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André, Nicolas

Normalized to: André, N.

12 article(s) in total. 321 co-authors, from 1 to 6 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 7,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.12680  [pdf] - 2090581
VOEvent for Solar and Planetary Sciences
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-11-30, last modified: 2020-05-05
With its Planetary Space Weather Service (PSWS), the Europlanet-H2020 Research Insfrastructure (EPN2020RI) project is proposing a compelling set of databases and tools to that provides Space Weather forecasting throughout the Solar System. We present here the selected event transfer system (VOEvent). We describe the user requirements, develop the way to implement event alerts, and chain those to the 1) planetary event and 2) planetary space weather predictions. The service of alerts is developed with the objective to facilitate discovery or prediction announcements within the PSWS user community in order to watch or warn against specific events. The ultimate objective is to set up dedicated amateur and/or professional observation campaigns, diffuse contextual information for science data analysis, and enable safety operations of planet-orbiting spacecraft against the risks of impacts from meteors or solar wind disturbances.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.02963  [pdf] - 2074397
Ice Giant Systems: The Scientific Potential of Missions to Uranus and Neptune (ESA Voyage 2050 White Paper)
Comments: 28 pages, 9 figures, version of Voyage2050 ESA white paper submitted to PSS
Submitted: 2019-07-04, last modified: 2020-04-02
Uranus and Neptune, and their diverse satellite and ring systems, represent the least explored environments of our Solar System, and yet may provide the archetype for the most common outcome of planetary formation throughout our galaxy. Ice Giants will be the last remaining class of Solar System planet to have a dedicated orbital explorer, and international efforts are under way to realise such an ambitious mission in the coming decades. In 2019, the European Space Agency released a call for scientific themes for its strategic science planning process for the 2030s and 2040s, known as Voyage 2050. We used this opportunity to review our present-day knowledge of the Uranus and Neptune systems, producing a revised and updated set of scientific questions and motivations for their exploration. This review article describes how such a mission could explore their origins, ice-rich interiors, dynamic atmospheres, unique magnetospheres, and myriad icy satellites, to address questions at the heart of modern planetary science. These two worlds are superb examples of how planets with shared origins can exhibit remarkably different evolutionary paths: Neptune as the archetype for Ice Giants, whereas Uranus may be atypical. Exploring Uranus' natural satellites and Neptune's captured moon Triton could reveal how Ocean Worlds form and remain active, redefining the extent of the habitable zone in our Solar System. For these reasons and more, we advocate that an Ice Giant System explorer should become a strategic cornerstone mission within ESA's Voyage 2050 programme, in partnership with international collaborators, and targeting launch opportunities in the early 2030s.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.00300  [pdf] - 2090582
MASER: A Science Ready Toolbox for Low Frequency Radio Astronomy
Comments: Submitted to Data Science Journal special issue after PV2018 conference
Submitted: 2019-02-01, last modified: 2020-02-25
MASER (Measurements, Analysis, and Simulation of Emission in the Radio range) is a comprehensive infrastructure dedicated to time-dependent low frequency radio astronomy (up to about 50 MHz). The main radio sources observed in this spectral range are the Sun, the magnetized planets (Earth, Jupiter, Saturn), and our Galaxy, which are observed either from ground or space. Ground observatories can capture high resolution data streams with a high sensitivity. Conversely, space-borne instruments can observe below the ionospheric cut-off (at about 10 MHz) and can be placed closer to the studied object. Several tools have been developed in the last decade for sharing space physics data. Data visualization tools developed by various institutes are available to share, display and analyse space physics time series and spectrograms. The MASER team has selected a sub-set of those tools and applied them to low frequency radio astronomy. MASER also includes a Python software library for reading raw data from agency archives.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.02339  [pdf] - 1931007
The in-situ exploration of Jupiter's radiation belts (A White Paper submitted in response to ESA's Voyage 2050 Call)
Comments: 28 pages, 3 Tables, 11 Figures
Submitted: 2019-08-06
Jupiter has the most energetic and complex radiation belts in our solar system. Their hazardous environment is the reason why so many spacecraft avoid rather than investigate them, and explains how they have kept many of their secrets so well hidden, despite having been studied for decades. In this White Paper we argue why these secrets are worth unveiling. Jupiter's radiation belts and the vast magnetosphere that encloses them constitute an unprecedented physical laboratory, suitable for both interdisciplinary and novel scientific investigations: from studying fundamental high energy plasma physics processes which operate throughout the universe, such as adiabatic charged particle acceleration and nonlinear wave-particle interactions; to exploiting the astrobiological consequences of energetic particle radiation. The in-situ exploration of the uninviting environment of Jupiter's radiation belts present us with many challenges in mission design, science planning, instrumentation and technology development. We address these challenges by reviewing the different options that exist for direct and indirect observation of this unique system. We stress the need for new instruments, the value of synergistic Earth and Jupiter-based remote sensing and in-situ investigations, and the vital importance of multi-spacecraft, in-situ measurements. While simultaneous, multi-point in-situ observations have long become the standard for exploring electromagnetic interactions in the inner solar system, they have never taken place at Jupiter or any strongly magnetized planet besides Earth. We conclude that a dedicated multi-spacecraft mission to Jupiter's radiation belts is an essential and obvious way forward and deserves to be given a high priority in ESA's Voyage 2050 programme.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.03573  [pdf] - 1663501
Solar System Ice Giants: Exoplanets in our Backyard
Rymer, Abigail; Mandt, Kathleen; Hurley, Dana; Lisse, Carey; Izenberg, Noam; Smith, H. Todd; Westlake, Joseph; Bunce, Emma; Arridge, Christopher; Masters, Adam; Hofstadter, Mark; Simon, Amy; Brandt, Pontus; Clark, George; Cohen, Ian; Allen, Robert; Vine, Sarah; Hansen, Kenneth; Hospodarsky, George; Kurth, William; Romani, Paul; Lamy, Laurent; Zarka, Philippe; Cao, Hao; Paty, Carol; Hedman, Matthew; Roussos, Elias; Cruikshank, Dale; Farrell, William; Fieseler, Paul; Coates, Andrew; Yelle, Roger; Parkinson, Christopher; Militzer, Burkhard; Grodent, Denis; Kollmann, Peter; McNutt, Ralph; André, Nicolas; Strange, Nathan; Barnes, Jason; Dones, Luke; Denk, Tilmann; Rathbun, Julie; Lunine, Jonathan; Desai, Ravi; Cochrane, Corey; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Postberg, Frank; Ebert, Robert; Hill, Thomas; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo; Regoli, Leonardo; Pontius, Duane; Stanley, Sabine; Greathouse, Thomas; Saur, Joachim; Marouf, Essam; Bergman, Jan; Higgins, Chuck; Johnson, Robert; Thomsen, Michelle; Soderlund, Krista; Jia, Xianzhe; Wilson, Robert; Englander, Jacob; Burch, Jim; Nordheim, Tom; Grava, Cesare; Baines, Kevin; Quick, Lynnae; Russell, Christopher; Cravens, Thomas; Cecconi, Baptiste; Aslam, Shahid; Bray, Veronica; Garcia-Sage, Katherine; Richardson, John; Clark, John; Hsu, Sean; Achterberg, Richard; Sergis, Nick; Paganelli, Flora; Kempf, Sasha; Orton, Glenn; Portyankina, Ganna; Jones, Geraint; Economou, Thanasis; Livengood, Timothy; Krimigi, Stamatios; Szalay, James; Jackman, Catriona; Valek, Phillip; Lecacheux, Alain; Colwell, Joshua; Jasinski, Jamie; Tosi, Federico; Sulaiman, Ali; Galand, Marina; Kotova, Anna; Khurana, Krishan; Kivelson, Margaret; Strobel, Darrell; Radiota, Aikaterina; Estrada, Paul; Livi, Stefano; Azari, Abigail; Yates, Japheth; Allegrini, Frederic; Vogt, Marissa; Felici, Marianna; Luhmann, Janet; Filacchione, Gianrico; Moore, Luke
Comments: Exoplanet Science Strategy White Paper, submitted to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, Space Studies Board, 9 March 2018
Submitted: 2018-04-10
Future remote sensing of exoplanets will be enhanced by a thorough investigation of our solar system Ice Giants (Neptune-size planets). What can the configuration of the magnetic field tell us (remotely) about the interior, and what implications does that field have for the structure of the magnetosphere; energy input into the atmosphere, and surface geophysics (for example surface weathering of satellites that might harbour sub-surface oceans). How can monitoring of auroral emission help inform future remote observations of emission from exoplanets? Our Solar System provides the only laboratory in which we can perform in-situ experiments to understand exoplanet formation, dynamos, systems and magnetospheres.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.09727  [pdf] - 1916722
VESPA: a community-driven Virtual Observatory in Planetary Science
Comments: Planetary and Space Sciences (in press), Special Issue "Enabling Open and Interoperable Access to Planetary Science and Heliophysics Databases and Tools". 43 pages, 14 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2017-05-26, last modified: 2017-06-14
The VESPA data access system focuses on applying Virtual Observatory (VO) standards and tools to Planetary Science. Building on a previous EC-funded Europlanet program, it has reached maturity during the first year of a new Europlanet 2020 program (started in 2015 for 4 years). The infrastructure has been upgraded to handle many fields of Solar System studies, with a focus both on users and data providers. This paper describes the broad lines of the current VESPA infrastructure as seen by a potential user, and provides examples of real use cases in several thematic areas. These use cases are also intended to identify hints for future developments and adaptations of VO tools to Planetary Science.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.01354  [pdf] - 1534179
Virtual Planetary Space Weather Services offered by the Europlanet H2020 Research Infrastructure
Comments: 14 pages
Submitted: 2017-01-05
The Europlanet 2020 Research Infrastructure will include new Planetary Space Weather Services (PSWS) that will extend the concepts of space weather and space situational awareness to other planets in our Solar System and in particular to spacecraft that voyage through it. PSWS will make five entirely new toolkits accessible to the research community and to industrial partners planning for space missions: a general planetary space weather toolkit, as well as three toolkits dedicated to the following key planetary environments: Mars, comets, and outer planets. This will give the European planetary science community new methods, interfaces, functionalities and/or plugins dedicated to planetary space weather in the tools and models available within the partner institutes. It will also create a novel event-diary toolkit aiming at predicting and detecting planetary events like meteor showers and impacts. A variety of tools are available for tracing propagation of planetary and/or solar events through the Solar System and modelling the response of the planetary environment (surfaces, atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres) to those events. But these tools were not originally designed for planetary event prediction and space weather applications. PSWS will provide the additional research and tailoring required to apply them for these purposes. PSWS will be to review, test, improve and adapt methods and tools available within the partner institutes in order to make prototype planetary event and space weather services operational in Europe at the end of the programme. To achieve its objectives PSWS will use a few tools and standards developed for the Astronomy Virtual Observatory (VO). This paper gives an overview of the project together with a few illustrations of prototype services based on VO standards and protocols.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.06980  [pdf] - 1331208
Cassini in situ observations of long-duration magnetic reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail
Comments: Initially submitted version (submitted 24 March 2015), published online in Nature Physics 30 November 2015
Submitted: 2015-12-22
Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process in solar system and astrophysical plasmas, through which stored magnetic energy associated with current sheets is converted into thermal, kinetic and wave energy. Magnetic reconnection is also thought to be a key process involved in shedding internally produced plasma from the giant magnetospheres at Jupiter and Saturn through topological reconfiguration of the magnetic field. The region where magnetic fields reconnect is known as the diffusion region and in this letter we report on the first encounter of the Cassini spacecraft with a diffusion region in Saturn's magnetotail. The data also show evidence of magnetic reconnection over a period of 19 h revealing that reconnection can, in fact, act for prolonged intervals in a rapidly rotating magnetosphere. We show that reconnection can be a significant pathway for internal plasma loss at Saturn. This counters the view of reconnection as a transient method of internal plasma loss at Saturn. These results, although directly relating to the magnetosphere of Saturn, have applications in the understanding of other rapidly rotating magnetospheres, including that of Jupiter and other astrophysical bodies.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.02345  [pdf] - 1161847
Nanodust detection between 1 and 5 AU by using Cassini wave measurements
Comments: to appear in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-04-09
The solar system contains solids of all sizes, ranging from km-size bodies to nano-sized particles. Nanograins have been detected in situ in the Earth's atmosphere, near cometary and giant planet environments, and more recently in the solar wind at 1 AU. These latter nano grains are thought to be formed in the inner solar system dust cloud, mainly through collisional break-up of larger grains and are then picked-up and accelerated by the magnetized solar wind because of their large charge-to-mass ratio. In the present paper, we analyze the low frequency bursty noise identified in the Cassini radio and plasma wave data during the spacecraft cruise phase inside Jupiter's orbit. The magnitude, spectral shape and waveform of this broadband noise is consistent with the signature of nano particles impinging at nearby the solar wind speed on the spacecraft surface. Nanoparticles were observed whenever the radio instrument was turned on and able to detect them, at different heliocentric distances between Earth and Jupiter, suggesting their ubiquitous presence in the heliosphere. We analyzed the radial dependence of the nano dust flux with heliospheric distance and found that it is consistent with the dynamics of nano dust originating from the inner heliosphere and picked-up by the solar wind. The contribution of the nano dust produced in asteroid belt appears to be negligible compared to the trapping region in the inner heliosphere. In contrast, further out, nano dust are mainly produced by the volcanism of active moons such as Io and Enceladus.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.4043  [pdf] - 1214981
Nanodust detection near 1 AU from spectral analysis of Cassini/RPWS radio data
Comments:
Submitted: 2014-06-16
Nanodust grains of a few nanometer in size are produced near the Sun by collisional break-up of larger grains and picked-up by the magnetized solar wind. They have so far been detected at 1 AU by only the two STEREO spacecraft. Here we analyze the spectra measured by the radio and plasma wave instrument onboard Cassini during the cruise phase close to Earth orbit; they exhibit bursty signatures similar to those observed by the same instrument in association to nanodust stream impacts on Cassini near Jupiter. The observed wave level and spectral shape reveal impacts of nanoparticles at about 300 km/s, with an average flux compatible with that observed by the radio and plasma wave instrument onboard STEREO and with the interplanetary flux models.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.4811  [pdf] - 1209042
Scientific rationale of Saturn's in situ exploration
Comments: Submitted to Planetary and Space Science
Submitted: 2014-04-18
Remote sensing observations meet some limitations when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the superiority of in situ probe measurements is illustrated by the exploration of Jupiter, where key measurements such as the determination of the noble gases abundances and the precise measurement of the helium mixing ratio have only been made available through in situ measurements by the Galileo probe. This paper describes the main scientific goals to be addressed by the future in situ exploration of Saturn placing the Galileo probe exploration of Jupiter in a broader context and before the future probe exploration of the more remote ice giants. In situ exploration of Saturn's atmosphere addresses two broad themes that are discussed throughout this paper: first, the formation history of our solar system and second, the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. In this context, we detail the reasons why measurements of Saturn's bulk elemental and isotopic composition would place important constraints on the volatile reservoirs in the protosolar nebula. We also show that the in situ measurement of CO (or any other disequilibrium species that is depleted by reaction with water) in Saturn's upper troposphere would constrain its bulk O/H ratio. We highlight the key measurements required to distinguish competing theories to shed light on giant planet formation as a common process in planetary systems with potential applications to most extrasolar systems. In situ measurements of Saturn's stratospheric and tropospheric dynamics, chemistry and cloud-forming processes will provide access to phenomena unreachable to remote sensing studies. Different mission architectures are envisaged, which would benefit from strong international collaborations.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.0132  [pdf] - 637125
OSS (Outer Solar System): A fundamental and planetary physics mission to Neptune, Triton and the Kuiper Belt
Comments: 43 pages, 10 figures, Accepted to Experimental Astronomy, Special Issue Cosmic Vision. Revision according to reviewers comments
Submitted: 2011-06-01, last modified: 2012-06-17
The present OSS mission continues a long and bright tradition by associating the communities of fundamental physics and planetary sciences in a single mission with ambitious goals in both domains. OSS is an M-class mission to explore the Neptune system almost half a century after flyby of the Voyager 2 spacecraft. Several discoveries were made by Voyager 2, including the Great Dark Spot (which has now disappeared) and Triton's geysers. Voyager 2 revealed the dynamics of Neptune's atmosphere and found four rings and evidence of ring arcs above Neptune. Benefiting from a greatly improved instrumentation, it will result in a striking advance in the study of the farthest planet of the Solar System. Furthermore, OSS will provide a unique opportunity to visit a selected Kuiper Belt object subsequent to the passage of the Neptunian system. It will consolidate the hypothesis of the origin of Triton as a KBO captured by Neptune, and improve our knowledge on the formation of the Solar system. The probe will embark instruments allowing precise tracking of the probe during cruise. It allows to perform the best controlled experiment for testing, in deep space, the General Relativity, on which is based all the models of Solar system formation. OSS is proposed as an international cooperation between ESA and NASA, giving the capability for ESA to launch an M-class mission towards the farthest planet of the Solar system, and to a Kuiper Belt object. The proposed mission profile would allow to deliver a 500 kg class spacecraft. The design of the probe is mainly constrained by the deep space gravity test in order to minimise the perturbation of the accelerometer measurement.