.5\pm 1\, {\rm mas}\,{\rm yr}^{-1}$, is one of the highest for microlensing planets yet discovered, implying that it will be possible to separately resolve the host within $\sim 7$ years. Two separate lines of evidence imply that the planet and host are in the Galactic disk. The planet could have been detected and characterized purely with follow-up data, which has important implications for microlensing surveys, both current and into the LSST era.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.3417  [pdf] - 823788
RR Lyrae Stars In The GCVS Observed By The Qatar Exoplanet Survey
Comments: Accepted IBVS
Submitted: 2014-05-14
We used the light curve archive of the Qatar Exoplanet Survey (QES) to investigate the RR Lyrae variable stars listed in the General Catalogue of Variable Stars (GCVS). Of 588 variables studied, we reclassify 14 as eclipsing binaries, one as an RS Canum Venaticorum-type variable, one as an irregular variable, four as classical Cepheids, and one as a type II Cepheid, while also improving their periods. We also report new RR Lyrae sub-type classifications for 65 variables and improve on the GCVS period estimates for 135 RR Lyrae variables. There are seven double-mode RR Lyrae stars in the sample for which we measured their fundamental and first overtone periods. Finally, we detect the Blazhko effect in 38 of the RR Lyrae stars for the first time and we successfully measured the Blazhko period for 26 of them.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.4982  [pdf] - 796520
Physical properties and transmission spectrum of the WASP-80 planetary system from multi-colour photometry
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2013-12-17, last modified: 2014-03-13
WASP-80 is one of only two systems known to contain a hot Jupiter which transits its M-dwarf host star. We present eight light curves of one transit event, obtained simultaneously using two defocussed telescopes. These data were taken through the Bessell I, Sloan griz and near-infrared JHK passbands. We use our data to search for opacity-induced changes in the planetary radius, but find that all values agree with each other. Our data are therefore consistent with a flat transmission spectrum to within the observational uncertainties. We also measure an activity index of the host star of log R'_HK=-4.495, meaning that WASP-80A shows strong chromospheric activity. The non-detection of starspots implies that, if they exist, they must be small and symmetrically distributed on the stellar surface. We model all available optical transit light curves to obtain improved physical properties and orbital ephemerides for the system.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.3092  [pdf] - 1208350
Candidate Gravitational Microlensing Events for Future Direct Lens Imaging
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, 6 tables, submitted to ApJ. For a brief video explaining the key results of this paper, please visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_dzT8NydJI
Submitted: 2014-03-12
The mass of the lenses giving rise to Galactic microlensing events can be constrained by measuring the relative lens-source proper motion and lens flux. The flux of the lens can be separated from that of the source, companions to the source, and unrelated nearby stars with high-resolution images taken when the lens and source are spatially resolved. For typical ground-based adaptive optics (AO) or space-based observations, this requires either inordinately long time baselines or high relative proper motions. We provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic Bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens mass with future high-resolution imaging. We investigate all events from 2004 -- 2013 that display detectable finite-source effects, a feature that allows us to measure the proper motion. In total, we present 20 events with mu >~ 8 mas/yr. Of these, 14 were culled from previous analyses while 6 are new, including OGLE-2004-BLG-368, MOA-2005-BLG-36, OGLE-2012-BLG-0211, OGLE-2012-BLG-0456, MOA-2012-BLG-532, and MOA-2013-BLG-029. In <~12 years the lens and source of each event will be sufficiently separated for ground-based telescopes with AO systems or space telescopes to resolve each component and further characterize the lens system. Furthermore, for the most recent events, comparison of the lens flux estimates from images taken immediately to those estimated from images taken when the lens and source are resolved can be used to empirically check the robustness of the single-epoch method currently being used to estimate lens masses for many events.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.5476  [pdf] - 774678
Variable Stars in the Globular Cluster NGC 288: [Fe/H] and Distance
Comments: 23 pages, 14 figures, 4 tables, 2 electronic tables, accepted for publication in ACTA ASTRONOMICA. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1306.3206
Submitted: 2014-01-21
A search for variable stars in the globular cluster NGC 288 was carried out using a time-series of CCD images in the $V$ and $I$ filters. The photometry of all stellar sources in the field of view of our images, down to $V\approx19$ mag, was performed using difference image analysis (DIA). For stars of $\approx15$ mag, measurement accuracies of $\approx8$ mmag and $\approx10$ mmag were achieved for $V$ and $I$ respectively. Three independent search strategies were applied to the 5525 light curves but no new variables were found above the threshold limits characteristic of our data set. The use of older data from the literature combined with the present data allowed the refinement of the periods of all known variables. Fourier light curve decomposition was performed for the RRab and the RRc stars to obtain an estimate of ${\rm [Fe/H]}_{ZW}=-1.62\pm0.02$ (statistical) $\pm0.14$ (systematic). A true distance modulus of $14.768\pm0.003$ mag (statistical) $\pm0.042$ mag (systematic), or a distance of $8.99\pm0.01$ kpc (statistical) $\pm0.17$ kpc (systematic) was calculated from the RRab star. The RRc star predicts a discrepant distance about one kiloparsec shorter but it is possibly a Blazhko variable. An independent distance from the P--L relationship for SX Phe stars leads to a distance of $8.9\pm0.3$ kpc. The SX Phe stars V5 and V9 are found to be double mode pulsators.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.1984  [pdf] - 768861
The Qatar Exoplanet Survey
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2014-01-09
The Qatar Exoplanet Survey (QES) is discovering hot Jupiters and aims to discover hot Saturns and hot Neptunes that transit in front of relatively bright host stars. QES currently operates a robotic wide-angle camera system to identify promising transiting exoplanet candidates among which are the confirmed exoplanets Qatar 1b and 2b. This paper describes the first generation QES instrument, observing strategy, data reduction techniques, and follow-up procedures. The QES cameras in New Mexico complement the SuperWASP cameras in the Canary Islands and South Africa, and we have developed tools to enable the QES images and light curves to be archived and analysed using the same methods developed for the SuperWASP datasets. With its larger aperture, finer pixel scale, and comparable field of view, and with plans to deploy similar systems at two further sites, the QES, in collaboration with SuperWASP, should help to speed the discovery of smaller radius planets transiting bright stars in northern skies.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.3951  [pdf] - 1202249
A Sub-Earth-Mass Moon Orbiting a Gas Giant Primary or a High Velocity Planetary System in the Galactic Bulge
Comments: 32 pages with 9 included figures
Submitted: 2013-12-13
We present the first microlensing candidate for a free-floating exoplanet-exomoon system, MOA-2011-BLG-262, with a primary lens mass of M_host ~ 4 Jupiter masses hosting a sub-Earth mass moon. The data are well fit by this exomoon model, but an alternate star+planet model fits the data almost as well. Nevertheless, these results indicate the potential of microlensing to detect exomoons, albeit ones that are different from the giant planet moons in our solar system. The argument for an exomoon hinges on the system being relatively close to the Sun. The data constrain the product M pi_rel, where M is the lens system mass and pi_rel is the lens-source relative parallax. If the lens system is nearby (large pi_rel), then M is small (a few Jupiter masses) and the companion is a sub-Earth-mass exomoon. The best-fit solution has a large lens-source relative proper motion, mu_rel = 19.6 +- 1.6 mas/yr, which would rule out a distant lens system unless the source star has an unusually high proper motion. However, data from the OGLE collaboration nearly rule out a high source proper motion, so the exoplanet+exomoon model is the favored interpretation for the best fit model. However, the alternate solution has a lower proper motion, which is compatible with a distant (so stellar) host. A Bayesian analysis does not favor the exoplanet+exomoon interpretation, so Occam's razor favors a lens system in the bulge with host and companion masses of M_host = 0.12 (+0.19 -0.06) M_solar and m_comp = 18 (+28 -100 M_earth, at a projected separation of a_perp ~ 0.84 AU. The existence of this degeneracy is an unlucky accident, so current microlensing experiments are in principle sensitive to exomoons. In some circumstances, it will be possible to definitively establish the low mass of such lens systems through the microlensing parallax effect. Future experiments will be sensitive to less extreme exomoons.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.2428  [pdf] - 1179818
A Super-Jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406
Tsapras, Y.; Choi, J. -Y.; Street, R. A.; Han, C.; Bozza, V.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Udalski, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Sumi, T.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Ipatov, S.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Andersen, J. M.; Novati, S. Calchi; Damerdji, Y.; Diehl, C.; Elyiv, A.; Giannini, E.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Juncher, D.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Vilela, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Barry, R.; Batista, V.; Bhattacharya, A.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J.; P`ere, C.; Pollard, K. R.; Wouters, D.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hwang, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kavka, A.; Koo, J. -R.; Lee, C. -U.; Maoz, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Shin, I. -G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Tan, T. G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yonehara, P. C. M. Yock A.
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2013-10-09, last modified: 2013-12-05
We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the lightcurve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a $2.73\pm 0.43\ M_{\rm J}$ planet orbiting a $0.44\pm 0.07\ M_{\odot}$ early M-type star. The distance to the lens is $4.97\pm 0.29$\ kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is $3.45\pm 0.26$ AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.6467  [pdf] - 1201857
Removal of systematics in photometric measurements: static and rotating illumination corrections in FORS2@VLT data
Comments: 16 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-11-25
Images taken with modern detectors require calibration via flat fielding to obtain the same flux scale across the whole image. One method for obtaining the best possible flat fielding accuracy is to derive a photometric model from dithered stellar observations. A large variety of effects have been taken into account in such modelling. Recently, Moehler et al. (2010) discovered systematic variations in available flat frames for the European Southern Observatory's FORS instrument that change with the orientation of the projected image on the sky. The effect on photometry is large compared to other systematic effects that have already been taken into account. In this paper, we present a correction method for this effect: a generalization of the fitting procedure of Bramich & Freudling (2012) to include a polynomial representation of rotating flat fields. We then applied the method to the specific case of FORS2 photometric observations of a series of standard star fields, and provide parametrised solutions that can be applied by the users. We found polynomial coefficients to describe the static and rotating large-scale systematic flat-field variations across the FORS2 field of view. Applying these coefficients to FORS2 data, the systematic changes in the flux scale across FORS2 images can be improved by ~1% to ~2% of the total flux. This represents a significant improvement in the era of large-scale surveys, which require homogeneous photometry at the 1% level or better.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.5411  [pdf] - 749847
Automated data reduction workflows for astronomy
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2013-11-21
Data from complex modern astronomical instruments often consist of a large number of different science and calibration files, and their reduction requires a variety of software tools. The execution chain of the tools represents a complex workflow that needs to be tuned and supervised, often by individual researchers that are not necessarily experts for any specific instrument. The efficiency of data reduction can be improved by using automatic workflows to organise data and execute the sequence of data reduction steps. To realize such efficiency gains, we designed a system that allows intuitive representation, execution and modification of the data reduction workflow, and has facilities for inspection and interaction with the data. The European Southern Observatory (ESO) has developed Reflex, an environment to automate data reduction workflows. Reflex is implemented as a package of customized components for the Kepler workflow engine. Kepler provides the graphical user interface to create an executable flowchart-like representation of the data reduction process. Key features of Reflex are a rule-based data organiser, infrastructure to re-use results, thorough book-keeping, data progeny tracking, interactive user interfaces, and a novel concept to exploit information created during data organisation for the workflow execution. Reflex includes novel concepts to increase the efficiency of astronomical data processing. While Reflex is a specific implementation of astronomical scientific workflows within the Kepler workflow engine, the overall design choices and methods can also be applied to other environments for running automated science workflows.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.6041  [pdf] - 1152352
MOA-2010-BLG-311: A planetary candidate below the threshold of reliable detection
Yee, J. C.; Hung, L. -W.; Bond, I. A.; Allen, W.; Monard, L. A. G.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Dominik, M.; Tsapras, Y.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Zellem, R.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gorbikov, E.; Han, C.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Lee, C. -U.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Nola, M.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shporer, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Skowron, J.; Thornley, G.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beatty, T. G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Henderson, C. B.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J. W.; Shappee, B.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; van Saders, J.; Zub, M.; Street, R. A.; Horne, K.; Bramich, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Sahu, K. C.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsgans, J.
Comments: 29 pages, 6 Figures, 3 Tables. For a brief video presentation on this paper, please see http://www.youtube.com/user/OSUAstronomy 10/25/2012 - Updated author list. Replaced 10/10/13 to reflect the version published in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-10-22, last modified: 2013-10-10
We analyze MOA-2010-BLG-311, a high magnification (A_max>600) microlensing event with complete data coverage over the peak, making it very sensitive to planetary signals. We fit this event with both a point lens and a 2-body lens model and find that the 2-body lens model is a better fit but with only Delta chi^2~80. The preferred mass ratio between the lens star and its companion is $q=10^(-3.7+/-0.1), placing the candidate companion in the planetary regime. Despite the formal significance of the planet, we show that because of systematics in the data the evidence for a planetary companion to the lens is too tenuous to claim a secure detection. When combined with analyses of other high-magnification events, this event helps empirically define the threshold for reliable planet detection in high-magnification events, which remains an open question.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.7714  [pdf] - 1179574
MOA-2010-BLG-328Lb: a sub-Neptune orbiting very late M dwarf ?
Furusawa, K.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Gould, A.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Snodgrass, C.; Prester, D. Dominis; Albrow, M. D.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Choi, J. Y.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Hung, L. -W.; Jung, Y. -K.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Nola, M.; Ofek, E.; Park, B. G.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I. -G.; Skowron, J.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Street, R. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Horne, K.; Donatowicz, J.; Sahu, K. C.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beatty, T. G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, C. S.; Black, C.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Fouque, P.; Greenhill, J.; Henderson, C. B.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J. W.; Shappee, B.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; van Saders, J.; Zellem, R.; Zub, M.
Comments: 30 pages, 6 figures. accepted for publication in ApJ. Figure 1 and 2 are updated
Submitted: 2013-09-29, last modified: 2013-10-09
We analyze the planetary microlensing event MOA-2010-BLG-328. The best fit yields host and planetary masses of Mh = 0.11+/-0.01 M_{sun} and Mp = 9.2+/-2.2M_Earth, corresponding to a very late M dwarf and sub-Neptune-mass planet, respectively. The system lies at DL = 0.81 +/- 0.10 kpc with projected separation r = 0.92 +/- 0.16 AU. Because of the host's a-priori-unlikely close distance, as well as the unusual nature of the system, we consider the possibility that the microlens parallax signal, which determines the host mass and distance, is actually due to xallarap (source orbital motion) that is being misinterpreted as parallax. We show a result that favors the parallax solution, even given its close host distance. We show that future high-resolution astrometric measurements could decisively resolve the remaining ambiguity of these solutions.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.2243  [pdf] - 713744
EMCCD photometry reveals two new variable stars in the crowded central region of the globular cluster NGC 6981
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, Submitted to A&A, Version 3 contains the correct celestial coordinates in Table 1
Submitted: 2013-04-08, last modified: 2013-09-02
Two previously unknown variable stars in the crowded central region of the globular cluster NGC 6981 are presented. The observations were made using the Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera at the Danish 1.54m Telescope at La Silla, Chile.The two variables were not previously detected by conventional CCD imaging because of their proximity to a bright star. This discovery demonstrates that EMCCDs are a powerful tool for performing high-precision time-series photometry in crowded fields and near bright stars, especially when combined with difference image analysis (DIA).
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.6159  [pdf] - 1178838
Simulator for Microlens Planet Surveys
Comments: Proc. IAU Symp. No. 293 "Formation, detection, and characterization of extrasolar habitable planets", ed. by N. Haghighipour. 4 pages, in press
Submitted: 2013-08-28
We summarize the status of a computer simulator for microlens planet surveys. The simulator generates synthetic light curves of microlensing events observed with specified networks of telescopes over specified periods of time. Particular attention is paid to models for sky brightness and seeing, calibrated by fitting to data from the OGLE survey and RoboNet observations in 2011. Time intervals during which events are observable are identified by accounting for positions of the Sun and the Moon, and other restrictions on telescope pointing. Simulated observations are then generated for an algorithm that adjusts target priorities in real time with the aim of maximizing planet detection zone area summed over all the available events. The exoplanet detection capability of observations was compared for several telescopes.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.5762  [pdf] - 1178801
Interpretation of a Short-Term Anomaly in the Gravitational Microlensing Event MOA-2012-BLG-486
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures and ApJ submitted
Submitted: 2013-08-27
A planetary microlensing signal is generally characterized by a short-term perturbation to the standard single lensing light curve. A subset of binary-source events can produce perturbations that mimic planetary signals, thereby introducing an ambiguity between the planetary and binary-source interpretations. In this paper, we present analysis of the microlensing event MOA-2012-BLG-486, for which the light curve exhibits a short-lived perturbation. Routine modeling not considering data taken in different passbands yields a best-fit planetary model that is slightly preferred over the best-fit binary-source model. However, when allowed for a change in the color during the perturbation, we find that the binary-source model yields a significantly better fit and thus the degeneracy is clearly resolved. This event not only signifies the importance of considering various interpretations of short-term anomalies, but also demonstrates the importance of multi-band data for checking the possibility of false-positive planetary signals.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.7978  [pdf] - 1173061
Beginning of activity in 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and predictions for 2014/5
Comments: 15 pages. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2013-07-30
Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was selected in 2003 as the new target of the Rosetta mission. It has since been the subject of a detailed campaign of observations to characterise its nucleus and activity. Here we present previously unpublished data taken around the start of activity of the comet in 2007/8, before its last perihelion passage. We constrain the time of the start of activity, and combine this with other data taken throughout the comet's orbit to make predictions for its likely behaviour during 2014/5 while Rosetta is operating. A considerable difficulty in observing 67P during the past years has been its position against crowded fields towards the Galactic centre for much of the time. The 2007/8 data presented here were particularly difficult, and the comet will once again be badly placed for Earth-based observations in 2014/5. We make use of the difference image analysis (DIA) technique, which is commonly used in variable star and exoplanet research, to remove background sources and extract images of the comet. In addition, we reprocess a large quantity of archival images of 67P covering its full orbit, to produce a heliocentric lightcurve. By using consistent reduction, measurement and calibration techniques we generate a remarkably clean lightcurve, which can be used to measure a brightness-distance relationship and to predict the future brightness of the comet. We determine that the comet was active around November 2007, at a pre-perihelion distance from the Sun of 4.3 AU. The comet will reach this distance, and probably become active again, in March 2014. We find that the dust brightness can be well described by Af\rho \propto r^-3.2 pre-perihelion and r^-3.4 post-perihelion, and that the comet has a higher dust-to-gas ratio than average. A model fit to the photometric data suggests that only a small fraction (1.4%) of the surface is active.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.6335  [pdf] - 1172942
Microlensing Discovery of a Tight, Low Mass-ratio Planetary-mass Object around an Old, Field Brown Dwarf
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, 3 tables, Submitted in ApJ
Submitted: 2013-07-24, last modified: 2013-07-25
Observations of accretion disks around young brown dwarfs have led to the speculation that they may form planetary systems similar to normal stars. While there have been several detections of planetary-mass objects around brown dwarfs (2MASS 1207-3932 and 2MASS 0441-2301), these companions have relatively large mass ratios and projected separations, suggesting that they formed in a manner analogous to stellar binaries. We present the discovery of a planetary-mass object orbiting a field brown dwarf via gravitational microlensing, OGLE-2012-BLG-0358Lb. The system is a low secondary/primary mass ratio (0.080 +- 0.001), relatively tightly-separated (~0.87 AU) binary composed of a planetary-mass object with 1.9 +- 0.2 Jupiter masses orbiting a brown dwarf with a mass 0.022 M_Sun. The relatively small mass ratio and separation suggest that the companion may have formed in a protoplanetary disk around the brown dwarf host, in a manner analogous to planets.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.3744  [pdf] - 1172078
Gravitational Binary-lens Events with Prominent Effects of Lens Orbital Motion
Comments: 6 pages and 4 figures
Submitted: 2013-06-17
Gravitational microlensing events produced by lenses composed of binary masses are important because they provide a major channel to determine physical parameters of lenses. In this work, we analyze the light curves of two binary-lens events OGLE-2006-BLG-277 and OGLE-2012-BLG-0031 for which the light curves exhibit strong deviations from standard models. From modeling considering various second-order effects, we find that the deviations are mostly explained by the effect of the lens orbital motion. We also find that lens parallax effects can mimic orbital effects to some extent. This implies that modeling light curves of binary-lens events not considering orbital effects can result in lens parallaxes that are substantially different from actual values and thus wrong determinations of physical lens parameters. This demonstrates the importance of routine consideration of orbital effects in interpreting light curves of binary-lens events. It is found that the lens of OGLE-2006-BLG-277 is a binary composed of a low-mass star and a brown dwarf companion.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.3206  [pdf] - 1172013
A detailed census of variable stars in the globular cluster NGC 6333 (M9) from CCD differential photometry
Comments: 20 pages, 17 figures, 5 tables, 1 electronic table
Submitted: 2013-06-13
We report CCD $V$ and $I$ time-series photometry of the globular cluster NGC 6333 (M9). The technique of difference image analysis has been used, which enables photometric precision better than 0.05 mag for stars brighter than $V \sim 19.0$ mag, even in the crowded central regions of the cluster. The high photometric precision has resulted in the discovery of two new RRc stars, three eclipsing binaries, seven long-term variables and one field RRab star behind the cluster. A detailed identification chart and equatorial coordinates are given for all the variable stars in the field of our images of the cluster. Our data together with literature $V$-data obtained in 1994 and 1995 allowed us to refine considerably the periods for all RR Lyrae stars. The nature of the new variables is discussed. We argue that variable V12 is a cluster member and an Anomalous Cepheid. Secular period variations, double mode pulsations and/or the Blazhko-like modulations in some RRc variables are addressed. Through the light curve Fourier decomposition of 12 RR Lyrae stars we have calculated a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]$_{\rm ZW}$=$-1.70 \pm 0.01{\rm(statistical)} \pm 0.14{\rm(systematic)}$ or [Fe/H]$_{UVES}=-1.67 \pm 0.01{\rm(statistical)} \pm 0.19{\rm(systematic)}$.Absolute magnitudes, radii and masses are also estimated for the RR Lyrae stars. A detailed search for SX Phe stars in the Blue Straggler region was conducted but none were discovered. If SX Phe exist in the cluster then their amplitudes must be smaller than the detection limit of our photometry. The CMD has been corrected for heavy differential reddening using the detailed extinction map of the cluster of Alonso-Garc\'ia et al. (2012). This has allowed us to set the mean cluster distance from two independent estimates; from the RRab and RRc absolute magnitudes, we find $8.04\pm 0.19$ kpc and $7.88\pm0.30$ kpc respectively.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.4837  [pdf] - 1171484
Variable stars in the globular cluster NGC 7492. New discoveries and physical parameters determination
Comments: 12 pages, 13 figures, 6 tables, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2013-05-21
We have performed a photometric V, R, I CCD time-series analysis with a baseline of ~8 years of the outer-halo globular cluster NGC 7492 with the aim of searching for new variables and using these (and the previously known variables) to determine the physical parameters of interest for the cluster (e.g. metallicity, absolute magnitude of the horizontal branch, distance, etc.). We use difference image analysis (DIA) to extract precise light curves in the relatively crowded star field, especially towards the densely populated central region. Several approaches are used for variability detection that recover the known variables and lead to new discoveries. We determine the physical parameters of the only RR0 star using light curve Fourier decomposition analysis. We find one new long period variable and two SX Phe stars in the blue straggler region. We also present one candidate SX Phe star which requires follow-up observations. Assuming that the SX Phe stars are cluster members and using the period-luminosity relation for these stars, we estimate their distances as ~25.2+-1.8 and 26.8+-1.8 kpc, and identify their possible modes of oscillation. We refine the periods of the two RR Lyrae stars in our field of view. We find that the RR1 star V2 is undergoing a period change and possibly exhibits the Blazhko effect. Fourier decomposition of the light curve of the RR0 star V1 allows us to estimate the metallicity [Fe/H]_ZW-1.68+-0.10 or [Fe/H]_UVES-1.64+-0.13, log-luminosity ~1.76+-0.02, absolute magnitude ~0.38+-0.04 mag, and true distance modulus of ~16.93+-0.04 mag, which is equivalent to a distance of ~24.3+-0.5 kpc. All of these values are consistent with previous estimates in the literature.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.3606  [pdf] - 1382035
Estimating the parameters of globular cluster M 30 (NGC 7099) from time-series photometry
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, 10 tables, A&A in press
Submitted: 2013-05-15
We present the analysis of 26 nights of V and I time-series observations from 2011 and 2012 of the globular cluster M 30 (NGC 7099). We used our data to search for variable stars in this cluster and refine the periods of known variables; we then used our variable star light curves to derive values for the cluster's parameters. We used difference image analysis to reduce our data to obtain high-precision light curves of variable stars. We then estimated the cluster parameters by performing a Fourier decomposition of the light curves of RR Lyrae stars for which a good period estimate was possible. We also derive an estimate for the age of the cluster by fitting theoretical isochrones to our colour-magnitude diagram (CMD). Out of 13 stars previously catalogued as variables, we find that only 4 are bona fide variables. We detect two new RR Lyrae variables, and confirm two additional RR Lyrae candidates from the literature. We also detect four other new variables, including an eclipsing blue straggler system, and an SX Phoenicis star. This amounts to a total number of confirmed variable stars in M 30 of 12. We perform Fourier decomposition of the light curves of the RR Lyrae stars to derive cluster parameters using empirical relations. We find a cluster metallicity [Fe/H]_ZW=-2.01 +- 0.04, or [Fe/H]_UVES=-2.11 +- 0.06, and a distance of 8.32 +- 0.20 kpc (using RR0 variables), 8.10 kpc (using one RR1 variable), and 8.35 +- 0.42 kpc (using our SX Phoenicis star detection in M 30). Fitting isochrones to the CMD, we estimate an age of 13.0 +- 1.0 Gyr for M 30.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.4169  [pdf] - 1164679
Microlensing Discovery of a Population of Very Tight, Very Low-mass Binary Brown Dwarfs
Choi, J. -Y.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Almeida, L. A.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gorbikov, E.; Jablonski, F.; Henderson, C. B.; Hwang, K. -H.; Janczak, J.; Jung, Y. -K.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Malamud, U.; Maoz, D.; McGregor, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Park, B. -G.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Shin, I. -G.; Yee, J. C.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Fang, X. -S.; Finet, F.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, S. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M. N.; Lundkvist, M.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Zimmer, F.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J. W.; Sahu, K. C.; Zub, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, 3 tables, ApJ submitted
Submitted: 2013-02-18, last modified: 2013-03-20
Although many models have been proposed, the physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of low-mass brown dwarfs are poorly understood. The multiplicity properties and minimum mass of the brown-dwarf mass function provide critical empirical diagnostics of these mechanisms. We present the discovery via gravitational microlensing of two very low-mass, very tight binary systems. These binaries have directly and precisely measured total system masses of 0.025 Msun and 0.034 Msun, and projected separations of 0.31 AU and 0.19 AU, making them the lowest-mass and tightest field brown-dwarf binaries known. The discovery of a population of such binaries indicates that brown dwarf binaries can robustly form at least down to masses of ~0.02 Msun. Future microlensing surveys will measure a mass-selected sample of brown-dwarf binary systems, which can then be directly compared to similar samples of stellar binaries.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.1184  [pdf] - 1165025
A Giant Planet beyond the Snow Line in Microlensing Event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251
Kains, N.; Street, R.; Choi, J. -Y.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Almeida, L. A.; Jablonski, F.; Tristram, P.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozlowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Skowron, J.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lundkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Sahu, K. C.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Bajek, D.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Ipatov, S.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, T.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Allen, W.; Batista, V.; Chung, S. -J.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Henderson, C.; Jung, Y. -K.; Koo, J. -R.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I. -G.; Yee, J.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouque, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Meintjes, P.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; Zub, M.
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, 3 tables; A&A in press
Submitted: 2013-03-05
We present the analysis of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251. This anomalous event was observed by several survey and follow-up collaborations conducting microlensing observations towards the Galactic Bulge. Based on detailed modelling of the observed light curve, we find that the lens is composed of two masses with a mass ratio q=1.9 x 10^-3. Thanks to our detection of higher-order effects on the light curve due to the Earth's orbital motion and the finite size of source, we are able to measure the mass and distance to the lens unambiguously. We find that the lens is made up of a planet of mass 0.53 +- 0.21,M_Jup orbiting an M dwarf host star with a mass of 0.26 +- 0.11 M_Sun. The planetary system is located at a distance of 2.57 +- 0.61 kpc towards the Galactic Centre. The projected separation of the planet from its host star is d=1.408 +- 0.019, in units of the Einstein radius, which corresponds to 2.72 +- 0.75 AU in physical units. We also identified a competitive model with similar planet and host star masses, but with a smaller orbital radius of 1.50 +- 0.50 AU. The planet is therefore located beyond the snow line of its host star, which we estimate to be around 1-1.5 AU.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.3782  [pdf] - 1157842
MOA-2010-BLG-073L: An M-Dwarf with a Substellar Companion at the Planet/Brown Dwarf Boundary
Street, R. A.; Choi, J. -Y.; Tsapras, Y.; Han, C.; Furusawa, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Bond, I. A.; Wouters, D.; Zellem, R.; Udalski, A.; Snodgrass, C.; Horne, K.; Dominik, M.; Browne, P.; Kains, N.; Bramich, D. M.; Bajek, D.; Steele, I. A.; Ipatov, S.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagayama, T.; Nishimaya, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Yee, J.; Dong, S.; Shin, I. -G.; Lee, C. -U.; Skowron, J.; De Almeida, L. Andrade; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Hwang, K. -H.; Koo, J. -R.; Maoz, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishhook, D.; Shporer, A.; McCormick, J.; Christie, G.; Natusch, T.; Allen, B.; Drummond, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Thornley, G.; Knowler, M.; Bos, M.; Bolt, G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouque, P.; Bachelet, E.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F.; Hinse, T. C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.
Comments: 24 pages, 8 figures, best viewed in colour, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2012-11-15, last modified: 2012-12-11
We present an analysis of the anomalous microlensing event, MOA-2010-BLG-073, announced by the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics survey on 2010-03-18. This event was remarkable because the source was previously known to be photometrically variable. Analyzing the pre-event source lightcurve, we demonstrate that it is an irregular variable over time scales >200d. Its dereddened color, $(V-I)_{S,0}$, is 1.221$\pm$0.051mag and from our lens model we derive a source radius of 14.7$\pm$1.3 $R_{\odot}$, suggesting that it is a red giant star. We initially explored a number of purely microlensing models for the event but found a residual gradient in the data taken prior to and after the event. This is likely to be due to the variability of the source rather than part of the lensing event, so we incorporated a slope parameter in our model in order to derive the true parameters of the lensing system. We find that the lensing system has a mass ratio of q=0.0654$\pm$0.0006. The Einstein crossing time of the event, $T_{\rm{E}}=44.3$\pm$0.1d, was sufficiently long that the lightcurve exhibited parallax effects. In addition, the source trajectory relative to the large caustic structure allowed the orbital motion of the lens system to be detected. Combining the parallax with the Einstein radius, we were able to derive the distance to the lens, $D_L$=2.8$\pm$0.4kpc, and the masses of the lensing objects. The primary of the lens is an M-dwarf with $M_{L,p}$=0.16$\pm0.03M_{\odot}$ while the companion has $M_{L,s}$=11.0$\pm2.0M_{\rm{J}}$ putting it in the boundary zone between planets and brown dwarfs.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.6045  [pdf] - 1152354
MOA-2010-BLG-523: "Failed Planet" = RS CVn Star
Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Bond, I. A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Greenhill, J.; Tsapras, Y.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Bensby, T.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nola, M.; Pogge, R. W.; Skowron, J.; Thornley, G.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Sahu, K. C.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Street, R. A.; Horne, K.; Bramich, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beatty, T. G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouque, P.; Henderson, C. B.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B; Martin, R.; Menzies, J. W.; Shappee, B.; Williams, A.; van Saders, J.; Zub, M.
Comments: 29 pp, 6 figs, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2012-10-22, last modified: 2012-10-26
The Galactic bulge source MOA-2010-BLG-523S exhibited short-term deviations from a standard microlensing lightcurve near the peak of an Amax ~ 265 high-magnification microlensing event. The deviations originally seemed consistent with expectations for a planetary companion to the principal lens. We combine long-term photometric monitoring with a previously published high-resolution spectrum taken near peak to demonstrate that this is an RS CVn variable, so that planetary microlensing is not required to explain the lightcurve deviations. This is the first spectroscopically confirmed RS CVn star discovered in the Galactic bulge.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.7242  [pdf] - 1152501
Constraining the parameters of globular cluster NGC 1904 from its variable star population
Comments: 14 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2012-10-26
We present the analysis of 11 nights of V and I time-series observations of the globular cluster NGC 1904 (M 79). Using this we searched for variable stars in this cluster and attempted to refine the periods of known variables, making use of a time baseline spanning almost 8 years. We use our data to derive the metallicity and distance of NGC 1904. We used difference imaging to reduce our data to obtain high-precision light curves of variable stars. We then estimated the cluster parameters by performing a Fourier decomposition of the light curves of RR Lyrae stars for which a good period estimate was possible. We also derive an estimate for the age of the cluster by fitting theoretical isochrones to our colour-magnitude diagram (CMD). Out of 13 stars previously classified as variables, we confirm that 10 are bona fide variables. We cannot detect variability in one other within the precision of our data, while there are two which are saturated in our data frames, but we do not find sufficient evidence in the literature to confirm their variability. We also detect a new RR Lyrae variable, giving a total number of confirmed variable stars in NGC 1904 of 11. Using the Fourier parameters, we find a cluster metallicity [Fe/H]_ZW=-1.63 +- 0.14, or [Fe/H]_UVES=-1.57 \pm 0.18, and a distance of 13.3 +- 0.4 kpc (using RR0 variables) or 12.9 kpc (using the one RR1 variable in our sample for which Fourier decomposition was possible).
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.2926  [pdf] - 1152012
Difference Image Analysis: Extension to a Spatially Varying Photometric Scale Factor and Other Considerations
Comments: MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2012-10-10
We present a general framework for matching the point-spread function (PSF), photometric scaling, and sky background between two images, a subject which is commonly referred to as difference image analysis (DIA). We introduce the new concept of a spatially varying photometric scale factor which will be important for DIA applied to wide-field imaging data in order to adapt to transparency and airmass variations across the field-of-view. Furthermore, we demonstrate how to separately control the degree of spatial variation of each kernel basis function, the photometric scale factor, and the differential sky background. We discuss the common choices for kernel basis functions within our framework, and we introduce the mixed-resolution delta basis functions to address the problem of the size of the least-squares problem to be solved when using delta basis functions. We validate and demonstrate our algorithm on simulated and real data. We also describe a number of useful optimisations that may be capitalised on during the construction of the least-squares matrix and which have not been reported previously. We pay special attention to presenting a clear notation for the DIA equations which are set out in a way that will hopefully encourage developers to tackle the implementation of DIA software.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.2323  [pdf] - 1150645
Microlensig Binaries with Candidate Brown Dwarf Companions
Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Janczak, J.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G.; Polishook, D.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Shporer, A.; Thornley, G.; Malamud, U.; Yee, J. C.; Choi, J. -Y.; Jung, Y. -K.; Park, H.; Lee, C. -U.; Park, B. -G.; Koo, J. -R.; Bajek, D.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Ipatov, S.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Street, R.; Alsubai, K. A.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lundkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wertz, O.; Zimmer, F.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Calitz, J. J.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Cook, K. H.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Hill, K.; Hoffman, M.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Meintjes, P.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Vinter, C.; Zub, M.
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2012-08-11, last modified: 2012-10-02
Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation history. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing events discovered during 2004 - 2011 observation seasons. Based on the low mass ratio criterion of q < 0.2, we found 7 candidate events, including OGLE-2004-BLG-035, OGLE-2004-BLG-039, OGLE-2007-BLG-006, OGLE-2007-BLG-399/MOA-2007-BLG-334, MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172, MOA-2011-BLG-149, and MOA-201-BLG-278/OGLE-2011-BLG-012N. Among them, we are able to confirm that the companions of the lenses of MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149 are brown dwarfs by determining the mass of the lens based on the simultaneous measurement of the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured mass of the brown dwarf companions are (0.02 +/- 0.01) M_Sun and (0.019 +/- 0.002) M_Sun for MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149, respectively, and both companions are orbiting low mass M dwarf host stars. More microlensing brown dwarfs are expected to be detected as the number of lensing events with well covered light curves increases with new generation searches.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.1244  [pdf] - 1124613
A possible binary system of a stellar remnant in the high magnification gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2007-BLG-514
Comments: 31 pages, 6 figures, 7 tables, accepted in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-07-05
We report the extremely high magnification (A > 1000) binary microlensing event OGLE-2007-BLG-514. We obtained good coverage around the double peak structure in the light curve via follow-up observations from different observatories. The binary lens model that includes the effects of parallax (known orbital motion of the Earth) and orbital motion of the lens yields a binary lens mass ratio of q = 0.321 +/- 0.007 and a projected separation of s = 0.072 +/- 0.001$ in units of the Einstein radius. The parallax parameters allow us to determine the lens distance D_L = 3.11 +/- 0.39 kpc and total mass M_L=1.40 +/- 0.18 M_sun; this leads to the primary and secondary components having masses of M_1 = 1.06 +/- 0.13 M_sun and M_2 = 0.34 +/- 0.04 M_sun, respectively. The parallax model indicates that the binary lens system is likely constructed by the main sequence stars. On the other hand, we used a Bayesian analysis to estimate probability distributions by the model that includes the effects of xallarap (possible orbital motion of the source around a companion) and parallax (q = 0.270 +/- 0.005, s = 0.083 +/- 0.001). The primary component of the binary lens is relatively massive with M_1 = 0.9_{-0.3}^{+4.6} M_sun and it is at a distance of D_L = 2.6_{-0.9}^{+3.8} kpc. Given the secure mass ratio measurement, the companion mass is therefore M_2 = 0.2_{-0.1}^{+1.2} M_sun. The xallarap model implies that the primary lens is likely a stellar remnant, such as a white dwarf, a neutron star or a black hole.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.2869  [pdf] - 1453901
Characterizing Low-Mass Binaries From Observation of Long Time-scale Caustic-crossing Gravitational Microlensing Events
Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Choi, J. -Y.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Fouqué, P.; Horne, K.; M.; Szymański, K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Kobara, S.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohmori, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Bramich, D. M.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lunkkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Almeida, L. A.; Batista, V.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Jablonski, F.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, S. -Y.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J. W.; Sahu, K. C.; Zub, M.
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2012-04-12, last modified: 2012-06-12
Despite astrophysical importance of binary star systems, detections are limited to those located in small ranges of separations, distances, and masses and thus it is necessary to use a variety of observational techniques for a complete view of stellar multiplicity across a broad range of physical parameters. In this paper, we report the detections and measurements of 2 binaries discovered from observations of microlensing events MOA-2011-BLG-090 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. Determinations of the binary masses are possible by simultaneously measuring the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the binary components are 0.43 $M_{\odot}$ and 0.39 $M_{\odot}$ for MOA-2011-BLG-090 and 0.57 $M_{\odot}$ and 0.17 $M_{\odot}$ for OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 and thus both lens components of MOA-2011-BLG-090 and one component of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 are M dwarfs, demonstrating the usefulness of microlensing in detecting binaries composed of low-mass components. From modeling of the light curves considering full Keplerian motion of the lens, we also measure the orbital parameters of the binaries. The blended light of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 comes very likely from the lens itself, making it possible to check the microlensing orbital solution by follow-up radial-velocity observation. For both events, the caustic-crossing parts of the light curves, which are critical for determining the physical lens parameters, were resolved by high-cadence survey observations and thus it is expected that the number of microlensing binaries with measured physical parameters will increase in the future.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.5409  [pdf] - 1123638
Systematic Trends In Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Data
Comments: MNRAS Accepted, IDL program available at http://www.danidl.co.uk/science.html
Submitted: 2012-05-24, last modified: 2012-06-07
We investigate the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry from Data Release 8 (DR8) in the search for systematic trends that still exist after the calibration effort of Padmanabhan et al. We consider both the aperture and point-spread function (PSF) magnitudes in DR8. Using the objects with repeat observations, we find that a large proportion of the aperture magnitudes suffer a ~0.2-2% systematic trend as a function of PSF full-width half-maximum (FWHM), the amplitude of which increases for fainter objects. Analysis of the PSF magnitudes reveals more complicated systematic trends of similar amplitude as a function of PSF FWHM and object brightness. We suspect that sky over-subtraction is the cause of the largest amplitude trends as a function of PSF FWHM. We also detect systematic trends as a function of subpixel coordinates for the PSF magnitudes with peak-to-peak amplitudes of ~1.6 mmag and ~4-7 mmag for the over- and under-sampled images, respectively. We note that the systematic trends are similar in amplitude to the reported ~1% and ~2% precision of the SDSS photometry in the griz and u wavebands, respectively, and therefore their correction has the potential to substantially improve the SDSS photometric precision. We provide an {\tt IDL} program specifically for this purpose. Finally, we note that the SDSS aperture and PSF magnitude scales are related by a non-linear transformation that departs from linearity by ~1-4%, which, without correction, invalidates the application of a photometric calibration model derived from the aperture magnitudes to the PSF magnitudes, as has been done for SDSS DR8.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.6323  [pdf] - 1123726
MOA-2010-BLG-477Lb: constraining the mass of a microlensing planet from microlensing parallax, orbital motion and detection of blended light
Bachelet, E.; Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Fouqué, P.; Gould, A.; Menzies, J. W.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Dong, Subo; Heyrovský, D.; Marquette, J. B.; Marshall, J.; Skowron, J.; Street, R. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Abe, L.; Agabi, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Allen, W.; Bertin, E.; Bos, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Chavez, J.; Christie, G. W.; Cole, A. A.; Crouzet, N.; Dieters, S.; Dominik, M.; Drummond, J.; Greenhill, J.; Guillot, T.; Henderson, C. B.; Hessman, F. V.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kandori, R.; Liebig, C.; Mékarnia, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Nagayama, T.; Nataf, D.; Natusch, T.; Nishiyama, S.; Rivet, J. -P.; Sahu, K. C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Thornley, G.; Tomczak, A. R.; Tsapras, Y.; Yee, J. C.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Kubas, D.; Martin, R.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; de Almeida, L. Andrade; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Lee, C. -U.; Lee, Y.; Koo, J. -R.; Maoz, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shporer, A.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Kobara, S.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Ohmori, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Kerins, E.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.
Comments: 3 Tables, 12 Figures, accepted in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-05-29
Microlensing detections of cool planets are important for the construction of an unbiased sample to estimate the frequency of planets beyond the snow line, which is where giant planets are thought to form according to the core accretion theory of planet formation. In this paper, we report the discovery of a giant planet detected from the analysis of the light curve of a high-magnification microlensing event MOA-2010-BLG-477. The measured planet-star mass ratio is $q=(2.181\pm0.004)\times 10^{-3}$ and the projected separation is $s=1.1228\pm0.0006$ in units of the Einstein radius. The angular Einstein radius is unusually large $\theta_{\rm E}=1.38\pm 0.11$ mas. Combining this measurement with constraints on the "microlens parallax" and the lens flux, we can only limit the host mass to the range $0.13<M/M_\odot<1.0$. In this particular case, the strong degeneracy between microlensing parallax and planet orbital motion prevents us from measuring more accurate host and planet masses. However, we find that adding Bayesian priors from two effects (Galactic model and Keplerian orbit) each independently favors the upper end of this mass range, yielding star and planet masses of $M_*=0.67^{+0.33}_{-0.13}\ M_\odot$ and $m_p=1.5^{+0.8}_{-0.3}\ M_{\rm JUP}$ at a distance of $D=2.3\pm0.6$ kpc, and with a semi-major axis of $a=2^{+3}_{-1}$ AU. Finally, we show that the lens mass can be determined from future high-resolution near-IR adaptive optics observations independently from two effects, photometric and astrometric.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.5112  [pdf] - 1123605
Investigation of variable star candidates in the globular cluster NGC 5024 (M53)
Comments: MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2012-05-23
We have performed a careful investigation of the 74 candidate variable stars presented by Safanova & Stalin (2011). For this purpose we used our data base of imaging and light curves from Arellano Ferro et al. (2011) and Arellano Ferro et al. (2012). We find that two candidates are known variable stars, eight candidates were discovered first by Arellano Ferro et al. (2011) but would not have been known to Safanova & Stalin (2011) at the time of their paper submission, while four candidates are new variables. Three of the new variables are SX Phe type and one is a semi-regular red giant variable (SR type). We also tentatively confirm the presence of true variability in two other candidates and we are unable to investigate another four candidates because they are not in our data base. However, we find that the remaining 54 candidate variable stars are spurious detections where systematic trends in the light curves have been mistaken for true variability. We believe that the erroneous detections are caused by the adoption of a very low detection threshold used to identify these candidates.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.0344  [pdf] - 1034636
OGLE-2005-BLG-153: Microlensing Discovery and Characterization of A Very Low Mass Binary
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2010-09-02, last modified: 2012-04-25
The mass function and statistics of binaries provide important diagnostics of the star formation process. Despite this importance, the mass function at low masses remains poorly known due to observational difficulties caused by the faintness of the objects. Here we report the microlensing discovery and characterization of a binary lens composed of very low-mass stars just above the hydrogen-burning limit. From the combined measurements of the Einstein radius and microlens parallax, we measure the masses of the binary components of $0.10\pm 0.01\ M_\odot$ and $0.09\pm 0.01\ M_\odot$. This discovery demonstrates that microlensing will provide a method to measure the mass function of all Galactic populations of very low mass binaries that is independent of the biases caused by the luminosity of the population.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.4789  [pdf] - 1118180
A New Type of Ambiguity in the Planet and Binary Interpretations of Central Perturbations of High-Magnification Gravitational Microlensing Events
Choi, J. -Y.; Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Fouqué, P.; Horne, K.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Kobara, S.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohmori, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Bramich, D. M.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lunkkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Almeida, L. A.; Batista, V.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Jablonski, F.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, S. -Y.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J. W.; Sahu, K. C.; Zub, M.
Comments: 8 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2012-04-21, last modified: 2012-04-25
High-magnification microlensing events provide an important channel to detect planets. Perturbations near the peak of a high-magnification event can be produced either by a planet or a binary companion. It is known that central perturbations induced by both types of companions can be generally distinguished due to the basically different magnification pattern around caustics. In this paper, we present a case of central perturbations for which it is difficult to distinguish the planetary and binary interpretations. The peak of a lensing light curve affected by this perturbation appears to be blunt and flat. For a planetary case, this perturbation occurs when the source trajectory passes the negative perturbation region behind the back end of an arrowhead-shaped central caustic. For a binary case, a similar perturbation occurs for a source trajectory passing through the negative perturbation region between two cusps of an astroid-shaped caustic. We demonstrate the degeneracy for 2 high-magnification events of OGLE-2011-BLG-0526 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0950/MOA-2011-BLG-336. For OGLE-2011-BLG-0526, the $\chi^2$ difference between the planetary and binary model is $\sim$ 3, implying that the degeneracy is very severe. For OGLE-2011-BLG-0950/MOA-2011-BLG-336, the stellar binary model is formally excluded with $\Delta \chi^2 \sim$ 105 and the planetary model is preferred. However, it is difficult to claim a planet discovery because systematic residuals of data from the planetary model are larger than the difference between the planetary and binary models. Considering that 2 events observed during a single season suffer from such a degeneracy, it is expected that central perturbations experiencing this type of degeneracy is common.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.4032  [pdf] - 1091733
Characterizing Lenses and Lensed Stars of High-Magnification Single-lens Gravitational Microlensing Events With Lenses Passing Over Source Stars
Choi, J. -Y.; Shin, I. -G.; Park, S. -Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Street, R.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Janczak, J.; Lee, C. -U.; Mallia, F.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G. "TG"; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Barnard, E.; Baudry, J.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Menzies, J.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Clay, N.; Fraser, S.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Mottram, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Zimmer, F.
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2011-11-17, last modified: 2012-03-20
We present the analysis of the light curves of 9 high-magnification single-lens gravitational microlensing events with lenses passing over source stars, including OGLE-2004-BLG-254, MOA-2007-BLG-176, MOA-2007-BLG-233/OGLE-2007-BLG-302, MOA-2009-BLG-174, MOA-2010-BLG-436, MOA-2011-BLG-093, MOA-2011-BLG-274, OGLE-2011-BLG-0990/MOA-2011-BLG-300, and OGLE-2011-BLG-1101/MOA-2011-BLG-325. For all events, we measure the linear limb-darkening coefficients of the surface brightness profile of source stars by measuring the deviation of the light curves near the peak affected by the finite-source effect. For 7 events, we measure the Einstein radii and the lens-source relative proper motions. Among them, 5 events are found to have Einstein radii less than 0.2 mas, making the lenses candidates of very low-mass stars or brown dwarfs. For MOA-2011-BLG-274, especially, the small Einstein radius of $\theta_{\rm E}\sim 0.08$ mas combined with the short time scale of $t_{\rm E}\sim 2.7$ days suggests the possibility that the lens is a free-floating planet. For MOA-2009-BLG-174, we measure the lens parallax and thus uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens. We also find that the measured lens mass of $\sim 0.84\ M_\odot$ is consistent with that of a star blended with the source, suggesting that the blend is likely to be the lens. Although we find planetary signals for none of events, we provide exclusion diagrams showing the confidence levels excluding the existence of a planet as a function of the separation and mass ratio.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:1203.1291  [pdf] - 1117102
OGLE-2008-BLG-510: first automated real-time detection of a weak microlensing anomaly - brown dwarf or stellar binary?
Comments: 17 pages with 8 figures, MNRAS submitted
Submitted: 2012-03-06
The microlensing event OGLE-2008-BLG-510 is characterised by an evident asymmetric shape of the peak, promptly detected by the ARTEMiS system in real time. The skewness of the light curve appears to be compatible both with binary-lens and binary-source models, including the possibility that the lens system consists of an M dwarf orbited by a brown dwarf. The detection of this microlensing anomaly and our analysis demonstrates that: 1) automated real-time detection of weak microlensing anomalies with immediate feedback is feasible, efficient, and sensitive, 2) rather common weak features intrinsically come with ambiguities that are not easily resolved from photometric light curves, 3) a modelling approach that finds all features of parameter space rather than just the `favourite model' is required, and 4) the data quality is most crucial, where systematics can be confused with real features, in particular small higher-order effects such as orbital motion signatures. It moreover becomes apparent that events with weak signatures are a silver mine for statistical studies, although not easy to exploit. Clues about the apparent paucity of both brown-dwarf companions and binary-source microlensing events might hide here.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.3295  [pdf] - 1084111
Microlensing Binaries Discovered through High-Magnification Channel
Shin, I. -G.; Choi, J. -Y.; Park, S. -Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Janczak, J.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Mallia, F.; Maoz, D.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Shporer, A.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Calitz, J. J.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Cook, K. H.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Hoffman, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Meintjes, P.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Vinter, C.; Zub, M.; Allan, A.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Street, R.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Zimmer, F.
Comments: 10 figures, 6 tables, 26 pages
Submitted: 2011-09-15, last modified: 2011-11-28
Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of 8 binary lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010. The perturbations, which are confined near the peak of the light curves, can be easily distinguished from the central perturbations caused by planets. However, the degeneracy between close and wide binary solutions cannot be resolved with a $3\sigma$ confidence level for 3 events, implying that the degeneracy would be an important obstacle in studying binary distributions. The dependence of the degeneracy on the lensing parameters is consistent with a theoretic prediction that the degeneracy becomes severe as the binary separation and the mass ratio deviate from the values of resonant caustics. The measured mass ratio of the event OGLE-2008-BLG-510/MOA-2008-BLG-369 is $q\sim 0.1$, making the companion of the lens a strong brown-dwarf candidate.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.0216  [pdf] - 1091333
The unusually large population of Blazhko variables in the globular cluster NGC 5024 (M53)
Comments: ACCEPTED IN MNRAS 14 pages, 9 figures and 6 tables
Submitted: 2011-11-01
We report the discovery of amplitude and phase modulations typical of the Blazhko effect in 22 RRc and 9 RRab type RR Lyrae stars in NGC 5024 (M53). This brings the confirmed Blazhko variables in this cluster to 23 RRc and 11 RRab, that represent 66% and 37% of the total population of RRc and RRab stars in the cluster respectively, making NGC 5024 the globular cluster with the largest presently known population of Blazhko RRc stars. We place a lower limit on the overall incidence rate of the Blazhko effect among the RR Lyrae population in this cluster of 52%. New data have allowed us to refine the pulsation periods. The limitations imposed by the time span and sampling of our data prevents reliable estimations of the modulation periods. The amplitudes of the modulations range between 0.02 and 0.39 mag. The RRab and RRc are neatly separated in the CMD, and the RRc Blazhko variables are on averge redder than their stable couterparts; these two facts may support the hypothesis that the HB evolution in this cluster is towards the red and that the Blazhko modulations in the RRc stars are connected with the pulsation mode switch.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.2160  [pdf] - 1077213
Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star
Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Suzuki, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Street, R.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kundurthy, P.; Skowron, J.; Becker, A. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Heyrovsky, D.; Barry, R. K.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Wellnitz, D. D.; Bond, I. A.; Sumi, T.; Dong, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Korpela, A. V.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Gorbikov, E.; Gould, A.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Mallia, F.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shporer, A.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Allan, A.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Tsapras, Y.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, R.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J; Sahu, K. C.; Waldman, I.; Zub, A. Williams M.; Bourhrous, H.; Matsuoka, Y.; Nagayama, T.; Oi, N.; Randriamanakoto, Z.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Glitrup, M.; Harpsoe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Zimmer, F.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Ulaczyk, K.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.
Comments: 38 pages with 7 figures
Submitted: 2011-06-10
We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of m_p = 10.4 +- 1.7 Earth masses and orbits a star of mass M_* = 0.56 +- 0.09 Solar masses at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 (+1.9 -0.5) AU and an orbital period of P = 7.6 (+7.7 -1.5} yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are enabled by the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect, which is seen primarily in the light curve distortion due to the orbital motion of the Earth. But, the analysis also demonstrates the capability to measure microlensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a "failed" gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets.
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.1880  [pdf] - 1077184
Exploring the variable stars in the globular cluster NGC5024 (M53): New RR Lyrae and SX Phoenicis stars
Comments: MNRAS Accepted (03/06/2011); Originally submitted 25/02/2011; 21 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2011-06-08
We report CCD V and I time series photometry of the globular cluster NGC 5024 (M53). The technique of difference image analysis has been used which enables photometric precisions better than 10 mmag for stars brighter than V 18.5mag even in the crowded central regions of the cluster. The high photometric precision has resulted in the discovery of two new RR1 stars and thirteen SX Phe stars. A detailed identification chart is given for all the variable stars in the field of our images of the cluster. Periodicities were calculated for all RR Lyraes and SX Phe stars and a critical comparison is made with previous determinations. Out of four probable SX Phe variables reported by Dekany & Kovacs (2009), the SX Phe nature is confirmed only for V80, V81 is an unlikely case while V82 and V83 remain as dubious cases. Previous misidentifications of three variables are corrected. Astrometric positions with an uncertainty of ~ 0.3 arcsec are provided for all variables. The light curve Fourier decomposition of RR0 and RR1 is discussed, we find a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]=-1.92+-0.06 in the scale of Zinn & West from 19 RR0 stars. The true distance moduli 16.36+-0.05 and 16.28+-0.07 and the corresponding distances 18.7+-0.4 and 18.0+-0.5 kpc are found from the RR0 and RR1 stars respectively. These values are in agreement with the theoretical period-luminosity relations for RR Lyrae stars in the I band and with recent luminosity determinations for the RR Lyrae stars in the LMC. The age of 13.25+-0.50 Gyr (Dotter et al. 2010), for NGC 5024, E(B-V)=0.02 and the above physical parameters of the cluster, as indicated from the RR0 stars, produce a good isochrone fitting to the observed CMD. The PL relation for SX Phe stars in NGC 5024 in the V and I bands is discussed in the light of the 13 newly found SX Phe stars and their pulsation mode is identified in most cases.
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.5094  [pdf] - 1076255
OGLE-2005-BLG-018: Characterization of Full Physical and Orbital Parameters of a Gravitational Binary Lens
Comments: 19 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2011-04-27
We present the analysis result of a gravitational binary-lensing event OGLE-2005-BLG-018. The light curve of the event is characterized by 2 adjacent strong features and a single weak feature separated from the strong features. The light curve exhibits noticeable deviations from the best-fit model based on standard binary parameters. To explain the deviation, we test models including various higher-order effects of the motions of the observer, source, and lens. From this, we find that it is necessary to account for the orbital motion of the lens in describing the light curve. From modeling of the light curve considering the parallax effect and Keplerian orbital motion, we are able to measure not only the physical parameters but also a complete orbital solution of the lens system. It is found that the event was produced by a binary lens located in the Galactic bulge with a distance $6.7\pm 0.3$ kpc from the Earth. The individual lens components with masses $0.9\pm 0.3\ M_\odot$ and $0.5\pm 0.1\ M_\odot$ are separated with a semi-major axis of $a=2.5 \pm 1.0$ AU and orbiting each other with a period $P=3.1 \pm 1.3$ yr. The event demonstrates that it is possible to extract detailed information about binary lens systems from well-resolved lensing light curves.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.2057  [pdf] - 316150
Reflex: Scientific Workflows for the ESO Pipelines
Comments: ADASS 2010, Submitted ASP Conference Series
Submitted: 2011-02-10
The recently released Reflex scientific workflow environment supports the interactive execution of ESO VLT data reduction pipelines. Reflex is based upon the Kepler workflow engine, and provides components for organising the data, executing pipeline recipes based on the ESO Common Pipeline Library, invoking Python scripts, and constructing interaction loops. Reflex will greatly enhance the quick validation and reduction of the scientific data. In this paper we summarize the main features of Reflex, and demonstrate as an example its application to the reduction of echelle UVES data.
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.3312  [pdf] - 1051479
Binary microlensing event OGLE-2009-BLG-020 gives a verifiable mass, distance and orbit predictions
Comments: 51 pages, 8 figures, 2 appendices. Submitted to ApJ. Fortran codes for Appendix B are attached to this astro-ph submission and are also available at http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~jskowron/OGLE-2009-BLG-020/
Submitted: 2011-01-17
We present the first example of binary microlensing for which the parameter measurements can be verified (or contradicted) by future Doppler observations. This test is made possible by a confluence of two relatively unusual circumstances. First, the binary lens is bright enough (I=15.6) to permit Doppler measurements. Second, we measure not only the usual 7 binary-lens parameters, but also the 'microlens parallax' (which yields the binary mass) and two components of the instantaneous orbital velocity. Thus we measure, effectively, 6 'Kepler+1' parameters (two instantaneous positions, two instantaneous velocities, the binary total mass, and the mass ratio). Since Doppler observations of the brighter binary component determine 5 Kepler parameters (period, velocity amplitude, eccentricity, phase, and position of periapsis), while the same spectroscopy yields the mass of the primary, the combined Doppler + microlensing observations would be overconstrained by 6 + (5 + 1) - (7 + 1) = 4 degrees of freedom. This makes possible an extremely strong test of the microlensing solution. We also introduce a uniform microlensing notation for single and binary lenses, we define conventions, summarize all known microlensing degeneracies and extend a set of parameters to describe full Keplerian motion of the binary lenses.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.5652  [pdf] - 1042779
CCD time-series photometry of the globular cluster NGC 6981: Variable star census and physical parameter estimates
Comments: MNRAS Accepted (15th Dec)
Submitted: 2010-12-27
We present the results from 10 nights of observations of the globular cluster NGC 6981 (M72) in the V, R and I Johnson wavebands. We employed the technique of difference image analysis to perform precision differential photometry on the time-series images, which enabled us to carry out a census of the under-studied variable star population of the cluster. We show that 20 suspected variables in the literature are actually non-variable, and we confirm the variable nature of another 29 variables while refining their ephemerides. We also detect 11 new RR Lyrae variables and 3 new SX Phe variables, bringing the total confirmed variable star count in NGC 6981 to 43. We performed Fourier decomposition of the light curves for a subset of RR Lyrae stars and used the Fourier parameters to estimate the fundamental physical parameters of the stars using relations available in the literature. Mean values of these physical parameters have allowed us to estimate the physical parameters of the parent cluster. We derive a metallicity of [Fe/H]_ZW = -1.48+-0.03 on the Zinn & West (1984) scale (or [Fe/H]_UVES = -1.38+-0.03 on the new Carretta et al. (2009) scale) for NGC 6981, and distances of ~16.73+-0.36 kpc and ~16.68+-0.36 kpc from analysis of the RR0 and RR1 stars separately. We also confirm the Oosterhoff type I classification for the cluster, and show that our colour-magnitude data is consistent with the age of ~12.75+-0.75 Gyr derived by Dotter et al (2010).
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.3027  [pdf] - 1042551
Qatar-1b: a hot Jupiter orbiting a metal-rich K dwarf star
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, submitted to Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Submitted: 2010-12-14, last modified: 2010-12-23
We report the discovery and initial characterisation of Qatar-1b, a hot Jupiter orbiting a metal-rich K dwarf star, the first planet discovered by the Alsubai Project exoplanet transit survey. We describe the strategy used to select candidate transiting planets from photometry generated by the Alsubai Project instrument. We examine the rate of astrophysical and other false positives found during the spectroscopic reconnaissance of the initial batch of candidates. A simultaneous fit to the follow-up radial velocities and photometry of Qatar-1b yield a planetary mass of 1.09+/-0.08 Mjup and a radius of 1.16+/-0.05 Rjup. The orbital period and separation are 1.420033 days and 0.0234 AU for an orbit assumed to be circular. The stellar density, effective temperature and rotation rate indicate an age greater than 4 Gyr for the system.
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.1809  [pdf] - 1041176
A sub-Saturn Mass Planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb
Miyake, N.; Sumi, T.; Dong, Subo; Street, R.; Mancini, L.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Tsapras, Y.; Yee, J. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Bond, I. A.; Fouque, P.; Browne, P.; Han, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Finet, F.; Furusawa, K.; Harpsoe, K.; Allen, W.; Hundertmark, M.; Freeman, M.; Suzuki, D.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Douchin, D.; Fukui, A.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagayama, T.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Collaboration, The MOA; Bolt, G.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gorbikov, E.; Higgins, D.; Janczak, K. -H. Hwang J.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Koo, J. -R.; lowski, S. Koz; Lee, Y.; Mallia, F.; Maury, A.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Mu~noz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Ofek, E. O.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Santallo, R.; Shporer, A.; Spector, O.; Thornley, G.; Collaboration, The Micro FUN; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Steele, I.; Collaboration, The RoboNet; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Glitrup, M.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mathiasen, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Zimmer, F.; Consortium, The MiNDSTEp; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Menzies, J.; Collaboration, The PLANET
Comments: accepted to ApJ, 28 pages, 6 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2010-10-09, last modified: 2010-12-10
We report the gravitational microlensing discovery of a sub-Saturn mass planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb, orbiting a K or M-dwarf star in the inner Galactic disk or Galactic bulge. The high cadence observations of the MOA-II survey discovered this microlensing event and enabled its identification as a high magnification event approximately 24 hours prior to peak magnification. As a result, the planetary signal at the peak of this light curve was observed by 20 different telescopes, which is the largest number of telescopes to contribute to a planetary discovery to date. The microlensing model for this event indicates a planet-star mass ratio of q = (3.95 +/- 0.02) x 10^{-4} and a separation of d = 0.97537 +/- 0.00007 in units of the Einstein radius. A Bayesian analysis based on the measured Einstein radius crossing time, t_E, and angular Einstein radius, \theta_E, along with a standard Galactic model indicates a host star mass of M_L = 0.38^{+0.34}_{-0.18} M_{Sun} and a planet mass of M_p = 50^{+44}_{-24} M_{Earth}, which is half the mass of Saturn. This analysis also yields a planet-star three-dimensional separation of a = 2.4^{+1.2}_{-0.6} AU and a distance to the planetary system of D_L = 6.1^{+1.1}_{-1.2} kpc. This separation is ~ 2 times the distance of the snow line, a separation similar to most of the other planets discovered by microlensing.
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.0338  [pdf] - 1034634
OGLE-2009-BLG-092/MOA-2009-BLG-137: A Dramatic Repeating Event With the Second Perturbation Predicted by Real-Time Analysis
Comments: 18 pages, 5 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2010-09-02
We report the result of the analysis of a dramatic repeating gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2009-BLG-092/MOA-2009-BLG-137, for which the light curve is characterized by two distinct peaks with perturbations near both peaks. We find that the event is produced by the passage of the source trajectory over the central perturbation regions associated with the individual components of a wide-separation binary. The event is special in the sense that the second perturbation, occurring $\sim 100$ days after the first, was predicted by the real-time analysis conducted after the first peak, demonstrating that real-time modeling can be routinely done for binary and planetary events. With the data obtained from follow-up observations covering the second peak, we are able to uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event occurred on a bulge clump giant and it was produced by a binary lens composed of a K and M-type main-sequence stars. The estimated masses of the binary components are $M_1=0.69 \pm 0.11\ M_\odot$ and $M_2=0.36\pm 0.06\ M_\odot$, respectively, and they are separated in projection by $r_\perp=10.9\pm 1.3\ {\rm AU}$. The measured distance to the lens is $D_{\rm L}=5.6 \pm 0.7\ {\rm kpc}$. We also detect the orbital motion of the lens system.
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.2706  [pdf] - 902424
Masses and Orbital Constraints for the OGLE-2006-BLG-109Lb,c Jupiter/Saturn Analog Planetary System
Comments: 48 pages including 10 figures, to be published in ApJ
Submitted: 2009-11-15, last modified: 2010-06-02
We present a new analysis of the Jupiter+Saturn analog system, OGLE-2006-BLG-109Lb,c, which was the first double planet system discovered with the gravitational microlensing method. This is the only multi-planet system discovered by any method with measured masses for the star and both planets. In addition to the signatures of two planets, this event also exhibits a microlensing parallax signature and finite source effects that provide a direct measure of the masses of the star and planets, and the expected brightness of the host star is confirmed by Keck AO imaging, yielding masses of M_* = 0.51(+0.05-0.04) M_sun, M_b = 231+-19 M_earth, M_c = 86+-7 M_earth. The Saturn-analog planet in this system had a planetary light curve deviation that lasted for 11 days, and as a result, the effects of the orbital motion are visible in the microlensing light curve. We find that four of the six orbital parameters are tightly constrained and that a fifth parameter, the orbital acceleration, is weakly constrained. No orbital information is available for the Jupiter-analog planet, but its presence helps to constrain the orbital motion of the Saturn-analog planet. Assuming co-planar orbits, we find an orbital eccentricity of eccentricity = 0.15 (+0.17-0.10) and an orbital inclination of i = 64 (+4-7) deg. The 95% confidence level lower limit on the inclination of i > 49 deg. implies that this planetary system can be detected and studied via radial velocity measurements using a telescope of >30m aperture.
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.0966  [pdf] - 1026693
OGLE 2008--BLG--290: An accurate measurement of the limb darkening of a Galactic Bulge K Giant spatially resolved by microlensing
Fouque, P.; Heyrovsky, D.; Dong, S.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Novati, S. Calchi; Cassan, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominik, M.; Prester, D. Dominis; Greenhill, J.; Horne, K.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kozlowski, S.; Kubas, D.; Lee, C. -H.; Marquette, J. -B.; Mathiasen, M.; Menzies, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nishiyama, S.; Papadakis, I.; Street, R.; Sumi, T.; Williams, A.; Yee, J. C.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cole, A.; Cook, K. H.; Donatowicz, J.; Kains, N.; Kane, S. R.; Martin, R.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Tsapras, Y.; Wambsganss, J.; Zub, M.; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Lee, C. -U.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Szewczyk, O.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Abe, F.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Gilmore, A. C.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Itow, Y.; ~Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Korpela, A. V.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Perrott, Y.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sako, T.; Sato, S.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D.; Sweatman, W.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.; Allan, A.; Bode, M. F.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Clay, N.; Fraser, S. N.; Hawkins, E.; Kerins, E.; Lister, T. A.; Mottram, C. J.; Saunders, E. S.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wheatley, P. J.; Anguita, T.; Bozza, V.; Harpsoe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Masi, G.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Thone, C. C.; Riffeser, A.; ~Seitz, S.; Bender, R.
Comments: Astronomy & Astrophysics in press
Submitted: 2010-05-06
Gravitational microlensing is not only a successful tool for discovering distant exoplanets, but it also enables characterization of the lens and source stars involved in the lensing event. In high magnification events, the lens caustic may cross over the source disk, which allows a determination of the angular size of the source and additionally a measurement of its limb darkening. When such extended-source effects appear close to maximum magnification, the resulting light curve differs from the characteristic Paczynski point-source curve. The exact shape of the light curve close to the peak depends on the limb darkening of the source. Dense photometric coverage permits measurement of the respective limb-darkening coefficients. In the case of microlensing event OGLE 2008-BLG-290, the K giant source star reached a peak magnification of about 100. Thirteen different telescopes have covered this event in eight different photometric bands. Subsequent light-curve analysis yielded measurements of linear limb-darkening coefficients of the source in six photometric bands. The best-measured coefficients lead to an estimate of the source effective temperature of about 4700 +100-200 K. However, the photometric estimate from colour-magnitude diagrams favours a cooler temperature of 4200 +-100 K. As the limb-darkening measurements, at least in the CTIO/SMARTS2 V and I bands, are among the most accurate obtained, the above disagreement needs to be understood. A solution is proposed, which may apply to previous events where such a discrepancy also appeared.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.1171  [pdf] - 554128
A Cold Neptune-Mass Planet OGLE-2007-BLG-368Lb: Cold Neptunes Are Common
Comments: 39 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2009-12-07, last modified: 2010-01-22
We present the discovery of a Neptune-mass planet OGLE-2007-BLG-368Lb with a planet-star mass ratio of q=[9.5 +/- 2.1] x 10^{-5} via gravitational microlensing. The planetary deviation was detected in real-time thanks to the high cadence of the MOA survey, real-time light curve monitoring and intensive follow-up observations. A Bayesian analysis returns the stellar mass and distance at M_l = 0.64_{-0.26}^{+0.21} M_\sun and D_l = 5.9_{-1.4}^{+0.9} kpc, respectively, so the mass and separation of the planet are M_p = 20_{-8}^{+7} M_\oplus and a = 3.3_{-0.8}^{+1.4} AU, respectively. This discovery adds another cold Neptune-mass planet to the planetary sample discovered by microlensing, which now comprise four cold Neptune/Super-Earths, five gas giant planets, and another sub-Saturn mass planet whose nature is unclear. The discovery of these ten cold exoplanets by the microlensing method implies that the mass ratio function of cold exoplanets scales as dN_{\rm pl}/d\log q \propto q^{-0.7 +/- 0.2} with a 95% confidence level upper limit of n < -0.35 (where dN_{\rm pl}/d\log q \propto q^n). As microlensing is most sensitive to planets beyond the snow-line, this implies that Neptune-mass planets are at least three times more common than Jupiters in this region at the 95% confidence level.
[116]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.5581  [pdf] - 1018549
Interpretation of Strong Short-Term Central Perturbations in the Light Curves of Moderate-Magnification Microlensing Events
Comments: 17 pages, 4 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2009-11-30
To improve the planet detection efficiency, current planetary microlensing experiments are focused on high-magnification events searching for planetary signals near the peak of lensing light curves. However, it is known that central perturbations can also be produced by binary companions and thus it is important to distinguish planetary signals from those induced by binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of microlensing events OGLE-2007-BLG-137/MOA-2007-BLG-091, OGLE-2007-BLG-355/MOA-2007-BLG-278, and MOA-2007-BLG-199/OGLE-2007-BLG-419, for all of which exhibit short-term perturbations near the peaks of the light curves. From detailed modeling of the light curves, we find that the perturbations of the events are caused by binary companions rather than planets. From close examination of the light curves combined with the underlying physical geometry of the lens system obtained from modeling, we find that the short time-scale caustic-crossing feature occurring at a low or a moderate base magnification with an additional secondary perturbation is a typical feature of binary-lens events and thus can be used for the discrimination between the binary and planetary interpretations.
[117]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.2068  [pdf] - 1017917
CCD time-series photometry of the globular cluster NGC 5053: RR Lyrae, Blue Stragglers and SX Phoenicis stars revisited
Comments: 21 pages, 16 figures, 11 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-10-11
We report the results of CCD $V$, $r$ and $I$ time-series photometry of the globular cluster NGC 5053. New times of maximum light are given for the eight known RR Lyrae stars in the field of our images and their periods are revised. Their $V$ light curves were Fourier decomposed to estimate their physical parameters. A discussion on the accuracy of the Fourier-based iron abundances, temperatures, masses and radii is given. New periods are found for the 5 known SX Phe stars and a critical discussion of their secular period changes is offered. The mean iron abundance for the RR Lyrae stars is found to be [Fe/H] $\sim -1.97 \pm 0.16$ and lower values are not supported by the present analysis. The absolute magnitude calibrations of the RR Lyrae stars yield an average true distance modulus of $16.12 \pm 0.04$ or a distance of $16.7 \pm 0.3$ kpc. Comparison of the observational CMD with theoretical isochrones indicates an age of $12.5 \pm 2.0$ Gyrs for the cluster. A careful identification of all reported Blue Stragglers (BS) and their $V,I$ magnitudes leads to the conclusion that BS12, BS22, BS23 and BS24 are not BS. On the other hand, three new BS are reported. Variability was found in seven BS, very likely of the SX Phe type in five of them, and in one red giant star. The new SX Phe stars follow established $PL$ relationships and indicate a distance in agreement with the distance from the RR Lyrae stars.
[118]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.3471  [pdf] - 243158
Mass measurement of a single unseen star and planetary detection efficiency for OGLE 2007-BLG-050
Comments: 20 pages, 23 figures
Submitted: 2009-07-20, last modified: 2009-07-22
We analyze OGLE-2007-BLG-050, a high magnification microlensing event (A ~ 432) whose peak occurred on 2 May, 2007, with pronounced finite-source and parallax effects. We compute planet detection efficiencies for this event in order to determine its sensitivity to the presence of planets around the lens star. Both finite-source and parallax effects permit a measurement of the angular Einstein radius \theta_E = 0.48 +/- 0.01 mas and the parallax \pi_E = 0.12 +/- 0.03, leading to an estimate of the lens mass M = 0.50 +/- 0.14 M_Sun and its distance to the observer D_L = 5.5 +/- 0.4 kpc. This is only the second determination of a reasonably precise (<30%) mass estimate for an isolated unseen object, using any method. This allows us to calculate the planetary detection efficiency in physical units (r_\perp, m_p), where r_\perp is the projected planet-star separation and m_p is the planet mass. When computing planet detection efficiency, we did not find any planetary signature and our detection efficiency results reveal significant sensitivity to Neptune-mass planets, and to a lesser extent Earth-mass planets in some configurations. Indeed, Jupiter and Neptune-mass planets are excluded with a high confidence for a large projected separation range between the planet and the lens star, respectively [0.6 - 10] and [1.4 - 4] AU, and Earth-mass planets are excluded with a 10% confidence in the lensing zone, i.e. [1.8 - 3.1] AU.
[119]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.1012  [pdf] - 23134
Kinematics of SDSS subdwarfs: Structure and substructure of the Milky Way halo
Comments: 16 pages, 13 figures, MNRAS (in press). Revised following referee's comments; using new and improved parallax relation. Results and conclusions unchanged
Submitted: 2009-04-06, last modified: 2009-07-11
We construct a new sample of ~1700 solar neighbourhood halo subdwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, selected using a reduced proper motion diagram. Radial velocities come from the SDSS spectra and proper motions from the light-motion curve catalogue of Bramich et al. (2008). Using a photometric parallax relation to estimate distances gives us the full phase-space coordinates. Typical velocity errors are in the range 30-50 km/s. This halo sample is one of the largest constructed to-date and the disc contamination is at a level of < 1 per cent. This enables us to calculate the halo velocity dispersion to excellent accuracy. We find that the velocity dispersion tensor is aligned in spherical polar coordinates and that (sigma_r, sigma_phi, sigma_theta) = (143 \pm 2, 82 \pm 2, 77 \pm 2) km/s. The stellar halo exhibits no net rotation, although the distribution of v_phi shows tentative evidence for asymmetry. The kinematics are consistent with a mildly flattened stellar density falling with distance like r^{-3.75}. Using the full phase-space coordinates, we look for signs of kinematic substructure in the stellar halo. We find evidence for four discrete overdensities localised in angular momentum and suggest that they may be possible accretion remnants. The most prominent is the solar neighbourhood stream previously identified by Helmi et al. (1999), but the remaining three are new. One of these overdensities is potentially associated with a group of four globular clusters (NGC5466, NGC6934, M2 and M13) and raises the possibility that these could have been accreted as part of a much larger progenitor.
[120]  oai:arXiv.org:0906.0498  [pdf] - 24857
Substructure revealed by RR Lyraes in SDSS Stripe 82
Comments: 15 pages, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-06-02
We present an analysis of the substructure revealed by 407 RR Lyraes in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82. Period estimates are determined to high accuracy using a string-length method. A subset of 178 RR Lyraes with spectrally derived metallicities are employed to derive metallicity-period-amplitude relations, which are then used to find metallicities and distances for the entire sample. The RR Lyraes lie between 5 and 115 kpc from the Galactic center. They are divided into subsets of 316 RRab types and 91 RRc types based on their period, colour and metallicity. The density distribution is not smooth, but dominated by clumps and substructure. Samples of 55 and 237 RR Lyraes associated with the Sagittarius Stream and the Hercules-Aquila Cloud respectively are identified. Hence, ~ 70 % of the RR Lyraes in Stripe 82 belong to known substructure. There is a sharp break in the density distribution at Galactocentric radii of 40 kpc, reflecting the fact that the dominant substructure in Stripe 82 - the Hercules-Aquila Cloud and the Sagittarius Stream - lies within 40 kpc. In fact, almost 60 % of all the RR Lyraes in Stripe 82 are associated with the Hercules-Aquila Cloud alone, which emphasises its pre-eminence. Additionally, evidence of a new and distant substructure - the Pisces Overdensity - is found, consisting of 28 faint RR Lyraes centered on Galactic coordinates (80 deg, -55 deg) and with distances of ~ 80 kpc. The total stellar mass in the Pisces Overdensity is ~10000 solar masses and its metallicity is [Fe/H] ~ -1.5.
[121]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.1354  [pdf] - 163047
OGLE-2005-BLG-071Lb, the Most Massive M-Dwarf Planetary Companion?
Comments: 51 pages, 12 figures, 3 tables, Published in ApJ
Submitted: 2008-04-09, last modified: 2009-06-02
We combine all available information to constrain the nature of OGLE-2005-BLG-071Lb, the second planet discovered by microlensing and the first in a high-magnification event. These include photometric and astrometric measurements from Hubble Space Telescope, as well as constraints from higher order effects extracted from the ground-based light curve, such as microlens parallax, planetary orbital motion and finite-source effects. Our primary analysis leads to the conclusion that the host of Jovian planet OGLE-2005-BLG-071Lb is an M dwarf in the foreground disk with mass M= 0.46 +/- 0.04 Msun, distance D_l = 3.3 +/- 0.4 kpc, and thick-disk kinematics v_LSR ~ 103 km/s. From the best-fit model, the planet has mass M_p = 3.8 +/- 0.4 M_Jup, lies at a projected separation r_perp = 3.6 +/- 0.2 AU from its host and so has an equilibrium temperature of T ~ 55 K, i.e., similar to Neptune. A degenerate model less favored by \Delta\chi^2 = 2.1 (or 2.2, depending on the sign of the impact parameter) gives similar planetary mass M_p = 3.4 +/- 0.4 M_Jup with a smaller projected separation, r_\perp = 2.1 +/- 0.1 AU, and higher equilibrium temperature T ~ 71 K. These results from the primary analysis suggest that OGLE-2005-BLG-071Lb is likely to be the most massive planet yet discovered that is hosted by an M dwarf. However, the formation of such high-mass planetary companions in the outer regions of M-dwarf planetary systems is predicted to be unlikely within the core-accretion scenario. There are a number of caveats to this primary analysis, which assumes (based on real but limited evidence) that the unlensed light coincident with the source is actually due to the lens, that is, the planetary host. However, these caveats could mostly be resolved by a single astrometric measurement a few years after the event.
[122]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.3003  [pdf] - 1002273
Difference imaging photometry of blended gravitational microlensing events with a numerical kernel
Comments: Accepted by MNRAS, 8 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2009-05-18
The numerical kernel approach to difference imaging has been implemented and applied to gravitational microlensing events observed by the PLANET collaboration. The effect of an error in the source-star coordinates is explored and a new algorithm is presented for determining the precise coordinates of the microlens in blended events, essential for accurate photometry of difference images. It is shown how the photometric reference flux need not be measured directly from the reference image but can be obtained from measurements of the difference images combined with knowledge of the statistical flux uncertainties. The improved performance of the new algorithm, relative to ISIS2, is demonstrated.
[123]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.1285  [pdf] - 20170
A systematic fitting scheme for caustic-crossing microlensing events
Comments: 12 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2009-01-09
We outline a method for fitting binary-lens caustic-crossing microlensing events based on the alternative model parameterisation proposed and detailed in Cassan (2008). As an illustration of our methodology, we present an analysis of OGLE-2007-BLG-472, a double-peaked Galactic microlensing event with a source crossing the whole caustic structure in less than three days. In order to identify all possible models we conduct an extensive search of the parameter space, followed by a refinement of the parameters with a Markov Chain-Monte Carlo algorithm. We find a number of low-chi2 regions in the parameter space, which lead to several distinct competitive best models. We examine the parameters for each of them, and estimate their physical properties. We find that our fitting strategy locates several minima that are difficult to find with other modelling strategies and is therefore a more appropriate method to fit this type of events.
[124]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.0813  [pdf] - 15190
RoboNet-II: Follow-up observations of microlensing events with a robotic network of telescopes
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures. Astronomical Notes - accepted. Changes:*spelling corrections and rewording. *Expanded sections on how the software interacts to further clarify the procedure. *Clarified further minor points as requested by the referee
Submitted: 2008-08-06, last modified: 2008-10-24
RoboNet-II uses a global network of robotic telescopes to perform follow-up observations of microlensing events in the Galactic Bulge. The current network consists of three 2m telescopes located in Hawaii and Australia (owned by Las Cumbres Observatory) and the Canary Islands (owned by Liverpool John Moores University). In future years the network will be expanded by deploying clusters of 1m telescopes in other suitable locations. A principal scientific aim of the RoboNet-II project is the detection of cool extra-solar planets by the method of gravitational microlensing. These detections will provide crucial constraints to models of planetary formation and orbital migration. RoboNet-II acts in coordination with the PLANET microlensing follow-up network and uses an optimization algorithm ("web-PLOP") to select the targets and a distributed scheduling paradigm (eSTAR) to execute the observations. Continuous automated assessment of the observations and anomaly detection is provided by the ARTEMiS system.
[125]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.0354  [pdf] - 15107
A new search for variable stars in the globular cluster NGC 6366
Comments: Accepted RMxAA
Submitted: 2008-08-03
New CCD photometry of NGC 6366 has lead to the discovery of some variable stars. Two possible Anomalous Cepheids (or Pop II Cepheids), three long period variables, one SX Phe and one eclipsing binary have been found. Also a list of 10 candidate variables is reported. The light curve of the RRab star, V1, has been decomposed into its Fourier harmonics, and the Fourier parameters were used to estimate the star's metallicity and distance; [Fe/H] = -0.87 +- 0.14 and d = 3.2 +- 0.1 kpc. It is argued that V1 may not be a member of the cluster but rather a more distant object. If this is so, an upper limit for the distance to the cluster of 2.8 +- 0.1 kpc can be estimated. The P-L relationship for SX Phe stars and the identified modes in the newly discovered SX Phe variable, V6, allow yet another independent determination of the distance to the cluster of d = 2.7 \+- 0.1 kpc. The M_V - {\rm [Fe/H]} relationship for RR Lyrae stars is addressed and the case of V1 is discussed.
[126]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.2159  [pdf] - 12643
The web-PLOP observation prioritisation system
Comments: 4 pages, Manchester Microlensing Conference, January 2008. To be published in the proceedings
Submitted: 2008-05-14
We present a description of the automated system used by RoboNet to prioritise follow up observations of microlensing events to search for planets. The system keeps an up-to-date record of all public data from OGLE and MOA together with any existing RoboNet data and produces new PSPL fits whenever new data arrives. It then uses these fits to predict the current or future magnitudes of events, and selects those to observe which will maximise the probability of detecting planets for a given telescope and observing time. The system drives the RoboNet telescopes automatically based on these priorities, but it is also designed to be used interactively by human observers. The prioritisation options, such as telescope/instrument parameters, observing conditions and available time can all be controlled via a web-form, and the output target list can also be customised and sorted to show the parameters that the user desires. The interactive interface is available at http://www.artemis-uk.org/web-PLOP/
[127]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.1273  [pdf] - 9913
A New Algorithm For Difference Image Analysis
Comments: MNRAS Letters Accepted
Submitted: 2008-02-11
In the context of difference image analysis (DIA), we present a new method for determining the convolution kernel matching a pair of images of the same field. Unlike the standard DIA technique which involves modelling the kernel as a linear combination of basis functions, we consider the kernel as a discrete pixel array and solve for the kernel pixel values directly using linear least-squares. The removal of basis functions from the kernel model is advantageous for a number of compelling reasons. Firstly, it removes the need for the user to specify such functions, which makes for a much simpler user application and avoids the risk of an inappropriate choice. Secondly, basis functions are constructed around the origin of the kernel coordinate system, which requires that the two images are perfectly aligned for an optimal result. The pixel kernel model is sufficiently flexible to correct for image misalignments, and in the case of a simple translation between images, image resampling becomes unnecessary. Our new algorithm can be extended to spatially varying kernels by solving for individual pixel kernels in a grid of image sub-regions and interpolating the solutions to obtain the kernel at any one pixel.
[128]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.4894  [pdf] - 9615
Light and Motion in SDSS Stripe 82: The Catalogues
Comments: MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2008-01-31
We present a new public archive of light-motion curves in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, covering 99 deg in right ascension from RA = 20.7 h to 3.3 h and spanning 2.52 deg in declination from Dec = -1.26 to 1.26 deg, for a total sky area of ~249 sq deg. Stripe 82 has been repeatedly monitored in the u, g, r, i and z bands over a seven-year baseline. Objects are cross-matched between runs, taking into account the effects of any proper motion. The resulting catalogue contains almost 4 million light-motion curves of stellar objects and galaxies. The photometry are recalibrated to correct for varying photometric zeropoints, achieving ~20 mmag and ~30 mmag root-mean-square (RMS) accuracy down to 18 mag in the g, r, i and z bands for point sources and extended sources, respectively. The astrometry are recalibrated to correct for inherent systematic errors in the SDSS astrometric solutions, achieving ~32 mas and ~35 mas RMS accuracy down to 18 mag for point sources and extended sources, respectively. For each light-motion curve, 229 photometric and astrometric quantities are derived and stored in a higher-level catalogue. On the photometric side, these include mean exponential and PSF magnitudes along with uncertainties, RMS scatter, chi^2 per degree of freedom, various magnitude distribution percentiles, object type (stellar or galaxy), and eclipse, Stetson and Vidrih variability indices. On the astrometric side, these quantities include mean positions, proper motions as well as their uncertainties and chi^2 per degree of freedom. The here presented light-motion curve catalogue is complete down to r~21.5 and is at present the deepest large-area photometric and astrometric variability catalogue available.
[129]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.4474  [pdf] - 157027
2MASS J01542930+0053266 : A New Eclipsing M-dwarf Binary System
Comments: 8 figures and 3 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2008-01-29
We report on 2MASS J01542930+0053266, a faint eclipsing system composed of two M dwarfs. The variability of this system was originally discovered during a pilot study of the 2MASS Calibration Point Source Working Database. Additional photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey yields an 8-passband lightcurve, from which we derive an orbital period of 2.6390157 +/- 0.0000016 days. Spectroscopic followup confirms our photometric classification of the system, which is likely composed of M0 and M1 dwarfs. Radial velocity measurements allow us to derive the masses (M_1 = 0.66 +/- 0.03 M_sun; M_2 = 0.62 +/- 0.03 M_sun) and radii (R_1 = 0.64 +/- 0.08 R_sun; R_2 = 0.61 +/- 0.09 R_sun) of the components, which are consistent with empirical mass-radius relationships for low-mass stars in binary systems. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of the lightcurves which allow us to uncover complicated degeneracies between the system parameters. Both stars show evidence of H-alpha emission, something not common in early-type M dwarfs. This suggests that binarity may influence the magnetic activity properties of low-mass stars; activity in the binary may persist long after the dynamos in their isolated counterparts have decayed, yielding a new potential foreground of flaring activity for next generation variability surveys.
[130]  oai:arXiv.org:0711.4027  [pdf] - 7378
CCD Photometry of the globular cluster NGC 5466. RR Lyrae light curve decomposition and the distance scale
Comments: 17 pages, MNRAS Accepted
Submitted: 2007-11-26
We report the results of CCD V and r photometry of the globular cluster NGC 5466. The difference image analysis technique adopted in this work has resulted in accurate time series photometry even in crowded regions of the cluster enabling us to discover five probably semi-regular variables. We present new photometry of three previously known eclipsing binaries and six SX Phe stars. The light curves of the RR Lyrae stars have been decomposed in their Fourier harmonics and their fundamental physical parameters have been estimated using semi-empirical calibrations. The zero points of the metallicity, luminosity and temperature scales are discussed and our Fourier results are transformed accordingly. The average iron abundance and distance to the Sun derived from individual RR Lyrae stars, indicate values of [Fe/H]=-1.91 +- 0.19 and D = 16.0 +- 0.6 kpc, or a true distance modulus of 16.02 +- 0.09 mag, for the parent cluster. These values are respectively in the Zinn & West metallicity scale and in agreement with recent luminosity determinations for the RR Lyrae stars in the LMC. The M_V-[Fe/H] relation has been recalibrated as M_V=+(0.18+-0.03)[Fe/H]+(0.85+-0.05) using the mean values derived by the Fourier technique on RR Lyrae stars in a family of clusters. This equation predicts M_V=0.58 mag for [Fe/H]=-1.5, in agreement with the average absolute magnitude of RR Lyrae stars calculated from several independent methods. The M_V-[Fe/H] relationship and the value of [Fe/H] have implications on the age of the globular clusters when determined from the magnitude difference between the horizontal branch and the turn off point (HB-TO method). The above results however would not imply a change in the age of NGC 5466, of 12.5+-0.9 Gyr, estimated from recent isochrone fitting.
[131]  oai:arXiv.org:0709.1131  [pdf] - 4708
New UltraCool and Halo White Dwarf Candidates in SDSS Stripe 82
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, published in MNRAS, minor text changes, final version
Submitted: 2007-09-07, last modified: 2007-11-19
A 2.5 x 100 degree region along the celestial equator (Stripe 82) has been imaged repeatedly from 1998 to 2005 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A new catalogue of ~4 million light-motion curves, together with over 200 derived statistical quantities, for objects in Stripe 82 brighter than r~21.5 has been constructed by combining these data by Bramich et al. (2007). This catalogue is at present the deepest catalogue of its kind. Extracting the ~130000 objects with highest signal-to-noise ratio proper motions, we build a reduced proper motion diagram to illustrate the scientific promise of the catalogue. In this diagram disk and halo subdwarfs are well-separated from the cool white dwarf sequence. Our sample of 1049 cool white dwarf candidates includes at least 8 and possibly 21 new ultracool H-rich white dwarfs (T_eff < 4000K) and one new ultracool He-rich white dwarf candidate identified from their SDSS optical and UKIDSS infrared photometry. At least 10 new halo white dwarfs are also identified from their kinematics.
[132]  oai:arXiv.org:0706.2566  [pdf] - 2309
An anomaly detector with immediate feedback to hunt for planets of Earth mass and below by microlensing
Comments: 13 pages, 4 figures and 1 table. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2007-06-18
(abridged) The discovery of OGLE 2005-BLG-390Lb, the first cool rocky/icy exoplanet, impressively demonstrated the sensitivity of the microlensing technique to extra-solar planets below 10 M_earth. A planet of 1 M_earth in the same spot would have provided a detectable deviation with an amplitude of ~ 3 % and a duration of ~ 12 h. An early detection of a deviation could trigger higher-cadence sampling which would have allowed the discovery of an Earth-mass planet in this case. Here, we describe the implementation of an automated anomaly detector, embedded into the eSTAR system, that profits from immediate feedback provided by the robotic telescopes that form the RoboNet-1.0 network. It went into operation for the 2007 microlensing observing season. As part of our discussion about an optimal strategy for planet detection, we shed some new light on whether concentrating on highly-magnified events is promising and planets in the 'resonant' angular separation equal to the angular Einstein radius are revealed most easily. Given that sub-Neptune mass planets can be considered being common around the host stars probed by microlensing (preferentially M- and K-dwarfs), the higher number of events that can be monitored with a network of 2m telescopes and the increased detection efficiency for planets below 5 M_earth arising from an optimized strategy gives a common effort of current microlensing campaigns a fair chance to detect an Earth-mass planet (from the ground) ahead of the COROT or Kepler missions. The detection limit of gravitational microlensing extends even below 0.1 M_earth, but such planets are not very likely to be detected from current campaigns. However, these will be within the reach of high-cadence monitoring with a network of wide-field telescopes or a space-based telescope.
[133]  oai:arXiv.org:0706.2325  [pdf] - 2263
The Monitor project: JW 380 -- a 0.26, 0.15 Msol pre main sequence eclipsing binary in the Orion Nebula Cluster
Comments: 11 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2007-06-15
We report the discovery of a low-mass (0.26 +/- 0.02, 0.15 +/- 0.01 Msol) pre-main-sequence eclipsing binary with a 5.3 day orbital period. JW 380 was detected as part of a high-cadence time-resolved photometric survey (the Monitor project) using the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope and Wide Field Camera for a survey of a single field in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) region in V and i bands. The star is assigned a 99 per cent membership probability from proper motion measurements, and radial velocity observations indicate a systemic velocity within 1 sigma of that of the ONC. Modelling of the combined light and radial velocity curves of the system gave stellar radii of 1.19 +0.04 -0.18 Rsol and 0.90 +0.17 -0.03 Rsol for the primary and secondary, with a significant third light contribution which is also visible as a third peak in the cross-correlation functions used to derive radial velocities. The masses and radii appear to be consistent with stellar models for 2-3 Myr age from several authors, within the present observational errors. These observations probe an important region of mass-radius parameter space, where there are currently only a handful of known pre-main-sequence eclipsing binary systems with precise measurements available in the literature.
[134]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0702518  [pdf] - 89572
The Monitor project: Rotation of low-mass stars in the open cluster NGC 2516
Comments: 19 pages, 24 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2007-02-20
We report on the results of an i-band time-series photometric survey of NGC 2516 using the CTIO 4m Blanco telescope and 8k Mosaic-II detector, achieving better than 1% photometric precision per data point over 15<~i<~19. Candidate cluster members were selected from a V vs V-I colour magnitude diagram over 16<V<26 (covering masses from 0.7 M_solar down to below the brown dwarf limit), finding 1685 candidates, of which we expect ~1000 to be real cluster members, taking into account contamination from the field (which is most severe at the extremes of our mass range). Searching for periodic variations in these gave 362 detections over the mass range 0.15<~M/M_solar<~0.7. The rotation period distributions were found to show a remarkable morphology as a function of mass, with the fastest rotators bounded by P>0.25 days, and the slowest rotators for M<~0.5 M_solar bounded by a line of P \propto M^3, with those for M>~0.5 M_solar following a flatter relation closer to P ~ constant. Models of the rotational evolution were investigated, finding that the evolution of the fastest rotators was well-reproduced by a conventional solid body model with a mass-dependent saturation velocity, whereas core-envelope decoupling was needed to reproduce the evolution of the slowest rotators. None of our models were able to simultaneously reproduce the behaviour of both populations.
[135]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0701790  [pdf] - 88919
The Hercules-Aquila Cloud
Comments: ApJ (Letters), in press
Submitted: 2007-01-27
We present evidence for a substantial overdensity of stars in the direction of the constellations of Hercules and Aquila. The Cloud is centered at a Galactic longitude of about 40 degrees and extends above and below the Galactic plane by at least 50 degrees. Given its off-centeredness and height, it is unlikely that the Hercules-Aquila Cloud is related to the bulge or thick disk. More likely, this is a new structural component of the Galaxy that passes through the disk. The Cloud stretches about 80 degrees in longitude. Its heliocentric distance lies between 10 and 20 kpc so that the extent of the Cloud in projection is roughly 20 kpc by 15 kpc. It has an absolute magnitude of -13 and its stellar population appears to be comparable to, but somewhat more metal-rich than, M92.
[136]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0701154  [pdf] - 554656
Discovery of an Unusual Dwarf Galaxy in the Outskirts of the Milky Way
Comments: Ap J (Letters) in press, the subject of an SDSS press release today
Submitted: 2007-01-05
In this Letter, we announce the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Leo T, in the Local Group. It was found as a stellar overdensity in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 (SDSS DR5). The color-magnitude diagram of Leo T shows two well-defined features, which we interpret as a red giant branch and a sequence of young, massive stars. As judged from fits to the color-magnitude diagram, it lies at a distance of about 420 kpc and has an intermediate-age stellar population with a metallicity of [Fe/H]= -1.6, together with a young population of blue stars of age of 200 Myr. There is a compact cloud of neutral hydrogen with mass roughly 10^5 solar masses and radial velocity 35 km/s coincident with the object visible in the HIPASS channel maps. Leo T is the smallest, lowest luminosity galaxy found to date with recent star-formation. It appears to be a transition object similar to, but much lower luminosity than, the Phoenix dwarf.
[137]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0611157  [pdf] - 86543
Is Ursa Major II the Progenitor of the Orphan Stream?
Comments: MNRAS, in press
Submitted: 2006-11-06, last modified: 2006-12-21
Prominent in the `Field of Streams' -- the Sloan Digital Sky Survey map of substructure in the Galactic halo -- is an `Orphan Stream' without obvious progenitor. In this numerical study, we show a possible connection between the newly found dwarf satellite Ursa Major II (UMa II) and the Orphan Stream. We provide numerical simulations of the disruption of UMa II that match the observational data on the position, distance and morphology of the Orphan Stream. We predict the radial velocity of UMa II as -100 km/s as well as the existence of strong velocity gradients along the Orphan Stream. The velocity dispersion of UMa II is expected to be high, though this can be caused both by a high dark matter content or by the presence of unbound stars in a disrupted remnant. However, the existence of a gradient in the mean radial velocity across UMa II provides a clear-cut distinction between these possibilities. The simulations support the idea that some of the anomalous, young halo globular clusters like Palomar 1 or Arp 2 or Ruprecht 106 may be physically associated with the Orphan Stream.
[138]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605705  [pdf] - 82392
An Orphan in the "Field of Streams"
Comments: ApJ, in press
Submitted: 2006-05-29, last modified: 2006-11-30
We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 photometry and spectroscopy to study a tidal stream that extends over 50 degrees in the North Galactic Cap. From the analysis of the path of the stream and the colors and magnitudes of its stars, the stream is about 20 kpc away at its nearest detection (the celestial equator). We detect a distance gradient -- the stream is farther away from us at higher declination. The contents of the stream are made up from a predominantly old and metal-poor population that is similar to the globular clusters M13 and M92. The integrated absolute magnitude of the stream stars is estimated to be M_r = -7.5. There istentative evidence for a velocity signature, with the stream moving at -40 km/s at low declinations and +100 km/s at high declinations. The stream lies on the same great circle as Complex A, a roughly linear association of HI high velocity clouds stretching over 30 degrees on the sky, and as Ursa Major II, a recently discovered dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Lying close to the same great circle are a number of anomalous, young and metal-poor globular clusters, including Palomar 1 and Ruprecht 106.
[139]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0608448  [pdf] - 84325
Cats and Dogs, Hair and A Hero: A Quintet of New Milky Way Companions
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, submitted to the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2006-08-21
We present five new satellites of the Milky Way discovered in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data, four of which were followed-up with either the Subaru or the Isaac Newton Telescopes. They include four probable new dwarf galaxies -- one each in the constellations of Coma Berenices, Canes Venatici, Leo and Hercules -- together with one unusually extended globular cluster, Segue 1. We provide distances, absolute magnitudes, half-light radii and color-magnitude diagrams for all five satellites. The morphological features of the color-magnitude diagrams are generally well described by the ridge line of the old, metal-poor globular cluster M92. In the last two years, a total of ten new Milky Way satellites with effective surface brightness mu_v >~ 28 mag/sq. arcsec have been discovered in SDSS data. They are less luminous, more irregular and appear to be more metal-poor than the previously-known nine Milky Way dwarf spheroidals. The relationship between these objects and other populations is discussed. We note that there is a paucity of objects with half-light radii between ~40 pc and ~ 100 pc. We conjecture that this may represent the division between star clusters and dwarf galaxies.
[140]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606633  [pdf] - 142666
A Curious New Milky Way Satellite in Ursa Major
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures, submitted to ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2006-06-26, last modified: 2006-07-04
In this Letter, we study a localized stellar overdensity in the constellation of Ursa Major, first identified in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data and subsequently followed up with Subaru imaging. Its color-magnitude diagram (CMD) shows a well-defined sub-giant branch, main sequence and turn-off, from which we estimate a distance of ~30 kpc and a projected size of ~250 x 125 pc. The CMD suggests a composite population with some range in metallicity and/or age. Based on its extent and stellar population, we argue that this is a previously unknown satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, hereby named Ursa Major II (UMa II) after its constellation. Using SDSS data, we find an absolute magnitude of M_V \~ -3.8, which would make it the faintest known satellite galaxy. UMa II's isophotes are irregular and distorted with evidence for multiple concentrations; this suggests that the satellite is in the process of disruption.
[141]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0604355  [pdf] - 142658
A Faint New Milky Way Satellite in Bootes
Comments: ApJ (Letters), in press
Submitted: 2006-04-17, last modified: 2006-06-29
In this Letter, we announce the discovery of a new satellite of the Milky Way in the constellation of Bootes at a distance of 60 kpc. It was found in a systematic search for stellar overdensities in the North Galactic Cap using Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 (SDSS DR5). The color-magnitude diagram shows a well-defined turn-off, red giant branch, and extended horizontal branch. Its absolute magnitude is -5.8, which makes it one of the faintest galaxies known. The half-light radius is 220 pc. The isodensity contours are elongated and have an irregular shape, suggesting that Boo may be a disrupted dwarf spheroidal galaxy.
[142]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606734  [pdf] - 83174
CCD Photometry of the globular cluster M2. RR Lyrae physical parameters and new variables
Comments: 13 Pages, 10 Figures, Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-06-29
We report the results of CCD V and R photometry of the RR Lyrae stars in M2. The periodicities of most variables are revised and new ephemerides are calculated. Light curve decomposition of the RR Lyrae stars was carried out and the corresponding mean physical parameters [Fe/H] = -1.47, Teff = 6276 K, log L = 1.63 Lsun and Mv = 0.71 from nine RRab and [Fe/H] = -1.61, M = 0.54 Msun, Teff = 7215 K, log L = 1.74 Lsun and Mv = 0.71 from two RRc stars were calculated. A comparison of the radii obtained from the above luminosity and temperature with predicted radii from nonlinear convective models is discussed. The estimated mean distance to the cluster is 10.49 +- 0.15 kpc. These results place M2 correctly in the general globular cluster sequences Oosterhoff type, mass, luminosity and temperature, all as a function of the metallicity. Mean relationships for M, log L/Lsun, Teff and Mv as a function of [Fe/H] for a family of globular clusters are offered. These trends are consistent with evolutionary and structural notions on the horizontal branch. Eight new variables are reported.
[143]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605026  [pdf] - 81714
The Origin of the Bifurcation in the Sagittarius Stream
Comments: ApJ, in press
Submitted: 2006-05-01, last modified: 2006-06-26
The latest Sloan Digital Sky Survey data reveal a prominent bifurcation in the distribution of debris of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal (Sgr) beginning at a right ascension of roughly 190 degrees. Two branches of the stream (A and B) persist at roughly the same heliocentric distance over at least 50 degrees of arc. There is also evidence for a more distant structure (C) well behind the A branch. This paper provides the first explanation for the bifurcation. It is caused by the projection of the young leading (A) and old trailing (B) tidal arms of the Sgr, whilst the old leading arm (C) lies well behind A. This explanation is only possible if the halo is close to spherical, as the angular difference between the branches is a measure of the precession of the orbital plane.
[144]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605025  [pdf] - 260727
The Field of Streams: Sagittarius and its Siblings
Comments: ApJ (Letters), in press
Submitted: 2006-05-01
We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 5 (DR5) u,g,r,i,z photometry to study Milky Way halo substructure in the area around the North Galactic Cap. A simple color cut (g-r < 0.4) reveals the tidal stream of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal, as well as a number of other stellar structures in the field. Two branches (A and B) of the Sagittarius stream are clearly visible in an RGB-composite image created from 3 magnitude slices, and there is also evidence for a still more distant wrap behind the A branch. A comparison of these data with numerical models suggests that the shape of the Galactic dark halo is close to spherical.
[145]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0604354  [pdf] - 142657
A New Milky Way Dwarf Satellite in Canes Venatici
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures; submitted to ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2006-04-17
In this Letter, we announce the discovery of a new dwarf satellite of the Milky Way, located in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was found as a stellar overdensity in the North Galactic Cap using Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 (SDSS DR5). The satellite's color-magnitude diagram shows a well-defined red giant branch, as well as a horizontal branch. As judged from the tip of the red giant branch, it lies at a distance of ~220 kpc. Based on the SDSS data, we estimate an absolute magnitude of Mv ~ -7.9, a central surface brightness of mu_0,V ~ 28 mag arcsecond^-2, and a half-light radius of \~ 8.5' (~ 550 pc at the measured distance). The outer regions of Canes Venatici appear extended and distorted. The discovery of such a faint galaxy in proximity to the Milky Way strongly suggests that more such objects remain to be found.
[146]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603276  [pdf] - 80485
Microlens OGLE-2005-BLG-169 Implies Cool Neptune-Like Planets are Common
Comments: Submitted to ApJ Letters, 9 text pages + 4 figures + 1 table
Submitted: 2006-03-10
We detect a Neptune mass-ratio (q~8e-5) planetary companion to the lens star in the extremely high-magnification (A~800) microlensing event OGLE-2005-BLG-169. If the parent is a main-sequence star, it has mass M~0.5 M_sun implying a planet mass of ~13 M_earth and projected separation of ~2.7 AU. When intensely monitored over their peak, high-magnification events similar to OGLE-2005-BLG-169 have nearly complete sensitivity to Neptune mass-ratio planets with projected separations of 0.6 to 1.6 Einstein radii, corresponding to 1.6--4.3 AU in the present case. Only two other such events were monitored well enough to detect Neptunes, and so this detection by itself suggests that Neptune mass-ratio planets are common. Moreover, another Neptune was recently discovered at a similar distance from its parent star in a low-magnification event, which are more common but are individually much less sensitive to planets. Combining the two detections yields 90% upper and lower frequency limits f=0.37^{+0.30}_{-0.21} over just 0.4 decades of planet-star separation. In particular, f>16% at 90% confidence. The parent star hosts no Jupiter-mass companions with projected separations within a factor 5 of that of the detected planet. The lens-source relative proper motion is \mu~7--10 mas/yr, implying that if the lens is sufficiently bright, I<23.8, it will be detectable by HST by 3 years after peak. This would permit a more precise estimate of the lens mass and distance, and so the mass and projected separation of the planet. Analogs of OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb orbiting nearby stars would be difficult to detect by other methods of planet detection, including radial velocities, transits, or astrometry.
[147]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0601563  [pdf] - 79421
Discovery of a Cool Planet of 5.5 Earth Masses Through Gravitational Microlensing
Comments:
Submitted: 2006-01-24
In the favoured core-accretion model of formation of planetary systems, solid planetesimals accumulate to build up planetary cores, which then accrete nebular gas if they are sufficiently massive. Around M-dwarf stars (the most common stars in our Galaxy), this model favours the formation of Earth-mass to Neptune-mass planets with orbital radii of 1 to 10 astronomical units (AU), which is consistent with the small number of gas giant planets known to orbit M-dwarf host stars. More than 170 extrasolar planets have been discovered with a wide range of masses and orbital periods, but planets of Neptune's mass or less have not hitherto been detected at separations of more than 0.15 AU from normal stars. Here we report the discovery of a 5.5 (+5.5/-2.7) M_earth planetary companion at a separation of 2.6 (+1.5/-0.6) AU from a 0.22 (+0.21/-0.11) M_solar M-dwarf star. (We propose to name it OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb, indicating a planetary mass companion to the lens star of the microlensing event.) The mass is lower than that of GJ876d, although the error bars overlap. Our detection suggests that such cool, sub-Neptune-mass planets may be more common than gas giant planets, as predicted by the core accretion theory.
[148]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0512352  [pdf] - 78552
Upper limits on the hot Jupiter fraction in the field of NGC 7789
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS (04/11/2005)
Submitted: 2005-12-13
We describe a method of estimating the abundance of short-period extrasolar planets based on the results of a photometric survey for planetary transits. We apply the method to a 21-night survey with the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope of \~32000 stars in a ~0.5 deg by 0.5 deg square field including the open cluster NGC 7789. From the colour-magnitude diagram we estimate the mass and radius of each star by comparison with the cluster main sequence. We search for injected synthetic transits throughout the lightcurve of each star in order to determine their recovery rate, and thus calculate the expected number of transit detections and false alarms in the survey. We take proper account of the photometric accuracy, time sampling of the observations and criteria (signal-to-noise and number of transits) adopted for transit detection. Assuming that none of the transit candidates found in the survey will be confirmed as real planets, we place conservative upper limits on the abundance of planets as a function of planet radius, orbital period and spectral type.
[149]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0506568  [pdf] - 73968
A Survey of Eclipsing Binary Stars in the Eastern Spiral Arm of M31
Comments: 10 pages, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2005-06-23
Results of an archival survey are presented using B-band imaging of the eastern spiral arm of M31. Focusing on the eclipsing binary star population, a matched-filter technique has been used to identify 280 binary systems. Of these, 127 systems (98 of which are newly discovered) have sufficient phase coverage to allow accurate orbital periods to be determined. At least nine of these binaries are detached systems which could, in principle, be used for distance determination. The light curves of the detached and other selected systems are presented along with a discussion of some of the more interesting binaries. The impact of unresolved stellar blends on these lightcurves is considered.
[150]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0505451  [pdf] - 73221
A Jovian-mass Planet in Microlensing Event OGLE-2005-BLG-071
Comments: 4 pages. Minor changes. Accepted for publication in ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2005-05-20, last modified: 2005-06-20
We report the discovery of a several-Jupiter mass planetary companion to the primary lens star in microlensing event OGLE-2005-BLG-071. Precise (<1%) photometry at the peak of the event yields an extremely high signal-to-noise ratio detection of a deviation from the light curve expected from an isolated lens. The planetary character of this deviation is easily and unambiguously discernible from the gross features of the light curve. Detailed modeling yields a tightly-constrained planet-star mass ratio of q=m_p/M=0.0071+/-0.0003. This is the second robust detection of a planet with microlensing, demonstrating that the technique itself is viable and that planets are not rare in the systems probed by microlensing, which typically lie several kpc toward the Galactic center.
[151]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0505540  [pdf] - 73310
A dearth of planetary transits in the direction of NGC 6940
Comments: 11 pages, 30 figures, mn2e.cls style, accepted to Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 8 April 2005
Submitted: 2005-05-26
We present results of our survey for planetary transits in the field of NGC 6940. We think nearly all of our observed stars are field stars. We have obtained high precision (3-10 millimags at the bright end) photometric observations of 50,000 stars spanning 18 nights in an attempt to identify low amplitude and short period transit events. We have used a matched filter analysis to identify 14 stars that show multiple events, and four stars that show single transits. Of these 18 candidates, we have identified two that should be further researched. However, none of the candidates are convincing hot Jupiters.
[152]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0503040  [pdf] - 71422
A Survey for Planetary Transits in the Field of NGC 7789
Comments: 22 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2005-03-02
We present results from 30 nights of observations of the open cluster NGC 7789 with the WFC camera on the INT telescope in La Palma. From ~900 epochs, we obtained lightcurves and Sloan r-i colours for ~33000 stars, with ~2400 stars with better than 1% precision. We expected to detect ~2 transiting hot Jupiter planets if 1% of stars host such a companion and that a typical hot Jupiter radius is ~1.2RJ. We find 24 transit candidates, 14 of which we can assign a period. We rule out the transiting planet model for 21 of these candidates using various robust arguments. For 2 candidates we are unable to decide on their nature, although it seems most likely that they are eclipsing binaries as well. We have one candidate exhibiting a single eclipse for which we derive a radius of 1.81+0.09-0.00RJ. Three candidates remain that require follow-up observations in order to determine their nature.
[153]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0408434  [pdf] - 66925
Structure and star formation in disk galaxies II. Optical imaging
Comments: 7 pages latex, 2 postscript figures. Accepted for Astronomy & Astrophysics. Images from this paper as well as those from Paper I (Knapen et al. 2003, MNRAS, 344, 527) will be available through the CDS
Submitted: 2004-08-24
We present optical observations of a sample of 57 spiral galaxies and describe the procedures followed to reduce the data. We have obtained images in the optical B and I broad bands, as well as in H alpha, with moderate spatial resolution and across wide enough fields to image the complete disks of the galaxies. In addition, we observed 55 of our sample galaxies in the R and eight in the V band, and imaged a subset through a dedicated narrow continuum filter for the H alpha line. We describe the data reduction procedures we developed in the course of this work to register, combine and photometrically calibrate each set of images for an individual galaxy. We describe in some detail the procedure used to subtract the continuum emission from our H alpha images. In companion papers, we describe near-infrared imaging of the galaxy sample, and present analyses of disk scale lengths, and of properties of bars, rings, and HII regions in the sample galaxies. The images described here will be made available for use by other researchers through the CDS.
[154]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0310848  [pdf] - 60511
Searching For Planetary Transits In The Open Cluster NGC 7789
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, To be published in the Conference Proceedings of the XIXth IAP Colloqium, Paris
Submitted: 2003-10-29
Open clusters are ideal targets for searching for transiting Hot Jupiters. They provide a relatively large concentration of stars on the sky and cluster members have similar metallicities, ages and distances. Fainter cluster members are likely to show deeper transit signatures, helping to offset sky noise contributions. A survey of open clusters will then help to characterise the Hot Jupiter fraction of main sequence stars, and how this may depend on primordial metallicity and stellar age. We present results from 11 nights of observations of the open cluster NGC 7789 with the WFC camera on the INT telescope in La Palma. From 684 epochs, we obtained lightcurves and B-V colours for ~25600 stars, with ~2400 stars with better than 1% precision. We expect to detect ~1 transiting Hot Jupiter in our sample assuming that 1% of stars host a Hot Jupiter companion.
[155]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0303613  [pdf] - 55852
Structure and star formation in disk galaxies I. Sample selection and near infrared imaging
Comments: Accepted for MNRAS. 16 Pages latex, including 9 embedded postscript figures and 3 panels of galaxy images in jpeg format. References updated
Submitted: 2003-03-27, last modified: 2003-03-28
We present near-infrared imaging of a sample of 57 relatively large, Northern spiral galaxies with low inclination. After describing the selection criteria and some of the basic properties of the sample, we give a detailed description of the data collection and reduction procedures. The K_s lambda=2.2 micron images cover most of the disk for all galaxies, with a field of view of at least 4.2 arcmin. The spatial resolution is better than an arcsec for most images. We fit bulge and exponential disk components to radial profiles of the light distribution. We then derive the basic parameters of these components, as well as the bulge/disk ratio, and explore correlations of these parameters with several galaxy parameters.
[156]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0208154  [pdf] - 50970
University of St.Andrews Open Cluster Survey for Hot Jupiters
Comments: 4 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2002-08-07
We are using the Isaac Newton Telescope Wide Field Camera to survey open cluster fields for transiting hot Jupiter planets. Clusters were selected on the basis of visibility, richness of stars, age and metallicity. Observations of NGC 6819, 6940 and 7789 began in 1999 and continued in 2000. We have developed an effective matched-filter transit-detection algorithm which has proved its ability to identify very low amplitude eclipse events in real data. Here we present our results for NGC 6819. We have identified 7 candidates showing transit-like events. Colour information suggests that most of the companion bodies are likely to be very-low-mass stars or brown dwarfs, intrinsically interesting objects in their own right.