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Barbieri, L.

Normalized to: Barbieri, L.

3 article(s) in total. 160 co-authors, from 1 to 2 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 16,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.06712  [pdf] - 1929702
Stellar activity analysis of Barnard's Star: Very slow rotation and evidence for long-term activity cycle
Comments: 16 pages, 20 figures
Submitted: 2018-12-17, last modified: 2019-08-06
The search for Earth-like planets around late-type stars using ultra-stable spectrographs requires a very precise characterization of the stellar activity and the magnetic cycle of the star, since these phenomena induce radial velocity (RV) signals that can be misinterpreted as planetary signals. Among the nearby stars, we have selected Barnard's Star (Gl 699) to carry out a characterization of these phenomena using a set of spectroscopic data that covers about 14.5 years and comes from seven different spectrographs: HARPS, HARPS-N, CARMENES, HIRES, UVES, APF, and PFS; and a set of photometric data that covers about 15.1 years and comes from four different photometric sources: ASAS, FCAPT-RCT, AAVSO, and SNO. We have measured different chromospheric activity indicators (H$\alpha$, Ca~{\sc II}~HK and Na I D), as well as the FWHM of the cross-correlation function computed for a sub-set of the spectroscopic data. The analysis of Generalized Lomb-Scargle periodograms of the time series of different activity indicators reveals that the rotation period of the star is 145 $\pm$ 15 days, consistent with the expected rotation period according to the low activity level of the star and previous claims. The upper limit of the predicted activity-induced RV signal corresponding to this rotation period is about 1 m/s. We also find evidence of a long-term cycle of 10 $\pm$ 2 years that is consistent with previous estimates of magnetic cycles from photometric time series in other M stars of similar activity levels. The available photometric data of the star also support the detection of both the long-term and the rotation signals.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.07981  [pdf] - 1846888
The PDS 110 observing campaign - photometric and spectroscopic observations reveal eclipses are aperiodic
Comments: Accepted to MNRAS; 12 pages, 7 figures; Supplementary photometric data in zipped latex source as all_photometry.csv
Submitted: 2019-01-23
PDS 110 is a young disk-hosting star in the Orion OB1A association. Two dimming events of similar depth and duration were seen in 2008 (WASP) and 2011 (KELT), consistent with an object in a closed periodic orbit. In this paper we present data from a ground-based observing campaign designed to measure the star both photometrically and spectroscopically during the time of predicted eclipse in September 2017. Despite high-quality photometry, the predicted eclipse did not occur, although coherent structure is present suggesting variable amounts of stellar flux or dust obscuration. We also searched for RV oscillations caused by any hypothetical companion and can rule out close binaries to 0.1 $M_\odot$. A search of Sonneberg plate archive data also enabled us to extend the photometric baseline of this star back more than 50 years, and similarly does not re-detect any deep eclipses. Taken together, they suggest that the eclipses seen in WASP and KELT photometry were due to aperiodic events. It would seem that PDS 110 undergoes stochastic dimmings that are shallower and shorter-duration than those of UX Ori variables, but may have a similar mechanism.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.05609  [pdf] - 1300327
Larger and faster: revised properties and a shorter orbital period for the WASP-57 planetary system from a pro-am collaboration
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 13 pages, 8 figures, 7 tables. The data will be available at the first author's website and the system will be added to the TEPCat catalogue at http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/jkt/tepcat/
Submitted: 2015-09-18
Transits in the WASP-57 planetary system have been found to occur half an hour earlier than expected. We present ten transit light curves from amateur telescopes, on which this discovery was based, thirteen transit light curves from professional facilities which confirm and refine this finding, and high-resolution imaging which show no evidence for nearby companions. We use these data to determine a new and precise orbital ephemeris, and measure the physical properties of the system. Our revised orbital period is 4.5s shorter than found from the discovery data alone, which explains the early occurrence of the transits. We also find both the star and planet to be larger and less massive than previously thought. The measured mass and radius of the planet are now consistent with theoretical models of gas giants containing no heavy-element core, as expected for the sub-solar metallicity of the host star. Two transits were observed simultaneously in four passbands. We use the resulting light curves to measure the planet's radius as a function of wavelength, finding that our data are sufficient in principle but not in practise to constrain its atmospheric properties. We conclude with a discussion of the current and future status of transmission photometry studies for probing the atmospheres of gas-giant transiting planets.