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Avillez, Miguel

Normalized to: Avillez, M.

4 article(s) in total. 90 co-authors, from 1 to 2 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 3,5.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.2181  [pdf] - 958427
COrE (Cosmic Origins Explorer) A White Paper
Comments: 90 pages Latex 15 figures (revised 28 April 2011, references added, minor errors corrected)
Submitted: 2011-02-10, last modified: 2011-04-29
COrE (Cosmic Origins Explorer) is a fourth-generation full-sky, microwave-band satellite recently proposed to ESA within Cosmic Vision 2015-2025. COrE will provide maps of the microwave sky in polarization and temperature in 15 frequency bands, ranging from 45 GHz to 795 GHz, with an angular resolution ranging from 23 arcmin (45 GHz) and 1.3 arcmin (795 GHz) and sensitivities roughly 10 to 30 times better than PLANCK (depending on the frequency channel). The COrE mission will lead to breakthrough science in a wide range of areas, ranging from primordial cosmology to galactic and extragalactic science. COrE is designed to detect the primordial gravitational waves generated during the epoch of cosmic inflation at more than $3\sigma $ for $r=(T/S)>=10^{-3}$. It will also measure the CMB gravitational lensing deflection power spectrum to the cosmic variance limit on all linear scales, allowing us to probe absolute neutrino masses better than laboratory experiments and down to plausible values suggested by the neutrino oscillation data. COrE will also search for primordial non-Gaussianity with significant improvements over Planck in its ability to constrain the shape (and amplitude) of non-Gaussianity. In the areas of galactic and extragalactic science, in its highest frequency channels COrE will provide maps of the galactic polarized dust emission allowing us to map the galactic magnetic field in areas of diffuse emission not otherwise accessible to probe the initial conditions for star formation. COrE will also map the galactic synchrotron emission thirty times better than PLANCK. This White Paper reviews the COrE science program, our simulations on foreground subtraction, and the proposed instrumental configuration.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:0706.2663  [pdf] - 314874
Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33): X-ray Imaging Spectroscopy of M33SNR21, the Brightest X-ray Supernova Remnant in M33
Comments: 27 pages, 6 figures (3 color). ApJ (in press)
Submitted: 2007-06-18
We present and interpret new X-ray data for M33SNR21, the brightest X-ray supernova remnant (SNR) in M33. The SNR is in seen projection against (and appears to be interacting with) the bright HII region NGC592. Data for this source were obtained as part of the Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33) Very Large Project. The nearly on-axis Chandra data resolve the SNR into a ~5" diameter (20 pc at our assumed M33 distance of 817+/-58 kpc) slightly elliptical shell. The shell is brighter in the east, which suggests that it is encountering higher density material in that direction. The optical emission is coextensive with the X-ray shell in the north, but extends well beyond the X-ray rim in the southwest. Modeling the X-ray spectrum with an absorbed sedov model yields a shock temperature of 0.46(+0.01,-0.02) keV, an ionization timescale of n_e t = $2.1 (+0.2,-0.3) \times 10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$ s, and half-solar abundances (0.45 (+0.12, -0.09)). Assuming Sedov dynamics gives an average preshock H density of 1.7 +/- 0.3 cm$^{-3}$. The dynamical age estimate is 6500 +/- 600 yr, while the best fit $n_e t$ value and derived $n_e$ gives 8200 +/- 1700 yr; the weighted mean of the age estimates is 7600 +/- 600 yr. We estimate an X-ray luminosity (0.25-4.5 keV) of (1.2 +/- 0.2) times $10^{37}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ (absorbed), and (1.7 +/- 0.3) times $10^{37}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ (unabsorbed), in good agreement with the recent XMM-Newton determination. No significant excess hard emission was detected; the luminosity $\le 1.2\times 10^{35}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ (2-8 keV) for any hard point source.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0410734  [pdf] - 68583
The Distribution of Pressures in a Supernova-Driven Interstellar Medium. I. Magnetized Medium
Comments: Revised version submitted to ApJ, 10 figures, 6 color. Minor revisions only
Submitted: 2004-10-29, last modified: 2005-01-27
Observations have suggested substantial departures from pressure equilibrium in the interstellar medium (ISM) in the plane of the Galaxy, even on scales under 50 pc. Nevertheless, multi-phase models of the ISM assume at least locally isobaric gas. The pressure then determines the density reached by gas cooling to stable thermal equilibrium. We use numerical models of the magnetized ISM to examine the consequences of supernova driving for interstellar pressures. In this paper we examine a (200 pc)^3 periodic domain threaded by magnetic fields. Individual parcels of gas at different pressures reach widely varying points on the thermal equilibrium curve: no unique set of phases is found, but rather a dynamically-determined continuum of densities and temperatures. A substantial fraction of the gas remains entirely out of thermal equilibrium. Our results appear consistent with observations of interstellar pressures. They also suggest that the high pressures observed in molecular clouds may be due to ram pressures in addition to gravitational forces. Much of the gas in our model lies far from equipartition between thermal and magnetic pressures, with ratios ranging from 0.1 to $10^4$ and ratios of uniform to fluctuating magnetic field of 0.5--1. Our models show broad pressure probability distribution functions with log-normal functional forms produced by both shocks and rarefaction waves, rather than power-law distributions produced by isolated supernova remnants. The width of the distribution can be described quantitatively by a formula derived from the work of Padoan, Nordlund, & Jones (1997).
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0106509  [pdf] - 43305
The Distribution of Pressures in a Supernova-Driven Interstellar Medium
Comments: Submitted to ApJ 26 June 2001. 36 pages, 13 reduced resolution color figures, contained on pages 24-36. First 23 pages can be printed on regular printer
Submitted: 2001-06-27
Observations have suggested substantial departures from pressure equilibrium in the interstellar medium (ISM) in the plane of the Galaxy, even on scales under 50 pc. Nevertheless, multi-phase models of the ISM assume at least locally isobaric gas. The pressure then determines the density reached by gas cooling to stable thermal equilibrium. We use two different sets of numerical models of the ISM to examine the consequences of supernova driving for interstellar pressures. The first set of models is hydrodynamical, and uses adaptive mesh refinement to allow computation of a 1 x 1 x 20 kpc section of a stratified galactic disk. The second set of models is magnetohydrodynamical, using an independent code framework, and examines a 200 pc cubed periodic domain threaded by magnetic fields. Both of these models show broad pressure distributions with roughly log-normal functional forms produced by both shocks and rarefaction waves, rather than the power-law distributions predicted by previous work, with rather sharp thermal pressure gradients. The width of the distribution of the logs of pressure in gas with log T < 3.9 is proportional to the rms Mach number in that gas, while the distribution in hotter gas is broader, but not so broad as would be predicted by the Mach numbers in that gas. Individual parcels of gas reach widely varying points on the thermal equilibrium curve: no unique set of phases is found, but rather a dynamically-determined continuum of densities and temperatures. Furthermore, a substantial fraction of the gas remains entirely out of thermal equilibrium. Our results appear consistent with observations of interstellar pressures, and suggest that the pressures observed in molecular clouds may be due to ram pressure rather than gravitational confinement.