sort results by

Use logical operators AND, OR, NOT and round brackets to construct complex queries. Whitespace-separated words are treated as ANDed.

Show articles per page in mode

Barry, Peter S.

Normalized to: Barry, P.

24 article(s) in total. 366 co-authors, from 1 to 15 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 3,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.04542  [pdf] - 2046587
Full-Array Noise Performance of Deployment-Grade SuperSpec mm-wave On-Chip Spectrometers
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures. Accepted by the Journal of Low Temperature Physics (Proceedings of the 18th International Workshop on Low Temperature Detectors)
Submitted: 2020-02-11
SuperSpec is an on-chip filter-bank spectrometer designed for wideband moderate-resolution spectroscopy at millimeter wavelengths, employing TiN kinetic inductance detectors. SuperSpec technology will enable large-format spectroscopic integral field units suitable for high-redshift line intensity mapping and multi-object spectrographs. In previous results we have demonstrated noise performance in individual detectors suitable for photon noise limited ground-based observations at excellent mm-wave sites. In these proceedings we present the noise performance of a full $R\sim 275$ spectrometer measured using deployment-ready RF hardware and software. We report typical noise equivalent powers through the full device of $\sim 3 \times 10^{-16} \ \mathrm{W}/\sqrt{\mathrm{Hz}}$ at expected sky loadings, which are photon noise dominated. Based on these results, we plan to deploy a six-spectrometer demonstration instrument to the Large Millimeter Telescope in early 2020.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.07146  [pdf] - 1996731
Atomic Layer Deposition Niobium Nitride Films for High-Q Resonators
Comments: Submitted to JLTP, LTD18 special edition
Submitted: 2019-08-19, last modified: 2019-11-12
Niobium nitride (NbN) is a useful material for fabricating detectors because of its high critical temperature and relatively high kinetic inductance. In particular, NbN can be used to fabricate nanowire detectors and mm-wave transmission lines. When deposited, NbN is usually sputtered, leaving room for concern about uniformity at small thicknesses. We present atomic layer deposition niobium nitride (ALD NbN) as an alternative technique that allows for precision control of deposition parameters such as film thickness, stage temperature, and nitrogen flow. Atomic-scale control over film thickness admits wafer-scale uniformity for films 4-30 nm thick; control over deposition temperature gives rise to growth rate changes, which can be used to optimize film thickness and critical temperature. In order to characterize ALD NbN in the radio-frequency regime, we construct single-layer microwave resonators and test their performance as a function of stage temperature and input power. ALD processes can admit high resonator quality factors, which in turn increase detector multiplexing capabilities. We present measurements of the critical temperature and internal quality factor of ALD NbN resonators under the variation of ALD parameters.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.02100  [pdf] - 1956006
Superconducting On-chip Fourier Transform Spectrometer
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-09-04
Kinetic inductance in thin film superconductors has been used as the basis for low-temperature, low-noise photon detectors. In particular thin films such as NbTiN, TiN, NbN, the kinetic inductance effect is strongly non-linear in the applied current, which can be utilized to realize novel devices. We present results from transmission lines made with these materials, where DC (current) control is used to modulate the phase velocity thereby enabling an on-chip spectrometer. The utility of such compact spectrometers are discussed, along with their natural connection with parametric amplifiers.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.01062  [pdf] - 1928247
CMB-S4 Decadal Survey APC White Paper
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Amin, Mustafa A.; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bock, James J.; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Project White Paper submitted to the 2020 Decadal Survey, 10 pages plus references. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1907.04473
Submitted: 2019-07-31
We provide an overview of the science case, instrument configuration and project plan for the next-generation ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4, for consideration by the 2020 Decadal Survey.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.11976  [pdf] - 2025648
Performance of Al-Mn Transition-Edge Sensor Bolometers in SPT-3G
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures, submitted to the Journal of Low Temperature Physics: LTD18 Special Edition
Submitted: 2019-07-27
SPT-3G is a polarization-sensitive receiver, installed on the South Pole Telescope, that measures the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from degree to arcminute scales. The receiver consists of ten 150~mm-diameter detector wafers, containing a total of 16,000 transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers observing at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. During the 2018-2019 austral summer, one of these detector wafers was replaced by a new wafer fabricated with Al-Mn TESs instead of the Ti/Au design originally deployed for SPT-3G. We present the results of in-lab characterization and on-sky performance of this Al-Mn wafer, including electrical and thermal properties, optical efficiency measurements, and noise-equivalent temperature. In addition, we discuss and account for several calibration-related systematic errors that affect measurements made using frequency-domain multiplexing readout electronics.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.10947  [pdf] - 2025643
On-sky performance of the SPT-3G frequency-domain multiplexed readout
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures submitted to the Journal of Low Temperature Physics: LTD18 Special Edition
Submitted: 2019-07-25
Frequency-domain multiplexing (fMux) is an established technique for the readout of large arrays of transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. Each TES in a multiplexing module has a unique AC voltage bias that is selected by a resonant filter. This scheme enables the operation and readout of multiple bolometers on a single pair of wires, reducing thermal loading onto sub-Kelvin stages. The current receiver on the South Pole Telescope, SPT-3G, uses a 68x fMux system to operate its large-format camera of $\sim$16,000 TES bolometers. We present here the successful implementation and performance of the SPT-3G readout as measured on-sky. Characterization of the noise reveals a median pair-differenced 1/f knee frequency of 33 mHz, indicating that low-frequency noise in the readout will not limit SPT-3G's measurements of sky power on large angular scales. Measurements also show that the median readout white noise level in each of the SPT-3G observing bands is below the expectation for photon noise, demonstrating that SPT-3G is operating in the photon-noise-dominated regime.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.09035  [pdf] - 1920209
Performance of a low-parasitic frequency-domain multiplexing readout
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures. Submitted to J. Low Temp. Detectors
Submitted: 2019-07-21
Frequency-domain multiplexing is a readout technique for transition edge sensor bolometer arrays used on modern CMB experiments, including the SPT-3G receiver. Here, we present design details and performance measurements for a low-parasitic frequency-domain multiplexing readout. Reducing the parasitic impedance of the connections between cryogenic components provides a path to improving both the crosstalk and noise performance of the readout. Reduced crosstalk will in turn allow higher multiplexing factors. We have demonstrated a factor of two improvement in parasitic resistance compared to SPT-3G hardware. Reduced parasitics also permits operation of lower-resistance bolometers, which enables better optimization of R$_{\rm{bolo}}$ for improved readout noise performance. The prototype system exhibits noise performance comparable to SPT-3G readout hardware when operating SPT-3G detectors.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.04473  [pdf] - 1914295
CMB-S4 Science Case, Reference Design, and Project Plan
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; McQuinn, Matthew; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: 287 pages, 82 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-09
We present the science case, reference design, and project plan for the Stage-4 ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.04452  [pdf] - 1749362
Eliminating stray radiation inside large area imaging arrays
Comments: arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1707.02142
Submitted: 2018-09-11
With increasing array size, it is increasingly important to control stray radiation inside the detector chips themselves. We demonstrate this effect with focal plane arrays of absorber coupled Lumped Element microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (LEKIDs) and lens-antenna coupled distributed quarter wavelength Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). In these arrays the response from a point source at the pixel position is at a similar level to the stray response integrated over the entire chip area. For the antenna coupled arrays, we show that this effect can be suppressed by incorporating an on-chip stray light absorber. A similar method should be possible with the LEKID array, especially when they are lens coupled.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.00036  [pdf] - 1743942
Year two instrument status of the SPT-3G cosmic microwave background receiver
Comments: 21 pages, 9 Figures, Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2018
Submitted: 2018-08-31
The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a millimeter-wavelength telescope designed for high-precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The SPT measures both the temperature and polarization of the CMB with a large aperture, resulting in high resolution maps sensitive to signals across a wide range of angular scales on the sky. With these data, the SPT has the potential to make a broad range of cosmological measurements. These include constraining the effect of massive neutrinos on large-scale structure formation as well as cleaning galactic and cosmological foregrounds from CMB polarization data in future searches for inflationary gravitational waves. The SPT began observing in January 2017 with a new receiver (SPT-3G) containing $\sim$16,000 polarization-sensitive transition-edge sensor bolometers. Several key technology developments have enabled this large-format focal plane, including advances in detectors, readout electronics, and large millimeter-wavelength optics. We discuss the implementation of these technologies in the SPT-3G receiver as well as the challenges they presented. In late 2017 the implementations of all three of these technologies were modified to optimize total performance. Here, we present the current instrument status of the SPT-3G receiver.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.08637  [pdf] - 1720402
MUSCAT: The Mexico-UK Sub-Millimetre Camera for AsTronomy
Comments: Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation, 2018, Austin, Texas, United States
Submitted: 2018-07-23
The Mexico-UK Sub-millimetre Camera for AsTronomy (MUSCAT) is a large-format, millimetre-wave camera consisting of 1,500 background-limited lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) scheduled for deployment on the Large Millimeter Telescope (Volc\'an Sierra Negra, Mexico) in 2018. MUSCAT is designed for observing at 1.1 mm and will utilise the full 40' field of view of the LMTs upgraded 50-m primary mirror. In its primary role, MUSCAT is designed for high-resolution follow-up surveys of both galactic and extra-galactic sub-mm sources identified by Herschel. MUSCAT is also designed to be a technology demonstrator that will provide the first on-sky demonstrations of novel design concepts such as horn-coupled LEKID arrays and closed continuous cycle miniature dilution refrigeration. Here we describe some of the key design elements of the MUSCAT instrument such as the novel use of continuous sorption refrigerators and a miniature dilutor for continuous 100-mK cooling of the focal plane, broadband optical coupling to Aluminium LEKID arrays using waveguide chokes and anti-reflection coating materials as well as with the general mechanical and optical design of MUSCAT. We explain how MUSCAT is designed to be simple to upgrade and the possibilities for changing the focal plane unit that allows MUSCAT to act as a demonstrator for other novel technologies such as multi-chroic polarisation sensitive pixels and on-chip spectrometry in the future. Finally, we will report on the current status of MUSCAT's commissioning.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.10400  [pdf] - 1725035
Mexico-UK Sub-millimeter Camera for AsTronomy
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Journal of Low Temperature Detectors
Submitted: 2018-06-27
MUSCAT is a large format mm-wave camera scheduled for installation on the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano (LMT) in 2018. The MUSCAT focal plane is based on an array of horn coupled lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors optimised for coupling to the 1.1mm atmospheric window. The detectors are fed with fully baffled reflective optics to minimize stray-light contamination. This combination will enable background-limited performance at 1.1 mm across the full 4 arcminute field-of-view of the LMT. The easily accessible focal plane will be cooled to 100 mK with a new closed cycle miniature dilution refrigerator that permits fully continuous operation. The MUSCAT instrument will demonstrate the science capabilities of the LMT through two relatively short science programmes to provide high resolution follow-up surveys of Galactic and extra-galactic sources previously observed with the Herschel space observatory, after the initial observing campaigns. In this paper, we will provide an overview of the overall instrument design as well as an update on progress and scheduled installation on the LMT.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.07920  [pdf] - 1623921
Initial investigation into the susceptibility of antenna-coupled LEKIDs to two level system affects
Comments: Presented at the 17th International Workshop on Low Temperature Detectors. Submitted to Journal of Low Temperature Physics
Submitted: 2018-01-24
Optical coupling to a lumped-element kinetic inductance detector (LEKID) via an antenna and transmission line structure enables a compact detector architecture, easily optimised for the required sensitivity and multiplexing performance of future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. Coupling in this way allows multi-chroic, polarisation-sensitive pixels to be realised through planar on-chip filtering structures. However, adding the necessary dielectric layers to LEKID structures to form the microstrip-coupled architecture has the potential to increase two level system (TLS) contributions, resulting in excess detector noise. Using a lumped-element resonator enables coupling via a microstrip to the inductive section only, whilst leaving capacitive elements clear of potentially noisy dielectrics. Here we present the preliminary data acquired to demonstrate that a microstrip transmission line structure can be coupled to a LEKID architecture with minimal additional TLS contributions. This is achieved through a simple fabrication process, which allows for the dielectric to be removed from capacitive regions of the LEKID. As a result we have produced resonators with the high quality factors required for large multiplexing ratios; thus highlighting the suitability of the separated KID architecture for future observations of the CMB.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.06265  [pdf] - 1698009
Design and performance of the antenna coupled lumped-element kinetic inductance detector
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-01-18
Focal plane arrays consisting of low-noise, polarisation-sensitive detectors have made possible the pioneering advances in the study of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). To make further progress, the next generation of CMB experiments (e.g. CMB-S4) will require a substantial increase in the number of detectors compared to the current stage 3 instruments. Arrays of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) provide a possible path to realising such large format arrays owing to their intrinsic multiplexing advantage and relative cryogenic simplicity. In this proceedings, we report on the design of a novel variant of the traditional KID design; the antenna-coupled lumped-element KID. A polarisation sensitive twin-slot antenna placed behind an optimised hemispherical lens couples power onto a thin-film superconducting microstrip line. The power is then guided into the inductive section of an aluminium KID where it is absorbed and modifies both the resonant frequency and quality factor of the KID. We present the various aspects of the design and preliminary results from the first set of seven-element prototype arrays and compare to the expected modelled performance.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.01192  [pdf] - 1955840
Simulating Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy measurements for Microwave Kinetic Inductance Devices
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-11-03
Microwave Kinetic Inductance Devices (MKIDs) are poised to allow for massively and natively multiplexed photon detectors arrays and are a natural choice for the next-generation CMB-Stage 4 experiment which will require 105 detectors. In this proceed- ing we discuss what noise performance of present generation MKIDs implies for CMB measurements. We consider MKID noise spectra and simulate a telescope scan strategy which projects the detector noise onto the CMB sky. We then analyze the simulated CMB + MKID noise to understand particularly low frequency noise affects the various features of the CMB, and thusly set up a framework connecting MKID characteristics with scan strategies, to the type of CMB signals we may probe with such detectors.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.11255  [pdf] - 1697946
Fabrication of antenna-coupled KID array for Cosmic Microwave Background detection
Comments: 7 pages, 9 figures, submitted to Journal of Low Temperature Physics
Submitted: 2017-10-30
Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) have become an attractive alternative to traditional bolometers in the sub-mm and mm observing community due to their innate frequency multiplexing capabilities and simple lithographic processes. These advantages make KIDs a viable option for the $O(500,000)$ detectors needed for the upcoming Cosmic Microwave Background - Stage 4 (CMB-S4) experiment. We have fabricated antenna-coupled MKID array in the 150GHz band optimized for CMB detection. Our design uses a twin slot antenna coupled to inverted microstrip made from a superconducting Nb/Al bilayer and SiN$_x$, which is then coupled to an Al KID grown on high resistivity Si. We present the fabrication process and measurements of SiN$_x$ microstrip resonators.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.03448  [pdf] - 1531012
Development of dual-polarization LEKIDs for CMB observations
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, Proc. SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2016, Paper 9914-24
Submitted: 2016-07-12
We discuss the design considerations and initial measurements from arrays of dual-polarization, lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) nominally designed for cosmic microwave background (CMB) studies. The detectors are horn-coupled, and each array element contains two single-polarization LEKIDs, which are made from thin-film aluminum and optimized for a single spectral band centered on 150 GHz. We are developing two array architectures, one based on 160 micron thick silicon wafers and the other based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers with a 30 micron thick device layer. The 20-element test arrays (40 LEKIDs) are characterized with both a linearly-polarized electronic millimeter wave source and a thermal source. We present initial measurements including the noise spectra, noise-equivalent temperature, and responsivity. We discuss future testing and further design optimizations to be implemented.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.03309  [pdf] - 1372118
Optical Response of Strained- and Unstrained-Silicon Cold-Electron Bolometers
Comments: Accepted for publication in Journal of Low Tempature Physics
Submitted: 2016-03-10
We describe the optical characterisation of two silicon cold-electron bolometers each consisting of a small ($32 \times 14~\mathrm{\mu m}$) island of degenerately doped silicon with superconducting aluminium contacts. Radiation is coupled into the silicon absorber with a twin-slot antenna designed to couple to 160-GHz radiation through a silicon lens.The first device has a highly doped silicon absorber, the second has a highly doped strained-silicon absorber.Using a novel method of cross-correlating the outputs from two parallel amplifiers, we measure noise-equivalent powers of $3.0 \times 10^{-16}$ and $6.6 \times 10^{-17}~\mathrm{W\,Hz^{-1/2}}$ for the control and strained device, respectively, when observing radiation from a 77-K source. In the case of the strained device, the noise-equivalent power is limited by the photon noise.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.06011  [pdf] - 1378697
A passive THz video camera based on lumped element kinetic inductance detectors
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-11-18
We have developed a passive 350 GHz (850 {\mu}m) video-camera to demonstrate lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) -- designed originally for far-infrared astronomy -- as an option for general purpose terrestrial terahertz imaging applications. The camera currently operates at a quasi-video frame rate of 2 Hz with a noise equivalent temperature difference per frame of $\sim$0.1 K, which is close to the background limit. The 152 element superconducting LEKID array is fabricated from a simple 40 nm aluminum film on a silicon dielectric substrate and is read out through a single microwave feedline with a cryogenic low noise amplifier and room temperature frequency domain multiplexing electronics.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.04488  [pdf] - 1347622
Low Noise Titanium Nitride KIDs for SuperSpec: A Millimeter-Wave On-Chip Spectrometer
Comments: 8 pages, 4 embedded figures, accepted for publication in the Journal of Low Temperature Physics
Submitted: 2015-11-13
SuperSpec is a novel on-chip spectrometer we are developing for multi-object, moderate resolution (R = 100 - 500), large bandwidth (~1.65:1) submillimeter and millimeter survey spectroscopy of high-redshift galaxies. The spectrometer employs a filter bank architecture, and consists of a series of half-wave resonators formed by lithographically-patterned superconducting transmission lines. The signal power admitted by each resonator is detected by a lumped element titanium nitride (TiN) kinetic inductance detector (KID) operating at 100 - 200 MHz. We have tested a new prototype device that achieves the targeted R = 100 resolving power, and has better detector sensitivity and optical efficiency than previous devices. We employ a new method for measuring photon noise using both coherent and thermal sources of radiation to cleanly separate the contributions of shot and wave noise. We report an upper limit to the detector NEP of $1.4\times10^{-17}$ W Hz$^{-1/2}$, within 10% of the photon noise limited NEP for a ground-based R=100 spectrometer.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.02295  [pdf] - 1223953
Status of SuperSpec: A Broadband, On-Chip Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, Proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2014 Conference, Vol 9153, Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VII
Submitted: 2015-01-09
SuperSpec is a novel on-chip spectrometer we are developing for multi-object, moderate resolution (R = 100 - 500), large bandwidth (~1.65:1) submillimeter and millimeter survey spectroscopy of high-redshift galaxies. The spectrometer employs a filter bank architecture, and consists of a series of half-wave resonators formed by lithographically-patterned superconducting transmission lines. The signal power admitted by each resonator is detected by a lumped element titanium nitride (TiN) kinetic inductance detector (KID) operating at 100-200 MHz. We have tested a new prototype device that is more sensitive than previous devices, and easier to fabricate. We present a characterization of a representative R=282 channel at f = 236 GHz, including measurements of the spectrometer detection efficiency, the detector responsivity over a large range of optical loading, and the full system optical efficiency. We outline future improvements to the current system that we expect will enable construction of a photon-noise-limited R=100 filter bank, appropriate for a line intensity mapping experiment targeting the [CII] 158 micron transition during the Epoch of Reionization
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.2113  [pdf] - 860359
A Strained Silicon Cold Electron Bolometer using Schottky Contacts
Comments: Published in Applied Physics Letters, 105, pp. 043509
Submitted: 2014-07-08, last modified: 2014-07-31
We describe optical characterisation of a Strained Silicon Cold Electron Bolometer (CEB), operating on a $350~\mathrm{mK}$ stage, designed for absorption of millimetre-wave radiation. The silicon Cold Electron Bolometer utilises Schottky contacts between a superconductor and an n++ doped silicon island to detect changes in the temperature of the charge carriers in the silicon, due to variations in absorbed radiation. By using strained silicon as the absorber, we decrease the electron-phonon coupling in the device and increase the responsivity to incoming power. The strained silicon absorber is coupled to a planar aluminium twin-slot antenna designed to couple to $160~\mathrm{GHz}$ and that serves as the superconducting contacts. From the measured optical responsivity and spectral response, we calculate a maximum optical efficiency of $50~\%$ for radiation coupled into the device by the planar antenna and an overall noise equivalent power (NEP), referred to absorbed optical power, of $1.1 \times 10^{-16}~\mathrm{\mbox{W Hz}^{-1/2}}$ when the detector is observing a $300~\mathrm{K}$ source through a $4~\mathrm{K}$ throughput limiting aperture. Even though this optical system is not optimised we measure a system noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of $6~\mathrm{\mbox{mK Hz}^{-1/2}}$. We measure the noise of the device using a cross-correlation of time stream data measured simultaneously with two junction field-effect transistor (JFET) amplifiers, with a base correlated noise level of $300~\mathrm{\mbox{pV Hz}^{-1/2}}$ and find that the total noise is consistent with a combination of photon noise, current shot noise and electron-phonon thermal noise.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.1652  [pdf] - 587352
MKID development for SuperSpec: an on-chip, mm-wave, filter-bank spectrometer
Comments: As submitted, except that "in prep" references have been updated
Submitted: 2012-11-07
SuperSpec is an ultra-compact spectrometer-on-a-chip for millimeter and submillimeter wavelength astronomy. Its very small size, wide spectral bandwidth, and highly multiplexed readout will enable construction of powerful multibeam spectrometers for high-redshift observations. The spectrometer consists of a horn-coupled microstrip feedline, a bank of narrow-band superconducting resonator filters that provide spectral selectivity, and Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) that detect the power admitted by each filter resonator. The design is realized using thin-film lithographic structures on a silicon wafer. The mm-wave microstrip feedline and spectral filters of the first prototype are designed to operate in the band from 195-310 GHz and are fabricated from niobium with at Tc of 9.2K. The KIDs are designed to operate at hundreds of MHz and are fabricated from titanium nitride with a Tc of 2K. Radiation incident on the horn travels along the mm-wave microstrip, passes through the frequency-selective filter, and is finally absorbed by the corresponding KID where it causes a measurable shift in the resonant frequency. In this proceedings, we present the design of the KIDs employed in SuperSpec and the results of initial laboratory testing of a prototype device. We will also briefly describe the ongoing development of a demonstration instrument that will consist of two 500-channel, R=700 spectrometers, one operating in the 1-mm atmospheric window and the other covering the 650 and 850 micron bands.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.0934  [pdf] - 585657
SuperSpec: design concept and circuit simulations
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2012-11-05
SuperSpec is a pathfinder for future lithographic spectrometer cameras, which promise to energize extra-galactic astrophysics at (sub)millimeter wavelengths: delivering 200--500 km/s spectral velocity resolution over an octave bandwidth for every pixel in a telescope's field of view. We present circuit simulations that prove the concept, which enables complete millimeter-band spectrometer devices in just a few square-millimeter footprint. We evaluate both single-stage and two-stage channelizing filter designs, which separate channels into an array of broad-band detectors, such as bolometers or kinetic inductance detector (KID) devices. We discuss to what degree losses (by radiation or by absorption in the dielectric) and fabrication tolerances affect the resolution or performance of such devices, and what steps we can take to mitigate the degradation. Such design studies help us formulate critical requirements on the materials and fabrication process, and help understand what practical limits currently exist to the capabilities these devices can deliver today or over the next few years.