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Böhringer, Hans

Normalized to: Böhringer, H.

88 article(s) in total. 735 co-authors, from 1 to 29 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 4,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.10941  [pdf] - 1985272
Galaxies and Cluster of Galaxies as Peak Patches of the Density Field
Comments: To appear in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-02-28, last modified: 2019-10-23
The mass function of galaxies and clusters of galaxies can be derived observationally based on different types of observations. In this study we test if these observations can be combined to a consistent picture which is also in accord with structure formation theory. The galaxy data comprise the optical galaxy luminosity function and the gravitational lensing signature of the galaxies, while the galaxy cluster mass function is derived from the X-ray luminosity distribution of the clusters. We show the results of the comparison in the form of the mass density fraction that is contained in collapsed objects relative to the mean matter density in the Universe. The mass density fraction in groups and clusters of galaxies extrapolated to low masses agrees very well with that of the galaxies: both converge at the low mass limit to a mass fraction of about 28\% if the outer radii of the objects are taken to be $r_{200}$. Most of the matter contained in collapsed objects is found in the mass range $M_{200} \sim 10^{12} - 10^{14} h^{-1}_{70} M_\odot$, while a larger amount of the cosmic matter resides outside of objects with radius $r_{200}$.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.09560  [pdf] - 1881027
Magnetic fields and extraordinarily bright radio emission in the X-ray faint galaxy group MRC 0116+111
Comments: 12 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-02-25, last modified: 2019-05-10
MRC 0116+111 is a nearby ($z=0.132$) poor galaxy group, which was previously known for exhibiting a bright diffuse radio emission with no central point-like source, presumably related to a past activity of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in its central cD galaxy. Here, we present an X-ray observation ($\sim$30 ks of cleaned XMM-Newton/EPIC exposure) of this system, allowing us for the first time a detailed comparison between the thermal and non-thermal components of its intragroup medium (IGrM). Remarkably, we find that the radio-to-X-ray luminosity ratio is among the highest ever observed for a diffuse extragalactic source so far, while the extent of the observed radio emission is about three times larger than its observed soft X-ray emission. Although powerful AGN activity may have disturbed the dynamics of the thermal IGrM in the form of turbulence, possibly re-energising part of the relativistic electron population, the gas properties lie within the $L_X$-$T$ scaling relation established previously for other groups. The upper limit we find for the non-thermal inverse-Compton X-ray emission translates into a surprisingly high lower limit for the volume-averaged magnetic field of the group ($\ge$4.3 $\mu$G). Finally, we discuss some interesting properties of a distant ($z \simeq 0.525$) galaxy cluster serendipitously discovered in our EPIC field of view.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.04050  [pdf] - 1763100
How frequent are close supermassive binary black holes in powerful jet sources?
Comments: 24 pages, 36 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-09-11
Supermassive black hole binaries may be detectable by an upcoming suite of gravitational wave experiments. Their binary nature can also be revealed by radio jets via a short-period precession driven by the orbital motion as well as the geodetic precession at typically longer periods. We have investigated Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and MERLIN radio maps of powerful jet sources for morphological evidence of geodetic precession. For perhaps the best studied source, Cygnus A, we find strong evidence for geodetic precession. Projection effects can enhance precession features, for which we find indications in strongly projected sources. For a complete sample of 33 3CR radio sources we find strong evidence for jet precession in 24 cases (73 per cent). The morphology of the radio maps suggests that the precession periods are of the order of 10^6 - 10^7 yr. We consider different explanations for the morphological features and conclude that geodetic precession is the best explanation. The frequently observed gradual jet angle changes in samples of powerful blazars can be explained by orbital motion. Both observations can be explained simultaneously by postulating that a high fraction of powerful radio sources have sub-parsec supermassive black hole binaries. We consider complementary evidence and discuss if any jetted supermassive black hole with some indication of precession could be detected as individual gravitational wave source in the near future. This appears unlikely, with the possible exception of M87.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.00029  [pdf] - 1656205
The HectoMAP Cluster Survey - II. X-ray Clusters
Comments: submitted to ApJ, a revised version in response to the referee's comments, 18 pages, 12 figures, 4 tables, Table 3 will be available when the paper is accepted
Submitted: 2017-11-30, last modified: 2018-01-24
We apply a friends-of-friends algorithm to the HectoMAP redshift survey and cross-identify associated X-ray emission in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey data (RASS). The resulting flux limited catalog of X-ray cluster survey is complete to a limiting flux of $\sim3 \times10^{-13}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ and includes 15 clusters (7 newly discovered) with redshift $z \leq 0.4$. HectoMAP is a dense survey ($\sim1200$ galaxies deg$^{-2}$) that provides $\sim50$ members (median) in each X-ray cluster. We provide redshifts for the 1036 cluster members. Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam imaging covers three of the X-ray systems and confirms that they are impressive clusters. The HectoMAP X-ray clusters have an $L_{X} - {\sigma}_{cl}$ scaling relation similar to that of known massive X-ray clusters. The HectoMAP X-ray cluster sample predicts $\sim 12000 \pm3000$ detectable X-ray clusters in the RASS to the limiting flux, comparable with previous estimates.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.05985  [pdf] - 1586107
Comparison of hydrostatic and dynamical masses of distant X-ray luminous galaxy clusters
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-07-19
The main goal of this work is to compare the results of three dynamical mass estimators to the X-ray hydrostatic values, focussing on massive galaxy clusters at intermediate redshifts $z\sim0.3$. We estimated dynamical masses with the virial theorem, the Jeans equation, and the caustic method using wide-field VIMOS spectroscopy. We investigated the role of colour selection and the impact of substructures on the dynamical estimators. The Jeans and caustic methods give consistent results, whereas the virial theorem leads to masses $\sim15\%$ larger. The Jeans, caustic, and virial masses are respectively $\sim20\%$, $\sim30\%$, and $\sim50\%$ larger than the hydrostatic values. Large scatters of $\gtrsim50\%$ are mainly due to the two outliers RXCJ0014 and RXCJ1347; excluding the latter increases the mass ratios by $\sim10\%$, giving a fractional mass bias significant at $\gtrsim2\sigma$. We found a correlation between the dynamical-to-hydrostatic mass ratio and two substructure indicators, suggesting a bias in the dynamical measurements. The velocity dispersions of blue galaxies are $\sim15\%$ ($\sim25\%$ after removing the substructures) larger than that of the red-sequence galaxies; using the latter leads to dynamical masses $\sim10\%-15\%$ smaller. Discarding the galaxies part of substructures reduces the masses by $\sim15\%$; the effect is larger for the more massive clusters, owing to a higher level of substructures. After the substructure analysis, the dynamical masses are in perfect agreement with the hydrostatic values and the scatters around the mean ratios are divided by $\sim2$.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.08690  [pdf] - 1582129
The fraction of cool-core clusters in X-ray vs. SZ samples using Chandra observations
Comments: 18 pages, 6 figures, 5 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2017-03-25, last modified: 2017-05-30
We derive and compare the fractions of cool-core clusters in the {\em Planck} Early Sunyaev-Zel'dovich sample of 164 clusters with $z \leq 0.35$ and in a flux-limited X-ray sample of 100 clusters with $z \leq 0.30$, using {\em Chandra} observations. We use four metrics to identify cool-core clusters: 1) the concentration parameter: the ratio of the integrated emissivity profile within 0.15 $r_{500}$ to that within $r_{500}$, and 2) the ratio of the integrated emissivity profile within 40 kpc to that within 400 kpc, 3) the cuspiness of the gas density profile: the negative of the logarithmic derivative of the gas density with respect to the radius, measured at 0.04 $r_{500}$, and 4) the central gas density, measured at 0.01 $r_{500}$. We find that the sample of X-ray selected clusters, as characterized by each of these metrics, contains a significantly larger fraction of cool-core clusters compared to the sample of SZ selected clusters (44$\pm$7\% vs. 28$\pm$4\% using the concentration parameter in the 0.15--1.0 $r_{500}$ range, 61$\pm$8\% vs. 36$\pm$5\% using the concentration parameter in the 40--400 kpc range, 64$\pm$8\% vs. 38$\pm$5\% using the cuspiness, and 53$\pm$7\% vs. 39$\pm$5\% using the central gas density). Qualitatively, cool-core clusters are more X-ray luminous at fixed mass. Hence, our X-ray flux-limited sample, compared to the approximately mass-limited SZ sample, is over-represented with cool-core clusters. We describe a simple quantitative model that uses the excess luminosity of cool-core clusters compared to non-cool-core clusters at fixed mass to successfully predict the observed fraction of cool-core clusters in X-ray selected samples.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.02763  [pdf] - 1581812
From the core to the outskirts: structure analysis of three massive galaxy clusters
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-03-08
The hierarchical model of structure formation is a key prediction of the Lambda cold dark matter model, which can be tested by studying the large-scale environment and the substructure content of massive galaxy clusters. We present here a detailed analysis of the clusters RXCJ0225.9-4154, RXCJ0528.9-3927, and RXCJ2308.3-0211, as part of a sample of massive X-ray luminous clusters located at intermediate redshifts. We used a multiwavelength analysis, combining WFI photometric observations, VIMOS spectroscopy, and the X-ray surface brightness maps. We investigated the optical morphology of the clusters, we looked for significant counterparts in the residual X-ray emission, and we ran several tests to assess their dynamical state. We correlated the results to define various substructure features, to study their properties, and to quantify their influence on simple dynamical mass estimators. RXCJ0225 has a bimodal core, and two massive galaxy groups are located in its immediate surroundings; they are aligned in an elongated structure that is also detected in X-rays. RXCJ0528 is located in a poor environment; an X-ray centroid shift and the presence of two central BCGs provide mild evidence for a recent and active dynamical history. RXCJ2308 has complex central dynamics, and it is found at the core of a superstes-cluster. The complexity of the cluster's central dynamics reflects the richness of its large-scale environment: RXCJ0225 and RXCJ2308 present a mass fraction in substructures larger than the typical 0.05-0.15, whereas the isolated cluster RXCJ0528 does not have any major substructures within its virial radius. The largest substructures are found in the cluster outskirts. The optical morphology of the clusters correlates with the orientation of their BCG, and with the position of the main axes of accretion.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.04615  [pdf] - 1532624
Discovery of a supercluster in the ZOA in Vela
Comments: Matches the final version published in MNRAS Letters. Updated author list, spelling, references
Submitted: 2016-11-14, last modified: 2016-12-13
We report the discovery of a potentially major supercluster that extends across the Galactic Plane in the constellation of Vela, at a mean recessional velocity of ~18,000 km/s. Recent multi-object spectroscopic observations of this Vela Supercluster (VSCL), using AAOmega+2dF and the Southern African Large Telescope, confirm an extended galaxy overdensity in the Zone of Avoidance (ZOA) located where residual bulk flows predict a considerable mass excess. We present a preliminary analysis of ~4,500 new spectroscopic galaxy redshifts obtained in the ZOA centred on the Vela region (l=272.5+-20 deg, b=0+-10 deg). The presently sparsely-sampled dataset traces an overdensity that covers 25 deg in Galactic longitude on either side of the Plane, suggesting an extent of 25 deg x 20 deg, corresponding to ~115 x 90 $h_{70}$ Mpc at the supercluster redshift. In redshift space, the overdensity appears to consist of two merging wall-like structures, interspersed with clusters and groups. Both the velocity histogram and the morphology of the multi-branching wall structure are consistent with a supercluster classification. $K_s^o$ galaxy counts show an enhancement of ~1.2 over the survey area for galaxies brighter than $M_K^*$ at the VSCL distance, and a galaxy overdensity of $\delta=0.50\rm{-}0.77$ within a photometric redshift shell around the VSCL, when compared to various Two-Micron All-Sky Survey samples. Taking account of selection effects, the VSCL is estimated to contribute $v_\rm{LG} \gtrsim 50$ km/s to the motion of the Local Group.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.02058  [pdf] - 1486790
Planck 2015 results. XXVI. The Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Argüeso, F.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Beichman, C.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Sanghera, H. S.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 39 pages and 33 figures. This paper is one of a set associated with the 2015 data release from Planck. Version accepted by Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2015-07-08, last modified: 2016-02-15
The Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources is a catalogue of sources detected in single-frequency maps from the full duration of the Planck mission and supersedes previous versions of the Planck compact source catalogues. It consists of compact sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, detected over the entire sky. Compact sources detected in the lower frequency channels are assigned to the PCCS2, while at higher frequencies they are assigned to one of two sub-catalogues, the PCCS2 or PCCS2E, depending on their location on the sky. The first of these catalogues covers most of the sky and allows the user to produce subsamples at higher reliabilities than the target 80% integral reliability of the catalogue. The PCCS2E contains sources detected in sky regions where the diffuse emission makes it difficult to quantify the reliability of the detections. Both the PCCS2 and PCCS2E include polarization measurements, in the form of polarized flux densities, or upper limits, and orientation angles for all seven polarization-sensitive Planck channels. The improved data-processing of the full-mission maps and their reduced noise levels allow us to increase the number of objects in the catalogue, improving its completeness for the target 80 % reliability as compared with the previous versions, the PCCS and ERCSC catalogues.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.04583  [pdf] - 1356349
Planck Intermediate Results. XXXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck SZ sources with telescopes in the Canary Islands Observatories
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Ferragamo, A.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Hempel, A.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Levrier, F.; Lietzen, H.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Streblyanska, A.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 15 pages, 14 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2015-04-17, last modified: 2016-02-11
We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with telescopes at the Canary Islands observatories as part of the general optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck collaboration. In total, 78 SZ sources are discussed. Deep-imaging observations were obtained for most of these sources; spectroscopic observations in either in long-slit or multi-object modes were obtained for many. We effectively used 37.5 clear nights. We found optical counterparts for 73 of the 78 candidates. This sample includes 53 spectroscopic redshift determinations, 20 of them obtained with a multi-object spectroscopic mode. The sample contains new redshifts for 27 Planck clusters that were not included in the first Planck SZ source catalogue (PSZ1).
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.5013  [pdf] - 1260740
Comparison of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements from Planck and from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager for 99 galaxy clusters
Comments: 41 pages (20 + 21 of appendices), 38 figures. Accepted by A&A 11/06/2015. Minor changes only from v1; long delay in publication due to lack of response from first referee
Submitted: 2014-05-20, last modified: 2015-06-15
We present observations and analysis of a sample of 123 galaxy clusters from the 2013 Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich sources with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI), a ground-based radio interferometer. AMI provides an independent measurement with higher angular resolution, 3 arcmin compared to the Planck beams of 5-10 arcmin. The AMI observations thus provide validation of the cluster detections, improved positional estimates, and a consistency check on the fitted 'size' ($\theta_{s}$) and 'flux' ($Y_{\rm tot}$) parameters in the Generalised Navarro, Frenk and White (GNFW) model. We detect 99 of the clusters. We use the AMI positional estimates to check the positional estimates and error-bars produced by the Planck algorithms PowellSnakes and MMF3. We find that $Y_{\rm tot}$ values as measured by AMI are biased downwards with respect to the Planck constraints, especially for high Planck-SNR clusters. We perform simulations to show that this can be explained by deviation from the 'universal' pressure profile shape used to model the clusters. We show that AMI data can constrain the $\alpha$ and $\beta$ parameters describing the shape of the profile in the GNFW model for individual clusters provided careful attention is paid to the degeneracies between parameters, but one requires information on a wider range of angular scales than are present in AMI data alone to correctly constrain all parameters simultaneously.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01598  [pdf] - 1486779
Planck 2015 results. XXVII. The Second Planck Catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Sources
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Feroz, F.; Ferragamo, A.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jin, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rozo, E.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Spencer, L. D.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Streblyanska, A.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, S. D. M.; Wright, E. L.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 41 pages. Submitted to A&A. Part of the 2015 Planck data release
Submitted: 2015-02-05
We present the all-sky Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources detected from the 29 month full-mission data. The catalogue (PSZ2) is the largest SZ-selected sample of galaxy clusters yet produced and the deepest all-sky catalogue of galaxy clusters. It contains 1653 detections, of which 1203 are confirmed clusters with identified counterparts in external data-sets, and is the first SZ-selected cluster survey containing > $10^3$ confirmed clusters. We present a detailed analysis of the survey selection function in terms of its completeness and statistical reliability, placing a lower limit of 83% on the purity. Using simulations, we find that the Y5R500 estimates are robust to pressure-profile variation and beam systematics, but accurate conversion to Y500 requires. the use of prior information on the cluster extent. We describe the multi-wavelength search for counterparts in ancillary data, which makes use of radio, microwave, infra-red, optical and X-ray data-sets, and which places emphasis on the robustness of the counterpart match. We discuss the physical properties of the new sample and identify a population of low-redshift X-ray under- luminous clusters revealed by SZ selection. These objects appear in optical and SZ surveys with consistent properties for their mass, but are almost absent from ROSAT X-ray selected samples.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.00543  [pdf] - 1332916
Planck 2013 results. XXIX. The Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources: Addendum
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Feroz, F.; Ferragamo, A.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; N; Groeneboom, E.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Olamaie, M.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Savini, G.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Streblyanska, A.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2015-02-02
We update the all-sky Planck catalogue of 1227 clusters and cluster candidates (PSZ1) published in March 2013, derived from Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect detections using the first 15.5 months of Planck satellite observations. Addendum. We deliver an updated version of the PSZ1 catalogue, reporting the further confirmation of 86 Planck-discovered clusters. In total, the PSZ1 now contains 947 confirmed clusters, of which 214 were confirmed as newly discovered clusters through follow-up observations undertaken by the Planck Collaboration. The updated PSZ1 contains redshifts for 913 systems, of which 736 (~80.6%) are spectroscopic, and associated mass estimates derived from the Y_z mass proxy. We also provide a new SZ quality flag, derived from a novel artificial neural network classification of the SZ signal, for the remaining 280 candidates. Based on this assessment, the purity of the updated PSZ1 catalogue is estimated to be 94%. In this release, we provide the full updated catalogue and an additional readme file with further information on the Planck SZ detections.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.04286  [pdf] - 923036
Optical and X-ray profiles in the REXCESS sample of galaxy clusters
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-01-18
Galaxy clusters' structure, dominated by dark matter, is traced by member galaxies in the optical and hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) in X-rays. We compare the radial distribution of these components and determine the mass-to-light ratio vs. system mass relation. We use 14 clusters from the REXCESS sample which is representative of clusters detected in X-ray surveys. Photometric observations with the Wide Field Imager on the 2.2m MPG/ESO telescope are used to determine the number density profiles of the galaxy distribution out to $r_{200}$. These are compared to electron density profiles of the ICM obtained using XMM-Newton, and dark matter profiles inferred from scaling relations and an NFW model. While red sequence galaxies trace the total matter profile, the blue galaxy distribution is much shallower. We see a deficit of faint galaxies in the central regions of massive and regular clusters, and strong suppression of bright and faint blue galaxies in the centres of cool-core clusters, attributable to ram pressure stripping of gas from blue galaxies in high density regions of ICM and disruption of faint galaxies due to galaxy interactions. We find a mass-to-light ratio vs. mass relation within $r_{200}$ of $\left(3.0\pm0.4\right) \times 10^2\, h\,\mathrm{M}_{\odot}\,\mathrm{L}_{\odot}^{-1}$ at $10^{15}\,\mathrm{M}_{\odot}$ with slope $0.16 \pm 0.14$, consistent with most previous results.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.5188  [pdf] - 1223676
The reversal of the SF-density relation in a massive, X-ray selected galaxy cluster at z=1.58: results from Herschel
Comments: Letter accepted for publication in MNRAS, ESA Press Release on 18 December 2014
Submitted: 2014-12-16
Dusty, star-forming galaxies have a critical role in the formation and evolution of massive galaxies in the Universe. Using deep far-infrared imaging in the range 100-500um obtained with the Herschel telescope, we investigate the dust-obscured star formation in the galaxy cluster XDCP J0044.0-2033 at z=1.58, the most massive cluster at z >1.5, with a measured mass M200= 4.7x10$^{14}$ Msun. We perform an analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 12 cluster members (5 spectroscopically confirmed) detected with >3$\sigma$ significance in the PACS maps, all ULIRGs. The individual star formation rates (SFRs) lie in the range 155-824 Ms/yr, with dust temperatures of 24$\pm$35 K. We measure a strikingly high amount of star formation (SF) in the cluster core, SFR (< 250 kpc) > 1875$\pm$158 Ms/yr, 4x higher than the amount of star formation in the cluster outskirts. This scenario is unprecedented in a galaxy cluster, showing for the first time a reversal of the SF-density relation at z~1.6 in a massive cluster.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.6663  [pdf] - 1451784
Planck intermediate results. XXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck clusters with the RTT150 telescope
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 14 pages, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2014-07-24
We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with the Russian-Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT150), as a part of the optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck collaboration. During this time period approximately 20% of all dark and grey clear time available at the telescope was devoted to observations of Planck objects. Some observations of distant clusters were also done at the 6-m Bolshoy Telescope Azimutal'ny (BTA) of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences. In total, deep, direct images of more than one hundred fields were obtained in multiple filters. We identified 47 previously unknown galaxy clusters, 41 of which are included in the Planck catalogue of SZ sources. The redshifts of 65 Planck clusters were measured spectroscopically and 14 more were measured photometrically. We discuss the details of cluster optical identifications and redshift measurements. We also present new spectroscopic redhifts for 39 Planck clusters that were not included in the Planck SZ source catalogue and are published here for the first time.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.5062  [pdf] - 832330
Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bourdin, H.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carr, R.; Carvalho, P.; Casale, M.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Falgarone, E.; Falvella, M. C.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Frommert, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Galli, S.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jasche, J.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A.; Räth, C.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Riazuelo, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schiavon, F.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smith, K.; Smoot, G. F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Taylor, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J. -P.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Tuttlebee, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vibert, L.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, C.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Winkel, B.; Xia, J. -Q.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2013-03-20, last modified: 2014-06-05
The ESA's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the CMB and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the SZ effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter LCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25 sigma. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations derived from CMB data and that derived from SZ data. The Planck and WMAP power spectra are offset from each other by an average level of about 2% around the first acoustic peak.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.0037  [pdf] - 844873
Feedback by massive stars and the emergence of superbubbles II. X-ray properties
Comments: 13 pages 12 figures, accepted by Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2014-04-30
In a previous paper we investigated the energy transfer of massive stars to the interstellar medium as a function of time and the geometrical configuration of three massive stars via 3D-mesh-refining hydrodynamics simulations, following the complete evolution of the massive stars and their supernovae except non-thermal processes . We analysed our ISM simulation results with the help of spectra for plasma temperatures between 0.1 and 10 keV and computed the spectral evolution and the spatio-temporal distribution of the hot gas. Results. Despite significant input of high temperature gas from supernovae and fast stellar winds, the resulting thermal X-ray spectra are generally very soft, with most of the emission well below 1 keV. We show that this is due to mixing triggered by resolved hydrodynamic instabilities. Supernovae enhance the X-ray luminosity of a superbubble by 1-2 orders of magnitude for a time span of about 0.1 Myr; longer if a supernova occurs in a larger superbubble and shorter in higher energy bands. Peak superbubble luminosities of the order of 10^{36} erg/s are reproduced well. The strong decay of the X-ray luminosity is due to bubble expansion, hydrodynamic instabilities related to the acceleration of the superbubble's shell thanks to the sudden energy input, and subsequent mixing. We also find global oscillations of our simulated superbubbles, which produce spatial variations of the X-ray spectrum, similar to what we see in the Orion-Eridanus cavity. We calculated the fraction of energy emitted in X-rays and find that with a value of a few times 10^{-4}, it is about a factor of ten below the measurements for nearby galaxies.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.4879  [pdf] - 1180838
Kinematic analysis of a sample of X-ray luminous distant galaxy clusters. The $L_X$ - $\sigma_v$ relation in the $z>0.6$ universe
Comments: 24 pages, 20 figures, 11 tables, accepted for publication in A&A (v2: typos/language style corrections, updated references)
Submitted: 2013-11-19, last modified: 2014-04-01
Observations and cosmological simulations show galaxy clusters as a family of nearly self-similar objects with properties that can be described by scaling relations as a function of e.g. mass and time. Here we study the scaling relations between the galaxy velocity dispersion and X-ray quantities like X-ray bolometric luminosity and temperature in galaxy clusters at high redshifts (0.64 $\leq$ z $\leq$ 1.46). We also compare our results with the similar study of the local HIFLUGCS sample. For the analysis, we use a set of 15 distant galaxy clusters extracted from the literature plus a sample of 10 newly discovered clusters selected in X-rays by the \XMM Distant Cluster Project (XDCP) with more than 10 confirmed spectroscopic members per cluster. We also study the evolution of this scaling relation by comparing the high redshift results with the data from the local HIFLUGCS sample. We also investigated the $L_X - T_X$ and the $\sigma_v - T_X$ relations for the 15 clusters in the literature sample. We report the results of the X-ray and kinematic analysis of 10 newly detected high redshift clusters and provide their spectroscopic and kinematic details. For the entire, distant sample we find a slope fully consistent with the one typical of local clusters, albeit with a large associated uncertainty. The study on the evolution of the amplitude reveals a positive offset if the self-similar evolution is neglected, hence possibly indicating the need for including evolutionary effects. However, the $L_X - T_X$ relation is found to be in good agreement with the local relation without any significant redshift evolution. Finally, the $\sigma_v - T_X$ relation appears to slightly deviate from the theoretical expectation that galaxies and gas particles have a similar specific kinetic energy. However, the associated uncertainty is currently too large for making any conclusive statement in this regard.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.5089  [pdf] - 1165439
Planck 2013 results. XXIX. Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; N; Groeneboom, E.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Olamaie, M.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Savini, G.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 42 pages, accepted for publication by A&A, catalogue available at ESA's Planck Legacy Archive and at SZ cluster database http://szcluster-db.ias.u-psud.fr
Submitted: 2013-03-20, last modified: 2014-03-28
We describe the all-sky Planck catalogue of clusters and cluster candidates derived from Sunyaev--Zeldovich (SZ) effect detections using the first 15.5 months of Planck satellite observations. The catalogue contains 1227 entries, making it over six times the size of the Planck Early SZ (ESZ) sample and the largest SZ-selected catalogue to date. It contains 861 confirmed clusters, of which 178 have been confirmed as clusters, mostly through follow-up observations, and a further 683 are previously-known clusters. The remaining 366 have the status of cluster candidates, and we divide them into three classes according to the quality of evidence that they are likely to be true clusters. The Planck SZ catalogue is the deepest all-sky cluster catalogue, with redshifts up to about one, and spans the broadest cluster mass range from (0.1 to 1.6) 10^{15}Msun. Confirmation of cluster candidates through comparison with existing surveys or cluster catalogues is extensively described, as is the statistical characterization of the catalogue in terms of completeness and statistical reliability. The outputs of the validation process are provided as additional information. This gives, in particular, an ensemble of 813 cluster redshifts, and for all these Planck clusters we also include a mass estimated from a newly-proposed SZ-mass proxy. A refined measure of the SZ Compton parameter for the clusters with X-ray counter-parts is provided, as is an X-ray flux for all the Planck clusters not previously detected in X-ray surveys.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.5080  [pdf] - 1165434
Planck 2013 results. XX. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chiang, H. C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 20 pages, accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2013-03-20, last modified: 2014-03-28
We present constraints on cosmological parameters using number counts as a function of redshift for a sub-sample of 189 galaxy clusters from the Planck SZ (PSZ) catalogue. The PSZ is selected through the signature of the Sunyaev--Zeldovich (SZ) effect, and the sub-sample used here has a signal-to-noise threshold of seven, with each object confirmed as a cluster and all but one with a redshift estimate. We discuss the completeness of the sample and our construction of a likelihood analysis. Using a relation between mass $M$ and SZ signal $Y$ calibrated to X-ray measurements, we derive constraints on the power spectrum amplitude $\sigma_8$ and matter density parameter $\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}$ in a flat $\Lambda$CDM model. We test the robustness of our estimates and find that possible biases in the $Y$--$M$ relation and the halo mass function are larger than the statistical uncertainties from the cluster sample. Assuming the X-ray determined mass to be biased low relative to the true mass by between zero and 30%, motivated by comparison of the observed mass scaling relations to those from a set of numerical simulations, we find that $\sigma_8=0.75\pm 0.03$, $\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}=0.29\pm 0.02$, and $\sigma_8(\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}/0.27)^{0.3} = 0.764 \pm 0.025$. The value of $\sigma_8$ is degenerate with the mass bias; if the latter is fixed to a value of 20% we find $\sigma_8(\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}/0.27)^{0.3}=0.78\pm 0.01$ and a tighter one-dimensional range $\sigma_8=0.77\pm 0.02$. We find that the larger values of $\sigma_8$ and $\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}$ preferred by Planck's measurements of the primary CMB anisotropies can be accommodated by a mass bias of about 40%. Alternatively, consistency with the primary CMB constraints can be achieved by inclusion of processes that suppress power on small scales relative to the $\Lambda$CDM model, such as a component of massive neutrinos (abridged).
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.5886  [pdf] - 1546170
The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II)\\ II. Construction and Properties of the Survey
Comments: Astronomy and Astrophysics Vol. 555, A30 - 15 pages, 20 figures
Submitted: 2014-03-24
Galaxy clusters provide unique laboratories to study astrophysical processes on large scales and are important probes for cosmology. X-ray observations are currently the best means of detecting and characterizing galaxy clusters. In this paper we describe the construction of the REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey based on the southern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. REFLEX II extends the REFLEX I survey by a factor of about two down to a flux limit of $1.8 \times 10^{-12}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ (0.1 - 2.4 keV). We describe the determination of the X-ray parameters, the process of X-ray source identification, and the construction of the survey selection function. The REFLEX II cluster sample comprises currently 915 objects. A standard selection function is derived for a lower source count limit of 20 photons in addition to the flux limit. The median redshift of the sample is $z = 0.102$. Internal consistency checks and the comparison to several other galaxy cluster surveys imply that REFLEX II is better than 90\% complete with a contamination less than 10\%.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.5261  [pdf] - 800219
X-ray Observations of the Chemical Abundances in the Intra-Cluster Medium
Comments: To be published by Mem. S.A.It., Conference Proceedings of the Rencontre de l'Observatoire 2013 ESO Workshop on Metal Production in a Hierachical Universe, 8 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2014-03-20
Clusters of galaxies as the largest clearly defined objects in our Universe are ideal laboratories to study the distribution of the most abundant chemical elements heavier than hydrogen and helium and the history of their production. The cluster environment allows us to study the element abundances not only inside the galaxies, but also in the intergalactic space, the intracluster medium. Since the intracluster medium is heated to temperatures of several ten Million degrees, we can study the chemical composition of this medium through X-ray spectroscopy. Up to 13 heavy elements have been detected by X-ray spectroscopy so far. The element most easily detected in the X-ray spectra is iron. In massive galaxy clusters we find a larger mass of heavy elements in the intracluster medium than in the galaxies. The consideration of the intracluster medium is therefore vital for an understanding of the complete history of nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements. The observed abundances for all elements heavier than nitrogen can roughly be modeled by using two types of sources: core collapse supernovae and supernovae type Ia. So called cool-core galaxy clusters show a larger heavy element abundance in the cluster center which seems to be enriched primarily by products of supernovae of type Ia. The evidence for observations of an evolution of the heavy element abundance with redshift has still a moderate significance.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.2927  [pdf] - 1208333
The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II) IV. X-ray Luminosity Function and First Constraints on Cosmological Parameters
Comments: Submitted for publication to Astronomy and Astrophysics, 15 pages, 17 figures
Submitted: 2014-03-12
The X-ray luminosity function is an important statistic of the census of galaxy clusters and an important means to probe the cosmological model of our Universe. Based on our recently completed REFLEX II cluster sample we construct the X-ray luminosity function of galaxy clusters for several redshift slices from $z = 0$ to $z = 0.4$ and discuss its implications. We find no significant signature of redshift evolution of the luminosity function in the redshift interval. We provide the results of fits of a parameterized Schechter function and extensions of it which provide a reasonable characterization of the data. Using a model for structure formation and galaxy cluster evolution we compare the observed X-ray luminosity function with predictions for different cosmological models. For the most interesting constraints for the cosmological parameters $\Omega_m$ and $\sigma_8$ we obatain $\Omega_m \sim 0.27 \pm 0.03$ and $\sigma_8 \sim 0.80 \pm 0.03$ based on the statistical uncertainty alone. Marginalizing over the most important uncertainties, the normalisation and slope of the $L_X - M$ scaling relation, we find $\Omega_m \sim 0.29 \pm 0.04$ and $\sigma_8 \sim 0.77 \pm 0.07$ ($1\sigma$ confidence limits). We compare our results with those of the SZ-cluster survey provided by the PLANCK mission and we find very good agreement with the results using PLANCK clusters as cosmological probes, but we have some tension with PLANCK cosmological results from the microwave background anisotropies. We also make a comparison with other cluster surveys. We find good agreement with these previous results and show that the REFLEX II survey provides a significant reduction in the uncertainties compared to earlier measurements.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.3734  [pdf] - 696613
Probing the evolution of the substructure frequency in galaxy clusters up to z~1
Comments: A&A in press
Submitted: 2013-07-14
Context. Galaxy clusters are the last and largest objects to form in the standard hierarchical structure formation scenario through merging of smaller systems. The substructure frequency in the past and present epoch provides excellent means for studying the underlying cosmological model. Aims. Using X-ray observations, we study the substructure frequency as a function of redshift by quantifying and comparing the fraction of dynamically young clusters at different redshifts up to z=1.08. We are especially interested in possible biases due to the inconsistent data quality of the low-z and high-z samples. Methods. Two well-studied morphology estimators, power ratio P3/P0 and center shift w, were used to quantify the dynamical state of 129 galaxy clusters, taking into account the different observational depth and noise levels of the observations. Results. Owing to the sensitivity of P3/P0 to Poisson noise, it is essential to use datasets with similar photon statistics when studying the P3/P0-z relation. We degraded the high-quality data of the low-redshift sample to the low data quality of the high-z observations and found a shallow positive slope that is, however, not significant, indicating a slightly larger fraction of dynamically young objects at higher redshift. The w-z relation shows no significant dependence on the data quality and gives a similar result. Conclusions. We find a similar trend for P3/P0 and w, namely a very mild increase of the disturbed cluster fraction with increasing redshifts. Within the significance limits, our findings are also consistent with no evolution.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.3611  [pdf] - 968435
Planck intermediate results. X. Physics of the hot gas in the Coma cluster
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Brown, S. D.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rudnick, L.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Stivoli, F.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zaroubi, S.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 20 pages, 18 figure, accepted by A&A, replaced to match published version
Submitted: 2012-08-17, last modified: 2012-12-19
We present an analysis of Planck satellite data on the Coma Cluster observed via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Planck is able, for the first time, to detect SZ emission up to r ~ 3 X R_500. We test previously proposed models for the pressure distribution in clusters against the azimuthally averaged data. We find that the Arnaud et al. universal pressure profile does not fit Coma, and that their pressure profile for merging systems provides a good fit of the data only at r<R_500: by r=2XR_500 it underestimates the observed y profile by a factor of ~2. This may indicate that at these larger radii either i) the cluster SZ emission is contaminated by unresolved SZ sources along the line of sight or ii) the pressure profile of Coma is higher at r>R_500 than the mean pressure profile predicted by the simulations. The Planck image shows significant local steepening of the y profile in two regions about half a degree to the west and to the south-east of the cluster centre. These features are consistent with the presence of shock fronts at these radii, and indeed the western feature was previously noticed in the ROSAT PSPC mosaic as well as in the radio. Using Planck y profiles extracted from corresponding sectors we find pressure jumps of 4.5+0.4-0.2 and 5.0+1.3-0.1 in the west and southeast, respectively. Assuming Rankine-Hugoniot pressure jump conditions, we deduce that the shock waves should propagate with Mach number M_w=2.03+0.09-0.04 and M_se=2.05+0.25-0.02 in the West and Southeast, respectively. Finally, we find that the y and radio-synchrotron signals are quasi-linearly correlated on Mpc scales with small intrinsic scatter. This implies either that the energy density of cosmic-ray electrons is relatively constant throughout the cluster, or that the magnetic fields fall off much more slowly with radius than previously thought.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1212.4131  [pdf] - 1158556
Planck Intermediate Results. XI: The gas content of dark matter halos: the Sunyaev-Zeldovich-stellar mass relation for locally brightest galaxies
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wang, W.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; White, M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 17 pages, 15 figures, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2012-12-17
We present the scaling relation between Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal and stellar mass for almost 260,000 locally brightest galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These are predominantly the central galaxies of their dark matter halos. We calibrate the stellar-to-halo mass conversion using realistic mock catalogues based on the Millennium Simulation. Applying a multi-frequency matched filter to the Planck data for each LBG, and averaging the results in bins of stellar mass, we measure the mean SZ signal down to $M_\ast\sim 2\times 10^{11} \Msolar$, with a clear indication of signal at even lower stellar mass. We derive the scaling relation between SZ signal and halo mass by assigning halo properties from our mock catalogues to the real LBGs and simulating the Planck observation process. This relation shows no evidence for deviation from a power law over a halo mass range extending from rich clusters down to $M_{500}\sim 2\times 10^{13} \Msolar$, and there is a clear indication of signal down to $M_{500}\sim 4\times 10^{12} \Msolar$. Planck's SZ detections in such low-mass halos imply that about a quarter of all baryons have now been seen in the form of hot halo gas, and that this gas must be less concentrated than the dark matter in such halos in order to remain consistent with X-ray observations. At the high-mass end, the measured SZ signal is 20% lower than found from observations of X-ray clusters, a difference consistent with Malmquist bias effects in the X-ray sample.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.6445  [pdf] - 600793
Studying the properties of galaxy cluster morphology estimators
Comments: Replaced to match version published in A&A, Eq. 1 corrected
Submitted: 2012-10-24, last modified: 2012-12-10
X-ray observations of galaxy clusters reveal a large range of morphologies with various degrees of disturbance, showing that the assumptions of hydrostatic equilibrium and spherical shape which are used to determine the cluster mass from X-ray data are not always satisfied. It is therefore important for the understanding of cluster properties as well as for cosmological applications to detect and quantify substructure in X-ray images of galaxy clusters. Two promising methods to do so are power ratios and center shifts. Since these estimators can be heavily affected by Poisson noise and X-ray background, we performed an extensive analysis of their statistical properties using a large sample of simulated X-ray observations of clusters from hydrodynamical simulations. We quantify the measurement bias and error in detail and give ranges where morphological analysis is feasible. A new, computationally fast method to correct for the Poisson bias and the X-ray background contribution in power ratio and center shift measurements is presented and tested for typical XMM-Newton observational data sets. We studied the morphology of 121 simulated cluster images and establish structure boundaries to divide samples into relaxed, mildly disturbed and disturbed clusters. In addition, we present a new morphology estimator - the peak of the 0.3-1 r500 P3/P0 profile to better identify merging clusters. The analysis methods were applied to a sample of 80 galaxy clusters observed with XMM-Newton. We give structure parameters (P3/P0 in r500, w and P3/P0_max) for all 80 observed clusters. Using our definition of the P3/P0 (w) substructure boundary, we find 41% (47%) of our observed clusters to be disturbed.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.5911  [pdf] - 1150962
Planck intermediate results. VIII. Filaments between interacting clusters
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2012-08-29, last modified: 2012-11-19
About half of the baryons of the Universe are expected to be in the form of filaments of hot and low density intergalactic medium. Most of these baryons remain undetected even by the most advanced X-ray observatories which are limited in sensitivity to the diffuse low density medium. The Planck satellite has provided hundreds of detections of the hot gas in clusters of galaxies via the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect and is an ideal instrument for studying extended low density media through the tSZ effect. In this paper we use the Planck data to search for signatures of a fraction of these missing baryons between pairs of galaxy clusters. Cluster pairs are good candidates for searching for the hotter and denser phase of the intergalactic medium (which is more easily observed through the SZ effect). Using an X-ray catalogue of clusters and the Planck data, we select physical pairs of clusters as candidates. Using the Planck data we construct a local map of the tSZ effect centered on each pair of galaxy clusters. ROSAT data is used to construct X-ray maps of these pairs. After having modelled and subtracted the tSZ effect and X-ray emission for each cluster in the pair we study the residuals on both the SZ and X-ray maps. For the merging cluster pair A399-A401 we observe a significant tSZ effect signal in the intercluster region beyond the virial radii of the clusters. A joint X-ray SZ analysis allows us to constrain the temperature and density of this intercluster medium. We obtain a temperature of kT = 7.1 +- 0.9, keV (consistent with previous estimates) and a baryon density of (3.7 +- 0.2)x10^-4, cm^-3. The Planck satellite mission has provided the first SZ detection of the hot and diffuse intercluster gas.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1209.3114  [pdf] - 570241
eROSITA Science Book: Mapping the Structure of the Energetic Universe
Comments: 84 Pages, 52 Figures. Published online as MPE document. Edited by S. Allen. G. Hasinger and K. Nandra. Few minor corrections (typos) and updated references
Submitted: 2012-09-14, last modified: 2012-09-20
eROSITA is the primary instrument on the Russian SRG mission. In the first four years of scientific operation after its launch, foreseen for 2014, it will perform a deep survey of the entire X-ray sky. In the soft X-ray band (0.5-2 keV), this will be about 20 times more sensitive than the ROSAT all sky survey, while in the hard band (2-10 keV) it will provide the first ever true imaging survey of the sky at those energies. Such a sensitive all-sky survey will revolutionize our view of the high-energy sky, and calls for major efforts in synergic, multi-wavelength wide area surveys in order to fully exploit the scientific potential of the X-ray data. The design-driving science of eROSITA is the detection of very large samples (~10^5 objects) of galaxy clusters out to redshifts z>1, in order to study the large scale structure in the Universe, test and characterize cosmological models including Dark Energy. eROSITA is also expected to yield a sample of around 3 millions Active Galactic Nuclei, including both obscured and un-obscured objects, providing a unique view of the evolution of supermassive black holes within the emerging cosmic structure. The survey will also provide new insights into a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including accreting binaries, active stars and diffuse emission within the Galaxy, as well as solar system bodies that emit X-rays via the charge exchange process. Finally, such a deep imaging survey at high spectral resolution, with its scanning strategy sensitive to a range of variability timescales from tens of seconds to years, will undoubtedly open up a vast discovery space for the study of rare, unpredicted, or unpredictable high-energy astrophysical phenomena. In this living document we present a comprehensive description of the main scientific goals of the mission, with strong emphasis on the early survey phases.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.2743  [pdf] - 968286
Planck intermediate results. III. The relation between galaxy cluster mass and Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borgani, S.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Coulais, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jagemann, T.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Munshi, D.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 19 pages, 9 figures, matches accepted version
Submitted: 2012-04-12, last modified: 2012-09-14
We examine the relation between the galaxy cluster mass M and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect signal D_A^2 Y for a sample of 19 objects for which weak lensing (WL) mass measurements obtained from Subaru Telescope data are available in the literature. Hydrostatic X-ray masses are derived from XMM-Newton archive data and the SZ effect signal is measured from Planck all-sky survey data. We find an M_WL-D_A^2 Y relation that is consistent in slope and normalisation with previous determinations using weak lensing masses; however, there is a normalisation offset with respect to previous measures based on hydrostatic X-ray mass-proxy relations. We verify that our SZ effect measurements are in excellent agreement with previous determinations from Planck data. For the present sample, the hydrostatic X-ray masses at R_500 are on average ~ 20 per cent larger than the corresponding weak lensing masses, at odds with expectations. We show that the mass discrepancy is driven by a difference in mass concentration as measured by the two methods, and, for the present sample, the mass discrepancy and difference in mass concentration is especially large for disturbed systems. The mass discrepancy is also linked to the offset in centres used by the X-ray and weak lensing analyses, which again is most important in disturbed systems. We outline several approaches that are needed to help achieve convergence in cluster mass measurement with X-ray and weak lensing observations.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.3376  [pdf] - 1453902
Planck Intermediate Results. IV. The XMM-Newton validation programme for new Planck galaxy clusters
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borgani, S.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Brown, M. L.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cabella, P.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; González-Riestra, R.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Stanford, A.; Stivoli, F.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2012-05-15, last modified: 2012-08-20
We present the final results from the XMM-Newton validation follow-up of new Planck galaxy cluster candidates. We observed 15 new candidates, detected with signal-to-noise ratios between 4.0 and 6.1 in the 15.5-month nominal Planck survey. The candidates were selected using ancillary data flags derived from the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) and Digitized Sky Survey all-sky maps, with the aim of pushing into the low SZ flux, high-z regime and testing RASS flags as indicators of candidate reliability. 14 new clusters were detected by XMM, including 2 double systems. Redshifts lie in the range 0.2 to 0.9, with 6 clusters at z>0.5. Estimated M500 range from 2.5 10^14 to 8 10^14 Msun. We discuss our results in the context of the full XMM validation programme, in which 51 new clusters have been detected. This includes 4 double and 2 triple systems, some of which are chance projections on the sky of clusters at different z. We find that association with a RASS-BSC source is a robust indicator of the reliability of a candidate, whereas association with a FSC source does not guarantee that the SZ candidate is a bona fide cluster. Nevertheless, most Planck clusters appear in RASS maps, with a significance greater than 2 sigma being a good indication that the candidate is a real cluster. The full sample gives a Planck sensitivity threshold of Y500 ~ 4 10^-4 arcmin^2, with indication for Malmquist bias in the YX-Y500 relation below this level. The corresponding mass threshold depends on z. Systems with M500 > 5 10^14 Msun at z > 0.5 are easily detectable with Planck. The newly-detected clusters follow the YX-Y500 relation derived from X-ray selected samples. Compared to X-ray selected clusters, the new SZ clusters have a lower X-ray luminosity on average for their mass. There is no indication of departure from standard self-similar evolution in the X-ray versus SZ scaling properties. (abridged)
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.4009  [pdf] - 1124891
Planck intermediate results. VI: The dynamical structure of PLCKG214.6+37.0, a Planck discovered triple system of galaxy clusters
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Heinämäki, P.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zaroubi, S.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Submitted to Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2012-07-17
The survey of galaxy clusters performed by Planck through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect has already discovered many interesting objects, thanks to the whole coverage of the sky. One of the SZ candidates detected in the early months of the mission near to the signal to noise threshold, PLCKG214.6+37.0, was later revealed by XMM-Newton to be a triple system of galaxy clusters. We have further investigated this puzzling system with a multi-wavelength approach and we present here the results from a deep XMM-Newton re-observation. The characterisation of the physical properties of the three components has allowed us to build a template model to extract the total SZ signal of this system with Planck data. We partly reconciled the discrepancy between the expected SZ signal from X-rays and the observed one, which are now consistent at less than 1.2 sigma. We measured the redshift of the three components with the iron lines in the X-ray spectrum, and confirmed that the three clumps are likely part of the same supercluster structure. The analysis of the dynamical state of the three components, as well as the absence of detectable excess X-ray emission, suggest that we are witnessing the formation of a massive cluster at an early phase of interaction.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.2138  [pdf] - 1124693
Constructing mock catalogues for the REFLEX II galaxy cluster sample
Comments: 12 pages, 10 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-07-09
We describe the construction of a suite of galaxy cluster mock catalogues from N-body simulations, based on the properties of the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. Our procedure is based on the measurements of the cluster abundance, and involves the calibration of the underlying scaling relation linking the mass of dark matter haloes to the cluster X-ray luminosity determined in the \emph{ROSAT} energy band $0.1-2.4$ keV. In order to reproduce the observed abundance in the luminosity range probed by the REFLEX II X-ray luminosity function ($0.01<L_{X}/(10^{44}{\rm erg}\,{\rm s}^{-1}h^{-2})<10$), a mass-X ray luminosity relation deviating from a simple power law is required. We discuss the dependence of the calibration of this scaling relation on the X-ray luminosity and the definition of halo masses and analyse the one- and two-point statistical properties of the mock catalogues. Our set of mock catalogues provides samples with self-calibrated scaling relations of galaxy clusters together with inherent properties of flux-limited surveys. This makes them a useful tool to explore different systematic effects and statistical methods involved in constraining both astrophysical and cosmological information from present and future galaxy cluster surveys.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.6885  [pdf] - 1124477
4MOST - 4-metre Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope
Comments: To appear in the proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Instrumentation + Telescopes conference, Amsterdam, 2012. 15 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2012-06-28
The 4MOST consortium is currently halfway through a Conceptual Design study for ESO with the aim to develop a wide-field (>3 square degree, goal >5 square degree), high-multiplex (>1500 fibres, goal 3000 fibres) spectroscopic survey facility for an ESO 4m-class telescope (VISTA). 4MOST will run permanently on the telescope to perform a 5 year public survey yielding more than 20 million spectra at resolution R~5000 ({\lambda}=390-1000 nm) and more than 2 million spectra at R~20,000 (395-456.5 nm & 587-673 nm). The 4MOST design is especially intended to complement three key all-sky, space-based observatories of prime European interest: Gaia, eROSITA and Euclid. Initial design and performance estimates for the wide-field corrector concepts are presented. We consider two fibre positioner concepts, a well-known Phi-Theta system and a new R-Theta concept with a large patrol area. The spectrographs are fixed configuration two-arm spectrographs, with dedicated spectrographs for the high- and low-resolution. A full facility simulator is being developed to guide trade-off decisions regarding the optimal field-of-view, number of fibres needed, and the relative fraction of high-to-low resolution fibres. Mock catalogues with template spectra from seven Design Reference Surveys are simulated to verify the science requirements of 4MOST. The 4MOST consortium aims to deliver the full 4MOST facility by the end of 2018 and start delivering high-level data products for both consortium and ESO community targets a year later with yearly increments.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.1318  [pdf] - 1117800
Planck Intermediate Results II: Comparison of Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements from Planck and from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager for 11 galaxy clusters
Planck; Collaborations, AMI; :; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cabella, P.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jagemann, T.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Olamaie, M.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, C.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Savini, G.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Shimwell, T. W.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: update to metadata author list only
Submitted: 2012-04-05, last modified: 2012-05-22
A comparison is presented of Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements for 11 galaxy clusters as obtained by Planck and by the ground-based interferometer, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager. Assuming a universal spherically-symmetric Generalised Navarro, Frenk & White (GNFW) model for the cluster gas pressure profile, we jointly constrain the integrated Compton-Y parameter (Y_500) and the scale radius (theta_500) of each cluster. Our resulting constraints in the Y_500-theta_500 2D parameter space derived from the two instruments overlap significantly for eight of the clusters, although, overall, there is a tendency for AMI to find the Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal to be smaller in angular size and fainter than Planck. Significant discrepancies exist for the three remaining clusters in the sample, namely A1413, A1914, and the newly-discovered Planck cluster PLCKESZ G139.59+24.18. The robustness of the analysis of both the Planck and AMI data is demonstrated through the use of detailed simulations, which also discount confusion from residual point (radio) sources and from diffuse astrophysical foregrounds as possible explanations for the discrepancies found. For a subset of our cluster sample, we have investigated the dependence of our results on the assumed pressure profile by repeating the analysis adopting the best-fitting GNFW profile shape which best matches X-ray observations. Adopting the best-fitting profile shape from the X-ray data does not, in general, resolve the discrepancies found in this subset of five clusters. Though based on a small sample, our results suggest that the adopted GNFW model may not be sufficiently flexible to describe clusters universally.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.5595  [pdf] - 1453894
Planck Intermediate Results. I. Further validation of new Planck clusters with XMM-Newton
The Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; González-Riestra, R.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jagemann, T.; Jasche, J.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Osborne, S.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Stivoli, F.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 14 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in A&A on April 15; minor modifications following referee comments
Submitted: 2011-12-23, last modified: 2012-05-10
We present further results from the ongoing XMM-Newton validation follow-up of Planck cluster candidates, detailing X-ray observations of eleven candidates detected at a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.5<S/N<5.3 in the same 10-month survey maps used in the construction of the Early SZ sample. The sample was selected in order to test internal SZ quality flags, and the pertinence of these flags is discussed in light of the validation results. Ten of the candidates are found to be bona fide clusters lying below the RASS flux limit. Redshift estimates are available for all confirmed systems via X-ray Fe-line spectroscopy. They lie in the redshift range 0.19<z<0.94, demonstrating Planck's capability to detect clusters up to high z. The X-ray properties of the new clusters appear to be similar to previous new detections by Planck at lower z and higher SZ flux: the majority are X-ray underluminous for their mass, estimated using Y_X as mass proxy, and many have a disturbed morphology. We find tentative indication for Malmquist bias in the Y_SZ-Y_X relation, with a turnover at Y_SZ \sim 4 e-4 arcmin^2. We present additional new optical redshift determinations with ENO and ESO telescopes of candidates previously confirmed with XMM-Newton. The X-ray and optical redshifts for a total of 20 clusters are found to be in excellent agreement. We also show that useful lower limits can be put on cluster redshifts using X-ray data only via the use of the Y_X vs. Y_SZ and X-ray flux F_X vs. Y_SZ relations.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.0141  [pdf] - 432373
The XMM-BCS galaxy cluster survey: I. The X-ray selected cluster catalog from the initial 6 deg$^2$
Comments: Accepted to A&A. Version with full resolution images and better layout is available at the author or at A&A. 34 pages, 35 figures, 18 tables
Submitted: 2011-11-01
The XMM-Newton - Blanco Cosmology Survey project (XMM-BCS) is a coordinated X-ray, optical and mid-infrared cluster survey in a field also covered by Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect surveys by the South Pole Telescope and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The aim of the project is to study the cluster population in a 14 deg$^2$ field. In this work, we present a catalog of 46 X-ray selected clusters from the initial 6 deg$^2$ survey core. We describe the XMM-BCS source detection pipeline and derive physical properties of the clusters. We provide photometric redshift estimates derived from the BCS imaging data and spectroscopic redshift measurements for a low redshift subset of the clusters. We derive the cluster log N - log S relation using an approximation to the survey selection function and find it in good agreement with previous studies. We carry out an initial comparison between X-ray luminosity derived masses and masses from optical estimators from the Southern Cosmology Survey for a subset of the cluster sample. Optical masses based on cluster richness and total optical luminosity are found to be significantly higher than the X-ray values. (abridged)
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.3708  [pdf] - 1084168
Observational constraints on the redshift evolution of X-ray scaling relations of galaxy clusters out to z ~ 1.5
Comments: 24 pages, 18 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2011-09-16
A precise understanding of the relations between observable X-ray properties of galaxy clusters and cluster mass is a vital part of the application of X-ray galaxy cluster surveys to test cosmological models. An understanding of how these relations evolve with redshift is just emerging from a number of observational data sets. The current literature provides a diverse and inhomogeneous picture of scaling relation evolution. We attempt to transform these results and the data on recently discovered distant clusters into an updated and consistent framework, and provide an overall view of scaling relation evolution. We study in particular the M-T, L_X-T, and M-L_X relation combining 14 published data sets supplemented with recently published data of distant clusters and new results from follow-up observations of the XMM-Newton Distant Cluster Project (XDCP). We find that the evolution of the M-T relation is consistent with the self-similar prediction, while the evolution of X-ray luminosity for a given temperature and mass for a given X-ray luminosity is slower than predicted. Our best fit results for the evolution factor E(z)^alpha are alpha = -1.04+-0.07 for the M-T relation, alpha = -0.23+0.12-0.62 for the L-T relation, and alpha = -0.93+0.62-0.12 for the M-L_X relation. We find that selection biases are the most likely reason for apparent inconsistencies between different published data sets. The new results provide the currently most robust calibration of high-redshift cluster mass estimates based on X-ray luminosity and temperature and help us to improve the prediction of the number of clusters to be found in future galaxy cluster X-ray surveys, such as eROSITA. The comparison of evolution results with hydrodynamical cosmological simulations suggests that early preheating of the intracluster medium provides the most suitable scenario to explain the observed evolution.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1108.2757  [pdf] - 1083385
Herschel observations of the Centaurus cluster - the dynamics of cold gas in a cool core
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures, 5 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-08-13
Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the cores of galaxy clusters have distinctly different properties from other low redshift massive ellipticals. The majority of the BCGs in cool-core clusters show signs of active star formation. We present observations of NGC 4696, the BCG of the Centaurus galaxy cluster, at far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths with the Herschel space telescope. Using the PACS spectrometer, we detect the two strongest coolants of the interstellar medium, CII at 157.74 micron and OI at 63.18 micron, and in addition NII at 121.90 micron. The CII emission is extended over a region of 7 kpc with a similar spatial morphology and kinematics to the optical H-alpha emission. This has the profound implication that the optical hydrogen recombination line, H-alpha, the optical forbidden lines, NII 6583 Angstrom, the soft X-ray filaments and the far-infrared CII line all have the same energy source. We also detect dust emission using the PACS and SPIRE photometers at all six wavebands. We perform a detailed spectral energy distribution fitting using a two-component modified black-body function and find a cold 19 K dust component with mass 1.6x10^6 solar mass and a warm 46 K dust component with mass 4.0x10^3 solar mass. The total FIR luminosity between 8 micron and 1000 micron is 7.5x10^8 solar luminosity, which using Kennicutt relation yields a low star formation rate of 0.13 solar mass per yr. This value is consistent with values derived from other tracers, such as ultraviolet emission. Combining the spectroscopic and photometric results together with optical H-alpha, we model emitting clouds consisting of photodissociation regions (PDRs) adjacent to ionized regions. We show that in addition to old and young stellar populations, there is another source of energy, such as cosmic rays, shocks or reconnection diffusion, required to excite the H-alpha and CII filaments.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.1376  [pdf] - 1077123
Planck Early Results XXVI: Detection with Planck and confirmation by XMM-Newton of PLCK G266.6-27.3, an exceptionally X-ray luminous and massive galaxy cluster at z~1
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borgani, S.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Brown, M. L.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cantalupo, C. M.; Cappellini, B.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chiang, C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; González-Riestra, R.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Heinämäki, P.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marleau, F.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nevalainen, J.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Paladini, R.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Saar, E.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Sutton, D.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures; final version accepted for publication in A&A ; minor changes in Sec.2.,3.2 and 4.1; Table 1: misprint on R500 error corrected; abundance value added
Submitted: 2011-06-07, last modified: 2011-07-27
We present first results on PLCK G266.6-27.3, a galaxy cluster candidate detected at a signal-to-noise ratio of 5 in the Planck All Sky survey. An XMM-Newton validation observation has allowed us to confirm that the candidate is a bona fide galaxy cluster. With these X-ray data we measure an accurate redshift, z = 0.94 +/- 0.02, and estimate the cluster mass to be M_500 = (7.8 +/- 0.8)e+14 solar masses. PLCK G266.6-27.3 is an exceptional system: its luminosity of L_X(0.5-2.0 keV)=(1.4 +/- 0.05)e+45 erg/s, equals that of the two most luminous known clusters in the z > 0.5 universe, and it is one of the most massive clusters at z~1. Moreover, unlike the majority of high-redshift clusters, PLCK G266.6-27.3 appears to be highly relaxed. This observation confirms Planck's capability of detecting high-redshift, high-mass clusters, and opens the way to the systematic study of population evolution in the exponential tail of the mass function.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.5784  [pdf] - 1077623
Discovery of the X-ray selected galaxy cluster XMMU J0338.8+0021 at z = 1.49 - Indications for a young system with a forming brightest galaxy
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, 2 Tables
Submitted: 2011-06-28
We report on the discovery of a galaxy cluster at z = 1.490 originally selected as an extended X-ray source in the XMM-Newton Distant Cluster Project. Further observations carried out with the VLT-FORS2 spectrograph allowed the spectroscopic confirmation of seven secure cluster members, providing a median system redshift of z = 1.490 +/- 0.009. The color magnitude diagram of XMMU J0338.8+0021 reveals the presence of a well populated red sequence with z-H ~ 3, albeit with an apparent significant scatter in color. Since we do not detect indications for strong star formation activity in any of the objects, the color spread could indicate different stellar ages of the member galaxies. In addition, we found the brightest cluster galaxy in a very active dynamical state, with an interacting, merging companion located at a physical projected distance of d ~ 20kpc. From the X-ray luminosity we estimate a cluster mass of M200 ~ 1.2 x 10^(14) Msun. The data seem to suggest a scenario in which XMMU J0338.8+0021 is a young system, possibly caught in a moment of active ongoing mass assembly.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.5877  [pdf] - 1076954
Discovery of a massive X-ray luminous galaxy cluster at z=1.579
Comments: letter to appear in A&A
Submitted: 2011-05-30
We report on the discovery of a very distant galaxy cluster serendipitously detected in the archive of the XMM-Newton mission, within the scope of the XMM-Newton Distant Cluster Project (XDCP). XMMUJ0044.0-2033 was detected at a high significance level (5sigma) as a compact, but significantly extended source in the X-ray data, with a soft-band flux f(r<40")=(1.5+-0.3)x10^(-14) erg/s/cm2. Optical/NIR follow-up observations confirmed the presence of an overdensity of red galaxies matching the X-ray emission. The cluster was spectroscopically confirmed to be at z=1.579 using ground-based VLT/FORS2 spectroscopy. The analysis of the I-H colour-magnitude diagram shows a sequence of red galaxies with a colour range [3.7 < I-H < 4.6] within 1' from the cluster X-ray emission peak. However, the three spectroscopic members (all with complex morphology) have significantly bluer colours relative to the observed red-sequence. In addition, two of the three cluster members have [OII] emission, indicative of on-going star formation. Using the spectroscopic redshift we estimated the X-ray bolometric luminosity, Lbol = 5.8x10^44 erg/s, implying a massive galaxy cluster. This places XMMU J0044.0-2033 at the forefront of massive distant clusters, closing the gap between lower redshift systems and recently discovered proto- and low-mass clusters at z >1.6.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.4888  [pdf] - 1076224
Exploring the galaxy cluster-group transition regime at high redshifts: Physical properties of two newly detected z > 1 systems
Comments: Accepted to A&A, 13/04/2011. 15 pages, 18 figures, 5 tables, 2 appendices
Submitted: 2011-04-26
Context: Multi-wavelength surveys for clusters of galaxies are opening a window on the elusive high-redshift (z>1) cluster population. Well controlled statistical samples of distant clusters will enable us to answer questions about their cosmological context, early assembly phases and the thermodynamical evolution of the intracluster medium. Aims: We report on the detection of two z>1 systems, XMMU J0302.2-0001 and XMMU J1532.2-0836, as part of the XMM-Newton Distant Cluster Project (XDCP) sample. We investigate the nature of the sources, measure their spectroscopic redshift and determine their basic physical parameters. Methods: The results of the present paper are based on the analysis of XMM-Newton archival data, optical/near-infrared imaging and deep optical follow-up spectroscopy of the clusters. Results: We confirm the X-ray source XMMU J0302.2-0001 as a gravitationally bound, bona fide cluster of galaxies at spectroscopic redshift z=1.185. We estimate its M500 mass to (1.6+/-0.3) times 10^{14} Msun from its measured X-ray luminosity. This ranks the cluster among intermediate mass system. In the case of XMMU J1532.2-0836 we find the X-ray detection to be coincident with a dynamically bound system of galaxies at z=1.358. Optical spectroscopy reveals the presence of a central active galactic nucleus, which can be a dominant source of the detected X-ray emission from this system. We provide upper limits of X-ray parameters for the system and discuss cluster identification challenges in the high-redshift low-mass cluster regime. A third, intermediate redshift (z=0.647) cluster, XMMU J0302.1-0000, is serendipitously detected in the same field as XMMU J0302.2-0001. We provide its analysis as well.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.2430  [pdf] - 1052061
X-ray Spectroscopy of the Virgo Cluster out to the Virial Radius
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-02-11
We present results from the analysis of a mosaic of thirteen XMM-Newton pointings covering the Virgo Cluster from its center northwards out to a radius r~1.2 Mpc (~4.5 degrees), reaching the virial radius and beyond. This is the first time that the properties of a modestly sized (M_vir~1.4e14 M_sun, kT~2.3 keV), dynamically young cluster have been studied out to the virial radius. The density profile of the cluster can be described by a surprisingly shallow power-law with index 1.21+/-0.12. In the radial range of 0.3r_vir<r<r_vir, the best fit temperature drops by roughly 60 per cent. Within a radius r<450 kpc, the entropy profile has an approximate power-law form with index 1.1, as expected for gravitationally collapsed gas in hydrostatic equilibrium. Beyond r~450 kpc, however, the temperature and metallicity drop abruptly, and the entropy profile becomes flatter, staying consistently below the expected value by a factor of 2-2.5. The most likely explanation for the unusually shallow density profile and the flattening of entropy at large radius is clumping in the ICM. Our data provide direct observational evidence that the ICM is enriched by metals all the way to r_200 to at least Z=0.1 Solar.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.3313  [pdf] - 1051480
The X-ray luminous galaxy cluster XMMU J1007.4+1237 at z=1.56 - The dawn of starburst activity in cluster cores
Comments: 6 pages, 3 color figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2011-01-17
Observational galaxy cluster studies at z>1.5 probe the formation of the first massive M>10^14 Msun dark matter halos, the early thermal history of the hot ICM, and the emergence of the red-sequence population of quenched early-type galaxies. We present first results for the newly discovered X-ray luminous galaxy cluster XMMU J1007.4+1237 at z=1.555, detected and confirmed by the XMM-Newton Distant Cluster Project (XDCP) survey. We selected the system as a serendipitous weak extended X-ray source in XMM-Newton archival data and followed it up with two-band near-infrared imaging and deep optical spectroscopy. We can establish XMMU J1007.4+1237 as a spectroscopically confirmed, massive, bona fide galaxy cluster with a bolometric X-ray luminosity of Lx=(2.1+-0.4)\times 10^44 erg/s, a red galaxy population centered on the X-ray emission, and a central radio-loud brightest cluster galaxy. However, we see evidence for the first time that the massive end of the galaxy population and the cluster red-sequence are not yet fully in place. In particular, we find ongoing starburst activity for the third ranked galaxy close to the center and another slightly fainter object. At a lookback time of 9.4Gyr, the cluster galaxy population appears to be caught in an important evolutionary phase, prior to full star-formation quenching and mass assembly in the core region. X-ray selection techniques are an efficient means of identifying and probing the most distant clusters without any prior assumptions about their galaxy content.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.1322  [pdf] - 1042404
The REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey: power spectrum analysis
Comments: 17 pages, 19 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-12-06
We present the power spectrum of galaxy clusters measured from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. This new sample extends the flux limit of the original REFLEX to $1.8 \times 10^{-12} erg/ s/cm^{2}$, yielding a total of 911 clusters with $\geq 94$ per cent completeness in redshift follow-up. The analysis of the data is improved by creating a set of 100 REFLEX II-like mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite of large volume LCDM N-body simulations (L-BASICC II). The measured power spectrum is in agreement with the predictions from a LCDM cosmological model. The measurements show the expected increase in the amplitude of the power spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity. On large scales, we show that the shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a scale independent bias and provide a model for the amplitude that allows us to connect our measurements with a cosmological model. By implementing a luminosity-dependent power spectrum estimator, we observe that the power spectrum measured from the REFLEX II sample is weakly affected by flux-selection effects. The shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a featureless power spectrum on scales $k>0.01\,h/Mpc$ and hence no statistically significant signal of baryonic acoustic oscillations can be detected. We show that the measured REFLEX II power spectrum displays signatures of non-linear evolution.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.4209  [pdf] - 1033882
Gas sloshing, cold front formation, and metal redistribution: the Virgo cluster as a quantitative test case
Comments: 23 pages, 23 Figures. Resubmitted to MNRAS, improved method, some results modified
Submitted: 2010-07-23, last modified: 2010-12-03
(abridged) We perform hydrodynamical simulations of minor-merger induced gas sloshing and the subsequent formation of cold fronts in the Virgo cluster. We show for the first time that sloshing reproduces all characteristics of the observed cold fronts quantitatively, and we suggest a third cold front at 20 kpc NW of the Virgo core. We identify several new features typical for sloshing cold fronts, most importantly a large-scale brightness asymmetry. We can trace these new features not only in Virgo, but also in other sloshing cold front clusters. By comparing synthetic and real observations, we estimate that the original minor merger event took place about 1.5 Gyr ago when a subcluster of 2-4 \times 10^13 M\odot passed the Virgo core at 100 to 400 kpc distance, where a smaller mass corresponds to a smaller pericentre distance, and vice versa. From the merger geometry, we derive the current location of the disturbing subcluster to be about 1-2 Mpc E of the Virgo core. A possible candidate is M60. Additionally, we quantify the metal redistribution by sloshing and discuss its importance. We verify that the subcluster required to produce the observed cold fronts could be completely ram pressure stripped before reaching the Virgo centre, and discuss the conditions required for this to be achieved. Finally, we demonstrate that the bow shock of a fast galaxy passing the Virgo cluster at ~ 400 kpc distance also causes sloshing and leads to very similar cold front structures. The responsible galaxy would be located about 2 Mpc north of the Virgo centre. A possible candidate is M85.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.3930  [pdf] - 1040713
The Massive Galaxy Cluster XMMU J1230.3+1339 at z ~ 1: Colour-magnitude relation, Butcher-Oemler effect, X-ray and weak lensing mass estimates
Comments: 29 pages, 34 figures, 6 tables, full resolution pdf-file available at http://www.usm.uni-muenchen.de/people/mike/XMMUJ1230_MNRAS.pdf, submitted to MNRAS, shortened abstract
Submitted: 2010-09-20
We present results from the multi-wavelength study of XMMU J1230.3+1339 at z ~ 1. We analyze deep multi-band wide-field images from the Large Binocular Telescope, multi-object spectroscopy observations from VLT, as well as space-based serendipitous observations, from the GALEX and Chandra X-ray observatories. We apply a Bayesian photometric redshift code to derive the redshifts using the FUV, NUV and the deep U, B, V, r, i, z data. We achieve an accuracy of $\triangle z/(1+z)$ = 0.07 (0.04) and the fraction of catastrophic outliers is $\eta$ = 13 (0)%, when using all (secure) spectroscopic data, respectively. The i - z against z colour-magnitude relation of the photo-z members shows a tight red-sequence with a zero point of 0.935 mag, and slope equal to -0.027. We observe evidence for a truncation at the faint end of the red-cluster-sequence and the Butcher-Oemler effect, finding a fraction of blue galaxies $f_b \approx$ 0.5. Further we conduct a weak lensing analysis of the deep 26' $\times$ 26' r-band LBC image. The observed shear is fitted with a Single-Isothermal-Sphere and a Navarro-Frenk-White model to obtain the velocity dispersion and the model parameters, respectively. Our best fit values are, for the velocity dispersion $\sigma_{SIS}$ = 1308 $\pm$ 284, concentration parameter c = 4.0$^{+14}_{-2}$ and scale radius r$_{s}$ = 345$^{+50}_{-57}$ kpc. Combining our mass estimates from the kinematic, X-ray and weak lensing analyses we obtain a total cluster mass of $M^{tot}_{200}$ = (4.56 $\pm$ 2.3) $\times$ 10$^{14}$ M$_{\sun}$. This study demonstrates the feasibility of ground based weak lensing measurements of galaxy clusters up to z ~ 1.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.0264  [pdf] - 1034623
A pan-chromatic view of the galaxy cluster XMMU J1230.3+1339 at z=0.975 - Observing the assembly of a massive system
Comments: 26 pages, 14 color figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2010-09-01
We present a comprehensive galaxy cluster study of XMMU J1230.3+1339 based on a joint analysis of X-ray data, optical imaging and spectroscopy observations, weak lensing results, and radio properties for achieving a detailed multi-component view of this newly discovered system at z=0.975. We find an optically very rich and massive system with M200$\simeq$(4.2$\pm$0.8)$\times$10^14 M$\sun$, Tx$\simeq$5.3(+0.7--0.6)keV, and Lx$\simeq$(6.5$\pm$0.7)$\times$10^44 erg/s, for which various widely used mass proxies are measured and compared. We have identified multiple cluster-related components including a central fly-through group close to core passage with associated marginally extended 1.4GHz radio emission possibly originating from the turbulent wake region of the merging event. On the cluster outskirts we see evidence for an on-axis infalling group with a second Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) and indications for an additional off-axis group accretion event. We trace two galaxy filaments beyond the nominal cluster radius and provide a tentative reconstruction of the 3D-accretion geometry of the system. In terms of total mass, ICM structure, optical richness, and the presence of two dominant BCG-type galaxies, the newly confirmed cluster XMMU J1230.3+1339 is likely the progenitor of a system very similar to the local Coma cluster, differing by 7.6 Gyr of structure evolution.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1003.4511  [pdf] - 1025890
Central galaxy growth and feedback in the most massive nearby cool core cluster
Comments: 15 pages, 11 figures, MNRAS in press. Corrected typo in abstract.
Submitted: 2010-03-23, last modified: 2010-03-25
We present multi-wavelength observations of the centre of RXCJ1504.1-0248 - the galaxy cluster with the most luminous and relatively nearby cool core at z~0.2. Although there are several galaxies within 100 kpc of the cluster core, only the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), which lies at the peak of the X-ray emission, has blue colours and strong line-emission. Approximately 80 Msun/yr of intracluster gas is cooling below X-ray emitting temperatures, similar to the observed UV star formation rate of ~140 Msun/yr. Most star formation occurs in the core of the BCG and in a 42 kpc long filament of blue continuum, line emission, and X-ray emission, that extends southwest of the galaxy. The surrounding filamentary nebula is the most luminous around any observed BCG. The number of ionizing stars in the BCG is barely sufficient to ionize and heat the nebula, and the line ratios indicate an additional heat source is needed. This heat source can contribute to the H\alpha-deduced star formation rates (SFRs) in BCGs and therefore the derived SFRs should only be considered upper limits. AGN feedback can slow down the cooling flow to the observed mass deposition rate if the black hole accretion rate is of the order of 0.5 Msun/yr at 10% energy output efficiency. The average turbulent velocity of the nebula is vturb ~325 km/s which, if shared by the hot gas, limits the ratio of turbulent to thermal energy of the intracluster medium to less than 6%.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.0395  [pdf] - 1024932
Metal transport by gas sloshing in M87
Comments: accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-02-01
We present the results of an XMM-Newton mosaic covering the central ~200 kpc of the nearby Virgo cluster. We focus on a strong surface brightness discontinuity in the outskirts of the brightest cluster galaxy, M87. Using both XMM-Newton and Suzaku, we derive accurate temperature and metallicity profiles across this feature and show that it is a cold front probably due to sloshing of the Virgo ICM. It is also associated with a discontinuity in the chemical composition. The gas in the inner, bright region of the front is ~40% more abundant in Fe than the gas outside the front, suggesting the important role of sloshing in transporting metals through the ICM. For the first time, we provide a quantitative estimate of the mass of Fe transported by a cold front. This amounts to ~6% of the total Fe mass within the radial range affected by sloshing, significantly more than the amount of metals transported by the AGN in the same cluster core. The very low Fe abundance of only ~0.2 solar immediately outside the cold front at a radius of 90 kpc suggests we are witnessing first-hand the transport of higher metallicity gas into a pristine region, whose abundance is typical of the cluster outskirts. The Mg/Fe and O/Fe abundance ratios remain approximately constant over the entire radial range between the centre of M87 and the faint side of the cold front, which requires the presence of a centrally peaked distribution not only for Fe but also for core-collapse type supernova products. This peak may stem from the star formation triggered as the BCG assembled during the protocluster phase.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:0908.3897  [pdf] - 1017239
Hubble Space Telescope Weak-lensing Study of the Galaxy Cluster XMMU J2235.3-2557 at z=1.4: A Surprisingly Massive Galaxy Cluster when the Universe is One-third of its Current Age
Comments: Accepted to ApJ for publication. 40 pages and 14 figures
Submitted: 2009-08-26
We present a weak-lensing analysis of the z=1.4 galaxy cluster XMMU J2235.3-2557, based on deep Advanced Camera for Surveys images. Despite the observational challenge set by the high redshift of the lens, we detect a substantial lensing signal at the >~ 8 sigma level. This clear detection is enabled in part by the high mass of the cluster, which is verified by our both parametric and non-parametric estimation of the cluster mass. Assuming that the cluster follows a Navarro-Frenk-White mass profile, we estimate that the projected mass of the cluster within r=1 Mpc is (8.5+-1.7) x 10^14 solar mass, where the error bar includes the statistical uncertainty of the shear profile, the effect of possible interloping background structures, the scatter in concentration parameter, and the error in our estimation of the mean redshift of the background galaxies. The high X-ray temperature 8.6_{-1.2}^{+1.3} keV of the cluster recently measured with Chandra is consistent with this high lensing mass. When we adopt the 1-sigma lower limit as a mass threshold and use the cosmological parameters favored by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year (WMAP5) result, the expected number of similarly massive clusters at z >~ 1.4 in the 11 square degree survey is N ~ 0.005. Therefore, the discovery of the cluster within the survey volume is a rare event with a probability < 1%, and may open new scenarios in our current understanding of cluster formation within the standard cosmological model.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.0271  [pdf] - 16979
The large-scale shock in the cluster of galaxies Hydra A
Comments: 14 pages, accepted for publication in A&A, minor revision compared to previous version
Submitted: 2008-10-01, last modified: 2009-01-09
We analyzed a deep XMM-Newton observation of the cluster of galaxies Hydra A, focusing on the large-scale shock discovered as a surface brightness discontinuity in Chandra images. The shock front can be seen both in the pressure map and in temperature profiles in several sectors. The Mach numbers determined from the temperature jumps are in good agreement with the Mach numbers derived from EPIC/pn surface brightness profiles and previously from Chandra data and are consistent with M~1.3. The estimated shock age in the different sectors using a spherically symmetric point explosion model ranges between 130 and 230 Myr and the outburst energy between 1.5 and 3e61 ergs. The shape of the shock seen in the pressure map can be approximated with an ellipse centered 70 kpc towards the NE from the cluster center. We aimed to develop a better model that can explain the offset between the shock center and the AGN and give a consistent result on the shock age and energy. To this end, we performed 3D hydrodynamical simulations in which the shock is produced by a symmetrical pair of AGN jets launched in a spherical galaxy cluster. As an explanation of the observed offset of the shock center, we consider large-scale bulk flows in the intracluster medium. The simulation successfully reproduces the size, ellipticity, and average Mach number of the observed shock front. The predicted age of the shock is 160 Myr and the total input energy 3e61 erg. Both values are within the range determined by the spherically symmetric model. Matching the observed 70 kpc offset of the shock ellipse from the cluster center requires large-scale coherent motions with a high velocity of 670 km/s. We discuss the feasibility of this scenario and offer alternative ways to produce the offset and to further improve the simulation.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.2613  [pdf] - 16360
Chemical enrichment in the cluster of galaxies Hydra A
Comments: A&A, in press. Corrected right panel of Fig. 11, no other changes compared to previous version
Submitted: 2008-09-15, last modified: 2008-11-14
We analyzed global properties, radial profiles and 2D maps of the metal abundances and temperature in the cool core cluster of galaxies Hydra A using a deep XMM-Newton exposure. The best fit among the available spectral models is provided by a Gaussian distribution of the emission measure (gdem). We can accurately determine abundances for 7 elements in the cluster core with EPIC and 3 elements with RGS. The gdem model gives lower Fe abundances than a single temperature model. The abundance profiles for Fe, Si, S, but also O are centrally peaked. Combining the Hydra A results with 5 other clusters for which detailed chemical abundance studies are available, we find a significant decrease of O with radius, while the increase in the O/Fe ratio with radius is small within 0.1 r_200. We compare the observed abundance ratios with the mixing of various supernova type Ia and core-collapse yield models in different relative amounts. Producing the estimated O, Si and S peaks in Hydra A requires either an amount of metals ejected by stellar winds 3-8 times higher than predicted by available models or a remaining peak in the enrichment by core-collapse supernovae from the protocluster phase. The temperature map shows cooler gas extending in arm-like structures towards the north and south. These structures appear to be richer in metals than the ambient medium and spatially correlated with the large-scale radio lobes. We estimate the mass of cool gas, which was probably uplifted by buoyant bubbles of relativistic plasma produced by the AGN, to 1.6-6.1x10^9 M_sun, and the energy associated with this uplift to 3.3-12.5x10^58 ergs. The best estimate of the mass of Fe uplifted together with the cool gas is 1.7x10^7 M_sun, 15% of the total mass of Fe in the central 0.5arcmin region.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:0705.0273  [pdf] - 930
Flaming, bright galaxies along the filaments of A2744
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures; accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2007-05-02
The existence of a clumpy, large-scale filamentary structure is at the basis of the current paradigm of cosmic formation and evolution of clusters. The star-formation history of galaxies falling into a cluster is altered as a result of the environmental stresses. We investigate the relation between substructure and properties of the galaxy population in a 30'x30' region centered on the massive merging cluster A2744 at z~0.3. Multi-object spectroscopy at low resolution and BVR photometry are used to detect the presence of substructure through a Dressler-Schectman analysis and the photometric redshift technique, respectively. Galaxies at the same photometric redshift of the cluster are divided into red and blue according to their distribution in the B-R vs. R colour-magnitude diagram. We identify two large-scale filaments associated with A2744. Along these filaments, the blue-to-red galaxy number ratio increases together with the cluster-centric distance but peaks slightly beyond the cluster virial radius. The filaments host a population of bright, large (i.e. more luminous than R* for the main body of the cluster and with angular sizes of 13-22 $h_{70}^{-1}$ kpc) blue galaxies that is hardly found among galaxies lying in a neighbouring low-density environment at the same redshift of the cluster. These results can be interpreted as a manifestation of galaxy harassment.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0702482  [pdf] - 89536
Statistics of X-ray observables for the cooling-core and non-cooling core galaxy clusters
Comments: A&A accepted
Submitted: 2007-02-19
We present a statistical study of the occurrence and effects of the cooling cores in the clusters of galaxies in a flux-limited sample, HIFLUGCS, based on ROSAT and ASCA observations. About 49% of the clusters in this sample have a significant, classically-calculated cooling-flow, mass-deposition rate. The upper envelope of the derived mass-deposition rate is roughly proportional to the cluster mass, and the fraction of cooling core clusters is found to decrease with it. The cooling core clusters are found to have smaller core radii than non-cooling core clusters, while some non-cooling core clusters have high $\beta$ values (> 0.8). In the relation of the X-ray luminosity vs. the temperature and the mass, the cooling core clusters show a significantly higher normalization. A systematic correlation analysis, also involving relations of the gas mass and the total infrared luminosity, indicates that this bias is shown to be mostly due to an enhanced X-ray luminosity for cooling core clusters, while the other parameters, like temperature, mass, and gas mass may be less affected by the occurrence of a cooling core. These results may be explained by at least some of the non-cooling core clusters being in dynamically young states compared with cooling core clusters, and they may turn into cooling core clusters in a later evolutionary stage.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610874  [pdf] - 86298
The gaseous atmosphere of M87 seen with XMM-Newton
Comments: 12 pages, 13 figures, A&A in press; minor modifications of text and layout, added one reference to RGS data analysis results
Submitted: 2006-10-30, last modified: 2007-01-29
M87 is a key object whose study can reveal the complex phenomena in cooling cores. We use a deep XMM-Newton observation of M87 to produce detailed temperature, pressure and entropy maps in order to analyze the physical processes of cooling cores and of their heating mechanisms. We employed both broad-band fitting and full spectroscopical one-temperature model analysis to derive temperature and surface brightness maps, from which the pseudo-deprojected entropy and pressure were calculated. We discuss possible physical interpretations of small deviations from radial and elliptical symmetry in these maps. The most prominent features observed are the E and SW X-ray arms that coincide with powerful radio lobes, a weak shock at a radius of 3', an overall ellipticity in the pressure map and a NW/SE asymmetry in the entropy map which we associate with the motion of the galaxy towards the NW. For the first time we find evidence that cold, metal-rich gas is being transported out of the center, possibly through bubble-induced mixing. Several edges in the abundance map indicate an oscillation of the galaxy along the NW/SE direction. Furthermore, the radio lobes appear to rise along the short axis of the elliptical pressure distribution, following the steepest gradient of the gravitational potential, and seem to contain a nonthermal pressure component.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0609080  [pdf] - 84672
RASS-SDSS Galaxy Cluster Survey. VI. The dependence of the cluster SFR on the cluster global properties
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication on A&A; corrected coefficient in Tab. 2
Submitted: 2006-09-04, last modified: 2006-09-05
Using a subsample of 79 nearby clusters from the RASS-SDSS galaxy cluster catalogue of Popesso et al. (2005a), we perform a regression analysis between the cluster integrated star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) the cluster total stellar mass (M_star), the fractions of star forming (f_SF) and blue (f_b) galaxies and other cluster global properties, namely its richness (N_gal, i.e. the total number of cluster members within the cluster virial radius), velocity dispersion (sigma_v), virial mass (M_200), and X-ray luminosity (L_X). All cluster global quantities are corrected for projection effects before the analysis. Galaxy SFRs and stellar masses are taken from the catalog of Brinchmann et al. (2004), which is based on SDSS spectra. We only consider galaxies with M_r <= -20.25 in our analysis, and exclude AGNs. We find that both Sigma_SFR and M_star are correlated with all the cluster global quantities. A partial correlation analysis show that all the correlations are induced by the fundamental one between Sigma_SFR and N_gal, hence there is no evidence that the cluster properties affect the mean SFR or M_star per galaxy. The relations between Sigma_SFR and M_star, on one side, and both N_gal and M_200, on the other side, are linear, i.e. we see no evidence that different clusters have different SFR or different M_star per galaxy and per unit mass. The fraction f_SF does not depend on any cluster property considered, while f_b does depend on L_X. We note that a significant fraction of star-forming cluster galaxies are red (~25% of the whole cluster galaxy population). We conclude that the global cluster properties are unable to affect the SF properties of cluster galaxies, but the presence of the X-ray luminous intra-cluster medium can affect their colors, perhaps through the ram-pressure stripping mechanism.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606260  [pdf] - 1233813
RASS-SDSS Galaxy Cluster Survey. VII. On the Cluster Mass to Light ratio and the Halo Occupation Distribution
Comments: 15 pages, 15 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2006-06-12
We explore the mass-to-light ratio in galaxy clusters and its relation to the cluster mass. We study the relations among the optical luminosity ($L_{op}$), the cluster mass ($M_{200}$) and the number of cluster galaxies within $r_{200}$ ($N_{gal}$) in a sample of 217 galaxy clusters with confirmed 3D overdensity. We correct for projection effects, by determining the galaxy surface number density profile in our cluster sample. This is best fitted by a cored King profile in low and intermediate mass systems. The core radius decreases with cluster mass, and, for the highest mass clusters, the profile is better represented by a generalized King profile or a cuspy Navarro, Frenk & White profile. We find a very tight proportionality between $L_{op}$ and $N_{gal}$, which, in turn, links the cluster mass-to-light ratio to the Halo Occupation Distribution $N_{gal}$ vs. $M_{200}$. After correcting for projection effects, the slope of the $L_{op}-M_{200}$ and $N_{gal}-M_{200}$ relations is found to be $0.92\pm0.03$, close, but still significantly less than unity. We show that the non-linearity of these relations cannot be explained by variations of the galaxy luminosity distributions and of the galaxy M/L with the cluster mass. We suggest that the nonlinear relation between number of galaxies and cluster mass reflects an underlying nonlinear relation between number of subhaloes and halo mass.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606191  [pdf] - 82631
RASS-SDSS Galaxy Cluster Survey. V. The X-ray-Underluminous Abell Clusters
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures, A&A in press
Submitted: 2006-06-08
In this paper we consider a large sample of optically selected clusters, in order to elucidate the physical reasons for the existence of X-ray underluminous clusters. For this purpose we analyze the correlations of the X-ray and optical properties of a sample of 137 spectroscopically confirmed Abell clusters in the SDSS database. We search for the X-ray counterpart of each cluster in the ROSAT All Sky Survey. We find that 40% of our clusters have a marginal X-ray detection or remain undetected in X-rays. These clusters appear too X-ray faint on average for their velocity dispersion determined mass, i.e. they do not follow the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity and virial mass traced by the other clusters. On the other hand, they do follow the general scaling relation between optical luminosity and virial mass. We refer to these clusters as the X-ray-Underluminous Abell clusters (AXU clusters, for short) and designate as 'normal' the X-ray detected Abell systems. We examine the distributions and properties of the galaxy populations of the normal and the AXU clusters, separately. The AXU clusters are characterized by leptokurtic (more centrally concentrated than a Gaussian) velocity distribution of their member galaxies in the outskirts ($1.5 < r/r_{200} \leq 3.5$), as expected for the systems in accretion. In addition, the AXU clusters have a higher fraction of blue galaxies in the external region and show a marginally significant paucity of galaxies at the center. Our results seem to support the interpretation that the AXU clusters are systems in formation undergoing a phase of mass accretion. Their low X-ray luminosity should be due to the still accreting Intracluster gas or to an ongoing merging process.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0602324  [pdf] - 79900
The X-Ray Luminosity--Mass Relation for Local Clusters of Galaxies
Comments: 18 pages, 13 figures, accepted to ApJ. We have incorporated the WMAP cosmology constraints in our analysis
Submitted: 2006-02-14, last modified: 2006-05-30
We investigate the relationship between soft \xray luminosity and mass for low redshift clusters of galaxies by comparing observed number counts to expectations of $\Lambda$CDM cosmologies. We use a three-parameter model for the conditional probability of luminosity given mass and epoch, described as a log-normal distribution of fixed width centered on a power-law scaling relation, $L \spropto M^p\rhoc^s(z)$. We use an ensemble of simulated clusters to argue that the observed, intrinsic variance in the temperature--luminosity relation is directly indicative of mass--luminosity variance, and derive $\sigm \se 0.43 \pm 0.06$ from HIFLUGCS data. Adding this to the likelihood analysis results in best-fit estimates $p \se 1.59 \pm 0.05$, $\lnlf \se 1.34 \pm 0.09$, and $\sigm \se 0.37 \pm 0.05$ for self-similar redshift evolution in a concordance ($\Omega_m \se 0.3$, $\Omega_\Lambda \se 0.7$, $\sigma_8 \se0.9$) universe. We show that the present-epoch intercept is very sensitive to power spectrum normalization, $\lnlf \spropto \sigate^{-4}$, and the slope is weakly sensitive to the matter density, $p \spropto \Omega_m^{1/2}$. The intercept derived here is dimmer by a factor 2, and slope slightly steeper, than the L-M relation published using hydrostatic mass estimates of the HIFLUGCS sample. We show that this discrepancy is largely due to Malmquist bias of the \xray\ flux-limited sample. In light of new WMAP constraints, we discuss the interplay between parameters and sources of systematic error, and offer a compromise model with $\Omega_m \se 0.24$, $\sigma_8 \se 0.85$, and somewhat lower scatter $\sigm \se 0.25$, in which hydrostatic mass estimates remain accurate to $\ssim 15%$. We stress the need for independent calibration of the L-M relation via weak gravitational lensing.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0507432  [pdf] - 74601
Metal Abundances in the ICM as a Diagnostics of the Cluster History
Comments: Advances in Space Research in press (proceedings of the COSPAR 2004 Assembly, Paris), 9 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2005-07-19
Galaxy clusters with a dense cooling core exhibit a central increase in the metallicity of the intracluster medium. Recent XMM-Newton studies with detailed results on the relative abundances of several heavy elements show that the high central abundances are mostly due to the contribution from supernovae type Ia. The dominant source is the stellar population of the central cluster galaxy. With this identification of the origin of heavy elements and the observed rates of SN Ia in elliptical galaxies, the central abundance peak can be used as a diagnostic for the history of the cluster core region. We find for four nearby cooling core clusters that the enrichment times for the central peaks are larger than 6 - 10 Gyrs even for a higher SN Ia rate in the past. This points to an old age and a relatively quiet history of these cluster core regions. A detailed analysis of the element abundance ratios provides evidence that the SN Ia yields in the central cluster galaxies are more rich in intermediate mass elements, like Si and S, compared to the SN Ia models used to explain the heavy element enrichment in our Galaxy.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0506201  [pdf] - 73601
RASS-SDSS Galaxy Cluster Survey. IV. A ubiquitous dwarf galaxy population in clusters
Comments: 17 pages, 13 figures. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2005-06-09
We analyze the Luminosity Functions (LFs) of a subsample of 69 clusters from the RASS-SDSS galaxy cluster catalog. When calculated within the cluster physical sizes, given by r200 or r500, all the cluster LFs appear to have the same shape, well fitted by a composite of two Schechter functions with a marked upturn and a steepening at the faint-end. Previously reported cluster-to-cluster variations of the LF faint-end slope are due to the use of a metric cluster aperture for computing the LF of clusters of different masses. We determine the composite LF for early- and late-type galaxies, where the typing is based on the galaxy u-r colors. The late-type LF is well fitted by a single Schechter function with a steep slope (alpha=-2.0 in the r band, within r200}). The early-type LF instead cannot be fitted by a single Schechter function, and a composite of two Schechter functions is needed. The faint-end upturn of the global cluster LF is due to the early-type cluster galaxies. The shape of the bright-end tail of the early-type LF does not seem to depend upon the local galaxy density or the distance from the cluster center. The late-type LF shows a significant variation only very near the cluster center. On the other hand, the faint-end tail of the early-type LF shows a significant and continuous variation with the environment. We provide evidence that the process responsible for creating the excess population of dwarf early type galaxies in clusters is a threshold process that occurs when the density exceeds ~500 times the critical density of the Universe. We interpret our results in the context of the 'harassment' scenario, where faint early-type cluster galaxies are predicted to be the descendants of tidally-stripped late-type galaxies.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0309427  [pdf] - 1456355
XMM-Newton Observations of the Perseus Cluster II: Evidence for Gas Motions in the Core
Comments: 8 pages, 7 figures; Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2003-09-16
The 5-9 keV spectrum of the inner ~100 kpc of the Perseus cluster measured by XMM-Newton can be well described by an optically thin plasma emission model as predicted by the APEC code, without any need for invoking a strong Ni overabundance or the effects of resonant scattering. For the strongest 6.7 keV line of He-like iron, the optical depth of the cluster, calculated using observed density, temperature and abundance profiles, is of order 3. The lack of evidence for resonant scattering effects implies gas motion in the core with a range in velocities of at least half of the sound velocity. If this motion has the character of small scale turbulence, then its dissipation would provide enough energy to compensate for radiative cooling of the gas. The activity of the supermassive black hole at the center of the cluster may be the driving force of the gas motion.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0211480  [pdf] - 53215
Observational Constraints on General Relativistic Energy Conditions, Cosmic Matter Density and Dark Energy from X-Ray Clusters of Galaxies and Type-Ia Supernovae
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures, Astron. Astrophys. (in press)
Submitted: 2002-11-21, last modified: 2003-03-04
New observational constraints on the cosmic matter density $\Omega_m$ and an effectively redshift-independent equation of state parameter $w_x$ of the dark energy are obtained while simultaneously testing the strong and null energy conditions of general relativity on macroscopic scales. The combination of REFLEX X-ray cluster and type-Ia supernova data shows that for a flat Universe the strong energy condition might presently be violated whereas the null energy condition seems to be fulfilled. This provides another observational argument for the present accelerated cosmic expansion and the absence of exotic physical phenomena related to a broken null energy condition. The marginalization of the likelihood distributions is performed in a manner to include a large fraction of the recently discussed possible systematic errors involved in the application of X-ray clusters as cosmological probes. This yields for a flat Universe, $\Omega_m=0.29^{+0.08}_{-0.12}$ and $w_x=-0.95^{+0.30}_{-0.35}$ ($1\sigma$ errors without cosmic variance). The scatter in the different analyses indicates a quite robust result around $w_x=-1$, leaving little room for the introduction of new energy components described by quintessence-like models or phantom energy. The most natural interpretation of the data is a positive cosmological constant with $w_x=-1 or something like it.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0301482  [pdf] - 1456343
XMM-Newton observations of the Perseus Cluster I: The temperature and surface brightness structure
Comments: 16 pages, 14 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2003-01-23
We present preliminary results of the XMM-Newton 50 ksec observation of the Perseus cluster. The global east/west asymmetry of the gas temperature and surface brightness distributions, approximately aligned with the chain of bright galaxies, suggests an ongoing merger, although the modest degree of the observed asymmetry certainly excludes a major merger interpretation. The chain of galaxies probably traces the filament along which accretion has started some time ago and is continuing at the present time. A cold and dense (low entropy) cluster core like Perseus is probably well "protected" against the penetration of the gas of infalling groups and poor clusters whereas in non-cooling core clusters like Coma and A1367, infalling subclusters can penetrate deeply into the core region. In Perseus, gas associated with infalling groups may be stripped completely at the outskirts of the main cluster and only compression waves (shocks) may reach the central regions. We argue that the passage of such a wave(s) can qualitatively explain the overall horseshoe shaped appearance of the gas temperature map (the hot horseshoe surrounds the colder, low entropy core) as well as other features of the Perseus cluster core. As compression waves traverse the cluster core, they can induce oscillatory motion of the cluster gas which can generate multiple sharp "edges", on opposite sides or the central galaxy. Gas motions induced by mergers may be a natural way to explain the high frequency of "edges" seen in clusters with cooling cores.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0212069  [pdf] - 53459
XMM observation of M~87 II. Abundance structure of the interstellar and intergalactic medium
Comments: 20 pages, 20 figures, to appear in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2002-12-03
Based on a detailed study of the temperature structure of the intracluster medium in the halo of M~87, abundance profiles of 7 elements, O, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe are derived. In addition, abundance ratios are derived from the ratios of line strengths, whose temperature dependences are small within the temperature range of the ICM of M~87. The abundances of Si, S, Ar, Ca and Fe show strong decreasing gradients outside 2$'$ and become nearly constant within the radius at $\sim1.5$ solar. The Fe/Si ratio is determined to be 0.9 solar with no radial gradient. In contrast, the O abundance is less than a half of the Si abundance at the center and has a flatter gradient. The Mg abundance is $\sim$1 solar within 2$'$, which is close to stellar abundance within the same radius. The O/Si/Fe pattern of M~87 is located at the simple extension of that of Galactic stars. The observed Mg/O ratio is about 1.25 solar, which is also the same ratio as for Galactic stars. The O/Si/Fe ratio indicates that the SN Ia contribution to Si and Fe becomes important towards the center and SN Ia products have similar abundances of Si and Fe at least around M~87, which may reflect dimmer SN Ia observed in old stellar systems. The S abundance is similar to the Si abundance at the center, but has a steeper gradient. This result suggests that the S/Si ratio of SN II products is much smaller than the solar ratio.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0208251  [pdf] - 51067
The REFLEX Galaxy Cluster Survey VII: Omega_m and sigma_8 from cluster abundance and large-scale clustering
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2002-08-13, last modified: 2002-11-25
For the first time the large-scale clustering and the mean abundance of galaxy clusters are analysed simultaneously to get precise constraints on the normalized cosmic matter density $\Omega_m$ and the linear theory RMS fluctuations in mass $\sigma_8$. A self-consistent likelihood analysis is described which combines, in a natural and optimal manner, a battery of sensitive cosmological tests where observational data are represented by the (Karhunen-Lo\'{e}ve) eigenvectors of the sample correlation matrix. This method breaks the degeneracy between $\Omega_m$ and $\sigma_8$. The cosmological tests are performed with the ROSAT ESO Flux-Limited X-ray (REFLEX) cluster sample. The computations assume cosmologically flat geometries and a non-evolving cluster population mainly over the redshift range $0<z<0.3$. The REFLEX sample gives the cosmological constraints and their $1\sigma$ random errors of $\Omega_m = 0.341 ^{+0.031}_{-0.029}$ and $\sigma_8 = 0.711 ^{+0.039}_{-0.031}$. Possible systematic errors are evaluated by estimating the effects of uncertainties in the value of the Hubble constant, the baryon density, the spectral slope of the initial scalar fluctuations, the mass/X-ray luminosity relation and its intrinsic scatter, the biasing scheme, and the cluster mass density profile. All these contributions sum up to total systematic errors of $\sigma_{\Omega_m}=^{+0.087}_{-0.071}$ and $\sigma_{\sigma_8}=^{+0.120}_{-0.162}$.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0201242  [pdf] - 47186
XMM-Newton observation of M87 I. Single-phase temperature structure of intracluster medium
Comments: 19 pages, 24 figures, to appear in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2002-01-15
We report the results of a detailed analysis of the temperature structure of the X-ray emitting plasma halo of M~87, the cD galaxy of the Virgo Cluster. Using the MEKAL model, the data provide strong indications that the intracluster medium has a single phase structure locally, except the regions associated to the radio structures. The deprojected spectrum at each radius is well fitted by a single temperature MEKAL model, except for the very central region ($<$ 2 arcmin) which seems to be affected by the jet and radio lobe structure. The temperature of the intracluster plasma is 1 keV at the center and gradually increases to 2.5 keV at 80 kpc. We have also fitted spectra using the APEC code. Although the large changes of the strength of K$\alpha$ lines causes a discrepancy between the Fe-L and Fe-K lines for the APEC results, the overall temperature structure has not changed. There is no sign of excess absorption in the spectral data. The single-phase nature of the intracluster medium is in conflict with the standard cooling flow model which is based on a multi-phase temperature structure. In addition, the signature of gas cooling below 0.8 keV to zero temperature is not observed as expected for a cooling flow. The gravitational mass profile derived from the temperature and density distribution of the intracluster gas shows two distinct contributions that can be assigned to the gravitational potential of the cD galaxy and the cluster. The central temperature of the intracluster medium agrees well with the potential depth and the velocity dispersion of the cD galaxy. The latter result implies that the central region of the intracluster medium is equivalent to a virialized interstellar medium in M 87.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0008215  [pdf] - 1454927
Evolution of Buoyant Bubbles in M87
Comments: 20 pages, 11 figures, ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2000-08-15, last modified: 2001-02-06
The morphology of the X-ray and radio emitting features in the central $\sim$ 50 kpc region around the galaxy M87 strongly suggests that buoyant bubbles of cosmic rays (inflated by an earlier nuclear active phase of the galaxy) rise through the cooling gas at roughly half the sound speed. In the absence of strong surface tension, initially spherical bubbles will transform into tori as they rise through an external medium. Such structures can be identified in the radio images of the halo of M87. During their rise, bubbles will uplift relatively cool X-ray emitting gas from the central regions of the cooling flow to larger distances. This gas is colder than the ambient gas and has a higher volume emissivity. As a result, rising ``radio'' bubbles may be trailed by elongated X-ray features as indeed is observed in M87. We performed simple hydrodynamic simulations to qualitatively illustrate the evolution of buoyant bubbles in the M87 environment.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9910363  [pdf] - 108917
The X-ray Morphology of the Lensing Galaxy Cluster Cl0024+17
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures, Astronomy & Astrophysics in press
Submitted: 1999-10-20
The paper reports the analysis of a very deep ROSAT HRI observation of the distant lensing cluster, CL0024+17. The morphology of the cluster is studied and the small core radius inferred from lensing analysis is confirmed. Constraints on the mass distribution are discussed.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9902067  [pdf] - 105086
A Flux-limited Sample of Bright Clusters of Galaxies from the Southern Part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey: the Catalog and the LogN-LogS
Comments: 27 pages, 8 figures and 3 tables included, LaTex, emulateapj.sty and epsf.sty, accepted for publication in ApJ: scheduled for the March 20, 1999, Vol.514. The cluster catalog is available at http://www.merate.mi.astro.it/~degrandi
Submitted: 1999-02-04
We describe the selection of an X-ray flux-limited sample of bright clusters of galaxies in the southern hemisphere, based on the first analysis of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey data (RASS1). The sample is constructed starting from an identification of candidate clusters in RASS1, and their X-ray fluxes are remeasured using the Steepness Ratio Technique. This method is better suited than the RASS1 standard algorithm for measuring flux from extended sources. The final sample is count-rate-limited in the ROSAT hard band (0.5-2.0 keV), so that due to the distribution of NH, its effective flux limit varies between about 3-4 x 10**-12 ergs cm**-2 s**-1 over the selected area. This covers the Decl<2.5 deg part of the south Galactic cap region (b<-20 deg) - with the exclusion of patches of low RASS1 exposure time and of the Magellanic Clouds area - for a total of 8235 deg**2. 130 candidate sources fulfill our selection criteria for bonafide clusters of galaxies in this area. Of these, 101 are Abell/ACO clusters, while 29 do not have a counterpart in these catalogs. Of these clusters, 126 (97%) clusters have a redshift and for these we compute an X-ray luminosity. 20% of the cluster redshifts come from new observations, as part of the ESO Key Program REFLEX Cluster Survey that is under completion. Considering the intrinsic biases and incompletenesses introduced by the flux selection and source identification processes, we estimate the overall completeness to be better than 90%. The observed number count distribution, LogN-LogS, is well fitted by a power law with slope alpha = 1.34 +/- 0.15 and normalization A = 11.87 +/- 1.04 sr**-1 (10**-11 ergs cm**-2 s**-1)**alpha, in good agreement with other measurements.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9812423  [pdf] - 104530
The X-ray Luminosity Function of Bright Clusters in the Local Universe
Comments: 13 pages with 3 figures included, LaTex, aaspp4.sty and epsf.sty, accepted for publication in ApJ Letters, only minor changes, added references
Submitted: 1998-12-22, last modified: 1999-01-22
We present the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) for clusters of galaxies derived from the RASS1 Bright Sample. The sample, selected from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey in a region of 2.5 sr within the southern Galactic cap, contains 130 clusters with flux limits in the range ~ 3-4 x 10^-12 ergs/cm^2/s in the 0.5-2.0 keV band. A maximum-likelihood fit with a Schechter function of the XLF over the entire range of luminosities (0.045 - 28. x 10^44 ergs/s), gives alpha = 1.52 +/- 0.11, L_* = 3.80 +0.70 -0.55 x 10^44 ergs/s, and A = 5.07 +/- 0.45 x 10^-7 Mpc^-3 (10^44 ergs/s)^(\alpha-1). We investigate possible evolutionary effects within the sample, out to our redshift limit (z ~ 0.3), finding no evidence for evolution. Our results are in good agreement with other local estimates of the XLF, implying that this statistic for the local universe is now well determined. Comparison with XLFs for distant clusters (0.3 < z < 0.6), shows that no evolution is present for L_X < 10^{44} ergs/s. However, we detect differences at the 3 sigma level, between our local XLF and the distant one estimated by Henry et al. for the EMSS sample. This difference is still present when considering the EMSS sample revised by Nichol et al.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9812394  [pdf] - 104501
The ROSAT Brightest Cluster Sample (BCS) - I. The compilation of the sample and the cluster log N-log S distribution
Comments: Table 3, listing the sample, is supplied as a separate PS file. An electronic version of this table can be obtained from the first author's WWW pages: http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/~ebeling/clusters/BCS.html
Submitted: 1998-12-21
We present a 90 per cent flux-complete sample of the 201 X-ray brightest clusters of galaxies in the northern hemisphere (dec > 0 deg), at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 20 deg), with measured redshifts z < 0.3 and fluxes higher than 4.4 x 10^(-12) erg cm^(-2) s^{-1) in the 0.1-2.4 keV band. The sample, called the ROSAT Brightest Cluster Sample (BCS), is selected from ROSAT All-Sky Survey data and is the largest X-ray selected cluster sample compiled to date. In addition to Abell clusters, which form the bulk of the sample, the BCS also contains the X-ray brightest Zwicky clusters and other clusters selected from their X-ray properties alone. Effort has been made to ensure the highest possible completeness of the sample and the smallest possible contamination by non-cluster X-ray sources. X-ray fluxes are computed using an algorithm tailored for the detection and characterization of X-ray emission from galaxy clusters. These fluxes are accurate to better than 15 per cent (mean 1 sigma error). We find the cumulative log N-log S distribution of clusters to follow a power law k S^(-alpha) with alpha=1.31 (+0.06)(-0.03) (errors are the 10th and 90th percentiles) down to fluxes of 2 x 10^(-12) erg cm^(-2) s^(-1), i.e. considerably below the BCS flux limit. Although our best-fitting slope disagrees formally with the canonical value of -1.5 for a Euclidean distribution, the BCS log N-log S distribution is consistent with a non-evolving cluster population if cosmological effects are taken into account.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809382  [pdf] - 103086
Probing the Cosmic Large-Scale Structure with the REFLEX Cluster Survey : Profile of an ESO Key Programme
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, submitted to the ESO Messenger
Submitted: 1998-09-29, last modified: 1998-10-01
The paper describes the goals and first results of the ROSAT ESO Flux-Limited X-ray (REFLEX) Cluster Survey, a redshift survey of the X-ray brightest galaxy clusters in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey in the southern hemisphere conducted in the frame of an ESO key programme.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809396  [pdf] - 103100
Likelihood Filter for Cluster Detection
Comments: 12 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 1998-09-30
The likelihood filter for cluster detection introduced by Postman et al. is generalized by using standard procedures and models originally developed in the theory of point processes. The generalized method has the advantage of being less biased at the expense of some higher computational effort.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809381  [pdf] - 103085
Results from the REFLEX Cluster Survey
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, To appear in the proceedings of the 14th IAP meeting: "Wide Field Surveys in Cosmology", Y. Mellier & S. Colombi (eds.)
Submitted: 1998-09-29
Based on the ROSAT All-Sky Survey we have conducted a large redshift survey as an ESO key programme to identify and secure redshifts for the X-ray brightest clusters found in the southern hemisphere. We present first results for a highly controlled sample for a flux limit of 3 10-12 erg/s/cm+2 comprising 475 clusters (87% with redshifts). The logN-logS function of the sample shows an almost perfect Euclidian slope and a preliminary X-ray luminosity function is presented.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9706155  [pdf] - 97676
The Steepness Ratio Technique: A New Method to analyze ROSAT All-Sky Survey Extended Sources
Comments: 22 pages, 18 figures, LaTeX file, uses aaspp4.sty. Accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 486, Sept 10, 1997
Submitted: 1997-06-16
In this first paper of a series we develop a new technique to analyze clusters of galaxies observed during the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). We call this method the Steepness Ratio Technique (SRT). The SRT uses the convolution between the real RASS point-spread function and the cluster emission profile assumed to be a beta-model with the beta parameter fixed to the value of 2/3. From the convolved source emission profile the SRT extracts total flux and extension (i.e., core radius) for each cluster. Using the Steepness Ratio (SR) and a control sample of RASS pointlike sources we are able to assign to each RASS source a model-independent probability of extension. Potential biases arising from the hypotheses of a beta-model emission profile and from a fixed beta value are quantified. Tests with control samples of optically identified sources extracted from both the ROSAT survey database and from the ROSAT-PSPC pointed observations archive are performed to check the SRT output. We find that the source properties derived using the SRT on RASS data are consistent with those determined from ROSAT-PSPC pointed observations.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9703012  [pdf] - 96773
Stripped Spiral Galaxies as Promising Targets for the Determination of the Cepheid distance to the Virgo Cluster
Comments: 21 pages, Latex(aaspp.sty), including 6 figures, accepted for publication in ApJL (shortened abstract:)
Submitted: 1997-03-03
The measurement of precise galaxy distances by Cepheid observations out to the distance of the Virgo cluster is important for the determination of the Hubble constant ($H_0$). The Virgo cluster is thereby often used as an important stepping stone. The first HST measurement of the distance of a Virgo galaxy (M100) using Cepheid variables provided a value for $H_0=80(\pm 17)$ km/s/Mpc (Freedman et al. 1994). This measurement was preceeded by a ground based study of the Virgo spiral NGC4571 (Pierce et al. 1994) formally providing $H_0= 87\pm7$ km/s/Mpc. These determinations rely on the accuracy with which the position of this observed spiral galaxy can be located with respect to the Virgo cluster center. This uncertainty introduces a major error in the determination of $H_0$, together with the uncertainty in the adopted Virgo infall velocity of the Local Group. Here we propose the use of spiral galaxies which show clear signs of being stripped off their interstellar medium by the intracluster gas of the Virgo cluster as targets for the Cepheid distance measurements. We show that the stripping process and the knowledge of the intracluster gas distribution from ROSAT X-ray observations allow us to locate these galaxies with an at least three times higher precision with respect to M87 than in the case of other spirals like M100. The X-ray observations further imply that M87 is well centered within the intracluster gas halo of the Virgo cluster and that M86 is associated with a group of galaxies and a larger dark matter halo. The combination of these informations could enable us to locate the two stripped spiral galaxies quite precisely within the Virgo cluster and could greatly improve the determination of the Virgo cluster distance.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9703002  [pdf] - 96763
A Note on the Statistical Mechanics of Violent Relaxation of Phase Space Elements of Different Densities
Comments: AASTeX, 9 pages, uses aas2pp4.sty. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 1997-02-28
The statistical mechanical investigation of Violent Relaxation of phase space elements of different densities first derived by Lynden-Bell (1967) is re-examined. It is found that the mass independence of the equations of motion of Violent Relaxation calls for a constraint on the volume of the phase space elements used to formulate the statistical mechanical description of Violent Relaxation. In agreement with observations of astrophysical objects believed to have been subject to Violent Relaxation (e.g. clusters of galaxies), the coarse grained phase space distribution $\bar{f}$ of the final state in the non-degenerate limit turns into a superposition of Maxwellians of a common velocity dispersion. Thus, the velocity dispersion problem present in the investigation of Lynden-Bell (1967) is removed.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9606057  [pdf] - 94817
Violent Relaxation of Indistinguishable Objects and Neutrino Hot Dark Matter in Clusters of Galaxies
Comments: AASTeX, 16 pages, 2 EPS figures, uses aas2pp4.sty. Accepted by ApJ Letters
Submitted: 1996-06-10
The statistical mechanical investigation of violent relaxation (Lynden-Bell 1967) is extended to indistinguishable objects. It is found that, coincidentally, the equilibrium distribution is the same as that obtained for classical objects. For massive neutrinos, the Tremaine \& Gunn (1979) phase space bound is revisited and reinterpretated as the limit indicating the onset of degeneracy related to the coarse-grained phase space distribution. In the context of one of the currently most popular cosmological models, the Cold and Hot Dark Matter (CHDM) model (Primack et al. 1995), the onset of degeneracy may be of importance in the core region of clusters of galaxies. Degeneracy allows the neutrino HDM density to exceed the limit imposed by the Tremaine \& Gunn (1979) bound while accounting for the phase space bound.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9603050  [pdf] - 94260
A Weak Gravitational Lensing and X-ray Analysis of Abell 2163
Comments: 30 pages, latex file. Postscript file also available at ftp://magicbean.berkeley.edu/pub/squires/a2163/a2163_paper.ps.gz
Submitted: 1996-03-12
We report on the detection of dark matter in the cluster of galaxies Abell~2163 using the weak gravitational distortion of background galaxies, and an analysis of the cluster X-ray emission. We find that while the qualitative distributions of the cluster light and the dark matter are similar -- shallow and extended, with significant substructure -- the X-ray morphology shows a more regular overall appearance. We interpret the joint lensing and X-ray observations as a signature of a merger event in the cluster. We present new ROSAT/HRI data and reanalyze ROSAT/PSPC data, accounting for the effect of a varying background to determine the best fit parameters in the $\beta$-model formalism. We combine the surface brightness fits with two determinations of the radial temperature profile to determine the total mass. Although there are slight variations in the total mass determinations introduced by the uncertainties in the $\beta$-fit, the main contributor to the error arises from the uncertainties in the temperature determinations. Even though the morphologies of the dark matter/light and X-ray gas are quite different, we find that the total mass determined from the X-ray and weak lensing estimates are consistent with each other within the $2\sigma$ error bars, with the X-ray inferred mass a factor of $\simeq 2$ larger. However, as the lensing mass estimates are differential (the surface density at any point is determined relative to the mean in a control annulus), the shallow, extended nature of the mass profile biases the lensing inferred mass downwards. We estimate the correction for this effect and find very good agreement between the corrected lensing and X-ray results. We determine the gas mass fraction and find $f_g \simeq 0.07h^{-3/2}$ at all radii and a constant mass-to-light ratio of $M/L_V
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9603037  [pdf] - 94247
ROSAT/HRI and ASCA observations of the most luminous X-ray cluster RXJ1347.5-1145
Comments: 11 pages, postscript, including 6 figures, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 1996-03-11
We report on the X-ray properties of the exceptional X-ray cluster RXJ1347.5-1145 at z=0.451. We confirm that it is with a luminosity $L_X(bol)=2\times 10^{46}$ erg/s the most luminous X-ray cluster discovered to date. The mass of the cluster within 1.7 Mpc is $9.8%\pm1.1\times 10^{14} \msol$. A comparison of the central X-ray mass and the mass determined from a simple gravitational lens model shows a discrepancy of a factor of 2-3 with the X-ray mass being smaller. The temperature of the cluster is $9.3^{+1.1}_{-1.0}$~keV. We detect a strong FeK line corresponding to a metallicity of $0.33\pm0.10$ in solar units, which is an unexpectedly high value for a distant and hot cluster. There are several hints that the cluster contains an extremely strong cooling flow. With the usual assumptions we derive formally a mass accretion rate of more than 3000 $\msol$/yr indicating that this may be the largest cooling flow detected so far. To find these extreme properties in this distant cluster which can be taken as an indication of a well relaxed and old system is of high importance for the theory of formation and evolution of clusters.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9602140  [pdf] - 94192
Abell 3627: A Nearby, X-ray Bright, and Massive Galaxy Cluster
Comments: 14 pages, Latex file, including aaspp.sty, 9 postscript figures and 1 table, accepted for publication by the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 1996-02-27
The cluster A3627 was recently recognized to be a very massive, nearby cluster in a galaxy survey close to the galactic plane. We are reporting on ROSAT PSPC observations of this object which confirm that the cluster is indeed very massive. The X-ray emission detected from the cluster extends over almost 1 degree in radius. The X-ray image is not spherically symmetric and shows indications of an ongoing cluster merger. Due to the strong interstellar absorption the spectral analysis and the gas temperature determination are difficult. The data are consistent with an overall gas temperature in the range 5 to 10 keV. There are signs of temperature variations in the merger region. A mass estimate based on the X-ray data yields values of $0.4 - 2.2 \cdot 10^{15}$ \msu \ if extrapolated to the virial radius of $3 h_{50}^{-1}$ Mpc. In the ROSAT energy band (0.1 - 2.4 keV) the cluster emission yields a flux of about $2 \cdot 10^{-10}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ which makes A3627 the 6$^{th}$ brightest cluster in the ROSAT All Sky Survey. The cluster was missed in earlier X-ray surveys because it was confused with a neighbouring X-ray bright, galactic X-ray binary (1H1556-605). The large X-ray flux makes A3627 an important target for future studies.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9512104  [pdf] - 93788
X-ray evolution in the ROSAT Brightest Cluster Sample
Comments: Uuencoded, compressed PostScript file, 2 pages, 2 figures, to appear in Proc. 'R\"ontgenstrahlung from the Universe', eds. Zimmermann, H.U. & Tr"umper, J.,1996, MPE Report 263
Submitted: 1995-12-15
We present the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of the ROSAT Brightest Cluster Sample (BCS), an X-ray selected, flux limited sample of 172 clusters of galaxies at $z\leq 0.3$ compiled from ROSAT All-Sky Survey data. While the bulk of the BCS consists of Abell clusters, the sample also contains Zwicky clusters and purely X-ray selected systems. The BCS-XLF represents the best determination of the local X-ray luminosity function for galaxy clusters and thus provides an important reference for evolutionary studies. For the BCS itself, we find no convincing evidence for cluster evolution within a redshift of $z=0.3$. This result is not in conflict with the findings of the EMSS study on cluster evolution.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9507008  [pdf] - 92946
The Dark Matter, Gas and Galaxy Distributions in Abell 2218: A Weak Gravitational Lensing and X-ray Analysis
Comments: 25 pages, Latex, no figures. Complete version with figures available by anon ftp at ftp://ftp.cita.utoronto.ca/ftp/cita/squires/a2218
Submitted: 1995-07-04
We report on the detection of dark matter in the cluster Abell 2218 using the weak gravitational distortion of background galaxies. We find a highly significant, coherent detection of the distortion in the images of the background galaxies. The inferred 2D mass distribution has a peak that is coincident with the optical and X-ray centroid. The qualitative distributions of the cluster light, the X-ray emission and the dark matter are similar and the projected total mass, gas, and light surface densities are consistent with a $r^{-1}$ profile at distance of $r > 180^{\prime\prime}$ from the cluster cD galaxy. Using the weak lensing technique, we determine a lower bound for the total mass in A2218 of $(3.9 \pm 0.7) \times 10^{14}$~h$^{-1}$~M$_\odot$ within a fiducial aperture of radius 0.4~h$^{-1}$Mpc. The associated cluster mass-to-light ratio is $(440 \pm 80)$~h~$M_\odot/L_{\odot B}$. The mass estimated by the weak lensing method is consistent with that inferred from the X-ray data under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium and we derive an upper bound for the gas-to-total mass ratio at 400~h$^{-1}$kpc of $M_{gas}/M_{tot} = (0.04 \pm 0.02)$h$^{-3/2}$.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9505097  [pdf] - 363115
Discovery of an Arc System in the Brightest ROSAT Cluster of Galaxies
Comments: 4 pages, uuencoded compressed postscript, including 3 figures, A&A Letters (in press)
Submitted: 1995-05-22
We report the discovery of two bright arcs in what turns out to be the brightest X--ray cluster in the ROSAT band ever observed, RXJ1347.5-1145. Its luminosity is $(6.2\pm0.6) \cdot10^{45}$erg s$^{-1}$ (in the range 0.1--2.4~keV). The arcs are most probably gravitationally lensed images of background galaxies. They were found serendipitously during our ongoing large--scale redshift survey of X--ray clusters detected by the ROSAT All Sky Survey. The arcs are almost opposite to each other with respect to the cluster centre, with a distance from it of about $35''$ ($=240 h^{-1}_{50}$ kpc), a radius that enables the probing of a rather large cluster volume. In this Letter we limit ourselves to the discussion of the general optical and X--ray features of this cluster and to the potential implications of the gravitational arcs. A more detailed discussion of the different mass estimates and of the cosmological implications for this exceptional object are left for future work based on more accurate optical and X--ray data, which are currently being collected.