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Battaglia, P.

Normalized to: Battaglia, P.

32 article(s) in total. 716 co-authors, from 1 to 29 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 7,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.11287  [pdf] - 2119129
Discovering Symbolic Models from Deep Learning with Inductive Biases
Comments: 9 pages content + 14 pages appendix/references. Supporting code found at https://github.com/MilesCranmer/symbolic_deep_learning
Submitted: 2020-06-19
We develop a general approach to distill symbolic representations of a learned deep model by introducing strong inductive biases. We focus on Graph Neural Networks (GNNs). The technique works as follows: we first encourage sparse latent representations when we train a GNN in a supervised setting, then we apply symbolic regression to components of the learned model to extract explicit physical relations. We find the correct known equations, including force laws and Hamiltonians, can be extracted from the neural network. We then apply our method to a non-trivial cosmology example-a detailed dark matter simulation-and discover a new analytic formula which can predict the concentration of dark matter from the mass distribution of nearby cosmic structures. The symbolic expressions extracted from the GNN using our technique also generalized to out-of-distribution data better than the GNN itself. Our approach offers alternative directions for interpreting neural networks and discovering novel physical principles from the representations they learn.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.01187  [pdf] - 2089273
Progress report on the Large Scale Polarization Explorer
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, Accepted for publication in Journal of Low Temperature Physics
Submitted: 2020-05-03, last modified: 2020-05-05
The Large Scale Polarization Explorer (LSPE) is a cosmology program for the measurement of large scale curl-like features (B-modes) in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. Its goal is to constrain the background of inflationary gravity waves traveling through the universe at the time of matter-radiation decoupling. The two instruments of LSPE are meant to synergically operate by covering a large portion of the northern microwave sky. LSPE/STRIP is a coherent array of receivers planned to be operated from the Teide Observatory in Tenerife, for the control and characterization of the low-frequency polarized signals of galactic origin; LSPE/SWIPE is a balloon-borne bolometric polarimeter based on 330 large throughput multi-moded detectors, designed to measure the CMB polarization at 150 GHz and to monitor the polarized emission by galactic dust above 200 GHz. The combined performance and the expected level of systematics mitigation will allow LSPE to constrain primordial B-modes down to a tensor/scalar ratio of $10^{-2}$. We here report the status of the STRIP pre-commissioning phase and the progress in the characterization of the key subsystems of the SWIPE payload (namely the cryogenic polarization modulation unit and the multi-moded TES pixels) prior to receiver integration.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.10272  [pdf] - 2065386
QUBIC: the Q & U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology
Battistelli, E. S.; Ade, P.; Alberro, J. G.; Almela, A.; Amico, G.; Arnaldi, L. H.; Auguste, D.; Aumont, J.; Azzoni, S.; Banfi, S.; Battaglia, P.; Baù, A.; Bèlier, B.; Bennett, D.; Bergè, L.; Bernard, J. -Ph.; Bersanelli, M.; Bigot-Sazy, M. -A.; Bleurvacq, N.; Bonaparte, J.; Bonis, J.; Bottani, A.; Bunn, E.; Burke, D.; Buzi, D.; Buzzelli, A.; Cavaliere, F.; Chanial, P.; Chapron, C.; Charlassier, R.; Columbro, F.; Coppi, G.; Coppolecchia, A.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; De Gasperis, G.; De Leo, M.; De Petris, M.; Dheilly, S.; Di Donato, A.; Dumoulin, L.; Etchegoyen, A.; Fasciszewski, A.; Ferreyro, L. P.; Fracchia, D.; Franceschet, C.; Lerena, M. M. Gamboa; Ganga, K.; Garcìa, B.; Redondo, M. E. Garcìa; Gaspard, M.; Gault, A.; Gayer, D.; Gervasi, M.; Giard, M.; Gilles, V.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Berisso, M. Gòmez; Gonzàlez, M.; Gradziel, M.; Grandsire, L.; Hamilton, J. -Ch.; Harari, D.; Haynes, V.; Henrot-Versillè, S.; Hoang, D. T.; Incardona, F.; Jules, E.; Kaplan, J.; Korotkov, A.; Kristukat, C.; Lamagna, L.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, T.; Luterstein, R.; Maffei, B.; Marnieros, S.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mattei, A.; May, A.; McCulloch, M.; Medina, M. C.; Mele, L.; Melhuish, S.; Mennella, A.; Montier, L.; Mousset, L.; Mundo, L. M.; Murphy, J. A.; Murphy, J. D.; Nati, F.; Olivieri, E.; Oriol, C.; O'Sullivan, C.; Paiella, A.; Pajot, F.; Passerini, A.; Pastoriza, H.; Pelosi, A.; Perbost, C.; Perciballi, M.; Pezzotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Piccirillo, L.; Pisano, G.; Platino, M.; Polenta, G.; Prèle, D.; Puddu, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ringegni, P.; Romero, G. E.; Salatino, M.; Salum, J. M.; Schillaci, A.; Scòccola, C.; Scully, S.; Spinelli, S.; Stankowiak, G.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Suarez, F.; Tartari, A.; Thermeau, J. -P.; Timbie, P.; Tomasi, M.; Torchinsky, S.; Tristram, M.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G.; Vanneste, S.; Viganò, D.; Vittorio, N.; Voisin, F.; Watson, B.; Wicek, F.; Zannoni, M.; Zullo, A.
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Journal of Low Temperature Physics
Submitted: 2020-01-28
The Q & U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology, QUBIC, is an innovative experiment designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background and in particular the signature left therein by the inflationary expansion of the Universe. The expected signal is extremely faint, thus extreme sensitivity and systematic control are necessary in order to attempt this measurement. QUBIC addresses these requirements using an innovative approach combining the sensitivity of Transition Edge Sensor cryogenic bolometers, with the deep control of systematics characteristic of interferometers. This makes QUBIC unique with respect to others classical imagers experiments devoted to the CMB polarization. In this contribution we report a description of the QUBIC instrument including recent achievements and the demonstration of the bolometric interferometry performed in lab. QUBIC will be deployed at the observation site in Alto Chorrillos, in Argentina at the end of 2019.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.12418  [pdf] - 2011325
QUBIC: using NbSi TESs with a bolometric interferometer to characterize the polarisation of the CMB
Piat, M.; Bélier, B.; Bergé, L.; Bleurvacq, N.; Chapron, C.; Dheilly, S.; Dumoulin, L.; González, M.; Grandsire, L.; Hamilton, J. -Ch.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hoang, D. T.; Marnieros, S.; Marty, W.; Montier, L.; Olivieri, E.; Oriol, C.; Perbost, C.; Prêle, D.; Rambaud, D.; Salatino, M.; Stankowiak, G.; Thermeau, J. -P.; Torchinsky, S.; Voisin, F.; Ade, P.; Alberro, J. G.; Almela, A.; Amico, G.; Arnaldi, L. H.; Auguste, D.; Aumont, J.; Azzoni, S.; Banfi, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battistelli, E. S.; Baù, A.; Bennett, D.; Bernard, J. -Ph.; Bersanelli, M.; Bigot-Sazy, M. -A.; Bonaparte, J.; Bonis, J.; Bottani, A.; Bunn, E.; Burke, D.; Buzi, D.; Buzzelli, A.; Cavaliere, F.; Chanial, P.; Charlassier, R.; Columbro, F.; Coppi, G.; Coppolecchia, A.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; De Gasperis, G.; De Leo, M.; De Petris, M.; Di Donato, A.; Etchegoyen, A.; Fasciszewski, A.; Ferreyro, L. P.; Fracchia, D.; Franceschet, C.; Lerena, M. M. Gamboa; Ganga, K.; García, B.; Redondo, M. E. García; Gaspard, M.; Gault, A.; Gayer, D.; Gervasi, M.; Giard, M.; Gilles, V.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Berisso, M. Gómez; Gradziel, M.; Harari, D.; Haynes, V.; Incardona, F.; Jules, E.; Kaplan, J.; Korotkov, A.; Kristukat, C.; Lamagna, L.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, T.; Luterstein, R.; Maffei, B.; Masi, S.; Mattei, A.; May, A.; McCulloch, M.; Medina, M. C.; Mele, L.; Melhuish, S.; Mennella, A.; Mousset, L.; Mundo, L. M.; Murphy, J. A.; Murphy, J. D.; Nati, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Paiella, A.; Pajot, F.; Passerini, A.; Pastoriza, H.; Pelosi, A.; Perciballi, M.; Pezzotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piccirillo, L.; Pisano, G.; Platino, M.; Polenta, G.; Puddu, R.; Ringegni, P.; Romero, G. E.; Salum, J. M.; Schillaci, A.; Scóccola, C.; Scully, S.; Spinelli, S.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Suarez, F.; Tartari, A.; Timbie, P.; Tomasi, M.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G.; Vanneste, S.; Viganò, D.; Vittorio, N.; Watson, B.; Wicek, F.; Zannoni, M.; Zullo, A.
Comments: Conference proceedings submitted to the Journal of Low Temperature Physics for LTD18
Submitted: 2019-11-27, last modified: 2019-12-09
QUBIC (Q \& U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology) is an international ground-based experiment dedicated in the measurement of the polarized fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). It is based on bolometric interferometry, an original detection technique which combine the immunity to systematic effects of an interferometer with the sensitivity of low temperature incoherent detectors. QUBIC will be deployed in Argentina, at the Alto Chorrillos mountain site near San Antonio de los Cobres, in the Salta province. The QUBIC detection chain consists in 2048 NbSi Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) cooled to 350mK.The voltage-biased TESs are read out with Time Domain Multiplexing based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) at 1 K and a novel SiGe Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) at 60 K allowing to reach an unprecedented multiplexing (MUX) factor equal to 128. The QUBIC experiment is currently being characterized in the lab with a reduced number of detectors before upgrading to the full instrument. I will present the last results of this characterization phase with a focus on the detectors and readout system.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.05862  [pdf] - 1989583
Learning Symbolic Physics with Graph Networks
Comments: 6 pages; references added + improvements to writing and clarity; accepted for an oral presentation at Machine Learning and the Physical Sciences Workshop @ NeurIPS 2019
Submitted: 2019-09-12, last modified: 2019-11-01
We introduce an approach for imposing physically motivated inductive biases on graph networks to learn interpretable representations and improved zero-shot generalization. Our experiments show that our graph network models, which implement this inductive bias, can learn message representations equivalent to the true force vector when trained on n-body gravitational and spring-like simulations. We use symbolic regression to fit explicit algebraic equations to our trained model's message function and recover the symbolic form of Newton's law of gravitation without prior knowledge. We also show that our model generalizes better at inference time to systems with more bodies than had been experienced during training. Our approach is extensible, in principle, to any unknown interaction law learned by a graph network, and offers a valuable technique for interpreting and inferring explicit causal theories about the world from implicit knowledge captured by deep learning.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.00785  [pdf] - 1820173
QUBIC: Exploring the primordial Universe with the Q\&U Bolometric Interferometer
Mennella, Aniello; Ade, Peter; Amico, Giorgio; Auguste, Didier; Aumont, Jonathan; Banfi, Stefano; Barbaràn, Gustavo; Battaglia, Paola; Battistelli, Elia; Baù, Alessandro; Bélier, Benoit; Bennett, David G.; Bergé, Laurent; Bernard, Jean Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Sazy, Marie Anne Bigot; Bleurvacq, Nathat; Bonaparte, Juan; Bonis, Julien; Bunn, Emory F.; Burke, David; Buzi, Daniele; Buzzelli, Alessandro; Cavaliere, Francesco; Chanial, Pierre; Chapron, Claude; Charlassier, Romain; Columbro, Fabio; Coppi, Gabriele; Coppolecchia, Alessandro; D'Agostino, Rocco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; De Bernardis, Paolo; De Gasperis, Giancarlo; De Leo, Michele; De Petris, Marco; Di Donato, Andres; Dumoulin, Louis; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Fasciszewski, Adrián; Franceschet, Cristian; Lerena, Martin Miguel Gamboa; Garcia, Beatriz; Garrido, Xavier; Gaspard, Michel; Gault, Amanda; Gayer, Donnacha; Gervasi, Massimo; Giard, Martin; Héraud, Yannick Giraud; Berisso, Mariano Gómez; González, Manuel; Gradziel, Marcin; Grandsire, Laurent; Guerard, Eric; Hamilton, Jean Christophe; Harari, Diego; Haynes, Vic; Versillé, Sophie Henrot; Hoang, Duc Thuong; Holtzer, Nicolas; Incardona, Federico; Jules, Eric; Kaplan, Jean; Korotkov, Andrei; Kristukat, Christian; Lamagna, Luca; Loucatos, Soutiris; Lowitz, Amy; Lukovic, Vladimir; Thibault, Louis; Luterstein, Raùl Horacio; Maffei, Bruno; Marnieros, Stefanos; Masi, Silvia; Mattei, Angelo; May, Andrew; McCulloch, Mark; Medina, Maria C.; Mele, Lorenzo; Melhuish, Simon J.; Montier, Ludovic; Mousset, Louise; Mundo, Luis Mariano; Murphy, John Anthony; Murphy, James; O'Sullivan, Creidhe; Olivieri, Emiliano; Paiella, Alessandro; Pajot, Francois; Passerini, Andrea; Pastoriza, Hernan; Pelosi, Alessandro; Perbost, Camille; Perciballi, Maurizio; Pezzotta, Federico; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Prêle, Damien; Puddu, Roberto; Rambaud, Damien; Ringegni, Pablo; Romero, Gustavo E.; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Scully, Stephen P.; Spinelli, Sebastiano; Stolpovskiy, Michail; Suarez, Federico; Stankowiak, Guillaume; Tartari, Andrea; Thermeau, Jean Pierre; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Torchinsky, Steve A.; Tristram, Mathieu; Tucker, Gregory S.; Tucker, Carole E.; Vanneste, Sylvain; Viganò, Daniele; Vittorio, Nicola; Voisin, Fabrice; Watson, Robert; Wicek, Francois; Zannoni, Mario; Zullo, Antonio
Comments: Proceedings of the 2018 ICNFP conference, Crete. Published by Universe arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1801.03730
Submitted: 2018-11-30, last modified: 2019-01-23
In this paper we describe QUBIC, an experiment that will observe the polarized microwave sky with a novel approach, which combines the sensitivity of state-of-the art bolometric detectors with the systematic effects control typical of interferometers. QUBIC unique features are the so-called "self-calibration", a technique that allows us to clean the measured data from instrumental effects, and its spectral imaging power, i.e. the ability to separate the signal in various sub-bands within each frequency band. QUBIC will observe the sky in two main frequency bands: 150 GHz and 220 GHz. A technological demonstrator is currently under testing and will be deployed in Argentina during 2019, while the final instrument is expected to be installed during 2020.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.03687  [pdf] - 1795038
The STRIP instrument of the Large Scale Polarization Explorer: microwave eyes to map the Galactic polarized foregrounds
Comments: 17 pages, 15 figures, proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation conference "Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy IX", on June 15th, 2018, Austin (TX)
Submitted: 2018-12-10
In this paper we discuss the latest developments of the STRIP instrument of the "Large Scale Polarization Explorer" (LSPE) experiment. LSPE is a novel project that combines ground-based (STRIP) and balloon-borne (SWIPE) polarization measurements of the microwave sky on large angular scales to attempt a detection of the "B-modes" of the Cosmic Microwave Background polarization. STRIP will observe approximately 25% of the Northern sky from the "Observatorio del Teide" in Tenerife, using an array of forty-nine coherent polarimeters at 43 GHz, coupled to a 1.5 m fully rotating crossed-Dragone telescope. A second frequency channel with six-elements at 95 GHz will be exploited as an atmospheric monitor. At present, most of the hardware of the STRIP instrument has been developed and tested at sub-system level. System-level characterization, starting in July 2018, will lead STRIP to be shipped and installed at the observation site within the end of the year. The on-site verification and calibration of the whole instrument will prepare STRIP for a 2-years campaign for the observation of the CMB polarization.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02296  [pdf] - 1779826
Thermal architecture for the QUBIC cryogenic receiver
May, A. J.; Chapron, C.; Coppi, G.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Melhuish, S.; Piat, M.; Piccirillo, L.; Schillaci, A.; Thermeau, J. -P.; Ade, P.; Amico, G.; Auguste, D.; Aumont, J.; Banfi, S.; Barbara, G.; Battaglia, P.; Battistelli, E.; Bau, A.; Belier, B.; Bennett, D.; Berge, L.; Bernard, J. -Ph.; Bersanelli, M.; Bigot-Sazy, M. -A.; Bleurvacq, N.; Bonaparte, J.; Bonis, J.; Bordier, G.; Breelle, E.; Bunn, E.; Burke, D.; Buzi, D.; Buzzelli, A.; Cavaliere, F.; Chanial, P.; Charlassier, R.; Columbro, F.; Coppolecchia, A.; Couchot, F.; D'Agostino, R.; De Gasperis, G.; De Leo, M.; De Petris, M.; Di Donato, A.; Dumoulin, L.; Etchegoyen, A.; Fasciszewski, A.; Franceschet, C.; Lerena, M. M. Gamboa; Garcia, B.; Garrido, X.; Gaspard, M.; Gault, A.; Gayer, D.; Gervasi, M.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Berisso, M. Gomez; Gonzalez, M.; Gradziel, M.; Grandsire, L.; Guerrard, E.; Hamilton, J. -Ch.; Harari, D.; Haynes, V.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hoang, D. T.; Incardona, F.; Jules, E.; Kaplan, J.; Korotkov, A.; Kristukat, C.; Lamagna, L.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, T.; Lowitz, A.; Lukovic, V.; Luterstein, R.; Maffei, B.; Marnieros, S.; Mattei, A.; McCulloch, M. A.; Medina, M. C.; Mele, L.; Mennella, A.; Montier, L.; Mundo, L. M.; Murphy, J. A.; Murphy, J. D.; O'Sullivan, C.; Olivieri, E.; Paiella, A.; Pajot, F.; Passerini, A.; Pastoriza, H.; Pelosi, A.; Perbost, C.; Perdereau, O.; Pezzotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pisano, G.; Polenta, G.; Prele, D.; Puddu, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ringegni, P.; Romero, G. E.; Salatino, M.; Scoccola, C. G.; Scully, S.; Spinelli, S.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Suarez, F.; Tartari, A.; Timbie, P.; Torchinsky, S. A.; Tristram, M.; Truongcanh, V.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G.; Vanneste, S.; Vigano, D.; Vittorio, N.; Voisin, F.; Watson, B.; Wicek, F.; Zannoni, M.; Zullo, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-11-06
QUBIC, the QU Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology, is a novel forthcoming instrument to measure the B-mode polarization anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background. The detection of the B-mode signal will be extremely challenging; QUBIC has been designed to address this with a novel approach, namely bolometric interferometry. The receiver cryostat is exceptionally large and cools complex optical and detector stages to 40 K, 4 K, 1 K and 350 mK using two pulse tube coolers, a novel 4He sorption cooler and a double-stage 3He/4He sorption cooler. We discuss the thermal and mechanical design of the cryostat, modelling and thermal analysis, and laboratory cryogenic testing.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.03730  [pdf] - 1616675
QUBIC - The Q&U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology - A novel way to look at the polarized Cosmic Microwave Background
Comments: Presented at the EPS Conference on High Energy Physics, Venice (Italy), 5-12 July 2017 Accepted for publication in conference proceedings
Submitted: 2018-01-11
In this paper we describe QUBIC, an experiment that takes up the challenge posed by the detection of primordial gravitational waves with a novel approach, that combines the sensitivity of state-of-the art bolometric detectors with the systematic effects control typical of interferometers. The so-called "self-calibration" is a technique deeply rooted in the interferometric nature of the instrument and allows us to clean the measured data from instrumental effects. The first module of QUBIC is a dual band instrument (150 GHz and 220 GHz) that will be deployed in Argentina during the Fall 2018.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.04372  [pdf] - 1576378
QUBIC Technical Design Report
Comments: 139 pages ; high resolution version can be found on the qubic website (http://qubic.in2p3.fr/QUBIC/Home.html) minor changes : update author list & affiliations ; correct title
Submitted: 2016-09-14, last modified: 2017-05-11
QUBIC is an instrument aiming at measuring the B mode polarisation anisotropies at medium scales angular scales (30-200 multipoles). The search for the primordial CMB B-mode polarization signal is challenging, because of many difficulties: smallness of the expected signal, instrumental systematics that could possibly induce polarization leakage from the large E signal into B, brighter than anticipated polarized foregrounds (dust) reducing to zero the initial hope of finding sky regions clean enough to have a direct primordial B-modes observation. The QUBIC instrument is designed to address all aspects of this challenge with a novel kind of instrument, a Bolometric Interferometer, combining the background-limited sensitivity of Transition-Edge-Sensors and the control of systematics allowed by the observation of interference fringe patterns, while operating at two frequencies to disentangle polarized foregrounds from primordial B mode polarization. Its characteristics are described in details in this Technological Design Report.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01583  [pdf] - 1483191
Planck 2015 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, N. Morisset D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiňo-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-02-05, last modified: 2016-02-16
We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. For the first time, we present LFI maps in Stokes Q and U polarization. We refer to other related papers where more detailed descriptions of the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.08853  [pdf] - 1486793
Planck 2015 results. III. LFI systematic uncertainties
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Catalano, A.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Keihäen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2015-07-31, last modified: 2016-02-08
We present the current accounting of systematic effect uncertainties for the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) that are relevant to the 2015 release of the Planck cosmological results, showing the robustness and consistency of our data set, especially for polarization analysis. We use two complementary approaches: (i) simulations based on measured data and physical models of the known systematic effects; and (ii) analysis of difference maps containing the same sky signal ("null-maps"). The LFI temperature data are limited by instrumental noise. At large angular scales the systematic effects are below the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum by several orders of magnitude. In polarization the systematic uncertainties are dominated by calibration uncertainties and compete with the CMB $E$-modes in the multipole range 10--20. Based on our model of all known systematic effects, we show that these effects introduce a slight bias of around $0.2\,\sigma$ on the reionization optical depth derived from the 70\,GHz $EE$ spectrum using the 30 and 353\,GHz channels as foreground templates. At 30\,GHz the systematic effects are smaller than the Galactic foreground at all scales in temperature and polarization, which allows us to consider this channel as a reliable template of synchrotron emission. We assess the residual uncertainties due to LFI effects on CMB maps and power spectra after component separation and show that these effects are smaller than the CMB amplitude at all scales. We also assess the impact on non-Gaussianity studies and find it to be negligible. Some residuals still appear in null maps from particular sky survey pairs, particularly at 30 GHz, suggesting possible straylight contamination due to an imperfect knowledge of the beam far sidelobes.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.08022  [pdf] - 1483207
Planck 2015 results. V. LFI calibration
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 25 pages, 19 figures, part of the Planck 2015 release. Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2015-05-29, last modified: 2015-11-17
We present a description of the pipeline used to calibrate the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) timelines into thermodynamic temperatures for the Planck 2015 data release, covering four years of uninterrupted operations. As in the 2013 data release, our calibrator is provided by the spin-synchronous modulation of the cosmic microwave background dipole, but we now use the orbital component, rather than adopting the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) solar dipole. This allows our 2015 LFI analysis to provide an independent Solar dipole estimate, which is in excellent agreement with that of HFI and within $1\sigma$ (0.3% in amplitude) of the WMAP value. This 0.3% shift in the peak-to-peak dipole temperature from WMAP and a global overhaul of the iterative calibration code increases the overall level of the LFI maps by 0.45% (30 GHz), 0.64% (44 GHz), and 0.82% (70 GHz) in temperature with respect to the 2013 Planck data release, thus reducing the discrepancy with the power spectrum measured by WMAP. We estimate that the LFI calibration uncertainty is now at the level of 0.20% for the 70 GHz map, 0.26% for the 44 GHz map, and 0.35% for the 30 GHz map. We provide a detailed description of the impact of all the changes implemented in the calibration since the previous data release.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01582  [pdf] - 1486774
Planck 2015 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results
Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Farhang, M.; Feeney, S.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Florido, E.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jin, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leahy, J. P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Müenchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Oppermann, N.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Pelkonen, V. -M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B. Rouillé; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Sanghera, H. S.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Shiraishi, M.; Smith, K.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tristram, M.; Troja, A.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vidal, M.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 40 pages, 24 figures
Submitted: 2015-02-05, last modified: 2015-08-09
The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14~May 2009 and scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12~August 2009 and 23~October 2013. In February~2015, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based on data from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data and the data products in the release, as well as the associated cosmological and astrophysical science results and papers. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and diffuse foregrounds in temperature and polarization, catalogues of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic cold clumps), and extensive simulations of signals and noise used in assessing the performance of the analysis methods and assessment of uncertainties. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data are described, as well as a CMB lensing likelihood. Scientific results include cosmological parameters deriving from CMB power spectra, gravitational lensing, and cluster counts, as well as constraints on inflation, non-Gaussianity, primordial magnetic fields, dark energy, and modified gravity.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.2029  [pdf] - 689677
In-flight calibration and verification of the Planck-LFI instrument
Comments: Long technical paper on Planck LFI in flight calibration campaign: 109 pages in this (not final) version, 100 page in the final JINST version
Submitted: 2013-07-08
In this paper we discuss the Planck-LFI in-flight calibration campaign. After a brief overview of the ground test campaigns, we describe in detail the calibration and performance verification (CPV) phase, carried out in space during and just after the cool-down of LFI. We discuss in detail the functionality verification, the tuning of the front-end and warm electronics, the preliminary performance assessment and the thermal susceptibility tests. The logic, sequence, goals and results of the in-flight tests are discussed. All the calibration activities were successfully carried out and the instrument response was comparable to the one observed on ground. For some channels the in-flight tuning activity allowed us to improve significantly the noise performance.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.0164  [pdf] - 1150428
A coherent polarimeter array for the Large Scale Polarization Explorer balloon experiment
Comments: In press on the Proceedings of the SPIE Conference Astronomical Telescopes + instrumentation 2012, Amsterdam, paper 8446-279
Submitted: 2012-08-01
We discuss the design and expected performance of STRIP (STRatospheric Italian Polarimeter), an array of coherent receivers designed to fly on board the LSPE (Large Scale Polarization Explorer) balloon experiment. The STRIP focal plane array comprises 49 elements in Q band and 7 elements in W-band using cryogenic HEMT low noise amplifiers and high performance waveguide components. In operation, the array will be cooled to 20 K and placed in the focal plane of a $\sim 0.6$ meter telescope providing an angular resolution of $\sim1.5$ degrees. The LSPE experiment aims at large scale, high sensitivity measurements of CMB polarization, with multi-frequency deep measurements to optimize component separation. The STRIP Q-band channel is crucial to accurately measure and remove the synchrotron polarized component, while the W-band channel, together with a bolometric channel at the same frequency, provides a crucial cross-check for systematic effects.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.0281  [pdf] - 544717
The Large-Scale Polarization Explorer (LSPE)
Comments: In press. Copyright 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited
Submitted: 2012-08-01
The LSPE is a balloon-borne mission aimed at measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at large angular scales, and in particular to constrain the curl component of CMB polarization (B-modes) produced by tensor perturbations generated during cosmic inflation, in the very early universe. Its primary target is to improve the limit on the ratio of tensor to scalar perturbations amplitudes down to r = 0.03, at 99.7% confidence. A second target is to produce wide maps of foreground polarization generated in our Galaxy by synchrotron emission and interstellar dust emission. These will be important to map Galactic magnetic fields and to study the properties of ionized gas and of diffuse interstellar dust in our Galaxy. The mission is optimized for large angular scales, with coarse angular resolution (around 1.5 degrees FWHM), and wide sky coverage (25% of the sky). The payload will fly in a circumpolar long duration balloon mission during the polar night. Using the Earth as a giant solar shield, the instrument will spin in azimuth, observing a large fraction of the northern sky. The payload will host two instruments. An array of coherent polarimeters using cryogenic HEMT amplifiers will survey the sky at 43 and 90 GHz. An array of bolometric polarimeters, using large throughput multi-mode bolometers and rotating Half Wave Plates (HWP), will survey the same sky region in three bands at 95, 145 and 245 GHz. The wide frequency coverage will allow optimal control of the polarized foregrounds, with comparable angular resolution at all frequencies.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.2038  [pdf] - 955981
Planck early results. III. First assessment of the Low Frequency Instrument in-flight performance
Mennella, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Butler, R. C.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; Dick, J.; Frailis, M.; Galeotta, S.; Gregorio, A.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Lowe, S.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Meinhold, P. R.; Morgante, G.; Pearson, D.; Perrotta, F.; Polenta, G.; Poutanen, T.; Sandri, M.; Seiffert, M. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Valiviita, J.; Villa, F.; Watson, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.; Aja, B.; Artal, E.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaglia, P.; Bennett, K.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cappellini, B.; Chen, X.; Colombo, L.; Cruz, M.; Danese, L.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Davies, R. D.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falvella, M. C.; Finelli, F.; Foley, S.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; George, D.; Gómez, F.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Herreros, J. M.; Hoyland, R. J.; Hughes, N.; Jewell, J.; Jukkala, P.; Juvela, M.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kilpia, V. -H.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Laaninen, M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leutenegger, P.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Malaspina, M.; Marinucci, D.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Miccolis, M.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Nesti, R.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Pagano, L.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Pettorino, V.; Pietrobon, D.; Pospieszalski, M.; Prézeau, G.; Prina, M.; Procopio, P.; Puget, J. -L.; Quercellini, C.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roddis, N.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Silvestri, R.; Simonetto, A.; Sjoman, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Sozzi, C.; Stringhetti, L.; Tauber, J. A.; Tofani, G.; Toffolatti, L.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Watson, C.; White, S. D. M.; Winder, F.
Comments: Published version
Submitted: 2011-01-11, last modified: 2011-12-19
The scientific performance of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) after one year of in-orbit operation is presented. We describe the main optical parameters and discuss photometric calibration, white noise sensitivity, and noise properties. A preliminary evaluation of the impact of the main systematic effects is presented. For each of the performance parameters, we outline the methods used to obtain them from the flight data and provide a comparison with pre-launch ground assessments, which are essentially confirmed in flight.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.2541  [pdf] - 1032478
Planck pre-launch status: calibration of the Low Frequency Instrument flight model radiometers
Comments: 15 pages, 18 figures. Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2010-05-14
The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) on-board the ESA Planck satellite carries eleven radiometer subsystems, called Radiometer Chain Assemblies (RCAs), each composed of a pair of pseudo-correlation receivers. We describe the on-ground calibration campaign performed to qualify the flight model RCAs and to measure their pre-launch performances. Each RCA was calibrated in a dedicated flight-like cryogenic environment with the radiometer front-end cooled to 20K and the back-end at 300K, and with an external input load cooled to 4K. A matched load simulating a blackbody at different temperatures was placed in front of the sky horn to derive basic radiometer properties such as noise temperature, gain, and noise performance, e.g. 1/f noise. The spectral response of each detector was measured as was their susceptibility to thermal variation. All eleven LFI RCAs were calibrated. Instrumental parameters measured in these tests, such as noise temperature, bandwidth, radiometer isolation, and linearity, provide essential inputs to the Planck-LFI data analysis.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4608  [pdf] - 33147
Noise Properties of the Planck-LFI Receivers
Comments: this paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst
Submitted: 2010-01-26
The Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers have been tested extensively during several dedicated campaigns. The present paper reports the principal noise properties of the LFI radiometers.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4589  [pdf] - 33143
Planck-LFI radiometers' spectral response
Comments: 16 pages, 9 figures, this paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst
Submitted: 2010-01-26
The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is an array of pseudo-correlation radiometers on board the Planck satellite, the ESA mission dedicated to precision measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background. The LFI covers three bands centred at 30, 44 and 70 GHz, with a goal bandwidth of 20% of the central frequency. The characterization of the broadband frequency response of each radiometer is necessary to understand and correct for systematic effects, particularly those related to foreground residuals and polarization measurements. In this paper we present the measured band shape of all the LFI channels and discuss the methods adopted for their estimation. The spectral characterization of each radiometer was obtained by combining the measured spectral response of individual units through a dedicated RF model of the LFI receiver scheme. As a consistency check, we also attempted end-to-end spectral measurements of the integrated radiometer chain in a cryogenic chamber. However, due to systematic effects in the measurement setup, only qualitative results were obtained from these tests. The measured LFI bandpasses exhibit a moderate level of ripple, compatible with the instrument scientific requirements.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4633  [pdf] - 33153
Planck LFI flight model feed horns
Comments: This is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication in JINST. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The definitive publisher authenticated version is available online at 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12004
Submitted: 2010-01-26
this paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst The Low Frequency Instrument is optically interfaced with the ESA Planck telescope through 11 corrugated feed horns each connected to the Radiometer Chain Assembly (RCA). This paper describes the design, the manufacturing and the testing of the flight model feed horns. They have been designed to optimize the LFI optical interfaces taking into account the tight mechanical requirements imposed by the Planck focal plane layout. All the eleven units have been successfully tested and integrated with the Ortho Mode transducers.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4610  [pdf] - 33148
The linearity response of the Planck-LFI flight model receivers
Comments: this paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst; This is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication in JINST. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The definitive publisher authenticated version is available online at 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12011.
Submitted: 2010-01-26
In this paper we discuss the linearity response of the Planck-LFI receivers, with particular reference to signal compression measured on the 30 and 44 GHz channels. In the article we discuss the various sources of compression and present a model that accurately describes data measured during tests performed with individual radiomeric chains. After discussing test results we present the best parameter set representing the receiver response and discuss the impact of non linearity on in-flight calibration, which is shown to be negligible.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4686  [pdf] - 1477095
The PLANCK LFI flight model ortho-mode transducers
Comments: this paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst
Submitted: 2010-01-26
The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) of the ESA Planck CMB mission is an array of 22 ultra sensitive pseudocorrelation radiometers working at 30, 44, and 70 GHz. LFI has been calibrated and delivered for integration with the satellite to the European Space Agency on November 2006. The aim of Planck is to measure the anisotropy and polarization of the Cosmic Background Radiation with a sensitivity and angular resolution never reached before over the full sky. LFI is intrinsically sensitive to polarization thanks to the use of Ortho-Mode Transducers (OMT) located between the feedhorns and the pseudo-correlation radiometers. The OMTs are microwave passive components that divide the incoming radiation into two linear orthogonal components. A set of 11 OMTs (2 at 30 GHz, 3 at 44 GHz, and 6 at 70 GHz) were produced and tested. This work describes the design, development and performance of the eleven Flight Model OMTs of LFI. The final design was reached after several years of development. At first, Elegant Bread Board OMTs were produced to investigate the manufacturing technology and design requirements. Then, a set of 3 Qualification Model (QM) OMTs were designed, manufactured and tested in order to freeze the design and the manufacturing technology for the flight units. Finally, the Flight Models were produced and tested. It is shown that all the OMT units have been accepted for flight and the electromagnetic performance is at least marginally compliant with the requirements. Mechanically, the units passed all the thermoelastic qualification tests after a reworking necessary after the QM campaign.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4787  [pdf] - 33194
LFI Radiometric Chain Assembly (RCA) data handling "Rachel"
Comments: This is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication in JINST. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The definitive publisher authenticated version is available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12017
Submitted: 2010-01-26
This paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST (http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/1748-0221). Planck's Low Frequency Instrument is an array of 22 pseudo-correlation radiometers at 30, 44, and 70 GHz. Before integrating the overall array assembly, a first set of tests has been performed for each radiometer chain assembly (RCA), consisting of two radiometers. In this paper, we describe Rachel, a software application which has been purposely developed and used during the RCA test campaign to carry out both near-realtime on-line data analysis and data storage (in FITS format) of the raw output from the radiometric chains.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4711  [pdf] - 33175
The Planck-LFI flight model composite waveguides
Comments: this paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst
Submitted: 2010-01-26
The Low Frequency Instrument on board the PLANCK satellite is designed to give the most accurate map ever of the CMB anisotropy of the whole sky over a broad frequency band spanning 27 to 77 GHz. It is made of an array of 22 pseudo-correlation radiometers, composed of 11 actively cooled (20 K) Front End Modules (FEMs), and 11 Back End Modules (BEMs) at 300K. The connection between the two parts is made with rectangular Wave Guides. Considerations of different nature (thermal, electromagnetic and mechanical), imposed stringent requirements on the WGs characteristics and drove their design. From the thermal point of view, the WG should guarantee good insulation between the FEM and the BEM sections to avoid overloading the cryocooler. On the other hand it is essential that the signals do not undergo excessive attenuation through the WG. Finally, given the different positions of the FEM modules behind the focal surface and the mechanical constraints given by the surrounding structures, different mechanical designs were necessary. A composite configuration of Stainless Steel and Copper was selected to satisfy all the requirements. Given the complex shape and the considerable length (about 1.5-2 m), manufacturing and testing the WGs was a challenge. This work deals with the development of the LFI WGs, including the choice of the final configuration and of the fabrication process. It also describes the testing procedure adopted to fully characterize these components from the electromagnetic point of view and the space qualification process they underwent. Results obtained during the test campaign are reported and compared with the stringent requirements. The performance of the LFI WGs is in line with requirements, and the WGs were successfully space qualified.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4659  [pdf] - 33164
Advanced modelling of the Planck-LFI radiometers
Comments: 21 pages, 15 figures, this paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst
Submitted: 2010-01-26
The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is a radiometer array covering the 30-70 GHz spectral range on-board the ESA Planck satellite, launched on May 14th, 2009 to observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with unprecedented precision. In this paper we describe the development and validation of a software model of the LFI pseudo-correlation receivers which enables to reproduce and predict all the main system parameters of interest as measured at each of the 44 LFI detectors. These include system total gain, noise temperature, band-pass response, non-linear response. The LFI Advanced RF Model (LARFM) has been constructed by using commercial software tools and data of each radiometer component as measured at single unit level. The LARFM has been successfully used to reproduce the LFI behavior observed during the LFI ground-test campaign. The model is an essential element in the database of LFI data processing center and will be available for any detailed study of radiometer behaviour during the survey.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4653  [pdf] - 33163
Thermal susceptibility of the Planck-LFI receivers
Comments: This is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Instrumentation. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The definitive publisher authenticated version is available online at 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12012
Submitted: 2010-01-26
This paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst . This paper describes the impact of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument front end physical temperature fluctuations on the output signal. The origin of thermal instabilities in the instrument are discussed, and an analytical model of their propagation and impact on the receivers signal is described. The experimental test setup dedicated to evaluate these effects during the instrument ground calibration is reported together with data analysis methods. Finally, main results obtained are discussed and compared to the requirements.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4648  [pdf] - 33162
Planck-LFI radiometers tuning
Comments: This is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication in JINST. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The definitive publisher authenticated version is available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12013]
Submitted: 2010-01-26
"This paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst" This paper describes the Planck Low Frequency Instrument tuning activities performed through the ground test campaigns, from Unit to Satellite Levels. Tuning is key to achieve the best possible instrument performance and tuning parameters strongly depend on thermal and electrical conditions. For this reason tuning has been repeated several times during ground tests and it has been repeated in flight before starting nominal operations. The paper discusses the tuning philosophy, the activities and the obtained results, highlighting developments and changes occurred during test campaigns. The paper concludes with an overview of tuning performed during the satellite cryogenic test campaign (Summer 2008) and of the plans for the just started in-flight calibration.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4644  [pdf] - 33160
Cryogenic environment and performance for testing the Planck radiometers
Comments: This is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication in JINST. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The definitive publisher authenticated version is available online at 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12015
Submitted: 2010-01-26
This paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst The Planck LFI Radiometer Chain Assemblies (RCAs) have been calibrated in two dedicated cryogenic facilities. In this paper the facilities and the related instrumentation are described. The main satellite thermal interfaces for the single chains have to be reproduced and stability requirements have to be satisfied. Setup design, problems occurred and improving solutions implemented are discussed. Performance of the cryogenic setup are reported.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4562  [pdf] - 1024812
Planck pre-launch status: Low Frequency Instrument calibration and expected scientific performance
Comments: Accepted for publications in Astronomy and Astrophysics. Astronomy & Astrophysics, 2010 (acceptance date: 12 Jan 2010)
Submitted: 2010-01-25
We give the calibration and scientific performance parameters of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) measured during the ground cryogenic test campaign. These parameters characterise the instrument response and constitute our best pre-launch knowledge of the LFI scientific performance. The LFI shows excellent $1/f$ stability and rejection of instrumental systematic effects; measured noise performance shows that LFI is the most sensitive instrument of its kind. The set of measured calibration parameters will be updated during flight operations through the end of the mission.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.3321  [pdf] - 1024699
Planck pre-launch status: Design and description of the Low Frequency Instrument
Bersanelli, M.; Mandolesi, N.; Butler, R. C.; Mennella, A.; Villa, F.; Aja, B.; Artal, E.; Artina, E.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balasini, M.; Baldan, G.; Banday, A.; Bastia, P.; Battaglia, P.; Bernardino, T.; Blackhurst, E.; Boschini, L.; Burigana, C.; Cafagna, G.; Cappellini, B.; Cavaliere, F.; Colombo, F.; Crone, G.; Cuttaia, F.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; De Angelis, L.; De Gasperis, G. C.; De La Fuente, L.; De Rosa, A.; De Zotti, G.; Falvella, M. C.; Ferrari, F.; Ferretti, R.; Figini, L.; Fogliani, S.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T.; Garavaglia, S.; Gomez, F.; Gorski, K.; Gregorio, A.; Guzzi, P.; Herreros, J. M.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hoyland, R.; Hughes, N.; Janssen, M.; Jukkala, P.; Kettle, D.; Kilpia, V. H.; Laaninen, M.; Lapolla, P. M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Leutenegger, P.; Levin, S.; Lilje, P. B.; Lowe, S. R.; Lubin, D. Lawson P. M.; Maino, D.; Malaspina, M.; Maris, M.; Marti-Canales, J.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Mediavilla, A.; Meinhold, P.; Miccolis, M.; Morgante, G.; Natoli, P.; Nesti, R.; Pagan, L.; Paine, C.; Partridge, B.; Pascual, J. P.; Pasian, F.; Pearson, D.; Pecora, M.; Perrotta, F.; Platania, P.; Pospieszalski, M.; Poutanen, T.; Prina, M.; Rebolo, R.; Roddis, N.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Salmon, n M. J.; Sandri, M.; Seiffert, M.; Silvestri, R.; Simonetto, A.; Sjoman, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Sozzi, C.; Stringhetti, L.; Taddei, E.; Tauber, J.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Varis, J.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wilkinson, A.; Winder, F.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 23 pages, 31 figures, accepted by Astronomy and Astrophysics, Planck LFI technical papers published by JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/1748-0221
Submitted: 2010-01-19
In this paper we present the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI), designed and developed as part of the Planck space mission, the ESA program dedicated to precision imaging of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Planck-LFI will observe the full sky in intensity and polarisation in three frequency bands centred at 30, 44 and 70 GHz, while higher frequencies (100-850 GHz) will be covered by the HFI instrument. The LFI is an array of microwave radiometers based on state-of-the-art Indium Phosphide cryogenic HEMT amplifiers implemented in a differential system using blackbody loads as reference signals. The front-end is cooled to 20K for optimal sensitivity and the reference loads are cooled to 4K to minimise low frequency noise. We provide an overview of the LFI, discuss the leading scientific requirements and describe the design solutions adopted for the various hardware subsystems. The main drivers of the radiometric, optical and thermal design are discussed, including the stringent requirements on sensitivity, stability, and rejection of systematic effects. Further details on the key instrument units and the results of ground calibration are provided in a set of companion papers.