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Adamów, Monika

Normalized to: Adamów, M.

18 article(s) in total. 98 co-authors, from 1 to 17 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 4,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.03301  [pdf] - 2086446
Two Ultra-Faint Milky Way Stellar Systems Discovered in Early Data from the DECam Local Volume Exploration Survey
Comments: 17 pages, 6 figures, 1 table; updated to match published version
Submitted: 2019-12-06, last modified: 2020-04-28
We report the discovery of two ultra-faint stellar systems found in early data from the DECam Local Volume Exploration survey (DELVE). The first system, Centaurus I (DELVE J1238-4054), is identified as a resolved overdensity of old and metal-poor stars with a heliocentric distance of ${\rm D}_{\odot} = 116.3_{-0.6}^{+0.6}$ kpc, a half-light radius of $r_h = 2.3_{-0.3}^{+0.4}$ arcmin, an age of $\tau > 12.85$ Gyr, a metallicity of $Z = 0.0002_{-0.0002}^{+0.0001}$, and an absolute magnitude of $M_V = -5.55_{-0.11}^{+0.11}$ mag. This characterization is consistent with the population of ultra-faint satellites, and confirmation of this system would make Centaurus I one of the brightest recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. Centaurus I is detected in Gaia DR2 with a clear and distinct proper motion signal, confirming that it is a real association of stars distinct from the Milky Way foreground; this is further supported by the clustering of blue horizontal branch stars near the centroid of the system. The second system, DELVE 1 (DELVE J1630-0058), is identified as a resolved overdensity of stars with a heliocentric distance of ${\rm D}_{\odot} = 19.0_{-0.6}^{+0.5} kpc$, a half-light radius of $r_h = 0.97_{-0.17}^{+0.24}$ arcmin, an age of $\tau = 12.5_{-0.7}^{+1.0}$ Gyr, a metallicity of $Z = 0.0005_{-0.0001}^{+0.0002}$, and an absolute magnitude of $M_V = -0.2_{-0.6}^{+0.8}$ mag, consistent with the known population of faint halo star clusters. Given the low number of probable member stars at magnitudes accessible with Gaia DR2, a proper motion signal for DELVE 1 is only marginally detected. We compare the spatial position and proper motion of both Centaurus I and DELVE 1 with simulations of the accreted satellite population of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and find that neither is likely to be associated with the LMC.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.04379  [pdf] - 1690343
Tracking Advanced Planetary Systems (TAPAS) with HARPS-N. VI. HD 238914 and TYC 3318-01333-1 - two more Li-rich giants with planets
Comments: A&A, accepted
Submitted: 2018-01-12, last modified: 2018-01-16
We present the latest results of our search for planets with HARPS-N at the 3.6 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo under the Tracking Advanced Planetary Systems project: an in-depth study of the 15 most Li abundant giants from the PennState - Toru\'n Planet Search sample. Our goals are first, to obtain radial velocities of the most Li-rich giants we identified in our sample to search for possible low-mass substellar companions, and second, to perform an extended spectral analysis to define the evolutionary status of these stars. Methods. This work is based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and its High Resolution Spectro- graph, and with the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Two stars, HD 181368 and HD 188214 , were also observed with UVES at the VLT to determine beryllium abundances. We report i) the discovery of two new planetary systems around the Li-rich giant stars: HD 238914 and TYC 3318-01333- 1 (a binary system); ii) reveal a binary Li-rich giant, HD 181368 ; iii) although our current phase coverage is not complete, we suggest the presence of planetary mass companions around TYC 3663-01966-1 and TYC 3105-00152-1 ; iv) we confirm the previous result for BD+48 740 and present updated orbital parameters, and v) we find a lack of a relation between the Li enhancement and the Be abundance for the stars HD 181368 and HD 188214 , for which we acquired blue spectra. We found seven stars with stellar or potential planetary companions among the 15 Li-rich giant stars. The binary star frequency of the Li-rich giants in our sample appears to be normal, but the planet frequency is twice that of the general sample, which suggests a possible connection between hosting a companion and enhanced Li abundance in giant stars. We also found most of the companions orbits to be highly eccentric.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.02899  [pdf] - 1716978
The Penn State - Toru\'n Centre for Astronomy Planet Search stars IV. Dwarfs and the complete sample
Comments: 11 pages, 10 figures, Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2018-01-09
Our knowledge of the intrinsic parameters of exoplanets is as precise as our determinations of their stellar hosts parameters. In the case of radial velocity searches for planets, stellar masses appear to be crucial. But before estimating stellar masses properly, detailed spectroscopic analysis is essential. With this paper we conclude a general spectroscopic description of the Pennsylvania-Torun Planet Search (PTPS) sample of stars. We aim at a detailed description of basic parameters of stars representing the complete PTPS sample. We present atmospheric and physical parameters for dwarf stars observed within the PTPS along with updated physical parameters for the remaining stars from this sample after the first Gaia data release. We used high resolution (R=60 000) and high signal-to-noise-ratio (S/N=150-250) spectra from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and its High Resolution Spectrograph. Stellar atmospheric parameters were determined through a strictly spectroscopic local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis (LTE) of the equivalent widths of FeI and FeII lines. Stellar masses, ages, and luminosities were estimated through a Bayesian analysis of theoretical isochrones. We present $T_{eff}$, log$g$ , [Fe/H], micrturbulence velocities, absolute radial velocities, and rotational velocities for 156 stars from the dwarf sample of PTPS. For most of these stars these are the first determinations. We refine the definition of PTPS subsamples of stars (giants, subgiants, and dwarfs) and update the luminosity classes for all PTPS stars. Using available Gaia and Hipparcos parallaxes, we redetermine the stellar parameters (masses, radii, luminosities, and ages) for 451 PTPS stars. The complete PTPS sample of 885 stars is composed of 132 dwarfs, 238 subgiants, and 515 giants, of which the vast majority are of roughly solar mass.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.07581  [pdf] - 1385566
TAPAS IV. TYC 3667-1280-1 b - the most massive red giant star hosting a warm Jupiter
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2016-03-24
We present the latest result of the TAPAS project that is devoted to intense monitoring of planetary candidates that are identified within the PennState-Toru\'n planet search. We aim to detect planetary systems around evolved stars to be able to build sound statistics on the frequency and intrinsic nature of these systems, and to deliver in-depth studies of selected planetary systems with evidence of star-planet interaction processes. The paper is based on precise radial velocity measurements: 13 epochs collected over 1920 days with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and its High-Resolution Spectrograph, and 22 epochs of ultra-precise HARPS-N data collected over 961 days. We present a warm-Jupiter ($T_{eq}=1350 K$, $m_{2} sin i=5.4\pm$0.4$M_{J}$) companion with an orbital period of 26.468 days in a circular ($e=0.036$) orbit around a giant evolved ($\log g=3.11\pm0.09$, $R=6.26\pm0.86R_{\odot}$) star with $M_{\star}=1.87\pm0.17M_{\odot}$. This is the most massive and oldest star found to be hosting a close-in giant planet. Its proximity to its host ($a=0.21au$) means that the planet has a $13.9\pm2.0\%$ probability of transits; this calls for photometric follow-up study. This massive warm Jupiter with a near circular orbit around an evolved massive star can help set constraints on general migration mechanisms for warm Jupiters and, given its high equilibrium temperature, can help test energy deposition models in hot Jupiters.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.06832  [pdf] - 1385456
Tracking Advanced Planetary Systems (TAPAS) with HARPS-N. III. HD 5583 and BD+15 2375 - two cool giants with warm companions
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures. Accepted by Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-01-25
Evolved stars are crucial pieces to understand the dependency of the planet formation mechanism on the stellar mass and to explore deeper the mechanism involved in star-planet interactions. Over the past ten years, we have monitored about 1000 evolved stars for radial velocity variations in search for low-mass companions under the Penn State - Torun Centre for Astronomy Planet Search program with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Selected prospective candidates that required higher RV precision measurements have been followed with HARPS-N at the 3.6 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo under the TAPAS project. We aim to detect planetary systems around evolved stars to be able to build sound statistics on the frequency and intrinsic nature of these systems, and to deliver in-depth studies of selected planetary systems with evidence of star-planet interaction processes. For HD 5583 we obtained 14 epochs of precise RV measurements collected over 2313 days with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET), and 22 epochs of ultra-precise HARPS-N data collected over 976 days. For BD+15 2375 we collected 24 epochs of HET data over 3286 days and 25 epochs of HARPS-S data over 902 days. We report the discovery of two planetary mass objects orbiting two evolved Red Giant stars: HD~5583 has a m sin i = 5.78 M$_{J}$ companion at 0.529~AU in a nearly circular orbit (e=0.076), the closest companion to a giant star detected with the RV technique, and BD+15~2735 that with a m sin i= 1.06 M$_{J}$ holds the record of the lightest planet found so far orbiting an evolved star (in a circular e=0.001, 0.576~AU orbit). These are the third and fourth planets found within the TAPAS project, a HARPS-N monitoring of evolved planetary systems identified with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.07159  [pdf] - 1392723
The Penn State - Toru\'n Centre for Astronomy Planet Search stars. III. The evolved stars sample
Comments: 46 pages, 17 figures. Accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2015-10-24
We present basic atmospheric parameters ($T_{eff}$, $log g$, $v_{t}$ and [Fe/H]), rotation velocities and absolute radial velocities as well as luminosities, masses, ages and radii for 402 stars (including 11 single-lined spectroscopic binaries), mostly subgiants and giants. For 272 of them we present parameters for the first time. For another 53 stars we present estimates of $T_{eff}$ and $log g$ based on photometric calibrations. More than half objects were found to be subgiants, there is also a large group of giants and a few stars appeard to be dwarfs. The results show that the presented sample is composed of stars with masses ranging from 0.52 to $3.21 M_{\odot}$ of which 17 have masses $\geq$ $2.0 M_{\odot}$. The radii of stars studied in this paper range from 0.66 to $36.04 R_{\odot}$ with vast majority having radii between 2.0 and $4.0 R_{\odot}$. They are generally less metal abundant than the Sun with median [Fe/H]$=-0.07$. For 62 stars in common with other planet searches we found a very good agreement in obtained stellar atmospheric parameters. We also present basic properties of the complete list of 744 stars that form the PTPS evolved stars sample. We examined stellar masses for 1255 stars in five other planet searches and found some of them likely to be significantly overestimated. Applying our uniformly determined stellar masses we confirm the apparent increase of companions masses for evolved stars, and we explain it, as well as lack of close-in planets with limited effective radial velocity precision for those stars due to activity.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.07076  [pdf] - 1224215
Three red giants with substellar-mass companions
Comments: 47 pages, 11 figures. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2015-01-28
We present three giant stars from the ongoing Penn State-Toru\'n Planet Search with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which exhibit radial velocity variations that point to a presence of planetary --mass companions around them. BD+49 828 is a $M=1.52 \pm 0.22$ $M_{\odot}$ K0 giant with a $m sini$=$1.6^{+0.4}_{-0.2}$ $M_{J}$ minimum mass companion in $a=4.2^{+0.32}_{-0.2}$ AU ($2590^{+300}_{-180}$d), $e=0.35^{+0.24}_{-0.10}$ orbit. HD 95127, a log$L$/$L_{\odot}$=$2.28 \pm 0.38$, $R = 20\pm 9$ $R_{\odot}$, $M=1.20 \pm 0.22$ $M_{\odot}$ K0 giant has a $m sini$=$5.01^{+0.61}_{-0.44}$ $M_{J}$ minimum mass companion in $a=1.28^{+0.01}_{-0.01}$ AU ($482^{+5}_{-5}$d), $e=0.11^{+0.15}_{-0.06}$ orbit. Finally, HD 216536, is a $M=1.36 \pm 0.38$ $M_{\odot}$ K0 giant with a $m sin i=1.47^{+0.20}_{-0.12}$ $M_{J}$ minimum mass companion in $a=0.609^{+0.002}_{-0.002}$ AU ($148.6^{+0.7}_{-0.7}$d), $e=0.38^{+0.12}_{-0.10}$ orbit. Both, HD 95127 b and HD 216536 b in their compact orbits, are very close to the engulfment zone and hence prone to ingestion in the near future. BD+49 828 b is among the longest period planets detected with the radial velocity technique until now and it will remain unaffected by stellar evolution up to a very late stage of its host. We discuss general properties of planetary systems around evolved stars and planet survivability using existing data on exoplanets in more detail.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.5971  [pdf] - 1222719
Tracking Advanced Planetary Systems with HARPS-N (TAPAS). I. A multiple planetary system around the red giant star TYC 1422-614-1
Comments: 26 pages, 7 figures. Accepted by Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2014-10-22
Context. Stars that have evolved-off the Main Sequence are crucial in expanding the frontiers of knowledge on exoplanets toward higher stellar masses, and to constrain star-planet interaction mechanisms. These stars, however suffer from intrinsic activity that complicates the interpretation of precise radial velocity measurement and are often avoided in planet searches. We have, over the last 10 years, monitored about 1000 evolved stars for radial velocity variations in search for low-mass companions under the Penn State - Toru\'n Centre for Astronomy Planet Search with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Selected prospective candidates that required higher RV precision meassurements have been followed with HARPS-N at the 3.6 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Aims. To detect planetary systems around evolved stars, to be able to build sound statistics on the frequency and intrinsic nature of these systems, and to deliver in-depth studies of selected planetary systems with evidences of star-planet interaction processes. Methods. We have obtained for TYC 1422-614-1 69 epochs of precise radial velocity measurements collected over 3651 days with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, and 17 epochs of ultra precise HARPS-N data collected over 408 days. We have complemented these RV data with photometric time-series from the All Sky Automatic Survey archive. Results. We report the discovery of a multiple planetary system around the evolved K2 giant star TYC 1422-614-1. The system orbiting the 1.15 M$_\odot$ star is composed of a planet with mass m$sin i$=2.5 M$_J$ in a 0.69 AU orbit, and a planet/brown dwarf with m$sin i$=10 M$_J$ in a 1.37 AU orbit. The multiple planetary system orbiting TYC 1422-614-1 is the first finding of the TAPAS project, a HARPS-N monitoring of evolved planetary systems identified with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.6733  [pdf] - 1179502
Constraints on a second planet in the WASP-3 system
Comments: Accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2013-09-26
There have been previous hints that the transiting planet WASP-3 b is accompanied by a second planet in a nearby orbit, based on small deviations from strict periodicity of the observed transits. Here we present 17 precise radial velocity measurements and 32 transit light curves that were acquired between 2009 and 2011. These data were used to refine the parameters of the host star and transiting planet. This has resulted in reduced uncertainties for the radii and masses of the star and planet. The radial-velocity data and the transit times show no evidence for an additional planet in the system. Therefore, we have determined the upper limit on the mass of any hypothetical second planet, as a function of its orbital period.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.6755  [pdf] - 1166211
Planetary-mass companions to the K-giants BD+15 2940 and HD 233604
Comments: 9 pages, 8 tables, 9 figures
Submitted: 2013-04-24
We report the discovery of planetary-mass companions to two red giants by the ongoing Penn State - Torun Planet Search (PTPS) conducted with the 9.2-m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The 1.1 Ms K0-giant, BD+15 2940, has a 1.1 Mj minimum mass companion orbiting the star at a 137.5-day period in a 0.54 AU orbit what makes it the closest - in planet around a giant and possible subject of engulfment as the consequence of stellar evolution. HD 233604, a 1.5 Ms K5-giant, is orbited by a 6.6 Mj minimum mass planet which has a period of 192 days and a semi-major axis of only 0.75 AU making it one of the least distant planets to a giant star. The chemical composition analysis of HD 233604 reveals a relatively high 7Li abundance which may be a sign of its early evolutionary stage or recent engulfment of another planet in the system. We also present independent detections of planetary-mass companions to HD 209458 and HD 88133, and stellar activity-induced RV variations in HD 166435, as part of the discussion of the observing and data analysis methods used in the PTPS project.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.0488  [pdf] - 1124545
Planets Around the K-Giants BD+20 274 and HD 219415
Comments: 5 figures, 13 pages, accepted by the Astrophysical Journal. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1110.1641
Submitted: 2012-07-02
We present the discovery of planet-mass companions to two giant stars by the ongoing Penn State- Toru\'n Planet Search (PTPS) conducted with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The less massive of these stars, K5-giant BD+20 274, has a 4.2 MJ minimum mass planet orbiting the star at a 578-day period and a more distant, likely stellar-mass companion. The best currently available model of the planet orbiting the K0-giant HD 219415 points to a Jupiter-mass companion in a 5.7-year, eccentric orbit around the star, making it the longest period planet yet detected by our survey. This planet has an amplitude of \sim18 m/s, comparable to the median radial velocity (RV) "jitter", typical of giant stars.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.4938  [pdf] - 1124293
BD+48 740 - Li overabundant giant star with a planet. A case of recent engulfment?
Comments: 14 pages, 2 figures, accepted to ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2012-06-21
We report the discovery of a unique object, BD+48 740, a lithium overabundant giant with A(Li)=2.33 +/- 0.04 (where A(Li) = log(n_Li/n_H) + 12), that exhibits radial velocity (RV) variations consistent with a 1.6 M_J companion in a highly eccentric, e = 0.67 +/- 0.17 and extended, a=1.89 AU (P=771 d), orbit. The high eccentricity of the planet is uncommon among planetary systems orbiting evolved stars and so is the high lithium abundance in a giant star. The ingestion by the star of a putative second planet in the system originally in a closer orbit, could possibly allow for a single explanation to these two exceptional facts. If the planet candidate is confirmed by future RV observations, it might represent the first example of the remnant of a multiple planetary system possibly affected by stellar evolution.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.1641  [pdf] - 1084722
Substellar-Mass Companions to the K-Giants HD 240237, BD +48 738 and HD 96127
Comments: 14 Pages, 8 Figures, Accepted by the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2011-10-07, last modified: 2011-10-21
We present the discovery of substellar-mass companions to three giant stars by the ongoing Penn State-Toru\'n Planet Search (PTPS) conducted with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The most massive of the three stars, K2-giant HD 240237, has a 5.3 MJ minimum mass companion orbiting the star at a 746-day period. The K0-giant BD +48 738 is orbited by a > 0.91 MJ planet which has a period of 393 days and shows a non-linear, long-term radial velocity trend that indicates a presence of another, more distant companion, which may have a substellar mass or be a low-mass star. The K2-giant HD 96127, has a > 4.0 MJ mass companion in a 647-day orbit around the star. The two K2-giants exhibit a significant RV noise that complicates the detection of low-amplitude, periodic variations in the data. If the noise component of the observed RV variations is due to solar-type oscillations, we show, using all the published data for the substellar companions to giants, that its amplitude is anti-correlated with stellar metallicity.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1011.3538  [pdf] - 1041988
The Penn State - Toru\'n Planet Search: target characteristics and recent results
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, proceeding of the conference "Planetary Systems beyond the Main Sequence" (Bamberg, Germany, August 11-14, 2010) edited by S. Schuh, H. Drechsel and U. Heber, AIP Conference Series, part of PlanetsbeyondMS/2010 proceedings http://arxiv.org/html/1011.6606
Submitted: 2010-11-15, last modified: 2011-01-14
More than 450 stars hosting planets are known today but only approximately 30 planetary systems were discovered around stars beyond the Main Sequence. The Penn State-Toru\'n Planet Search, putting an emphasis on extending studies of planetary system formation and evolution to intermediate-mass stars, is oriented towards the discoveries of substellar-mass companions to a large sample of evolved stars using high-precision radial velocity technique. We present the recent status of our survey and detailed characteristic for ~350 late type giant stars, i.e. the new results of radial velocity analysis and stellar fundamental parameters obtained with extensive spectroscopic method. Moreover, in the future we will make an attempt to perform the statistical study of our sample and searching the correlations between the existence of substellar objects and stellar atmospheric parameters according to previous works which investigated the planetary companion impact on the evolution of the host stars.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.2627  [pdf] - 530536
Red giants from the Pennsylvania - Torun Planet Search
Comments: 3 pages, 2 figures, proceeding of the conference "New Technologies for Probing the Diversity of Brown Dwarfs and Exoplanets" (Shangai, China, July 19-24, 2009), to appear in EPJ Web of Conferences
Submitted: 2010-02-12
The main goal of the Pennsylvania - Torun Planet Search (PTPS) is detection and characterization of planets around evolved stars using the high-accuracy radial velocity (RV) technique. The project is performed with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. To determine stellar parameters and evolutionary status for targets observed within the survey complete spectral analysis of all objects is required. In this paper we present the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures, surface gravities, microturbulent velocities and metallicities) of a subsample of Red Giant Clump stars using strictly spectroscopic methods based on analysis of equivalent widths of Fe I and Fe II lines. It is shown that our spectroscopic approach brings reliable and consistent results.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:0906.1804  [pdf] - 315941
Substellar-mass companions to the K-dwarf BD +14 4559 and the K-giants HD 240210 and BD +20 2457
Comments: 28 pages, 4 tables, 10 figures. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2009-06-09
We present the discovery of substellar-mass companions to three stars by the ongoing Penn State - Toru\' n Planet Search (PTPS) conducted with the 9.2-m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The K2-dwarf, BD +14 4559, has a 1.5 M$_{J}$ companion with the orbital period of 269 days and shows a non-linear, long-term radial velocity trend, which indicates a possible presence of another planet-mass body in the system. The K3-giant, HD 240210, exhibits radial velocity variations that require modeling with multiple orbits, but the available data are not yet sufficient to do it unambiguously. A tentative, one-planet model calls for a 6.9 M$_J$ planet in a 502-day orbit around the star. The most massive of the three stars, the K2-giant, BD +20 2457, whose estimated mass is 2.8$\pm$1.5 M$_\odot$, has two companions with the respective minimum masses of 21.4 M$_J$ and 12.5 M$_J$ and orbital periods of 380 and 622 days. Depending on the unknown inclinations of the orbits, the currently very uncertain mass of the star, and the dynamical properties of the system, it may represent the first detection of two brown dwarf-mass companions orbiting a giant. The existence of such objects will have consequences for the interpretation of the so-called brown dwarf desert known to exist in the case of solar-mass stars.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.0374  [pdf] - 1001850
Is there a metallicity enhancement in planet hosting red giants?
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures. To appear in "Extrasolar Planets in Multi-body Systems: Theory and Observations"
Submitted: 2009-04-02
The Penn State/Toru\'n Centre for Astronomy Search for Planets Around Evolved Stars is a high-precision radial velocity (RV) survey aiming at planets detection around giant stars. It is based on observations obtained with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. As proper interpretation of high precision RV data for red giants requires complete spectral analysis of targets we perform spectral modeling of all stars included in the survey. Typically, rotation velocities and metallicities are determined in addition to stellar luminosities and temperatures what allows us to estimate stellar ages and masses. Here we present preliminary results of metallicity studies in our sample. We search a metallicity dependence similar to that for dwarfs by comparing our results for a sample of 22 giants earlier than K5 showing significant RV variations with a control sample of 58 relatively RV-stable stars.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.4544  [pdf] - 1001533
A Search for Planets with SALT
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2009-02-26
As the SALT High Resolution Spectrograph completion is nearing we plan to extend the Pennsylvania-Torun Planets Search (PTPS) with HET to the southern hemisphere. Due to overlap of the skies available for both HET and SALT in the declination range (+10, -10) deg some cooperation and immediate follow up is possible. Here we present, as an example, a $\sim$ 1000 star sample of evolved stars for the future SALT Planet Search.